Posts by tag: BMW

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BMW March 14, 2018 posted by

What could have been: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport

In 2008 BMW launched the ultimate boxer sport bike, the HP2 Sport. An offshoot of the stillborn GP racer project (which management wisely decided could not be competitive in a straight up fight), BMW instead released a no-compromise sporting twin of uber-exclusive status. Limited in numbers and impossibly expensive, the HP2 Sport was a brief, flashy prelude to the more conventional S1000RR. I’ve been eyeing this example for a bit, and decided it was finally time to share with RSBFS readers.

2008 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for sale on eBay

The BMW HP2 Sport is a bit of a dichotomy. Long known as the gentleman’s transport, BMWs staid reputation was based on longevity, quality and composure; out and out sporting intent was conspicuously missing. Incorporating all of the traditional elements of BMW – including the boxer twin and shaft drive – the HP2 Sport stretched the boundaries of what was possible. New cylinder head design opened up the airways with four valves, yet were shorter than older 2-valve assembly. That new dimension, bolted onto cylinders that were placed a bit higher on the bike, made for better cornering with less risk of touching down the heads during spirited cornering. Power was up – way up – with an estimated 130 HP on tap. While nothing compared to the following S1000RR’s 200 ponies, this was a high water mark for a factory boxer. Top level brakes (Brembo) and suspension (Ohlins) complimented the package, along with a generous sprinkling of carbon fiber. Test riders universally liked the HP2 Sport, outside of the price tag and the limitations of the boxer packaging. By 2012 the HP2 Sport faded into the sunset, and with it the future of the boxer as a serious sporting platform.

From the seller:
For the BMW Motorrad enthusiast – a 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS in absolutely pristine condition. Freshly serviced by A&S BMW in Sacramento, it’s been fitted with a rare Fat Cat slipper clutch (with less than 100 miles since installation). As used on the race versions, this Suter-designed clutch is the final piece that transforms the torquey HP2 into a fluid track day or backroad delight. Very few HP2 Sports have been equipped with one as they are hard to find (this one came from England) expensive to buy and install, but worth every penny on a big-bore high performance twin like the HP2.

This motorcycle has been garaged, covered, and impeccably maintained since new. Never dropped or down and in perfect mechanical and cosmetic condition. BMW made an iconic engineering statement with the HP2 Sport by building a very limited production, hand crafted “factory special” featuring DOHC radial valve heads, exotic internals and carbon fiber bodywork from an F1 constructor (signed by the technician who built each piece). The result was the highest performance BMW boxer twin ever made (136bhp), featuring sublime handling, ABS brakes, a factory-installed quick shifter and the first carbon fiber subframe on a production motorcycle. This bike sparkles with carbon fiber valve covers and tail light assembly, milled-from-billet foot controls/clip-ons/upper triple clamps, Motek MotoGP-style instrumentation (with programmable displays and lap timers), Magura levers, forged aluminum wheels, BMW’s patented telelever/paralever front/rear suspension with fully adjustable Ohlins shocks and Brembo radial-mount monoblock calipers. The best components available were used in constructing these machines.

More from the seller:
Approximately 230 HP2 Sports were imported into the US (BMW kept the actual number confidential) and they will never make another Boxer like this one. A blue-chip collectible motorcycle that’s a revelation to ride – it represents the ultimate evolution of the classic air/oil cooled BMW boxer motor, wrapped in bespoke carbon bodywork and mated to a lightweight chassis with world-class components. Understandably, it draws a crowd wherever it goes. The track stand (pictured) is also included. Original MSRP was nearly $27,000, and prices for exceptional examples like this now are on the rise.

The HP2 Sport was available as a base model, or with ABS. The option list was short, with both models benefitting from the same excellent componentry throughout. Price wise, this was a $25k+ motorcycle in 2008 – which was a princely sum. Prices for used models have slowly dropped as they infiltrate into the secondhand market, but overall the valuation of these bikes has persisted. What we are likely seeing is the common pricing dip prior to an eventual rise in overall values. This is a limited edition, very special model motorcycle that should present well for years to come. This is exactly the type of model that will appreciate in the future even if it was not as appreciated as a sport bike when first introducted. This particular model looks to be in very good condition, has a reasonable number of miles, and has been listed several times on eBay. The price point has slowly moved downwards since the first listing, making this example a good (possible bargain?) candidate. Bidding starts below $15k, which is in the range for the model. Check it out here, and if you’re a BMW fan (airhead, oilhead, brick or inline) hit us up in the Comments and share your thoughts. Does the HP2 Sport push the right buttons for you? Good Luck!

