Posts by tag: air cooled

Suzuki February 20, 2019 posted by

Slingshot, engage: Road-worn 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750

Slingshot Gixxers have gained value over the last couple years on the strength of their reputation as basically the earliest available fully modern street legal sportbike. Short of an astronomically expensive RC30, a late '80s GSX-R is about as close as you'll get to a vintage bike that rides like something from this century. Beyond that, they carry a mystique born of their world-beating pace when new. The awe they inspired when they debuted has evolved into full-on legend status.

1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for sale on eBay

With the help of redesigned fairings and suspension, 17-inch rubber and a new rack of flatslide Mikunis, the '88 Gixxer burst on the scene with technology and pace that was unheard of at the time, especially for something so light. Back then, the lack of water cooling didn't raise any eyebrows, though Suzuki did have to get creative with oil cooling to keep the things running properly. The 750cc inline four commanded 112 horses in street trim, and the bodywork had been slickened to reduce the mill's effort.

This 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750 is in unrestored, original condition, except for some exhaust and airbox mods. Whereas many of these bikes are either hammered or babied, this one strikes a nice balance of looking like a bike that was well looked-after, but ridden as it should have been and stored without huge regard for the cosmetics. If you're looking for a rider and you don't care about looks too much, seek no more. If you're looking for an easy restoration that doesn't require a nut-and-bolt re-work, here's your steed. The seller is quite proud that the bike rides on its original tires, but we'd have those suckers swapped out in a heartbeat.

From the eBay listing:

1988 GSX-R 750 Slingshot. This is a true Survivor, never been touched with the exception of the exhaust. Runs and performs perfectly. I do have the original air box also. Original tires that are in excellent condition for their age. The tires tell the story of this bike, it has been rode less than 500 miles a year. Some of the clear is peeling from decales (normal for the age of the bike). Right fairing has crack by lamp (see pic) and solo seat has small crack in rear, quick fix if you want but, I would leave it alone as bike is a survivor! Hate to see this bike go but, must make room and that is the only reason while it is going up for sale! I will listen to any reasonable offers!
Also bike comes with really nice matching Suzuki jacket cost was $550.00 when bought! Email any question you might have and also see another listing of mine on a 1989 Suzuki GSX-R 1100 that is also up for sale!

At $5,000, the asking price is right at what Hagerty says an excellent example should go for. With fairly low miles, great patina and rising interest in these machines, he might not be too far off.

Slingshot, engage: Road-worn 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750
Kawasaki February 16, 2019 posted by

Old School Awesome: 1982 Kawasaki GPz 750

There comes a point and time when nearly everything becomes valued - nostalgically if not financially. Such just might be the case with today's find, a cherry 1982 Kawasaki GPz750. In the early 1980s the GPz was generally a top-dog kind of sport bike. Pitted against Honda's CB and Suzuki's GS models, the GPz looked and acted like a sportbike. With an air cooled inline four, double overhead cams and a brace of Mikuni constant velocity carbs, the 750 could pump out 80 HP - good for nipping into the 11s in the 1/4 mile. By today's standards this is all relatively tame - and old tech such as air cooling, carburetors and twin shocks seems laughable. But it was good enough to put a young fellow by the name of Wayne Rainey on the top step of the AMA Superbike championship on a Muzzy-prepped bike and cement the GPz as a sporting weapon with serious intent.

Old School Awesome: 1982 Kawasaki GPz 750 for sale on eBay

1982 was the first year of the 750, as both the GPz550 and GPz1100 were introduced a year earlier. 1982 was also a bit of a one year only model, based on the older architecture. Follow on years found a revised fairing setup (from quarter fairing to half), as well as the introduction to Uni-Trak, Kawasaki's rising rate linkage, single rear shock setup. Fuel injection was also on the horizon (the 1100 introduced it to the series), but liquid cooling would have to wait for the introduction of the revolutionary Ninja model. So while one can view the GPz as a mass-produced motorcycle and therefore likely never to become truly rare, the combination of a one year only configuration and the survivor status does elevate this one into something worth considering.

