Posts by tag: air cooled

Ghezzi-Brian March 16, 2020 posted by

Gorgeous Guzzi: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin for Sale

The Daytona/Sport 1100i were very entertaining machines, with plenty of grunt from the nearly 1100cc v-twin, matched with quality suspension and brakes. Unfortunately, they were also burdened with shaft drive and nearly 100 extra pounds of weight, compared to other Italian sportbikes of the era. So basically a charismatic engine in an overweight package. Sadly, Colin Chapman wasn’t available to help out, but Giuseppe Ghezzi and Bruno Saturno, two halves of the Ghezzi-Brian team, stepped up to build the lightweight, but very pricey Supertwin that cost nearly $15,000 in 2001 money.

There’s a lot of clever engineering going on here, and the completed machine supposedly weighed in at nearly 70lbs less than a Daytona or Sport 1100i. The bike certainly looks lighter and more agile than a Sport 1100i, although I feel like the colors on this example date the bike a bit. Perimeter brakes similar to Buell’s ZTL or “zero tortional load” system supposedly reduce unsprung weight up front and look really trick, the frame channels air through to the airbox below the rear shock, and a redesigned rear suspension helped to reduce the torque reaction of the shaft drive.

I have an old “all Italian” issue of Bike magazine that features one of my favorite comparison tests of all time: an Aprilia RS250 versus a Ducati 748 versus a Bimota YB9 versus a Moto Guzzi Daytona RS. Obviously, the “big old bus” Guzzi didn’t fare well in such light-footed company, but their big, longitudinally-mounted v-twin could still be entertaining slotted into something like this Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin. And this wasn’t the end of the line for Ghezzi and Guzzi: in the Supertwin you can see the kernel of ideas later used in the stunning MGS-01.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian 1064cc Supertwin for Sale

Frame no. FP1239

As Roland Brown of Motorcyclist puts it:

“I’m carving through a series of immaculately surfaced bends in the hills near Lecco in northern Italy, aboard a stunning new V-twin whose jutting cylinders, grunty power and off-beat exhaust could only come from Moto Guzzi.

“The Guzzi factory at Mandello del Lario is only a short ride from here, but this bike isn’t the first dramatic result of Guzzi’s recent acquisition by Aprilia. This is the Supertwin 1100, now being hand-built in small numbers by Ghezzi & Brian, a specialist firm from the nearby village of Perego.

“As you ride it, carving through the twisties, the aural clues don’t match the experience. The grunty power and off-beat exhaust could only come from Moto Guzzi. But this isn’t just a Guzzi from the Mandello del Lario factory, this is the Supertwin, a hand-built, low production superbike from Ghezzi-Brian, the specialist firm from the nearby village of Perego.

“Moto Guzzi is one of the oldest and most storied motorcycle manufacturers in existence, but they’ve drifted pretty far from their sporting roots, owing to their purchase by Piaggio, a move that has kept them afloat, but forever relegated to building vintage-styled and cruisers to prevent them competing with more sports-oriented bikes from sister-company Aprilia. Really though, the downward slide began long before that, as Guzzi just couldn’t keep pace with the ruthless development of modern sportbikes from Japan. Luckily, there’ve been a few bright spots along the way, like this Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin that point out just how much life is still left in Moto Guzzi’s v-twin.

“Produced by Giuseppe Ghezzi and Bruno Saturno this is a race-replica designed around Ghezzi’s successful racing machine, the Supertwin features quality suspension at both ends and clever engineering designed to reduce weight. The slim bodywork reveals the iconic longitudinal v-twin and contrasts nicely with the hulking mechanicals. The huge perimeter front brakes look incredibly trick on the OZ Racing wheels and should offer up excellent stopping power to go with the increased straight-line performance that comes mostly from a huge weight reduction: the Supertwin weighs in at a claimed 427lbs dry, down 55lbs from the largely stock V11 Sport that donates its engine. Power is a modest 91hp but the 1064cc motor puts out impressive torque to match the amazing soundtrack. 

“Ghezzi’s frame is based on a steel spine and uses the motor as a stressed member, but that’s where the similarities end. The Supertwin spine doubles not as the oil tank but as the airbox, taking in air under the tank to feed the intakes that run back from those jutting cylinders.  There’s plenty of clever engineering rearward, too, where a multiadjustable Bitubo shock lies horizontally and is worked by a rising-rate linkage. In Guzzi fashion the Supertwin’s box-section steel swingarm incorporates a parallelogram arrangement to cancel torque reaction.  But this bike’s real innovation is up front, where its multiadjustable, inverted Paioli fork holds a 17-inch wheel whose twin discs are a massive 420mm in diameter and are fixed to the rim rather than the hub. The entire system, incorporating four-piston calipers biting on thin discs that are fully floating to allow for heat expansion, has been developed by local firm Braking.”

The bike offered is presented in truly excellent condition throughout with the gentle patina of a sparingly used, but meticulously kept near 20-year-old machine. The odometer reads an original 7,500 kms from new, most of which were enjoyed earlier in its life, as it has been on static display in three prominent private California collections for the last half of its existence.

The bike is offered in a Bill of Sale, but I can assist with titling. Please contact me.

For additional photos and details, please visit Classic Avenue.

The $24,900 asking price is a lot of cash for a Guzzi-powered special with pushrods and two valves per cylinder. In the plus column, 90hp should provide plenty of poke in the relatively light machine, the design is extremely exotic, and Guzzi engines are very durable and easy to service. Unfortunately, the bodywork is nearly unobtainable, and I’m not sure where you’d pick up a set of those perimeter brake discs, or a replacement wheel if you ding a rim.

-tad

Gorgeous Guzzi: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin for Sale
Bimota March 13, 2020 posted by

Extra, EXTRA Exclusive: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

This Bimota SB4S is the epitome of an Italian exotic: long, low, lean, and fast, stuffed full of the best componentry and radical thinking available at the time. Imagine it sitting next to nearly any other early 1980s machine and it’s almost like a MotoGP bike just dropped by your local bike night. Note the one-piece tank and tail section attached by just a few fasteners to help simplify maintenance, the quick-release axles, high-spec suspension, eccentric chain adjuster, and lightweight 16″ wheels that were fitted with then-rare radial tires. Most SB4s used modular units similar to Honda’s Comstar wheels, but this example is fitted with beautiful Campagnolo hoops.

Bimota’s reputation was built around their race-inspired frames, and the SB4’s is no exception. The chrome-moly trellis unit with machined aluminum side-plates is a gorgeous piece of engineering, once the lightweight bodywork is removed, and wrapped around the utterly massive 1074cc powerplant borrowed from Suzuki’s GSX1100. Air-cooled, with four valves per cylinder and Suzuki’s Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber technology, it was left largely stock in this application because the main performance advantage of the SB4 came from a reduction in weight: the Bimota came in at a claimed 405lbs, 130lbs less than the 535lb GSX1100!

Significantly, the SB4 was available with both three-quarter and full fairings. Looks are subjective, but the three-quarter design is probably the better bet if you plan to regularly use your Bimota: the full fairing apparently traps lots of heat, and the air-cooled mill has a hard time managing the resulting elevated temperatures. That being said, this example has 15,000 miles on the odometer, so previous owners have either ridden it fast enough to keep temps down, or spent a lot of time rolling it around their garages…

I’ve seen a number of different directional indicators, or even no indicators fitted to the SB4. I’m assuming that none were originally included, because Italy, but different solutions were found to suit the requirements of different markets. These flush indicators seem to work as well as any, and are a damn sight less obnoxious than the DOT-approved bits fitted to many later motorcycles. I’d fit some bar-end signals and get rid of these barnacle-looking things, but that might just be me.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

1984 Bimota SB4S, 1 of only 34 produced

Bimota’s significant reputation was forged in the creation of fast, exclusive motorcycles oozing with Italian style. That reputation began in the 1970s when founders Giuseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburini shifted their successful heating and ventilation firm’s focus to that of their passion – motorcycles. 

Japan’s offerings of the time often consisted of a wonderfully smooth, powerful engine mounted in a frame of limited performance. Moto Martin of France, Bakker of Holland, and Harris and Spondon of England, all saw the potential of these engines. But Bimota exploited the situation with Italian flair, building exotic, exclusive, innovative machines in very limited numbers. Technical innovation too has long been a Bimota hallmark, as exemplified by the hub centre-steered Tesi models, while on the world’s racetracks Bimota-framed machines have won hundreds of races and numerous championships. 

Utilizing the Suzuki GSX1100 powerplant, the Bimota SB4 was priced at approximately $11,000, making it one of the world’s most expensive motorcycles. And one of the most exclusive with only 272 built, 34 of which were the even-more-exclusive SB4S models with full fairing. And one of these SB4S is on offer here. In perfectly original condition, the bike has covered a little more than 15,000 miles from new. Having been on static display for several years, the bike was recently re-commissioned and serviced, and now starts easily and rides perfectly. Brakes work well and all electrical systems function as they should.

This is a perfect opportunity to add an exclusive, very limited production Italian exotic with the ease of ownership and outright power and pace of a Japanese superbike.

For further information, video of the bike running, and additional photos, please visit ClassicAvenue.com

The SB4S is extremely rare, rare enough it’s hard to find actual pictures of one. Just 34 were built, and I’m not sure how consistent they were in terms of specifications. It supposedly differs from the “regular” SB4 with its four-into-one exhaust, oil-cooler, and other details. This example has the standard dual exhaust, and I can’t tell if there’s an oil-cooler hiding behind the full fairing. I’m also curious about the adapters that apparently allow larger, four-piston front brake calipers to be fitted. They appear to be a period-correct update, so I’d love to know more: did the bike come this way from Bimota? Was it modified when new? We’ve featured this particular bike a couple times in the past, but this is a heavily revised listing with much nicer photos, so it seemed a good time to revisit it. The seller is asking $21,900 this time around, so maybe the third time is the charm?

-tad

Extra, EXTRA Exclusive: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale
Featured Listing March 10, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America

Update 2.16.2020: Joe has updated his remaining inventory with competitive pricing. Asking price for this MV Agusta 750S America is $67,000. Call Joe at 847-668-2004 -dc

Back in 1974, there was no other bike to have, really. Regardless of what you were able to shop for, the MV Agusta 750S America was the bike you wanted. First of all, it was Italian, and red, which meant it had that little something extra that nobody else had. Temperamental, yes, and expensive to be sure, and perhaps not even the fastest thing on two wheels, but none of that mattered. It would more or less keep pace with the cruder, brawnier two strokes, and it would go around corners without killing you. Then there was the noise.

Whether you’re listening to a Colombo V-12 at full song, or the rorty throb of a Lancia Fulvia’s V4, or the percussive pop and rattle of a Ducati 900 SS/SP, the Italians long ago mastered the art of the proper internal combustion sound. The 750 S America may have them all beat, with a rhythmic, tachycardic and slightly uneven throbbing at idle cracking into a full-chested wail at higher revs. It’s quite the song and dance for 90 horsepower, but in its day the MV’s voice was the siren song of speed.

This 1974 MV Agusta 750S America is in magnificent shape, and appears to be all or almost all-original. The classic red-and-gold livery is without blemishes, and the bike’s numerous nooks and crannies appear to be clean enough to eat off of. The condition is thanks in large part to a fastidious seller, who has kept the bike stored in a heated facility and made sure that it remains ready to run.

From the seller:

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection.  I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection.  These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s.  Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one.  These motorcycles were targeted for by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best was available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the ‘70s and ‘80s are the future Ferrari’s of motorcycle collecting.   We all know what has happened to Ferraris.

For many people the MV Augusta American is like the Ferrari of motorcycles.  It is a typically great Italian design that when new cost an unthinkable amount of money and has been held in the highest esteem since it was produced.

In the world of motorcycle collecting it is one of the most prestigious Italian bikes that you can have in your collection.   This bike, as far as we know, is entirely original.  It runs perfectly, and, is, without question, one of the best sounding motorcycle that were ever made and yes, it is kept in fully heated storage when not in use.   It is always kept on a trickle charger. It is ready to travel 500 miles on the first day.

If you ever heard of Ferrari GTO run through the gears you will know that the 1974 Augusta MV 750 S America has a very similar melodic sound of authority which is just music to the ears.

This is a very expensive bike for serious collectors.  It is a very limited production bike.  By searching the Internet, you can read all the accolades that have accumulated over time for this particular breed, this is for serious future collectors.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Back in ’74, these things were the most expensive bikes on the street, with a raft of super-expensive parts keeping them out of the hands of you average grocery bagger. With just 550 or so MV Agusta 750S Americas built, the story is more or less the same today. If you have the means …

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America
Ducati March 10, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica

Update 2.16.2020: Joe has updated his remaining inventory with competitive pricing. Asking price for this 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica is $29,000. Call Joe at 847-668-2004 -dc

In 1978 Mike Hailwood won the Isle of Man TT riding a Ducati. This was 11 years after his last motorcycle race, the previous period during which he was firmly on the Honda payroll. Everything about the event spelled disaster – an old timer long past his glory years on a make of bike nobody really associated him with – and nobody believed he would be competitive. But this was the stuff of heroes; and heroes always win. Hailwood went on to win what can only be considered the comeback of the century. This cemented the legend of Mike “the Bike” Hailwood’s connection with Ducati, and provided for some wonderful bikes. Today’s Featured Listing – a 1985 Ducati MHR – is one such factory offering that celebrated the success of Mike Hailwood.

The Ducati MHR is a bike built in the tradition of homage; it was built to celebrate the famous TT win. But given that the TT was for street-based machinery, the factory replica was not simply a graphics package. Yes, Hailwood won in 1978. Yes, the Pantah (which introduced the next generation belt-driven cams vs. bevel-driven) was introduced way back in 1980. Then why, you might ask, was a MHR being built in 1985 and based on the older hardware? The answer is that Ducati, still a relatively small company, focused on bevel drive for the big bikes (750 – 1000cc), while the Pantah was initially offered in 600cc and below variants. The bevel-drive motors were still very much in the forefront during this time, even though they may seem slightly archaic today. So the MHR is based on the “square case” 900SS of the day – which was a capable machine in its own right. But why still offer a homage bike in 1985 when Hailwood won the TT back in 1978? Simple: the public demanded it. While the MHR was a very limited edition, it was a tremendously successful marketing effort and a strong model for Ducati. Today’s seller has some good details about this bike, so I will let him take it over from here:

From the seller:
1985 Ducati Hailwood Replica

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

More from the seller:
The Ducati Hailwood Millie shown here was made in two series. The first one being a short fairing and only 900 cc with a kick starter and this model, the Hailwood Millie (1000 cc) with the electric starter and the large fairing; one is one of the most beautifully designed fairings ever. It is a big bike not meant for the meek. Of course, it has the electric starter and exhaust note that will thrill any motorcycle enthusiast. It is in absolutely near perfect condition. It is always on a trickle charger and ready to give you a thrill of a lifetime as you wind through the gears and open it up on an open road. This is another Italian bike that, in our opinion, can be classified as the Ferrari of bikes of the future.

This is certainly a bike for the serious collectors. For those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as a Ferrari. Ten years ago, I spent a long time looking for the best Hailwood Millie and believe me this was the beat of the best, hands down.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Update from seller 12.13.2019:

These second generation MHR machines are truly beautiful motorcycles. Whereas the original offering utilizes a fiberglass cover over a stock SS tank, the latter bikes use a tank that is unique to the model. The rest of the bodywork is all MHE, evoking the spirit (and the livery) of the racer. And while the underpinnings are SS items, some performance items such as the Conti exhausts are model specific. The solo seat is a non-race item; in reality it is a rear pillion cover, making this a two-seater and enhancing the usefulness of the bike. But people who lust after a MHR are not concerned with practicality – they want the booming V-twin soundtrack and the waves of torque that have made Ducati victorious and famous. You may not be able to ride with the effortless agility of Mike Hailwood, but you can still rock the livery and the sound while paying homage to the great man with this stunning 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica
Featured Listing March 4, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1971 Norton Dunstall 810 Sleeper

Update 3.17.2020: This Dunstall is now on eBay. Thank you again for supporting the site! -dc

By the early 1970s, if you were a roadracer or a cafe rat with a few extra shillings and a penchant for Nortons, tuner Paul Dunstall’s name was never far from your mind. A retired racer, Dunstall started knocking out performance exhausts for Nortons in his family’s scooter shop, before buying a raft of leftover Norton racing parts and building spec engines for customers. His tweaks were the stuff of legend by the end of the 1960s, and in 1971, Norton commissioned him to build a few factory-tuned bikes around the Commando platform.

1971 Norton Dunstall 810 for sale on eBay

The result was the 125-mph, 70-horsepower 1971 Norton Dunstall 810 Sleeper, a parallel twin monster sporting a tiny fiberglass fuel tank, bored out jugs and bigger cams and carburetors than the stock bike. CycleWorld hustled their tester to the magazine’s first-ever sub-12-second quarter mile. On the street, the bike would knock down the 0-60 run in less than five seconds. Heady stuff at a time when motorcycles were either Dennis Hopper’s Harley Davidson or Brian Wilson’s groovy little Honda.

This 1971 Norton Dunstall 810 Sleeper is a factory-built superbike, not one of the dozens of modified Commandos that followed the factory run. It has had a recent restoration, which included a new steel fuel tank to replace the ethanol-damaged fiberglass original. The steel tank is a great addition if you plan to ride this bike, but it would be a great idea to have the fiberglass unit restored all the same. In its 48 years, the bike hasn’t managed to crack 3,000 miles.

From the seller:

You are looking at a rare 1971 Norton Dunstall 810 Sleeper model. They say that less than five percent of advertised Dunstalls are true factory bikes, rather they are regular Nortons with added Dunstall parts. This is the real deal, an unrestored factory produced bike with 2,100 original miles. It’s in amazing original condition with great patina. It comes with incredible documentation, original bill of sale, correspondence between the original owner and Paul Dunstall, shipping forms, customs forms and more. It really belongs is a Norton collection or a museum as it’s a true time capsule.

The Sleeper model was designed to look like a regular Commando but run circles around them. This one includes the following options verses a regular Sleeper, 810 kit, Mk 4 Cams, a rare Quaife five speed transmission, high performance Dr. Gordon Blair exhaust and an electronic ignition.

The bike was just recommissioned by Jaye Strait of Britech New England, a well known British Bike expert. New carbs, coils, fuel lines, gas tank, etc. The tank was replaced due to ethanol having its way with the original fiberglass one. The new steel tank was painstakingly modified to look like the original, including reproducing the original decals and rear tank mounts. The original which is included can be repaired but we decided to go with steel for riding the bike but keep the original for collecting. The bike runs great pulls like a race horse smoothly through all gears and idles beautifully once warmed up. It’s very entertaining to ride for an almost fifty-year-old bike. However, if you are going to ride it new tires are needed as the set on the bike is very old.

I’m happy to answer any questions and supply more photos. I will also work with your shipping company, but you are responsible for shipping. No low ball offers or tire kickers please.

The bike is located in Concord, NH. If early English monsters are your thing, it’d be tough to find a cooler one. Email Scott directly with any questions: schermerhornscott1@gmail.com

Featured Listing: 1971 Norton Dunstall 810 Sleeper
Featured Listing February 22, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1979 Honda CBX

What’s cooler than a steel-framed classic motorcycle powered by an air-cooled inline six? In the literal sense, almost anything, as no matter how many fins you cast into the block, six 166-cc pistons slamming up and down at 9,000 rpm produce rather a lot of heat. In the figurative sense, though, damn near nothing comes anywhere close.

1979 Honda CBX for sale on eBay

The Honda CBX only lasted from 1978 to 1982, but when it bowed in ’78 it was the fastest production bike there was, and reviewers raved about how much better it went than the next-best CB900F. One reviewer said that even though the CBX was more expensive, it represented the better bargain as the dynamics were good enough to outweigh the cost difference. With 105 horsepower from the big six and a 140-mph top end, the numbers were absolutely eye watering, at a time when 80 horsepower was considered just fine. Even with a 600lb wet weight — gargantuan by today’s values, and unthinkable for anything sporting — the bike wasn’t that much heavier than its four-cylinder competition.

This 1979 Honda CBX is in better-than-showroom condition, having only covered 9,000 miles over the last 41 years. It has been owned by a Honda dealer, and two fastidious owners in the last 20 years, who kept it immaculately clean. The seller went through it thoroughly, but says he only refinished a few small parts. The gorgeous shine you see everywhere else is factory original.

From the eBay listing:

1979CBX: As close to new as possible with no “patina”. The original owner was a Honda Dealership owner. The owner passed away after putting 8,533 miles on it in 5 years. It took 20 years for his estate to be settled and the bike was auctioned in 2005. The second owner had it for 15 years (mostly sat in his living room) and put about 500 miles on it before selling it to me in July 2019.

I disassembled the bike and performed the following: Replaced the wheel bearings and seals, replaced the steering head bearings and dust seals, rebuilt the brake calipers and master cylinders using all Honda NOS parts. Replaced all of the brake lines with Spiegler stainless steel lines. Replaced the 630 drive chain with Honda NOS chain (continuous with no mater link) in a sealed bag with instructions and a new chain wear decal. Replaced the tires with Avon Roadriders. Replaced the shocks with Hagon adjustables. Rebuilt the forks with Honda NOS seals, o’rings and Race-Tech springs. The carburetors were restored by Old School Carbs. Replaced the fuel petcock with Honda NOS assembly.

There were only four parts that I refinished-side stand, center stand, brake master cylinder and battery side bracket. The only part that I re-chromed was the rear axle nut. The front fender, fuel tank, tailpiece, side covers and chain guard are original. The seat is original. All of the electrics except the battery are original.

Included is the original operator’s manual velcro’d to the right side cover. Also the complete original tool kit is in its bag next to the battery box.

I had planned to ride the bike after I completed my work. I have changed my mind as it is too nice for me to risk it. Please call if you have any questions or need pictures of specific areas. Paul 314-600-0197

As the specter of inline six motorcycles fades further into history, bikes like the CBX are moving up in the world with collectors. Apart from the alarming speeds they can achieve, they sound like a Formula 1 car at full chat, and cut a wide swath in person. Finding one even close to this nice is going to be increasingly hard.

Featured Listing: 1979 Honda CBX
Featured Listing February 20, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica

This Featured Listing is part of the The Bob Benyo Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, Bob! -dc

This 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica makes as much of a statement today as it did when it rolled out of Minato City 37 years ago. In ‘83, the bikes announced what those who followed AMA Superbike racing already knew: That Japanese bikes were about to take over road racing for good, with the help of a brave, skinny Californian kid named Eddie Lawson. Today, this bike’s impeccable, unrestored condition sets it apart.

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR for sale one eBay

With Steady Eddie aboard, the KZ1000Rs stormed to the AMA Superbike title in 1981 and 1982, and the ‘83 ELR looked like it was an eyelash from the bike that did the deed.

The bikini fairing, boxy tank, deep-dished seat and ducktail rear cowl were lifted right from the 1982 GPz1100, but the unmistakable lime green and electric blue livery were all racebike. Gold wheels finished off the look, and a Kerker pipe and reservoir shocks meant it sounded fierce and handled its weight and power with aplomb. 

This one has fewer than 1,800 miles on the clock, and has had a minor refresh but is otherwise as it was purchased. The clutch is new, the carbs have been freshly cleaned and painted, and couple cosmetic pieces were swapped out for NOS parts. Otherwise, it’s all original. As a bonus, it will be supplied with a set of NOS bodywork, from the fenders to the tank.

From the eBay listing

1983 Kawasaki kz1000r Eddie Lawson superbike replica near perfect all original! Multiple award winning with all “NOS” body parts coming out of my private collection.

Multiple award winner just won 1st place best original Japanese bike. The judges from the pebble beach event were blown away at how perfect she was.

This bike underwent minor clean up/refresh at my shop globe motorcycles limited. I used a full set of “NOS” body work so very hard to find i only have 2 full sets left. I swaped out the engine side covers with “NOS” units and new OEM gaskets and seals.

I have had this bike for several years and it has been the elr that i ride. She looks and rides as good as she did back in 1983.

The engine:
Serial number kzt00je041780 the engine is the original that came with the bike. I get asked this question all the time, why are’nt the ELR engine numbers ever close or similar to the frame numbers? The engine numbers have a specific range they must fall into for 1982 and 1983 kz1000r’s. This is the engine that came with the bike when she was new and is in the correct serial number range for a late 1983 elr.

With only 1789 miles it the engine ran great when i got her but i opted for her to run a bit better since i wanted to ride her. I installed a new hd clutch, all new OEM seals, pushrod, and gaskets (its just what i do). The engine itself has never been painted so no paint whent where it does not belong. The engine side covers were replaced with “NOS” units, very hard to find.

The carburetors were completely disassembled ultrasonically cleaned, and painted just as the factory did, resembled and synchronized. I re-jetted them with #132 main jets and raised the jet neddle with one washer to aid in running better with the competition baffle.

The frame:

The frame and swing arm are all original paint and look better then any of the other original elr’s i have had.
The tires have been replace with Dunlop k400’s (k300’s are not available). The grips, levers, mirrors, , end caps are all “NOS”.
The seat is all original with no blemishes.

The Kerker KR exhaust is the original unit that i had re coated to the original kal*gard finish and installed with OEM copper gaskets. The Kerker side emblem, the hanger bracket/bushing assembly, and the large competition baffle are all NOS ($500). The fuel tank, petcock, fuel guage sender, fuel cap, side covers, front cowl, rear cowl, front fender, tail light, wind shield and rubber seal, emblems, and associated hardware are all “NOS over $7500 worth of unobtainium. A modest amount of NOS/OEM hardware was used.

Tell your wife this is a great investment that will only go up in value unlike her shoe and handbag collection :). So here is your chance to own the best example of 1 of the 750ish 1983 Kawasaki kz1000r Eddie Lawson superbike replica’s ever built for north America. It is as close to when it came out of the crate with the exception of the Dunlop k400 tires and a very small amount of patina on the wheels. I will refinish the wheels to exact OEM specs for the new caretaker at my cost if he or she prefers “NOS” looking wheels (a very expensive process). I will for sure cry when it sells but i am blessed to have a few more ELR’s.

I have owned more then 20 ELR ‘s in the 15 years and have the largest inventory of ELR parts so bid with confidence. This bike will not disappoint. Please feel free to contact me with any questions 954-816-0806 Bob. Please come see her first if you have any doubts. I have been riding, racing, fixing, restoring, and collecting special bikes since graduating from American motorcycle institute “AMI” in Daytona beach Florida.

This ELR belongs in a museum so don’t miss out. I restored and preserved more bikes then i can count and have satisfied owners around the world with giant smiles on there faces every time they look at what the bought. The last 2 ELR s i sold (a 1982 and a 1983) went to Japan. They both had NOS body parts on all original bikes with low miles and sold for $28,500 and $36,000 and just not a perfect as this one.

The original tool kit, owners manual, and 2 keys come with the bike. The first buyer to hit the buy from the 2 ELR’s i have for sale will get my autographed custom painted 1983 bell helmet. The second one will end up with a custom painted 1983ish bell helmet that we will have to send to Eddie and wait for him to sign it.

Lets keep e-bay a great place to do business and only bid if you are planning to buy it.

$1000 deposit and the balance within 3 business days in cash or bank wire. I can store the bike for a few months and help arrange shipping

With ELRs getting rarer by the day, and NOS bodywork essentially unobtanium, we imagine it would be impossible to find another one like this. It’s a collector’s dream and an absolute museum piece. 

Featured Listing: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica
Ducati February 20, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati MHR 900 from the Edinger Collection 

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

David Edinger has blessed us recently with a raft bikes from his gorgeous collection, and this 1985 Ducati 900 Mike Hailwood Replica is literally a shining example of David’s impeccable taste. As he notes in the description that you will read below, this one is not the coveted Mille version, but the displacement matches Hailwood’s racer.

As pretty as it is, the 1985 Ducati 900 MHR is simply a 900SS with a sexy fairing and paintwork. With about 75 horsepower on tap and plenty of torque to go around, they make punchy, pleasant street bikes, but they certainly won’t set any point-to-point records.

In ‘84, the bike got a new frame, Marzocchi forks and redesigned engine cases to accommodate an electric starter. As well as marking Mike Hailwood’s 1978 Isle of Man TT win, the 1985 MHRs marked the last bevel-drive bikes and the last Ducatis to be built without Cagiva’s influence.

This 1985 MHR 900 has been treated to a fastidious restoration in the hands of Edinger, who is its third owner. It started life in Japan, before it emigrated to New Zealand. Edinger bought it several years ago and rode it for a while before it went under the knife.

From the seller:

This is a 1985 900 Mike Hailwood Replica. This was the transitional year with some 85 models being Mille’s. However true fans of Mike the Bike know he rode the 900. The bike I believe originally was purchased in Japan and then purchased by the second owner in New Zealand. The bike has ridden for one lap on the infamous Nurburgring in Germany and later rode around the Isle of Mann in 2007 for the TT Centenary. The bike has 55,203 KM’s or 34,301 miles and has new Metzler’s.
I shipped the bike from New Zealand to Indianapolis where after I rode the bike as received for several years. After moving to Austin, I tasked Revival Cycles to do a ground up restoration.
I have every receipt that came with the bike and a clear title.
There is small paint scratch on the left hand fairing showing in the picture. The paint job alone was $6,000. VIN # is 7A857001197906193

The bike is located in Texas
Asking price is $30,000
Edinger.david@gmail.com317-908-2573
David Edinger

The results of the restoration are mesmerizing. Although this isn’t the fastest or sweetest handling Ducati ever made, it’s certainly beautiful and rare, and is emblematic of a time when the brand’s future was far from certain, but its past accomplishments could not be disputed.

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati MHR 900 from the Edinger Collection