MI

BMW November 7, 2017 posted by

Carbon to the Core: 2018 BMW HP4 Race

With the exception of the swingarm, engine, chain and paint, basically everything about the 2018 BMW HP4 Race is made of carbon fiber. Bodywork? Check. Wheels? Yep. Frame? You bet.

2018 BMW HP4 Race for sale on eBay

That’s right, the frame is made of the black stuff, molded using a special technique to increase rigidity and strength. The wheels, too, employ a special weaving method, lending strength to their lithe waist band. The result is a bike that tiptoes across the ground at 377 pounds with a full tank.

Just 750 of these bikes will be sold worldwide, with 215 horses and a full complement of World Superbike-worth suspension and electronics. This bike is number 240, and sits at BMW of Manhattan, where it will be on display until the 17th of November, after which it can be taken home.

From the (short) eBay listing:

Number 240 of 750 units worldwide.
For track use only.

Additional taxes and fees may apply. Contact dealership for additional information and details.

*Vehicle in stock and on showroom floor for display until Friday November 17th.*
*Vehicle cannot be delivered/picked-up before Saturday November 18th.*

It isn’t likely that a bike this collectable will ever get ridden in true anger, but BMW said when it was launched that the oh-so-delicate carbon parts were designed such that the least expensive and important parts would fail first if you prang it, saving the frame and wheels. Don’t ask us what that means.

Still, if you have $78k lying around, you could do much worse for your coin.

Carbon to the Core: 2018 BMW HP4 Race
BMW September 11, 2017 posted by

Blade Runner Meets Kraftwerk: 1991 BMW K1

Looking back, it’s hard to see any way the BMW K1 would have ever been anything but controversial, with such a heinous striking profile and the infamous Ishihara test livery, but BMW came at its design as only the Germans can: With an eye for both problem solving and pushing the envelope.

1991 BMW K1 for sale on eBay

The K1 was aimed at pushing BMW into the youth market, catering to buyers who wanted the sporty fairings and race bike queues of Japanese and Italian machines, while satisfying its core group of high-speed touring-oriented buyers.

So, the Bavarians threw a 1,000-cc longitudinal four cylinder at the equation, and then added shaft drive and a single-sided paralever swingarm. The engine was limited by BMW to 100 horsepower, which meant achieving 150-mph autobahn blasts would require aerodynamic trickery.

Enter the now-dated bodywork, which caused either reverence or revulsion, and achieved an 0.38 drag coefficient.

The 1991 BMW K1 for sale here wears the most controversial red and yellow color scheme, and is in very nice condition with a couple caveats. The seller says the ABS was removed when they purchased the bike, though it was supplied with all the ABS parts. They do not say whether it was reinstalled. The digital clock is also broken.

On the upside, it comes with a full titanium Remus exhaust.

From the eBay listing:

Selling My 1991 BMW K1. I purchased this ICONIC motor bike with a great sounding REMUS exhaust system installed. The first for me hearing this type of sound from a BMW motorcycle, Sweet. The ABS System was also removed when purchased. I didn’t ask why, but the parts came with the bike. It has a very strong engine and power train that launches the bike effortlessly and the Remus exhaust isn’t overpowering with noise while cruising. New battery and tender purchased last year, tender also sold with bike. This BMW K1 is a daily rider and will be sold as such. Starts every time. Display cluster LCD clock not working properly.

Clear title in My Possession. Sold in As Is condition.

The starting bid on this rare and wild beast is $5,500, and with more than six days left in the auction, it has yet to attract any bids.

Blade Runner Meets Kraftwerk: 1991 BMW K1
BMW April 14, 2017 posted by

Pugilist: 2003 BMW Boxer Cup

I know there are some RSBFS faithful out there that refuse to believe a BMW can be sporty OR rare. I beg to differ. As such, I offer you this 2003 Boxer Cup machine, created by BMW to capitalize on what was essentially a one-make Battle Of The Twins series. As #172 in a 200-bike limited production, it is justifiably rare – even if this is really an upscale version of the R1100S model. As for the sporting equation, I rely on the likes of Reg Pridmore, Randy Mamola, and Kevin Schwantz to comment; all have been competitors on BMW twins. Sure, at age 77 Reg could probably beat all of us on track even if he were riding a motorized skateboard, but each of these professional riders has shown the possible performance attainable from the bikes out of Bavaria.

2003 BMW Boxer Cup for sale on eBay

With carbon fiber fender and mudguard, a full belly pan, carbon valve covers with cylinder head pucks, twin under-seat exhaust, Ohlins suspension on both ends and a special setup that raises the rear of the bike to aid in cornering clearance, the Replika machine is as sporty as you could get in the BMW world during this time. Evoking the 5 year racing series was a marketing coup for BMW, and with model-specific graphics (including Mamola’s replicated signature on the fairing) this BMW promises to be something different.

From the seller:
Thank you for viewing my favorite moto: 2003 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika
This rare bike is amazing to ride! Comfortable, smooth, fast, and people love the timeless design. If you have made it this far into my listing, then I don’t need to write 10 pages explaining the Boxer Cup racing series and the limited production of very rare commemorative Bimmers that were sold around the world. Specifically, this moto is a great example of a well-preserved and maintained R1100S BCR that has always been adult ridden, never dropped or even leaned on, garage-kept, and will always be a fan favorite to every type of rider.

More from the seller:
I purchased this from a private owner in spring of 2016, had it enclosed shipped from Florida, and loved every second of riding it. Sadly, I am moving and need to downsize for the time being. The spark plugs, all fluids, and tires were replaced at 7,300 miles (shortly before I purchased it). This bike is nearly spotless: I’d rate the condition of it around a 9.3/10 with only stress cracks on the windscreen, a few very minor scratches on the gas tank, seat cover, and a few chips on the lower front of the bellypan. I have pampered this moto for 3,000 miles, and most of them are highway from weekend adventures. The rear tire is starting to show a little wear, but should easily perform for another 2,500-3,000 miles before replacing.

Sure, it was not until the S1000RR and piles of money that BMW finally met the competition head on in World Super Bike – but the Boxer Cup paved the way. This example is very, very clean. Miles are certainly low for what we all know to be a dead reliable lump of a motor, and unlike some of the high-strung Italian supermodels you can ride this one through some pretty decently sized service intervals. It’s everything you would expect from a BMW twin, with a little extra cachet, performance and exclusivity. Check it out here for all of the details and some great photos. Then jump back into the comments section and share your thoughts on the Boxer Cup – genuinely good race series, or mad marketing ploy von Deutschland?

MI

Pugilist: 2003 BMW Boxer Cup
BMW April 5, 2017 posted by

The Ultimate Boxer: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for Sale

In the early days of motorcycle design, there were a variety of alternatives to the telescopic forks that have become the standard in an industry evolving towards efficiency but, unfortunately also towards homogeny. Even the S1000RR that followed today’s HP2 Sport as BMW’s flagship sportbike is evidence of this: that striking asymmetrical bodywork is wrapped around an inline four and conventional, if highly sophisticated suspension. Sure, it blew everything into the weeds upon its introduction and has more performance than any mortal can actually use on the road, but it’s kind of… same-y. You certainly can’t accuse the HP2 of that.

It may look like a pair of telescopic forks up front, but that’s actually BMW’s Telelever front end, and the HP2 features a pair of Öhlins shocks: one in the rear, and one controlling the movement of the front wheel. These days, the only real players in the alternative front end game are BMW and Bimota, although there are always a few weirdo independent builders lurking in the wings. Forkless front ends have distinct theoretical advantages, but generally seem to have two problems. One, they’re more complicated to design and manufacture, and multiple linkages in set ups like the one used by Bimota can lead to play and vagueness in the handling, something that should actually be a strong point of the design. But the bigger issue seems to be the fact that the rest of the industry revolves around telescopic forks. They aren’t ideal, but people know how to set them up and make them work, you can buy highly-developed components off the rack from specialists, and riders are familiar with how they feel: Bimotas and BMWs are actually engineered with a bit of dive tuned in, so they don’t feel completely alien to riders used to telescopic forks.

Like the front suspension, the engine of the HP2 is a bit more than it seems as well. Sure, it uses BMW’s iconic flat-twin engine with its longitudinal crank, shaft-drive, and cylinder heads sticking out where you might find the highway pegs on a Harley Fat Boy. But inside, you’re looking at titanium connecting rods, and the bike debuted new four-valve cylinder heads with radial valves that helped the bike produce a claimed 128hp. Those heads feature skid plates in case you deck them out on track: roadgoing cornering clearance is generous, but track riders are advised to add a bit of rear ride height, and might need to adjust their racing lines slightly if they’re used to dragging elbows in the corners. For the rest of us, this is a very capable mount for road or track.

Elsewhere, the bike was kitted out with the best of everything: monstrous radial Brembos, adjustable ergonomics, and even a quickshifter that was the very first fitted from the factory to a production motorcycle. Carbon fiber is everywhere and includes a self-supporting rear seat unit, and helped the bike weigh in at a relatively svelte 392lbs dry. Keep in mind that those exotic titanium rods will need replacement at the 30,000 mile mark, but that’s a long way off for a collectible like this, and at least you just need two of them…

From the original eBay listing: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for Sale

This is the ABS version.  One owner bike.  Own the coolest boxer ever. This is number #103.  Only 1987 miles.  Bike is nearly perfect.  There is a small blemish on tail section.  Tires are like new, bike has been maintained at local BMW dealer with full records. Currently has extended warranty until June of 2017.

So the original listing makes the lazy eBay poster move of copy/pasting the bike’s manufacturer’s specs in place of any detailed information about the bike being offered. Sellers take note: no one cares about the fact that the bike has a three-phase alternator. And just what in the hell is “inner leg curve, unladen weight”? If you’ve got some sort of wild racing cams in your bike, the people looking to buy it might want to know. Otherwise, it just smacks of “well, I know I should post something here in this section…” It’s basically non-information: no one is reading it, and most of it is pretty meaningless even if they did. I’m assuming with just a shade under 2,000 miles it probably hasn’t needed anything. And even if this isn’t the original owner, I’m sure the “full records” mean that the seller can confidently say “there are no issues” leave it at that.

HP2s are quirky, fast, rare, and actually usable, although they don’t seem to be particularly desirable yet. Maybe they’re confusing to collectors? Neither fish nor fowl, with decent, but not eyeball-flattening performance and sporty, but not particularly beautiful looks. High-quality, light-weight, race-bred parts attached to a platform ultimately limited by design in terms of absolute performance. But with a whole raft of perfectly fast, competent, and slightly vanilla inline fours out there that can be had by the bucket load, it’s hard to put a price on character and individuality. Or maybe you can: the Buy It Now price for this one is $16,999 which is pretty much right on the money for a nice HP2

-tad

The Ultimate Boxer: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for Sale
BMW February 24, 2017 posted by

Brains and Brawn: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale

Before the introduction of their conventional, but devastatingly effective S1000RR, BMW was known for their durable, quirky motorcycles and “old man in a Roadcrafter suit” image. But in the lead-up to the introduction of the RR, BMW attempted to revive their forgotten, but very legitimate sporting image with the limited-production HP2 Sport. BMW already had an inline-four engine that would, on the surface, have seemed like a more likely candidate for sportbike-ification, but BMW instead chose to base their sportbike on their iconic 180° flat-twin configuration. Did they choose the twin to clearly separate the planned inline-four superbike from their previous offerings? Or was the existing, longitudinally-mounted “brick” simply too heavy for sportbike duty? I’m not sure, but the resulting HP2 ended up being much more “nerd Ducati” and less “Teutonic Gixxer.”

In terms of specification, the HP2 is surprisingly close to Ducati’s L-twin-powered superbikes of the period: two cylinders, 128hp near the 9,500 rpm redline, and a claimed 392lbs dry weight is probably closer to the older 999 than the 1198, but the HP2 is still in the ballpark. That low weight looks especially impressive when you realize power reaches the rear wheel via a heavy driveshaft, and the BMW comes with a raft of high-performance parts to turn what might otherwise have been a bit of a sow’s ear into the proverbial silk purse: dual overhead cam heads, radial valves, titanium connecting rods, adjustable ergonomics, and even a self-supporting carbon-fiber subframe. The lack of a slipper clutch is unfortunate, considering the rotational mass of the powertrain, but one is available if you have the time or money to drop the engine and install one.

The sometimes vague feeling often criticized by reviewers of BMW’s “alternatively suspended” bikes is happily missing in the HP2, and handling is considered a high point, while Brembo monoblock calipers offer impressive stopping power well in excess of what might be required to rein in those 128 horses. The heads sticking out in the breeze do ultimately limit cornering clearance, but you’ll need to be on a race track before it becomes anything more than an academic issue. Luckily, it comes fitted with plastic sliders… A bit of rear ride height helps, but dragging an elbow in corners might ultimately be impossible if you lack simian proportions.

From the original eBay listing: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale

Original adult owner purchased from Lone Star BMW in Austin Texas.  Carbon fiber body panels, forged aluminum rims, brembo antilock brakes, clutchless upshift, and ohlines suspension.  All warranty work done and service completed.  Replaced the fuel pump with a ethanol compatible unit. Never dropped, raced or crashed.  There is a blemish on the right lower fairing from a stone.  This is the ultimate boxer. With only approximately 115 ever imported to the US, you don’t have to wait for this to become a rare classic – it already is!  Clear Texas title.  2016 miles.

Keep in mind that there’s a price to be paid for all that exclusivity and high-performance technology: these weren’t meant for casual owners and, when new, were priced north of $20,000. Maintenance costs are appropriate for a low-production exotic as well, and BMW recommends the titanium connecting rods get replaced at 30,000 miles, so start saving now. Hey, at least valve-adjustments should be a snap!

-tad

Brains and Brawn: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale
BMW December 7, 2016 posted by

Featured Listing: 2008 BMW HP2 for Sale

There’s a proud tradition of independent motorcycle builders “sportifying” some very unlikely machines: CBXs converted into monoshock cafe-racers, heavily modified Swallower Moto Guzzis with chain drive and Hossack front ends, even venerable RZ500 engines stuffed into R6 frames. In the case of the HP2, BMW built their very own factory eclectic performance motorcycle by taking the quirky, flat-twin R1100S powerplant and adding high-spec parts to create a bit of an odd-duck sportbike, but one with real-world ability.

Certainly, if you were designing a sportbike from scratch, you likely wouldn’t build it around an air-cooled 180° twin with shaft-drive. But throw in a set of DOHC heads with radial valves, titanium connecting rods, fully-adjustable ergonomics, and a self-supporting carbon-fiber seat/subframe, and the performance intentions of the bike start to look more convincing. A 9,500rpm redline and 128hp were Ducati superbike territory just a few years ago and that power, while not class-leading, comes with a big lump of torque for brisk, if not eyeball-flattening performance from the claimed 392lbs dry machine.

In theory, BMW’s Telelever front end should offer up improved performance under heavy braking, but reviewers of bikes so equipped generally felt they were a bit vague in terms of steering feedback. However, the HP2 reviews were very positive with regards to the handling and feel of the bike, and those Brembo monoblock brakes provide plenty of stopping power. Keep in mind, the HP2 might seem weird to ride at first if you’re used to inline fours: that shaft-drive means increased inertia and the bike lacks a slipper clutch as delivered, although one is available for the bike. And while cornering-clearance is generous for road-use, the standard suspension settings can have the heads touching down at extreme lean angles, so track-day junkies should plan accordingly and see about raising the rear ride-height.

Really, you get the feeling the whole thing was helping to set the stage for their S1000RR by establishing that BMW could create a sportbike that didn’t rely on generous helpings of nostalgia and a reliance on “character.” Obviously, this falls somewhere short of the bar set by the RR in terms of outright performance, but it’s surprisingly capable, given the limitations of the platform. Of course, high performance parts can mean expensive replacement costs, and BMW does recommend those titanium rods be replaced at the 30,000 mile mark… Luckily, that service is a long way off for today’s Featured Listing.

From the seller: 2008 BMW HP2 for Sale

Only 1125 miles. Added it to my collection in 2008. Looks and runs well. Bike always stored indoors, and run every couple of months to keep healthy. Have very large bike collection being thinned down to make more space. Overall, a pretty well preserved bike.

64 year old owner, former bike wrench and former shop owner. Every effort has been made to show condition of bike with pictures . Can e-mail better, larger pictures directly, on request. Bike in good cond, though no warranty expressed or implied. Sold AS – IS .

Payment by cashier check, must clear for bike to be released. Chase or Wells Fargo the quickest. Cash, in person, works, too. :o)

Today’s HP2 has obviously spent more time being admired than being ridden, with just 1,125 miles on the odometer, but that might make it ideal for someone who wants to admire it: it’s certainly a striking bike, with tons of cool details and the low miles means you’ll get plenty of time riding it before you start to eat into the value. Aside from some discoloration on the exhaust pipes, it looks to be in excellent condition, as it should be with such low miles. The seller also includes a video of his collection and a short clip of the bike going around a corner, so we know it will both start and turn. The asking price for this bike of kit is $15,000 which is steep, but the HP2 is most definitely a rare and collectible bike that can also get a wiggle on and a surprise a few people at a track day.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2008 BMW HP2 for Sale
BMW January 12, 2016 posted by

Time-Capsule Space Ship: 1993 BMW K1 for Sale

1993 BMW K1 L Side Front

A flawed motorcycle that nevertheless succeeded in its intended mission, BMW’s radical K1 was tasked with changing public perception of the slightly stodgy brand and, although it didn’t actually sell particularly well, it certainly managed to send the brand off in a new direction. A bit too futuristically-styled, and possibly a bit too ambitious in terms of technology, it certainly shook things up for BMW, and it also helped them prepare for stricter emissions requirements that were in the pipeline, something their airhead flat twin wouldn’t be capable of meeting. The K100’s liquid-cooled inline four and offshoot triple found in the K75 would make that much easier, and a sportier version for the four found its way into the K1.

1993 BMW K1 R Side

While a liquid-cooled inline four sounds pretty conventional, BMW of course had to do it their own way, and the long-stroke, Bosch-injected, longitudinally-mounted engine was laid-over on its side to keep the center of gravity low. This generally has the disadvantage of a pretty long wheelbase and the de rigueur telelever shaft drive is pretty heavy, but this was intended as a sport-touring machine, not a pure sportbike: with 516lbs to pull around, that torquey motor made for a bike that was reasonably fast, but certainly no road-burner.

1993 BMW K1 Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1993 BMW K1 for Sale

This bike came from the factory as pictured – special order Silk Blue with no K1 decals. This machine was professionally stored in a collectors climate controlled warehouse for over 20 years. I purchased the bike with 976 miles on it in January 2015. I have only put about 250 miles on the bike.

This machine is nearly perfect. One small V shape crack is shown on the pictures below. The ABS sensor also needs to be reset.

This is really a one of a kind motorcycle that is just about new in every sense.

1993 BMW K1 Rear Suspension

Unable to compete in the changing landscape of Japanese supersports in the early 90s, the bike was discontinued in ’93. It’s a bit of an odd duck today: it doesn’t offer much that appeals to traditional BMW enthusiasts with its inline four and very limited cargo capacity. The fairing panels are subject to cracking and the limited airflow means those bits of plastic can get very, very hot. And it’s not really very sporty compared to Japanese or Italian bikes of the period.

1993 BMW K1 Front Brakes

These certainly aren’t display pieces and, with prices relatively low, a nice K1 could make a pretty neat alternative for riders obsessed with quirky. However, with under 1,200 miles on the clock and a starting bid of over $10,000 this example is for collectors only. Most of the bikes were painted up in some pretty lurid red/yellow paint schemes, but this particular example is a very restrained, traditional blue that will probably help it appeal to BMW enthusiasts looking to complete their collections.

-tad

1993 BMW K1 L Side