From the seller:
1982 KAWASAKI GPZ 750 , I have the original stock seat and rear shocks, this bike runs like new, I Just installed Michelin Pilots front and rear, the bike has been freshly serviced and a Dyno Jet carburetor kit installed to enhance the Horse power with the period correct Bassani exhaust. The bike has been kept in doors it's whole life and has zero cosmetic issue's. It gets attention where ever I ride. they made this model only 1 year so these are very rare to be seen in show room condition.

I bought brand new spare brake pads, clutch kit, gaskets, spare starter motor etc . these are included in the sale. every thing electrical works perfectly, I just freshened up the battery with a Yuasa OEM original. so it's ready to ride from California to New York.

Most GPzs have lived multiple lives. Purchased new by aggressive riders, many found their way to the racetrack in amateur and privateer formats. Those that stayed on the streets passed through a few owners, with the price likely dropping with each change. That quickly put these bikes into the financial reach of younger riders, driving up insurance rates everywhere. Not all were flogged and forgotten, but enough were to make finding a good example difficult today. And this particular example is no garage queen - with 20k on the clocks (eBay advert lists 18k) this bike has been ridden. But there is life yet in that robust motor, and all the appeal of the "arrest me red" paint still applies. It may be on the far side of 30 something, but viscerally this bike still has all its mojo.

Located in the sunny state of California (which bodes very well for issues such as rust and corrosion), this 1982 GPz750 is looking for a new home. The paint looks good despite the age, and there have been few modifications. The aftermarket exhaust is not stock, but a Bassani is not the worst pipe you could image for this application. There are a number of spares that come along with the purchase, which is a good thing from a maintenance point of view. Parts are still readily available for the mechanicals, although cosmetic trim might be getting scarce. Fortunately, all of those pieces are still attached. Check it out here. If you are of a certain age, you KNOW you wanted one of these. Maybe you had one (lucky bastard), and now miss it. Was this the bike you regretted selling all those years ago? Jump over to the Comments section and share your stories. Good Luck!!

MI

Old School Awesome: 1982 Kawasaki GPz 750
Laverda February 14, 2019 posted by

Rhymes with Orange: 1979 Laverda Formula 500

We tend to think (often and fondly) of Laverda building big bikes. With triples. The Jota, the RGS and the Mirage, for example. But before those, Laverda created smaller bikes too, such as the 500cc parallel twin. And in the hit-and-miss world of European bikes in the 1970s, the Laverda 500 - while extremely competent - was never a contender; a too small dealer network inhibited expansion, and a too high price prohibited widespread adoption. While technologically sound and a major step forward in the middleweight class, the 500 was not the sales success that was envisioned. Stuck with a slow selling model and hungry for image, Laverda re-worked the 500 into the Formula - a one make race bike. What you see here is just such a rare machine.

1979 Laverda Formula 500 for sale on eBay

Starting with the bones of the street bike, Laverda stripped off all of the road going concessions such as lights, signals and horn (although these came in a box when the bike was purchased new). In all, the feature deletions resulted in a savings of 35 pounds from the already svelte 500 machine - tipping the scales at a scant 337 lbs dry. And with a DOHC 8-valve parallel twin (air cooled) pumping out just over 50 horsepower (thanks to revised cams and higher compression pistons over the standard 500), the Formula was relatively potent. Bespoke rear sets and clip on bars were added, as was the incredible bodywork. With this bike, aspiring racers (no professionals allowed) were able to join the Coppa Laverda (Laverda Cup), with Laverda providing technical support and available spares. The race series ran in Italy, and was a huge success from 1978 to 1981. It was even duplicated in other parts of Europe - notably Belgium and Germany - and convinced Laverda to race it professionally. The Laverda 500 was successful in such endurance races such as the 24 hours of Montjuich as well as the fabled Isle of Man.

From the seller:
Very rare Laverda Formula road registered,100% original, unrestored conditions, the bike has raced 3 races in 1979.

Only 200 Formula was been made and only 20 was been registered for road use

As with all smaller Italian builds, numbers vary. Estimates of rarity range between a low of 175 units, to a high of 210. That is not very many. Plus it was a race bike - and we all know how difficult preserved longevity can be for old racers. They are generally handed down, modified, wrecked, rebuilt, modified again, and the cycle continues. Add to the fact that these were for a European only series, and you will be hard pressed to find one outside of Italy. And as far as the street bike status goes, all Formula machines were sold new with the electrics and bits to make them road worthy, AND they had a street title (!). While not many Formulas found their way onto the streets, we should all rejoice that some (such as this one) did.

There is not too much info on this particular machine, although there are some decent (but low res) pictures. This is an extremely rare Laverda, and undoubtedly has some interesting history behind if if those pieces could talk. This looks to be a Series II model, as the original builds had a one piece tank/tail section. The latter variants had a two-piece setup that allowed for easier access to the engine and components. This bike is located in Italy - but given it's rarity I didn't think you would mind. Bidding action has been VERY slow for such a find, with ZERO bids on a $15,900 opening ask. That does not appear terribly out of line with current values today, as this Formula would make a wonderful addition to any collection. Check it out here before it's too late. Good Luck!!

MI

Rhymes with Orange: 1979 Laverda Formula 500
Ducati February 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2001 Parking Space Odyssey – NEW 2001 Ducati MH900e

Update 2.13.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to Iconic Motorbikes for the buy and to our seller. -dc

Following a very eventful motorcycle auction weekend in Las Vegas we find this immensely collectible Ducati MH900e with zero miles and never-been titled MSO status. The internet darling of 1999, the Terblance-designed homage to the original Mike Hailwood edition has always been considered to be rolling artwork. Today's example shows just how much this bike resonated with the collecting community. Born at the turn of the century in numbers limited to just 2000, the MHe "evoluzione" was a radical design that remains unique to this day.

2001 Ducati MH900e with zero miles for sale on eBay

The underpinnings of the MHe are more pedestrian than the rest of the bike. Powered by a standard dual spark L-twin familiar to any SuperSport, Monster or Sport Classic rider, the MHe offers adequate performance along with that booming, traditional Ducati sound. But it is the details that make this pile of parts stand out. The frame is a straight-section trellis that have defined Ducati for decades - but it is linked to a single-sided swing arm of artistic proportions. The intricate layout of that piece of kit alone make the bike stand out. But combine the throwback cafe fairing and round headlight with that Buck Rogers tail section complete with high shotgun style pipes and a hybrid style emerges.

From the seller:
I purchased two of these MH900e's in 2002, I rode one for years and this one has been various living rooms as art for the past 17 years. This Ducati #20 came from the original internet purchaser in Ontario. It is still on the original MSO from Ducati (never titled) I had the bike un-crated and prepped for display at the now defunct Santa Rosa Ducati dealer. I still have the original crate sides with #20 on each side, If wanted I am happy to dig them out of my warehouse for you. This bike is as delivered, NO flaws, nicks, scuff, etc. Has not been exposed to sun, dampness, extreme heat etc. A pampered Wine country life since 2002...... All the extras are present, never worn XL T-shirt, Plaque, Stand, manuals, tool roll, optional Ducati cover, plus period launch Magazines. No disappointments, second only to one in a crate 🙂 lowest # (20) I have seen for a while. Inspections welcome, this bike is located in Sonoma, Ca.

Before you scoff and make some claims that the seller rode this with the odometer disconnected or similar, note that this intelligent individual purchased TWO bikes: one to show and one to go. That is either investment savvy or total Bologna commitment. Either way it provides for a brand new, never registered, zero mile example available to an entirely new crowd some 18 years after production has ceased. And given that the seller has all of the Ducati specialty items included with each bike this is really like purchasing a new MHe.

The fly in this "as new as a bike in a box" ointment is how much these bikes have risen in value over the years. The most recent MHe we posted was a mid-$20k ask, and the Las Vegas motorcycle auctions completed just last weekend showed even stronger pricing. Of all the Ducati Limited Edition models, the MHe may well be the most bankable. At the $35,000 Buy It Now, this may be the most expensive MHe we have seen yet - and proof of the continued earning potential of the model. Check it out here. The new status essentially means it has sat for 18 years, but my assumption is that the next caretaker already has a coveted indoor habitat identified. Review the pics and the details, and make the man an offer. It's not every day we find a brand new Ducati MH900e on our pages. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing:  2001 Parking Space Odyssey – NEW 2001 Ducati MH900e
Featured Listing January 30, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Pristine 1979 Honda CBX

The 1979 Honda CBX, a six-cylinder behemoth dressed up as a buttoned-down commuter, was an exercise in weird, but impressive, flex from Honda. As the long run of the original CB750 was at its peak, Big Red decided it was time to show off the ultimate evolution of the CB line, but elected to bare its engineering fangs instead of building a taught, sinewed race bike on the CB platform. Honda brass at the time even admitted that, if they had been going for track records, they could have made it with a much lighter, more focused and faster four cylinder.

1979 Honda CBX for sale on eBay

But that wasn't what the CBX was for, so they took the lessons from their tiny 250cc grand prix six cylinders of the 1960s and made a mill four times that size that put out 105 horses at 9,000 rpm. Honda stuck the accessory drives in the middle of the crank, as opposed to at the ends, to keep the crank short for cornering clearance. That also helped balance the big engine, which otherwise would have vibrated mercilessly. Though the technology and thought meant the CBX was a true feat of manufacturing and engineering, it was also heavy, flexy and intimidating. Reports from the time said the handling was more impressive than it had any right to be, but few people were buying it.

This 1979 Honda CBX has been mothballed since 1988, when it was placed on display in a family dealership. The carbs were drained as it was put in storage and the engine was turned over regularly to keep it free. It had a new tank at some point in the 1990s after the original was dented. The tires were last changed in 2001. The seller says he plans to leave it as-is and let the purchaser decide what to do with the bike. Between 1979 and 1988, it covered just 8,400 miles.

From the eBay listing:

This is an original 1979 Honda CBX. It has not been registered or on the road since 1988. It has been stored in a climate controlled garage in Northern Nevada until I purchased it from a friend a few years ago...it had been in their family and on in display in their dealership since the 80's.

I received the original California small pink slip with 1988 registration ( I have photos of this when I took it to DMV ) I have since registered and titled this in Arizona, it has a clean and clear title in my name.

I bought the bike as it sits today. Carbs were drained and the bike has been in stored conditioned for over 15 years. The engine was turned over occasionally. The tires are from 2001 I believe which I think is when it was last freshened up a bit. I also was told that the original tank suffered a dent while on display in the early to mid 90s and the original tank was replaced with one of the last new oem ones available from Honda. The tank is perfect and like new inside and out as seen.

I am selling the bike as is, I am going to leave it up to the new owner to display as is or make it a runner. I added a new battery and fresh avgas last week and the bike runs and the carbs do not leak, however it only ran on 5 cylinders and did not want to idle. So carbs will need a proper going over if you plan to bring it back to life.

Two other flaws on the bike. The tach was lazy when I started the bike, this might sort it self out with some run time. There is also some scratches on the gauges as shown in the photos.

I have not spent much time trying to detail the bike so it will clean up much better than what is shown in the photos if you dedicate a day or two, but as it sits it is very nice...it has basically been inside the last 30 years!!!

Original owners manual and tool kit in place and perfect. The original keys were lost, I had new ones made. I took photos with the tank, side covers and seat off so you can get an idea of the condition.

I will add a few more photos over the next few days, please email me with any questions or if you need specific photos, have questions etc.

I CAN SHIP ANYWHERE IN THE U.S. and help ASSIST with WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!!!

The asking price for this time capsule is $15,500, for which you are getting a pristine, absolutely unmolested example of a piece of Honda's corporate history. They do not make them like this any more.

Featured Listing:  Pristine 1979 Honda CBX
Moto Guzzi January 26, 2019 posted by

Italian Oddity: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

Even if you're an Italian bike fan, this one might have flown under your radar. But that's what we do here at RareSportbikesforSale.com: let you know that interesting bikes like the Moto Guzzi V65 Lario exist. I especially love 80s Moto Guzzis because they're generally pretty durable and very affordable. They won't set the world on fire with their performance, but they're quirky, stylish, and pretty good handlers, if you allow for the fact that it's a 32 year old motorcycle on 16" wheels.

The bike could work up a decent turn of speed, with 60hp and a five-speed gearbox that meant the bike could do an honest 110+ with good handling for the time. Oddly, Moto Guzzi's 643cc "middleweight" was a more mechanically sophisticated machine than their big Le Mans. It was still air-cooled, but had four-valve Heron-style heads, with the four valves operated by pushrods and rockers, similar to the setup used in the later four-valve Daytona. Heron heads, if you're not familiar, have flat surfaces instead of domed or hemispheric combustion chambers, with recesses cut for valves and spark plugs. Instead, Heron-head engines generally use dished-top pistons to allow room for the fuel/air charge. This means the heads are easier to produce, and Heron heads have been used in a number of automotive applications, including Jaguar's V12.

Unfortunately, the 4-valve "small block" Guzzis have a reputation for catastrophic failures. Digging around the Guzzi forums, the problem likely stemmed [ahem] from the two-piece valves that tended to fracture, although the cam and valve springs have also been blamed. Who knows? You might get lucky and the bike will be fine, or a combination of softer valve springs, a set of Suzuki 250N valves, and careful use might see you through, but… caveat emptor.

Hopefully by now that's either been an issue and rectified, or never will be a problem, but I do get a bit nervous when I see a low-mileage example come up for sale. Easy to check though, with those cylinder heads sticking out proud of the bodywork like that, and the owner may be aware of them being checked recently or repaired. Bottom line: if you buy one, try out the updated valves and springs recommended by the Guzzi message boards and ride it with your fingers crossed until it breaks, then see about finding a two-valve engine from a different model. I believe the 750cc Nevada engine is a popular choice for this, if you can find one.

I love the huge, white-faced Veglia tachometer on a bike that probably doesn't even need a tach, the padded "safety" dash, and the button key. If you've never seen an original Guzzi key from the era, the fob basically folds over once the key is in place, forming a sort of knob you turn to switch on the ignition [see above]. Bodywork is swoopy and very 80s, but will provoke questions wherever you go. First and most common: "Moto Guzzi? Who makes that?"

This isn't pristine, but is in very nice condition and should make a great, quirky weekend ride if you want something interesting and don't have a ton of cash to splash. If you're looking for a budget classic, the V35 and V50 are obviously not as fast, but sweet-handling and much more reliable. All-in-all, it's a funky little bike, but there are reasons they don't go for very much and have low miles. If you like to tinker, it might be worth a shot.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

I bought this bike in 1993 and I am the second owner. Very low miles always starts up no problem, idle is a little rough when cold but fine when warmed up, carb balance is difficult to maintain on these even with the right tools. Previous owner had megaphones on it and said he had changed jets to suit, I put the original exhausts back on and messed with jets but couldn’t find any better set up than what it has now, it runs great accelerates very well  and it is pretty fast for an old 650.

The only issues I have had are leaking fuel lines and carb/intake connections, all of which have been replaced.

There are a few cosmetic issues that I tried to show in the photos, mainly with cheap plastic and paint. The fairing has a crack across it which has been repaired with a fiberglass patch across the back leaving a small step, this could be buffed and painted but the crack is only visible from the underside. The belly fairing also has a stress crack down the front; nothing has been done to it. Some of the engine paint is peeling under the carbs due to the fuel leaks and on the bevel gear housing; the front forks have a few scratches due to tag stickers and their removal. Some of the red wheel paint is flaking but this is an easy fix.

The air cleaner box has been removed and K&N filters installed and the seat replaced with a Corbin single. The only other mod was to replace the remote choke lever assembly with individual carb mounted levers. I have the remote assembly.

It has the original tool kit, a few spares, including the megaphones, at least two keys and a clear title.

I can deliver to a shipping point within 50 miles of Columbia SC.

The price is right, the bike is funky, and it makes Italian v-twin noises, although there's more sound than fury. The biggest limiting factor could be the 16" wheels: rear tires are particularly hard to find in the correct sizes, and some of the bigger Guzzis suffered handling issues when fitted with the smaller hoop. They look a little strange too. 18" wheels supposedly fixed the bigger Gooses, so maybe that's an option here, if you don't like the way the Lario goes around corners. Parts may also be hard to come by, although these days you can probably get used bits from Europe via eBay.

-tad

Italian Oddity: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale