Posts by tag: FZR1000

Bimota April 19, 2021 posted by

Still No Slouch: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

If you don’t mind the typical Italian quirks, the Bimota YB11 currently offers tremendous bang for the buck. It’s as rare as hen’s teeth, with just 650 made worldwide, packs a Yamaha YZF1000R motor and gearbox, is clothed in lightweight bodywork, and generally trade at $10,000 or less. It doesn’t get much rarer or more exclusive than that and the styling, while obviously not modern, makes the bike striking enough to display in your living room.

That 1002cc Thunderace motor puts out a stout 145hp and 80 ft/lbs of torque, enough to propel this Italian missile to nearly 170mph, a heady number in 1997 and still nothing to sneeze at today. Reliability for the engine is excellent as well, although accessing the bike to service it can prove difficult with the engine in the frame… Luckily the super leggera [“very lightweight”] bodywork is easily removed, with the tank shroud and entire tail section formed from a single piece!

The rest of the bike is every bit as exotic as you’d expect, with stout 51mm right-way up Paioli forks that feature carbon fiber tubes, Brembo gold line brakes, lots of carbon fiber, and even a pillion pad and pegs! You have to admit: passenger accommodations on a limited-production Italian superbike are exceptionally rare…

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

I am selling my 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera (and two other bikes – please see my profile) located in Cocoa, Florida. These bikes are always parked indoors and kept on battery tenders when not being ridden. I am not a dealer; I am a motorcycle collector/enthusiast selling my personal bikes due to an unforeseen health matter.

1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera, 1 of 87 imported into USA in ’97 (650 worldwide)
-Biposto model (OEM passenger seat and NOS passenger pegs included with sale)
-Low 5,598 miles!
-YB11 is the last Yamaha-powered Bimota model produced (unlikely to see another Yamaha model in the future, as Bimota has been acquired by Kawasaki), powered by a 145hp Yamaha Thunderace engine (1,002cc). A robust inline-4, carbureted Yamaha engine that has a great track record and parts availability. Considered to be one of the most well-mannered, reliable, and sport touring-friendly Bimotas available.
-Original owner was a collector (this bike was ~$30,000 new and many went to collectors). Owner prior to me was an enthusiast and regular on Bimota Forums; they completed a functional/riding restoration prior to my possession to refresh the bike after minimal riding in its early years.
-Service/updates include: 51mm Paoli fork seals were replaced with NOS set, brake rotors/pads replaced, Arrow exhaust system with appropriate jetting to match (sounds tremendous), all fluids changed, adjustable anodized clutch and brake levers, good tires with plenty of tread remaining, fasteners on bodywork upgraded to stainless pieces, carbon fiber reinforcement on backside of bodywork mounting points to prevent cracking in the future, low profile rear signals, upgraded brake/clutch fluid reservoirs.
-Runs smoothly, very powerful, Yamaha EXUP system functions as it should
-Headlight, taillight, turn signals, gauge cluster, digital temp/odometer readout all function correctly
-Title is clear, no liens, ready to be signed over
-Extras: I am including some parts, ephemera, and spares for new owner, to include: NOS passenger pegs with locking mechanism, passenger seat in good condition, lightly used radiator obtained from previous owner(not needed but kept as a spare), “Bimota: 25 Years Of Excellence” by Giorgio Sarti (rare, out of print, $300-400 on eBay when found, best Bimota resource in print, IMHO)

PLEASE READ CONDITION NOTES CAREFULLY! I am an enthusiast and I know the feeling of driving far to pick up a car/bike/moped/etc and being disappointed upon arrival. I will tell you as much as I can, in hopes that your expectations will be accurate. I would rather you arrive and be pleasantly surprised at how the bike shows in person, rather than disappointed that flaws were omitted.

Condition Notes: This bike is very clean; please view photos carefully for best idea of condition. The mirrors have some minor/superficial scuffs on the plastic on the backsides, see photos. There is a small hairline crack near left mirror, see photos(has been reinforced on backside to prevent further spread). There is a scuff/wear where the bodywork meets, near the right fork tube, see photos(this is hard to notice unless underneath or very low, but worth mentioning). Black paint is chipping on kickstand. Please view photos carefully and let me know if you have questions about any other areas.

The seller appears knowledgeable and the bike looks very clean, in spite of a few minor blemishes and the over-exposed photos that don’t flatter the paintwork. I’m a huge fan of 90s Bimotas and values have managed to remain low, although that can’t last forever. They are pain to work on, but the mechanical bits are sound and this thing could still surprise an unwary modern bike with its performance. As to the claim that this “the most sport-touring” friendly Bimota available: the pegs do feel very high, but I’ve read that the somewhat odd riding position does work very well once you’ve acclimated yourself.

-tad

Still No Slouch: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale
Bimota January 30, 2021 posted by

Why Be Anything Else? 1991 Bimota YB8

Bimota – a significant and famous portmanteau for motorcycle enthusiasts. Named after a combination of the three founder’s last names (Bianchi, Morri & Tamburini), Bimota started life out as a small design firm creating chassis and bodywork kits for racing. By replacing the spindly frames from production motorcycles, Bimota found that they could engineer a bike with much better performance than stock – even while using otherwise stock components such as wheels, brakes, engines and transmissions. This led to building street bike kits, until eventually Bimota became a full-fledged builder of complete motorcycles. Other than a brief foray into building their own engine (the ill-fated V-Due), Bimota has always relied upon donor engines and transmissions for their creations. And such it is with today’s beautiful Bimota YB8, which takes its heart from the mighty Yamaha FZR1000. Bimota supplies nearly everything else, given the bike its soul.

1991 Bimota YB8 for sale on eBay

The YB8 is not just another pretty face. Naysayers may look at a Bimota and see it as a rebodied or rebadged Yamaha. This could not be further from the truth. From the big beam aluminum chassis that exploits stiffness and mass centralization, the YB8 starts out life as a completely different motorcycle than the donor FZR. Bimota is very particular about their engineering and design; what is on the bike belongs on the bike, and nothing more. From the gorgeous frame plates to the svelte rear wheel eccentric adjuster, the components on a Bimota exude class. So too does the lightweight fiberglass bodywork; it has style and aero to compliment its utter lack of weight. And there is genius in the simplicity; one piece of bodywork comprises the entire tail section and tank cover, and one piece comprises the entire rest in a clamshell design.

From the seller:
I purchased this bike from Bob Steinburgler at Bimota Spirit. It was one from his personal collection just like the Vdue 500 I bought from him . One of the pictures is the bike at his shop before shipping it to me .YB8 is mint there’s no stress cracks on the body it is perfect so is everything else. Low mileage as well. If you’re looking for a collectable one this is it. Please feel free to message me if you have any other questions. Thank you very much.

As the Bimota brand is about uncompromising performance and style, it should not surprise the reader to discover that they are not about easy maintenance or access. Removing the lower bodywork is a stress test as these areas are known for cracking the thin gel coat. Components are very tightly packed together to centralize weight. Headers wrap very tightly against the engine and cases to provide minimalist dimensions overall, but make tasks like changing the oil a chore. In some Genesis-powered models, the engine needs to be lowered from the frame to adjust the valves. Is all that hassle worth it? You bet!!

Bimotas are rare and special bikes that are largely hand-built. They are designed and assembled by motorcycle enthusiasts that are willing to compromise some areas to ensure important aspects (again, performance and style) are enhanced. These are not mass produced, and numbers are relatively few. Parts for the Fizzer power plant and tranny are plentiful, making the YB series a pretty good way into the Bimota range. Power and performance is more than adequate, and the styling is off the charts. Nice touches like the Bimota-branded binnacle cluster show fit and polish that distance this bike from its kit-bike roots. This rare and wonderful machine is being offered up by the same seller that has brought us a recent stash of ultra-cool bikes (V-Due, OW01, YZF-SP, Superlight, 851…), and looks to have been maintained as is deserving of its pedigree. Check out all of the photos and details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Why Be Anything Else? 1991 Bimota YB8
Yamaha December 10, 2020 posted by

Front Loaded: 1994 Yamaha GTS1000

While not particularly sport bike-like and definitely less rare than many unicorns posted on this site, the RSBFS staff nonetheless flocks to the unique – if not a bit porky – Yamaha GTS1000. A gem of the sport touring set with its own rabid following, the GTS stands out due to the RADD/Parker front suspension. The rest of the bike is competent and reliable, but otherwise unspectacular. Think of the GTS as competence accomplished in a slightly different way.

1994 Yamaha GTS1000 for sale on eBay

Motorcycle engineers have long envisioned an alternate type of front suspension – one that could isolate road irregularities from weight transfer and steering. The attempts at alternate nose gear developed the moniker of “funny front ends” by many. And while the various suspension designs all had merit in some aspects, the overall package was always compromised in some fashion. The RADD/Parker design offers a single-sided swingarm hanging off the front of the “chassis” with a strut on the left side only. Steering is accomplished via a telescopic column, and braking duties are managed via a single disk mounted centrally and squeezed by a six-piston caliper with antilock functionality. All in all the designed worked – but packaging (such as the C-shaped “Omega” frame) was best accomplished by something larger than a sport bike. Thus, the FZR1000-powered GTS was born.

From the seller:
1994 Yamaha GTS1000 A low mile original bike in fantastic condition. Runs and drives great. No issues. These were groundbreaking in their time and are getting very difficult to find in this condition.
Prices are steadily climbing. Collectors are moving in on them the last couple years.
A great opportunity still affordable for now. This bike will never go down in price.
The back rest is removable and the hard cases for touring come with bike.

Redesigning what has been a staple of motorcycling for more than 50 years took some guts by Yamaha brass. The years of massive experimentation during the 1980s were largely over, and the buying public had consistently voted to follow standard conventions when it came to buying new bikes in the showroom. To be fair, the front fork must compromise size in order to combat flex (which the upside down fork was designed to combat) and is far from an ideal solution for a device that has to deal with so many different force vectors. But it works well enough that creating a new mousetrap did not earn Yamaha a long line for the new GTS. That makes this example a relatively rare survivor, despite its otherwise conventional UJM features.

If you question how well this whole setup works, consider that this 1994 GTS is sporting 33,500 miles on the clock. In truth once you are seated in the well-appointed cockpit you would be very hard pressed to identify any differences from riding a conventional motorcycle. That is perhaps the biggest benefit – as well as the biggest detraction – to the GTS. It does everything you would expect from a well-engineered motorcycle without feeling different or special – even though it was much more expensive than its conventional peers. Today these are well-loved and sought after machines. This particular example looks to have been used and cared for, and includes a Corbin seat upgrade and hard bags to further encourage time in the saddle. With a Buy It Now of $6k, this 1994 Yamaha GTS1000 is looking for a new home. Check out all of the details here. Stay safe, and good luck!!

MI

Front Loaded:  1994 Yamaha GTS1000
Yamaha July 8, 2019 posted by

Grace, Space, and Pace: 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 Thunderace for Sale

I co-opted Jaguar’s old motto for that headline, but it does seem to apply to the short-lived Yamaha YZF1000. Known in some markets as the “Thunderace,” the YZF1000 was quickly superseded by the class-breaking R1, but it was an open-class motorcycle in the GSX-R1100 and ZX-11 mold, offering handling, reasonable comfort, and real-world performance. Weight and power figures aren’t attention-grabbing by today’s standards, but these days you can pick up this handsome and versatile motorcycle for very little cash.

The “Genesis” inline four engine had Yamaha’s distinctive, forward-canted design and an odd 1002cc displacement. It was packed with their signature performance-enhancing technology, including five-valve heads and an EXUP Exhaust Ultimate Power Valve that helped with midrange performance. Pretty much every modern sportbike has some kind of exhaust valve now, but Yamaha were the first to apply the concept to four-stroke engines. The package was good for 145hp and 164mph, which is plenty fast for any roadbike, unless your weekends involve illicit drag races top-gear roll-ons against modern superbikes with extended-swingarms and nitrous on deserted stretches of freeway…

As with some other open-class sportbikes of the era, the “Thunderace” had a five-speed gearbox, since the engine had an ample spread of torque, but the six-speed from a YZF750R apparently will fit into the cases. So you can always bolt that in, if you happen to have one lying around. An updated Deltabox frame from the YZF750R was wrapped around the engine and gearbox, and the Thunderace saw one of the first applications of Yamaha’s famous “blue-spot” calipers that saw use on the original R1.

Today’s example is exceptionally clean, even considering the low miles. As the seller indicates, there are a couple of very minor flaws in the bodywork, but that can be easily overlooked if you just plan to ride it, or corrected if you plan to squirrel it away deep underground in your private, climate-controlled collection.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 Thunderace for Sale

1997 Yamaha YZF1000R “Thunderace” 1003cc motorcycle with 8,980 original 2-owner miles with all original plastics and paint. I purchased from the original owner in early 2018. The YZF1000R was last year Yamaha used its bulletproof FZR1000 EXUP engine, stuffing it into a 600cc superbike frame – and this bike was only imported to the U.S. for one year (sold in Europe from 1996-2003). The YZF1000R is the bridge between the FZR1000 and R1 models. 

Perfect addition for ANY collection or to ride for the next 100k miles if you’d like. This bike starts/runs like a sewing machine, dives into corners like a champion, stops on an absolute dime, and rides/feels/looks like a nearly new bike. Maintains operating temperature as she should, pulling hard toward to redline from any RPM and in any gear. The only non-original item I can find on this bike are the installed Helibars, which have completely improved the riding position.

Bike was recently serviced by a former Yamaha mechanic and FZR/YZF1000R expert. New fork seals and oil, carbs cleaned and tuned/adjusted, new spark plugs, EXUP valve serviced, new valve cover gasket, new thermostat, o-ring and coolant. Also, installed new NOS cleaner element, rebuilt clutch using only OEM Yamaha frictions, springs and clutch springs, new OEM Yamaha front and rear brake pads, new OEM Yamaha oil filter, new OEM Yamaha fuel tank petcock (under tank), fresh oil, coolant, brake and clutch fluid. New NOS radiator cap installed, new NOS windscreen recently installed. Tires are nearly new with less than 800 easy miles on them. I’d estimate with the shop rates and parts costs, I’ve got $2000.00+ in the bike over the past year. With that said, she needs nothing else mechanically done to her.

Zero issues with this bike (e.g., does not pop out of gear on hard acceleration, strong clutch lever and grip, does not use or drip oil, etc.). Cooling fan come up when bike reaches proper temperature; she does not overheat in the Texas summers. Has only been fed non-ethanol fuel for the past year + Sta-bill additive = zero carb. issues (I don’t run ethanol-blended fuel in either of my bikes). Two original ignition keys come with the bike.

Winner of the bike will get all the original paperwork from the original owner, including the original sales invoice and other documents. Incredible documented history!

The only cosmetic flaws (see photos) came from shipping the bike. Note the left cowl where it meets the fairing is cracked (repaired inside the cowl – repair is not visible), note the cowl is cracked under/behind the LH mirror, note the fuel tank has a small ding in the top. Also note the original exhaust can has a dent underneath/to the outside (photographed) and scome scratching near the head pipe where your RH boot would be.  

The seller also includes additional pictures here, and a video of the bike running here, along with a video of Richard Hammond’s review. With a starting bid of $4,500 I think the seller might be aiming a bit high with this one, in spite of the low miles and condition. The Thunderace was a bit of a lame-duck bike for Yamaha: with the class-redefining R1 on the horizon, the YZF was soon very obsolete and the bike was only in production a short while, especially here in the US where it was only available for one year. That makes them pretty rare, but rarity doesn’t always equal value. Personally, I really like them, but I think the seller is overestimating its value at the moment.

-tad

Grace, Space, and Pace: 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 Thunderace for Sale
Yamaha July 2, 2019 posted by

Street Survivor: Unmolested 1987 Yamaha FZR1000

The late 1980s’ prevailing ideas about greed, money, partying, and the blessed individual weren’t always reflected in the vehicles people drove — the Chrysler LeBaron wasn’t exactly haute couture — but when they were, stand back. The early iterations of the Yamaha FZR1000 reflected the big-hair-and-cocaine era like few others, with a high-contrast red-and-white speedblock bodywork set off with gold script. The bright red wheels only added to the visual cues that this thing was absolutely batty.

1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for sale on eBay

Under the fairings, the 135 horsepower inline four stood ready to cash the checks that the bodywork wrote. It’d nail 60 in less than three seconds on its way to 167 mph on the big end, but unlike a lot of the ’80s big bikes it ran with, it could turn. That made them monsters in the hands of road racers at places like Daytona.

This 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 is in near-perfect entirely unmolested condition, and has just been woken from a 16-year dormancy. The oil and battery are new, the carbs freshly cleaned and old gas was drained. Unfortunately, sitting left a little bit of rust in the gas tank, so it might require being re-lined sooner than later. Aside from another rust spot in front of the kickstand, this thing looks every bit as fresh as its 5,329 miles suggest.

From the eBay listing:

Up for sale is a 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 Motorcycle. All original. Clear title. Only 5,329 miles. Matching numbers. One owner machine. Have the original sales receipt for $5,799 in 1988.. And all service records. Owners manual and tool kit. The motorcycle was sitting since 2003. To freshen the bike up..a new battery was installed, Gas tank flushed. Carburetors Cleaned. The bike starts right up, no smoke or leaks, noises etc. Sounds great. Rides nicely. Goes through the gears smoothly. All of the electronics do work. Gas tank has some light rust inside. Both front and rear brakes work as they should. Condition is outstanding. Spot of rust on the frame in front of the shifter. Always garage kept, little to no rust. No dents in the tank, No cracks in any of the plastics. A true survivor bike. 5 Day No reserve auction. Sold as is. Owners manual and toolkit included. Please see all 24 pictures before buying. Email with any questions.

If you want to ride it, it’s for sure going to need a fresh set of rubber, but with that taken care of, this is a beautiful example of an iconic sportbike from the dawn of the genre.

Street Survivor: Unmolested 1987 Yamaha FZR1000
Yamaha July 1, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR1000

Update 8.30.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

For as plentiful as bikes like this 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 were in their day, it’s becoming increasingly rare to see them pop up on the local Craigslist, as time and the squiddly behavior they enable take their toll. But nice ones are still out there, and more often than not you’ll see them for sale here.

When the 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 dropped, it was one of a few bikes with mind-bending numbers that signalled the dawn of the superbike age. Honda had their VFRs, Suzuki their GSXRs and Yamaha had the FZR1000, which carried the most modern looks and eye-watering power numbers. By today’s standards, where the price of a nicely-equipped Civic will get you a 210-horsepower Aprilia RSV4, the FZR’s 135 horsepower doesn’t seem that crazy. But back in ’87, it might as well have been a Saturn IV rocket.

That grunt let the big FZR hit 60 in less than three seconds and run to a 160 mph top speed, which is fast by any standard, and far and away enough for any mortal.

This 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 is in beautiful condition, especially considering its age and the 46,000 miles on the odometer. There are age-associated blemishes here and there and a couple stress cracks, but it is otherwise flawless. The only deviations from stock are an aftermarket windscreen and a manual switch for the cooling fan.

From the seller:

Bike is extremely rare and in immaculate condition.

* Brand new tires and brakes front and rear, battery and fork seals all have less that 25 miles
* All fluids just changed
* Near perfect paint and bodywork – only a small stress crack around one of the fairing fasteners and a couple very small fairing scratches
* Unmolested, spotlessly clean and completely stock except for aftermarket windscreen and a hard-wired switch to operate cooling fan manually
* Solo seat is present
* 75,000 kms (46000 miles)
* Starts, runs and shifts perfectly and everything works as it should with the exception of the high/low beam switch which is a bit temperamental at times on low beam, but I always ride with high beam so it’s not an issue for me and should be an easy fix
* Bike is located in Vancouver, BC and is open to reasonable offers, as I’m not in a rush or need to sell it
* Buyer will be responsible for shipping, but will provide buyer assistance

Price $3,500 USD.

For a rider or a collector, there is little to dislike about this one. With Yamaha’s reputation for durability, even the relatively high mileage should not be a concern.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR1000
Yamaha May 8, 2019 posted by

Too Little or Just Enough? 1990 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale

The Yamaha’s R1M’s crossplane crank inline four makes 197 claimed horsepower. The brand-new, heavily revised BMW S1000RR supposedly makes 205. The new Ducati Panigale V4R? 221 horsepower. Where will it end? These bikes are technological marvels, with relatively minimal mass, power that would trump a world superbike machine of just a few years ago, and the electronics required to keep relatively novice pilots from launching themselves into next week when they sneeze and open the throttle a bit more than intended. But does that make these machines more fun? How much power can you really use on the road, and is anything more than 100hp really just gilding the lily?  Or did we hit “peak fun” with bikes like this 1990 Yamaha FZR400U?

On paper, pure performance is no contest, if that’s your definition of “fun.” The 399cc inline four that motivated the FZR400 was certainly much higher spec than you’d normally expect from a bike this size, and featured liquid-cooling, dual overhead cams, and sixteen valves. Unfortunately, there’s no replacement for displacement, and it all adds up to a claimed 64hp. The aluminum Deltabox frame helps reduce mass and the resulting 410 wet weight is light, but not shockingly so. Brakes are single-piston, but at least there are two of them up front.

But in spite of the fairly bland power-to-weight, the FZR was endowed with that magical agility possessed by the very best sportbikes. Handling certainly was a strong point for the FZR400, and these are famously competent sportbikes, although they often get overshadowed by Honda’s much more exotic VFR400R. That should be no surprise as, in many markets, the 400cc class was considered “middleweight” and was hotly contested on track and in showrooms. In the US, 400cc was definitely “entry-level” territory, and most companies gave only a half-hearted effort in selling their wares here: only the Honda CB-1 that shared an engine with the CBR400 and the Yamaha FZR400 made it here officially

As you can see from the pictures, it appears to be in very original condition, although the stalk-mount adapter for the left front turn signal is missing, and there’s plenty of surface corrosion and a few minor scuffs, as described by the seller below. The front calipers also look very freshly painted, which suggests regular maintenance of the parts that really matter.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR400U for Sale

This is a used 1989 Yamaha FZR400 with a clear title and very low miles, 28,375 mi. I don’t ride this, nor is it registered, so the mileage will not change. Selling to make space in my garage. I am the second owner of this ‘89 FZR400, it has spent the last 8 years in a climate controlled storage unit due to me being deployed. I had the fuel system flushed and the bike was serviced this past month, in addition it had a new battery installed. The tires are not dry rotten so I didn’t have them replaced. I can provide a video of the bike being started if you so desire. Being that it is a carburated model it takes a bit of choke to get it turned over. Now on to the pictures. As you can see there is some battle damage from a few different incidents. Since I have had it there was no use on it so the few chips and scrapes were done by the previous owner. There is some pitting on the forks and other aluminum bits. I didn’t see any cracks in the plastic, however keep in mind this has the OEM plastics on it. An oil change has been done recently,11Mar18, with Motul 5100 and K&N oil filter. Belly pan has some light scrapes and some distortion from the exhaust. This can be seen the photos. The heat distortion is the same that my ‘90 FZR400 has, the difference being my ‘90 has 1/6 the mileage on it. I can be present if you want the bike shipped, however I am not arranging shipping. I am not in a hurry to see this so, any low-ball offers will not be considered.

The seller refers to this as “very low miles” and, unless you’re talking about a car, I’m not sure nearly 30,000 miles qualifies. That being said, it’s not like this thing has been used as a commuter hack, so the miles wouldn’t necessarily put me off, either. Otherwise, it sounds like a solid bike, given the supposed care it’s received. After years of being the ideal budget-minded track or canyon ripper, these are starting to gain traction as collectibles. Certainly, they’re among the best-looking bikes of the era, with the classic Yamaha colors, twin headlamps, and chunky aluminum frame. Starting bid is $5,799.00 with no takers as yet. Prices seem to be on the rise for these, but the seller may be jumping the gun here and I’d say a $5,799.00 asking price is probably still a bit optimistic.

-tad

Too Little or Just Enough? 1990 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale
Bimota March 18, 2019 posted by

Factory Fresh: Zero-Mile 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

One of the things I love about Italian bikes and cars is that, no matter what, they look like the vision of one person, not a committee. Sure, there may be the occasional stylistic misstep, but oddballs like the Alfa Romeo Milano and Bimota Mantra make a statement, and you can feel the passion in their creation, even if it’s sometimes misguided… Fortunately, the Bimota YB10 Dieci is one of the more timeless Bimota designs, and they obviously knew they had a good thing going, since the bodywork and frame seems to have changed very little between the YB4, YB6, YB7, YB8, and YB10.

The sleek envelope of the bodywork is the first thing you notice, but Bimotas are uncompromising sportbikes and have always been about the frame. Earlier bikes used trellis-style frames, but by the late 80s, they’d moved to lightweight aluminum beam-style designs as seen here, complete with beautiful machined details. This was the 10th Bimota that used a Yamaha engine, hence the name YB10, which has nothing to do with displacement. In this case, it was Yamaha’s smooth and powerful 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed gearbox. The package was good for 145hp and 172mph, not world-beating in today’s terms, but still very, very fast. In 1991, this thing was the epitome of speed, and the embodiment of exotic.

Some readers have misunderstood my previous posts featuring Bimotas, thinking that my criticisms indicate a dislike of the brand. I’m a huge fan of Bimota, and Italian vehicles in general, but experience means I’m very familiar with their… peculiarities, their qualities both superlative and frustrating. Bikes like the YB10 embody everything I love and everything frustrating about Italian machines: they’re gorgeous, fast, and full of personality, with a few hand-built details that speak to their low-volume production and some elements of their construction that indicate the clear focus on performance above all else. If you’re looking for authentic race-bike details, they’re easy to find here, from the exquisitely machined frame and top yoke to lightweight bodywork made up of just a few pieces, all connected with quarter-turn fasteners… But it’s a fine line between “race bike” and “kit bike” and these can be frustrating for owners used to more refined machines.

These days, this limited-production, Italian dream machine can be had for relative peanuts, although this particular example calls for a few more of those peanuts, since it’s never actually been registered, or turned a wheel. Personally, I like my bikes to be usable as bikes, but collectors are strange creatures, and unused examples like this usually command premium dollars.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

Up for bid is a 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci – Rare 1 of only 224 made– Never registered, zero miles! This gorgeous super-bike is part of a collection of fine motorcycles at Formula One Motor Sports in Oakdale New York.

Bimotas are well known for their Italian style, class and over the top engineering. It has a one piece billet machined frame paired with a Yamaha FZR1000 motor, and seamless upper fairing it also comes with billet triple, classic style wheels!

The Bimota Dieci not only offers Italian Style but you get the reliability of a Japanese Motorbike. Don’t miss out on a chance to bid on this museum quality bike it is a must have for any collector.

This may be a museum-quality bike, but the $21,000 the seller is asking is a museum-quality price. There are plenty of lovingly cared-for, low mileage Bimotas out there at literally half the price, so you’d really have to be one of those zero-mile obsessives to want to splash out for this one. “Plenty of” being relative, of course since, as the seller points out, just a little over 200 were made. But they do show up occasionally for sale and, to give you an idea of what they normally go for, the last one we featured had 12,000 miles and an $11,000 asking price.

-tad

 

 

Factory Fresh: Zero-Mile 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale