Posts by tag: BMW

BMW November 7, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1

This is the fourth motorcycle being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

In the annals of modern motorcycle history, the Japanese have the technological might, the Italians have the performance artwork, and the Germans… well, the Germans had a more conservative approach. Much of that has changed in recent years (witness the HP2 Sport, the S1000RR), but it was with the iconic K1 that BMW proved it had the technological chops AND an artistic feel without abandoning the company soul or ethics. You see, BMW wanted (needed) younger riders to join the brand. But their staid approach of “the gentleman’s transport” didn’t cut it with the youth. They wanted speed. But BMW was constrained by the 100 bhp limit imposed on bikes sold in Germany. So how to get maximum speed within the imposed power listing? Technology. Namely, aerodynamics. Thus the design and style of the K1 was born of function, and has gone on to become a bit of a legend.

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1

The life of the K1 started with a standard K bike – in this case a K100. This was the “new” architecture for BMW; the inline four cylinder motor flopped on it’s side and mounted crosswise on the bike. This allowed for a low center of gravity; the crankshaft runs parallel with the bike on the right side and made for easy power takeoff for the shaft drive. From those bones, the K1 started ingesting technology. The standard K100 engine was upgraded with 16 valve heads, higher compression and lighter connecting rods for extended high RPM running. ABS was a standard feature for US-bound bikes, but optional in other markets. Wanting to achieve speeds in the range of 150 mph, the K1 entered the wind tunnel and was shaped with a vengeance. The wheelbase was extended for greater stability. Check out the streamlines of the front fender, and the aerodynamic – yet protective – main fairing. The integrated tail section even contained saddlebags, which provided function AND airflow resolution. In all, there are seven pieces to the main fairing to harness and define the aero elements. Colors offered were Teutonic interpretations of yin and yang: either fire engine red with yellow accents, or a turquoise blue with yellow accents. Love it or hate it, either color combination stands out.

From the seller:
41,000km’s / 25k mi. This is a fantastic example of the timeless “ketchup & mustard” 1990’s BMW design icon.

Fully restored to new condition in Europe in 2014, this K1 is absolutely beautiful in every respect, and runs/operates perfectly. Heated grips, ABS, 100hp 16v, Marzocchi forks, Brembo brakes – 6,900 examples ever produced. Included with the sale is a hard bound folio detailing the ownership (U.K. and Germany) and restoration details.

Probably the best non-original K1 on earth: $15,000

Despite the techno wizardry, the end result was a 520+ pound, long wheelbase motorcycle that excelled at what BMWs always excelled at: eating up the miles. And with a price tag higher than most available motorcycles (MSRP of over $13,000), this hardly targeted the youth. Instead, BMW created a showroom magnet that pulled interested viewers in – and then sold them a different K or R bike instead. Sales of the K1 were slow, and the bike was under appreciated during it’s stay on the dealer floor. Time has been kinder to the model, and cannot erase the sensationalism built up around this pivotal motorcycle – even if it did not set the world on fire. Today these are rare machines that still represent the change of attitude in BMW management, and finding one that does not exhibit the ravages of time (think large expanses of thin bodywork and the possibility for damage) or abuse should be celebrated.

Today’s 19991 BMW K1 comes to us courtesy of the Stuart Parr Collection, and shows as beautifully as a new bike. Drool over the high resolution photography, and tell me this isn’t the cleanest K1 you have seen in the wild. I mean, it just looks *perfect*. And this is no zero mile “never gonna be ridden” garage queen either; this wonderful example has 25,000 on the clocks. We all know the legendary longevity of a BMW, and to find a rare K1 in the cosmetic condition such as this should make you sit up and take notice. Asking price is $15,000 and inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here. Good Luck!

MI

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1
BMW August 31, 2019 posted by

About Time: 1982 Krauser-BMW MKM1000

I must admit, I’ve been sitting on the sidelines on this one. After the 3rd or 4th time around on eBay, I figured it was about time I wrote it up here (it was already on our Facebook site). After all, it is a freaking Krauser frame with seemingly pristine bodywork. That makes this a rare bird. A pretty bird. A pretty rare bird. The pinnacle of the early 1980s frame game (spearheaded by Bimota, but with Harris, Spondon, Elgi and others close behind), Krauser was one of the few tuners that offered performance products for BMW; the other was Luftmeister. And while the latter focused primarily on turbocharging for relatively cheap grunt, Krauser was an all around performance shop. They offered bolt-on bits, bodywork, engine upgrades (including custom 4-valve heads), and the crown jewel of them all, the MKM1000 kit. Meant to transform the staid “Gentleman’s Express” into a true sports bike, the Krauser kit accepted BMW running gear into a bespoke (and very trick) frame. Custom bodywork completed the transformation from sheep to wolf.

1982 Krauser-BMW MKM1000 for sale on eBay

Under the skin is where the Krauser MKM1000 really shines. Following the Bimota route of utilizing straight tubes to properly channel loads, the MKM (Michael Krause Motorcycles) frame is often referred to as a “birdcage” type. Painstakingly time-consuming and expensive to create, this complex arrangement of straight tubes results in a stiffer frame that is also lighter than conventional frame arrangements. The 1000cc BMW boxer motor appears to hang in mid-air in an unusually high manner. This is because Krauser lifted the engine to provide more cornering clearance for the vulnerable cylinder heads. Shaft drive, along with the rest of the tranny and running gear of the donor R100 was maintained.

From the seller:
Here we have a Krauser MKM1000 in stunning condition.

Ultra rare super low production numbers. An opportunity to own one of perhaps 200 built. This is number 42. The quintessential collectible Airhead, it doesn’t get any better than this. Mileage is 29,573 kms (18483 miles).

The bird cage frame, which there are 52 straight tubes and four curved chromium molybdenum tubes welded together at 150 points, weighed in just 11.6 kilograms. A series of other changes were made when integrating the R100RS parts. Engine sat slightly higher, front forks were 38mm lower, rake and trail were increased, wheelbase made longer by 43mm, custom rear sets, 21 litre aluminium fuel tank hidden under the elegant one piece tank cover, seat and rear cowling. A matching aerodynamic fairing was developed for the autobahn and a wider swingarm allowed for a wider rear wheel and rubber. Weighing just 496 pounds wet, the MKM was lighter than all of its competition, including the Ducati Super Sport and the Moto Guzzi Le Mans.

Recently complied for road use in New Zealand and has a current warrant of fitness. This can be exported to any port in the world. Please ask for shipping details.

On paper – and in person – the MKM1000 really looks like a competitive threat to similar sporting hardware of the era. Light in weight, aerodynamic in form and purposeful in stance, the Krauser offering could have been a contender. But while the airhead BMW unit is revered for longevity and it’s bulletproof ability to eat up mile after mile, it is far from a powerhouse. With heavy crank and rods it doesn’t rev particularly quickly, and even BWM gave up on it when they entered WSBK racing with a more conventional inline four. The jacking effect of the shaft drive can get in the way of spirited cornering, and while its effects can be minimized with some suspension tuning it is always present. So while the paper tells a tale, the proof was not exactly the same. All in all, the Krauser MKM1000 was well reviewed and an iconic and rare unicorn for the Beemer faithful.

As mentioned above, this particular bike has been around the auction block for a few tries. It is located in beautiful Auckland, New Zealand, which is currently in the winter season. The seller appears willing to ship to all ports of call, which makes this a particularly good find. Better yet, hop over to the northern of the NZ islands and enjoy the fabulous Kiwi hospitality, take in the sights and sounds, check out the bike in person, and then bring it back home. Now that sounds like a great vacation souvenir. We have seen one or two of these amazing machines on these pages in years past, but they remain rare and pretty elusive. Check this one out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

About Time: 1982 Krauser-BMW  MKM1000
BMW August 15, 2019 posted by

Mamma Mia Mamola: 2003 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika

If you are a motorcycle manufacturer with a relatively “boring” reputation – known more for your gentleman’s autobahn express and less for outright performance – how do you change your image to go after the more sport-oriented buying public? One glance at Detroit and the Golden Era of NASCAR tells of the secret: Win on Sunday, sell on Monday. That is all well and good, but how to ensure you actually win on Sunday? Sponsor and participate in a one-make race series, of course! Drum up publicity with star power, and hold races in conjunction with bigger motorsport events where the fans will be in attendance. And just like that the BMW Boxer Cup was born.

2003 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika for sale on eBay

Initially pitched as a race of champions with real motorcycle racing stars, the Boxer Cup became a legitimate race series with close competition and abundant exposure for BMW. Randy Mamola, a legend in two-wheeled circles, served as BMW ambassador and spokesperson for the series. To convert the race exposure into sales, BMW created a special version of the R1100RS Sport model. Featuring a graphics package that mimicked the one-series race bike, the Boxer Cup Replika offered a unique livery, a sprinkling of carbon fiber (including unique cylinder head cover protectors), and lower engine cover with oil catcher. The under seat exhaust was a special item from Laser, and suspension was Ohlins modified from stock units. Additionally, the Replika model had slightly different geometry; the rear suspension was raised to quicken steering and provide more ground clearance for the cylinder heads. Randy Momola’s signature graces the fairing – as if you needed a reminder this was a Replika. Back in 2003 these numbered and authenticated models sold for an MSRP of $13,490.

From the seller:
This is a 2003 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika. This was a race replica for the BMW Boxer Cup series in the early aughts. This particular bike is #194 of only 200 made in 2003. This is a rare, pedigreed motorcycle that comes with a certificate of authenticity and a badge with the replica number.

This bike is in excellent condition! It received it’s 12,000 mi service two years ago, and is perfectly tuned. I changed the oil every 2500 miles during my ownership. The bodywork looks perfect, the only flaw I can find is a mar on the cowl. Of course, the carbon fiber belly pan has the inevitable rock chips of 12,000mi on the road. The rear wheel was powdercoated white, and the valve covers black. The windshield was cut down because it was already cracked and was directing the wind right under my helmet. The original left side mirror was damaged and replaced with a salvaged one. This bike has never been dropped.

Aside from the all stainless steel Staintune exhaust, this bike is stock. No engine, drivetrain, or suspension modifications have been made.

More from the seller:
Stuff not included:
The carbon fiber valve cover protectors and steering damper are long gone.
No ABS. ABS was never included on the BCR, but I know someone’s going to ask about it, so…no.

Stuff included:
This BMW comes equipped with slightly taller touring handlebars, but the original low racing handlebars are included.
The original factory exhaust and emissions stuff is included.
Rear footpegs and hardware are included.
Service manuals and related paperwork are included.
The original valve covers are included.
And yes, the Wunderlich R1100S bike stand is included too!

With 12k+ miles under the keel, this BMW has been used; perhaps more than a collectible bike would normally be utilized, but far, far less than the average BMW of this age. Keeping in mind that the R series BMW is legendary in terms of longevity – and that the Boxer Cup Replika claimed NO additional horsepower – this high-end R-bike should have many more miles in the bank. The bike appears to have been maintained well, although there are some notable changes from stock. At 16 years of age this bike has clearly had a previous life, with changes made by former owner(s). Some items are replaceable (cylinder head cover guards – if you can find them, windscreen), and the powder coated rear wheel doesn’t look all bad in white. There are some questions as to why was the mirror replaced, why are the cylinder head covers powder coated, and why was the windscreen cracked?. These are popular items to suffer in a tip over, although the ad states no crash damage. Overall (and given the age) from the pictures at least, this bike looks to be quite presentable.

Offered for the not-so-princely sum of $5,700 USD, this New Jersey-based Replika offers a serious discount from the MSRP of many, many years ago. But it is still a BMW, it is still perched on Ohlins springy/damping bits sport suspension, and it still retains all of the qualities BMWs are famous for: usable power and torque, predictable handling, low maintenance shaft drive, and good highway speed touring manners. Price is on the lower side for the model, but representative of the miles and condition. Check it out here and Good Luck!!

MI

Mamma Mia Mamola: 2003 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika
BMW April 7, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2007 BMW R1200S

Somehow, weird isn’t exactly the adjective that leaps to my mind when someone says, “BMW.” I mostly picture skinny European men in their late 40s designing ergonomics with a supercomputer, getting every detail down to its most efficient and sensible form. But, then I look at the 2007 BMW R1200S and I have to wonder whether those buttoned-down engineers weren’t enjoying one hell of an acid flashback when they designed this thing.

It’s an incredible machine, and a shame that there are so few of them knocking around. The 1,200cc twin-cylinder boxer engine is both antiquated and a technological marvel, generating 122 horsepower and 83 torques out of architecture nobody but BMW would dare still use. Then there’s the fact that this sportbike, which tipped the scales at 482 pounds ready-to-ride, wears a single-sided swingarm that contains a shaft final drive. Up front, there is BMW’s excellent but odd telelever suspension set up. All this on a bike that ze Germans drew up as a track and canyon carver.

The R1200S bowed in 2006 to replace the long-serving R1100S, and came in substantially lighter and more powerful than the older bike. Power was up thanks to a compression bump and some fueling and timing tweaks, and weight was down thanks to an entirely new steel trellis frame. Despite all that, the R1200S was a tough sell, since it rode somewhere less comfortably than a true sport tourer, but lacked the all-out aggression of an R1 or similar. In ’08, Bimmer replaced it with the even more ludicrous HP2.

This R1200S has been ridden enough to show enthusiasm, but is in absolutely impeccable shape, as you would expect from something this rare and special. It is equipped with a quick-turn throttle, smoked windscreen and tank pads, but is otherwise as it left the dealership.

From the seller:

Grey 2007 BMW R1200S, 14900 mi, Clean Canadian title. Heated grips & ABS. All original except for Techspec tank pads, RRRapido Quickaction throttle pulley & light smoke windscreen. The bike is in extremely good shape. The Pirelli Angels have approx. 25% wear on them.

The bike will come with some specialized tooling; valve adjusment shims, spark plug removal tool, Carbtune Pro synchronizer.

If you are looking here I don’t have to explain how rare and how good this bike is.

Located in Montreal, Canada.

Asking price, 6900 USD.
Contact Steve: stevemongrain74@gmail.com

For $6,900, you’re paying Suzuki DRZ money for a very rare, very fast and very cool and entirely out there machine. If you’re looking for a long-term do-it-all bike, here’s your mount.

Featured Listing: 2007 BMW R1200S
BMW January 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Honest-to-God 2012 Suter BMW MotoGP bike

You read the headline correctly. What you are looking at is an honest-to-God MotoGP racebike that won the CRT class at the 2012 Qatar Grand Prix under American roadracing hero and two-time World Superbike champion Colin Edwards. The overall win went to Jorge Lorenzo, who was on his way to his second MotoGP championship. Edwards crossed the line 12th overall, a testament to the difference between CRT and the factory machines.  

Based on a bespoke Suter chassis, the bike was powered by a warmed up WSBK-spec BMW S1000RR engine. Even with the better part of 240 horses, the BMW mill was handicapped compared to the factory rides by electronics and development time. Having almost 240 horses is one thing, putting it down is quite another. For a painfully detailed look at the season, click here.

The seller’s description of the bike is pretty basic, but there is a detailed fact sheet with more photos here.

Being a MotoGP machine, this bike does not have the battlescars and booboos that former racebikes generally wear. It’s got just enough dirt to look as if it just cooled down from taking the checkered flag at Valencia, but otherwise is in beautiful shape.

The bike wears all of its as-raced MotoGP parts, including the Bosch data acquisition electronics, and 16.5-inch magnesium wheels, with a fresh set of GP-spec Bridgestone slicks included.

CRT, short for claiming rule team, was a short-lived section of the MotoGP rules that allowed teams without factory money to compete at the big dance. Head over to the always wonderful Moto Matters to learn how the CRT bikes differed from the full-on factory mounts.

Though the bikes were always destined to be slower than their better-funded factory-backed competitors, they made for some truly innovative and interesting machines. This 2012 Suter BMW CRT machine was a work-in-progress for the season Edwards was aboard, and even on the night he won in the desert, the famously blunt Texan was only medium happy with its performance.

For anyone below The Texas Tornado’s talent level (which is everyone), the bike will be an absolute monster. At $99,000 not including transport, it represents something of a bargain, considering Forward Racing would have spent more than that on just the engine back in 2012. If you have the means and the skill, Speedbox can be contacted through their website.

Featured Listing: Honest-to-God 2012 Suter BMW MotoGP bike
BMW December 19, 2018 posted by

HP What ? – 2012 BMW K1300S HP

With mid-size car power and somewhat lighter weight, BMW’s K1300S jumped onto the bus headed for the dragstrip with the Hayabusa, ZX-14, VFR1200F, and Triumph Sprint GT.  The rare HP limited edition upped the ante with titanium Akrapovich exhaust, and everything that wasn’t electronically adjustable was carbon fiber.

2012 BMW K1300S HP for sale on eBay

For 2008, BMW increased the bore of their almost-1200cc inline four to arrive at 1293cc.  Double overhead cams, four valves per cylinder, and digital electronic fuel injection conspire to make 173 hp, with 103 ft.-lbs. torque peaking at 8,250 rpm.  It’s a long reach out to the adjustable handlebars, but the factory rear-set pegs are a help.  The Duolever front end and shaft drive are chapter and verse from the BMW hymnal, but you can select the mode for the HP’s ESA electronically adjustable suspension on the fly.  ABS and traction/stability control are on-off only, and tire pressure monitoring completes the car-like spec sheet.  Carbon is there for the mudguards, airbox ( i.e. tank ) cover, clutch cover, and seat console.

 

Coming out of Brooklyn, this K1300S has relatively low miles, seemingly undamaged and stock except for a gel seat.  Starting bid seems competitive for a bike with an original MSRP of $20K-plus.  Tank bag and choice of windscreen round out the accessories, and though there’s no BIN, maybe the rear stand and battery will come with.  From the eBay auction:

2012 K1300S HP limited edition number 215 out of 750 in excellent condition with only 9830 miles.  New Continental Sport Attack tires with 300 miles on them.  Comes with ESA, ASC and ABS.  Gear shift assistant-heated grips, BMW tank bag and clear and smoked wind screens.  Leather gel seat for those longer rides.  Akrapovic exhaust, radar detector (adaptive technology and the white powder coated wheels round out this great motorcycle.  Never been down.  I have the clean title in hand.  Buy it now and I will throw in a rear BMW wheel stand and a BMW battery charger.

 

The HP reviewed well, most of its mass vanishing once under way.  Hard to imagine how the platform could be developed further, and it didn’t find a home in BMW’s line-up after 2016.  Like its heavyweight counterparts, it only needs access to a nice open road and a major hole in the schedule.  Maybe that rider is out there watching this auction, with just one day to run…

-donn

 

HP What ? – 2012 BMW K1300S HP
BMW September 28, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport

Update 1.2.2019: The bike has SOLD! -dc

There is no other way to put this: If you must have the ultimate expression of BMW’s iconic two-cylinder boxer engine, the 2009 BMW HP2 Sport is your only option. The engine has been in rafts of special, technologically perfect, desirable machines, but it was never so focused, powerful and manic as here. It took the line’s venerated torque curve, refinement and unique Germanness and turned it into a race bike engine. Around that mill, which was the first of its breed to have dual overhead camshafts, BMW draped carbon fiber by the sheet and a World Superbike-spec datalogger (no, seriously) dashboard. They kept the whole thing moving in the right direction with Ohlins suspension on both ends.

The bodywork was all carbon fiber, as were the valve covers, and the bike rocked forged wheels, fully adjustable footpegs and a quickshifter. it has taken the rest of the superbike world until now to come close to catching up with the blingy, technical prowess of this nine-year-old Bavarian.  The list goes on to include forged triple clamps and a bunch of other special parts, but the list of superlatives is getting exhausting.

Perhaps the best part of the HP2 is that it was never really meant to be much of a racebike. The telelever front end is heavy, the heads limit cornering clearance, and, what’s more, it debuted as the S1000RR came on the scene. It was pure engineering obscenity, the expression of the wildest fantasies of some seriously nerdy German gearheads.

This one is an immaculate, 7,000-mile example with a bunch of tasteful aftermarket bits, including an uninstalled Power Commander 5. All the stock pieces (except the original battery) come with it.

From the seller:

Rare opportunity to own a 2009 BMW HP2 SPORT. Only about 250 HP2 Sports were ever brought to the US.
One of the most beautiful examples of a supersport motorcycle ever produced.
This motorcycle came with some of the best equipment from the factory:
MotoGP inspired 2D data logging dash
Quick shift
Full carbon fiber bodywork
Carbon fiber heads
Full Ohlins suspension
Forged wheels
Added:
Bar end mirrors with custom mirror block offs (have the stock mirrors)
Mini front turn signals (have the stock turn signals)
Shorai Lithium battery
Including the PitBull stand
Have all the paperwork, pink slip in hand, registered till Nov 2018, owners manual, PC5 never installed, will come with the BMW
This bike has been stored in my dining room and painlessly cared for.
Text if interested

The bike is located in Garden Grove, California, and is listed at $16,500 on Craigslist and CycleTrader.

Featured Listing: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport
Sport Bikes For Sale April 23, 2018 posted by

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale – April 21st!

Update 4.23.2018:  We’ve updated most of the listings below with their sale prices, and estimates from Bonhams were very close in most cases.  Their showcase pieces did very well also.  From Bonhams:

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale took place this weekend (21 and 22 April) at the International Classic MotorCycle Show and saw an incredible 92% of lots sold, achieving a total of £3,376,045 (US $4,708,029).

Several world records were broken, including the 1970 Clymer Münch 1,177cc TTS ‘Mammoth’ which achieved a staggering £154,940 and the 1973 MV Agusta 750S which realized £96,700, the highest prices ever achieved for these models at auction.

Congratulations to Bonhams on a great sale and to all the new owners!

-dc


For those lucky enough to be in attendance at the Staffordshire County Showgrounds in Stratford, UK, there will be an amazing collection of motorcycles passing over the auction block courtesy of Bonhams. But fear not: you need not be in attendance in order to participate in the auction. And just so you don’t miss out on any of the key lots going up for sale, RSBFS is here to help you navigate through the drool-worthy articles on hand. Register early, and bid with confidence!

For the rest of us, let us know what you think of the sale and estimates in the comments below.

– RSBFS Team

1998 Ducati 916 SPS – This 4,000 mile machine has a Bonhams estimate of $21,000 – $27,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 20,196 inc. premium

1990 Ducati 851 SP2 by NCR – Never been raced, but chock full of NCR parts. Bonhams estimate: US $39,000 – $49,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 27,631 inc. premium

1989 Honda VFR750R Type RC30 – this works Honda is an Isle of Man TT and Macau Grand Prix veteran. Bonhams estimate: US$ 35,000 – 49,000.  SOLD – US$ 40,393 inc. premium

1987 Ducati 851 – Alan Cathcart’s personal machine since new, this tri colore beauty has a Bonhams estimate of $49,000 – $63,000 USD

1998 Ducati 916 Senna III – This low mileage 916 is number 281 of 300. Bonhams estimate: $14,000 – $17,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 22,620 inc. premium

1998 Ducati 916 SPS – With a documented history (including complete engine rebuild) this SPS has a Bonhams estimate of $18,000 – $24,000 USD.

1999 Ducati 996 SPS2 – Only 150 examples of this Euro-spec model were built. Bonhams estimate: $13,000 – $17,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 13,733 inc. premium

1986 Ducati 400 F3 – With only 327 kilometers showing, this late Cagiva-era Ducati has a Bonhams estimate of $5,600 – $8,400.  SOLD – US$ 5,655 inc. premium

2000 MV Agusta 750cc F4 S – This ‘1+1’ Biposto example of the astounding F4 lineup has a Bonhams estimate of $9,800 – 13,000.  SOLD – US$ 10,987 inc. premium

1990 Suzuki GSX-R750L ‘Slingshot’ – Presented as virtually new after an extensive restoration, this bike will be sold at No Reserve. Bonhmas estimate: $4,900 – 6,300.  SOLD – US$ 6,947 inc. premium

1988 Honda VFR400R Type NC21 – A rare oddity in the US, this baby RC30 shows approximately 23,000 miles. Bonhams estimate: $3,100 – $3,900.  SOLD US$ 4,524 inc. premium

1978 BMW 980cc R100RS ‘Krauser’ – Though rather high mileage at 80k+, this looks well looked after. Bonhams estimate: US$ 7,100 – 11,000.  SOLD – US$ 7,755 inc. premium

1971 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport ‘Telaio Rosso’ – Recently restored, previous magazine tester. Bonhams estimate: US$ 34,000 – 42,000.  SOLD US$ 43,625 inc. premium

1976 Ducati 900SS – Used in the late 70’s in amateur racing, it was later returned to road duty but includes many spares. Bonhams estimate: US$ 35,000 – 45,000.  SOLD – US$ 37,162 inc. premium

1977 Benelli 750cc Sei – odometer shows 13k KMs, includes receipts. Bonhams estimate: US$ 11,000 – 17,000.  SOLD – US$ 22,620 inc. premium

1979 Honda CBX1000Z – Imported to the UK via Canada in 1982. Includes receipts and Delkevic exhaust system. Bonhams estimate: US$ 14,000 – 20,000.   SOLD – US$ 15,349 inc. premium

1983 Suzuki GSX1100 Katana – Shows nearly 25k miles and includes some receipts. Bonhams estimate: US$ 7,100 – 11,000.  SOLD – US$ 12,926 inc. premium

1979 Suzuki GS1000 – No mention of Wes Cooley, is it a clone? Bonhams estimate: US$ 6,400 – 9,200.  SOLD – US$ 11,310 inc. premium

1970 Clymer Münch 1,177cc TTS ‘Mammoth’ – One of the featured lots of the Stafford auction. Completely restored. Bonhams estimate: US$ 110,000 – 140,000.  SOLD – US$ 217,692 inc. premium

1973 MV Agusta 750S – Another featured lot at the Stafford sale and noted as one of the most desirable of post-war motorcycles. Bonhams estimate: US$ 99,000 – 130,000.  SOLD – US$ 135,864 inc. premium

1957 F.B. Mondial 250cc DOHC Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle – World Championship and Isle of Man TT-winning motorcycle of great historical and technical interest. Offered with assorted correspondence relating to its provenance. Bonhams estimate: US$ 110,000 – 170,000.  SOLD – US$ 129,569 inc. premium

Honda 250cc RC163 Grand Prix Replica – The 250cc inline four gem was a championship winner, this replica is suitable for parades or vintage racing.  Bonham’s estimate: $20,000 – $25,000

1974 AMF Harley-Davidson 250cc Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle – This Aermacchi-designed two-stroke is unrestored and was in the stable of the Cesena Motorcycle Club before being on display at the Rimini Motorcycle museum for the past 30 years.  Bonham’s estimate – $17,000 – $21,000.  SOLD – US$ 17,773 inc. premium

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale – April 21st!