Posts by tag: air cooled

Kawasaki June 26, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 Mk II AMA Superbike

Update 8.3.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

RSBFS is pretty strict when it comes to what makes it on the site. And while we generally shy away from race-prepped bikes, this one got the attention of the entire RSBFS staff. It spoke to us, and we believe that it will speak to our readers in the same way. Because this 1980 KZ1000 AMA Superbike is a terrific specimen of the way things were. In the days when going professional racing in the US meant starting wtih a street-based machine, the KZ1000 was about as high-tech as you were likely to find. From there you did what you could to
address the flexi-frame geometry, the teeny-tiny brakes, and the limitation of the air-cooled, two valve motor. Aerodynamics for motorcycles was a new art and really didn’t exist for the masses, save for the occasional bikini fairing. The “standard” was as close to a sporting motorcycle as most manufacturers offered, even though they were a far cry from the race-bike-with-lights that you can find at your dealership today. And if you like the way your Kawyamhonzuki GSXCBR1ZX carves corners today – just like a race bike – you can look back at dinosaurs like this and be very, very thankful that competition improves the breed.

Featured Listing: 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 Mk II AMA Superbike

Starting life out as a 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 – before being prepped for a life on the track – this example has few ties back to the original bike that spawned the silhouette. Both the frame and the braced swing arm are modified right out of the Yoshimura heyday. Suspension has been updated to better handle the rigors of racing, including a pair of trick Fox “piggyback” shocks. The engine and electrics have been converted over to race bike usage, which means that there may be some mystery in terms of exactly what was done. The charging system appears to be total loss, with magnetos feeding the spark and no need for a large battery thanks to the lighting delete. Note the slimmed-down profile of the crankcase ends; removal of the end-mounted components (such as alternator) and custom aluminum plates narrow this critical dimension, allowing for greater lean angle before hard parts touch down. The smoothbore carbs with awesome looking velocity stacks complete the transformation from streetable standard to no holds barred racer. Neat custom touches abound, including the oil cooler installation mount (with braided steel lines, naturally), the aforementioned crank end plates, and the rear caliper bracket. The exhaust is another Yosh product, and tucks the pipes high and tight for maximum cornering clearance. The cockpit remains relatively stock looking, if you ignore the doctored speedo.

From the seller:
1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 Mk II AMA Superbike as it rolled off the track in 1990

This example defines the word “untouched”. Formerly raced by the late Dr. David Kieffer racer #122 of “Roughstock Racing” in AMA Superbike. What you see here is current photos of it’s unrestored condition including original paint and complete bike is as it rolled off the race track for the last time at Steamboat Springs Colorado Vintage races in 1990.
Features include:

-Race Prepared by Roughstock Racing
-Pops Yoshimura Frame and Braced Swingarm- No VIN# being race only frame
-Engine to frame bracing through Countershaft
-ARD Magneto ignition
-EPM Mags- unrestored 18” Rear & 19” front-typical surface marks
-29mm Mikuni Smoothbore Carbs
-Yoshimura 4/1 header with Velasco end section
-AP Lockheed front Calipers
-Grimeca rear Caliper
-Fox Racing Shocks and Koni set in spares
-Spare wheels with original rain tires- Sun USA front 19” x 2.75” DID rear 18” x 3.5”
-Small assortment of electrical spares
-Full gearing assortment
-Spare front rotors

More from the seller:
Engine fires up easy and sounds good. It is believed to be a big bore with a close ratio transmission but I cannot verify details. Any plans to use it for other than display and firing up should be preceded by a full teardown. Bike was in dry storage for many years after last race and was gone through for inspection of cams, carbs and basic components before being fired up again in 2015 and has been fired on occasion.

More from the seller:
Bike is located in Allentown, PA

Price: $25,000

Proceeds from the sale of this bike will go towards the Quarterley Racing / On Track Development program that supports four Moto America Junior Cup riders in Kawasaki Ninja 400’s. The team is headed by Dale Quarterley, former AMA Superbike Kawasaki rider. Look us up on Facebook.

The history on this bike is certainly interesting, and entertaining. The late Dr. David Kieffer – the former owner and racer of the bike – was a board certified orthopedic surgeon, but also a also a motorcycling enthusiast. He amassed an impressive collection of bikes during his lifetime, and actively raced as an AMA Pro in the Superbike class as well as the Colorado-based Motorcycle Roadracing Association (MRA). Lest you think this man was simply a rich doctor playing motorcycle racer, Dr. Kieffer was a fierce competitor and actually raced an RC30 in endurance events prior to it being officially homologated for AMA racing (at which time he entered the bike in Superbike events). That shows impressive commitment, but it was his off track activities that make him an inspirational figure. Being an orthopedic surgeon immersed in a sport where physical trauma is common, the good doctor not only raced against the competition but he also performed surgery on them (Fred Merkel, Scott Russell, Aaron Yates and Ricky Johnson, to name a few). According to some sources, Dr. Kieffer would provide medical aid to competitors who could not otherwise afford treatment (i.e. no insurance). As a result, he was nominated to be the AMA Sportsman of The Year in 1986.

Dr. Kieffer went on to contribute to medicine in motorsports in varying ways through his association with the AMA and FIM (including acting as Chief Medical Officer for FIM events such as MotoGP), and he left behind an impressive legacy of good. He also left behind an sizeable collection of machines – including this very period correct Kawasaki KZ1000 Superbike. The history is moving and significant. But Dr. Kieffer’s good works did not end with his passing. Proceeds of the sale of this bike will aid in young rider development under the guidance of road racing superstar Dale Quarterly, improving US talent into Moto America with the goal of feeding riders into the international scene. This is an amazing opportunity to acquire a rare and significant racer with history, and contribute to road racing in America at the same time. Check out the cool historic pics as well as all the recent shots. Then give Bob and call and strike a deal. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 Mk II AMA Superbike
Kawasaki June 25, 2019 posted by

Big Green Monster: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR

Used to be factories could build race replicas by throwing on a garland sticker, some reservoir shocks, a rorty pipe and a loud paintjob. Just basic mods and some raucous pigments got you looking a lot like Eddie Lawson back in 1983, though getting near his lap times still required a pile of special parts, and just a dollop of otherworldly talent. 

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R for sale on eBay

Kawasaki celebrated Eddie’s pre-500cc grand prix 1981 AMA Superbike championship in high style, churning out about 1,000 examples of the wild 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R. The engine came straight out of the regular KZ1000, albeit with a few tweaks. The bodywork was from the mighty GPz 1100, while the seat and bars were near-takeoffs from Lawson’s race-ready mount. 

The lovely thing about the Eddie Lawson Replica is that there are no hyper-performance parts to get in the way of everyday rideability. The big mill is air-oil cooled to keep temperatures in check as simply as possible. It also sports a roller bearing crank assembly to insure magnificent longevity. 

This ELR has been ridden, and it shows, but that is part of its charm. The nicks, rubs and touch-up paint show someone did their best to do right by the bike’s namesake, racking up just over 16,000 miles in the process. Nonoriginal parts are few and far between, though some lovely Ohlins rear shocks have made their way to the party. 

From the eBay listing

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R – Eddie Lawson Replica – Factory Race Replica

This is an extremely original example of the limited production, special edition superbike commemorating Eddie Lawson (1981-82 Superbike Champion and four-time 500cc World Champion). Less than 1,000 ever produced, with some sources citing only 750 having been made (www.motorcycleclassics.com). When we first saw this bike at the Barber Vintage Motorcycle Museum it made an immediate impression, and we knew we had to have one. Wearing infamous Kawasaki racing green paint, the KZ1000R is powered by a 998cc double-overhead camshaft inline four. The Kerker 4-into-1 is factory included.

This motorcycle came from a high-end collector and has been well-preserved and well-loved. As far as we can discern the paint is all original, as are nearly all of the components on the vehicle. The non-original items include the fairing decals and brand new Ohlins rear shocks. All electric components function, as do all of the gauges and dash indication lights.

We have completed the following maintenance items:

• Fresh oil change.
• We rebuilt the petcock.
• Steering bearings were just replaced.
• New drive chain.

We’d like to disclose all of the imperfections in writing for full transparency. Please refer to all photos, as well as the additional photos and videos linked below:

• There is touch up paint on the back of the front fender.
• The mirror mount on the front brake master cylinder (right-hand side) has material missing but still functions.
• Scratches on the underside of the tank with light dings on other parts of the body.
• There is a light abrasion on the back side of the right fork.
• Small tears along the edge of the seat.

Clean title in hand. A must-have bike for the collection that you wont be afraid to ride!

$22,000.00 – Accepting Offers

Please see all videos and additional pictures.
www.burnupcompany.com

At $22,000 buy-it-now, the seller knows what they have. While the ELR might not be the highest-performance race rep ever built, it might be the most iconic, and it celebrates a true American icon to boot.

Big Green Monster: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR
Moto Guzzi June 24, 2019 posted by

La Scelta: 2001 Moto Guzzi V11 Sport

Going Moto Guzzi has always been a choice. These v-twins are an interesting alternative to the high-strung offerings of those other Italian marques. Character is plentiful, as is an abundance of low RPM torque. Quality is high, at both the component as well as the build level. Performance is adequate – but far more relaxed than your usual hypercycle. Think of modern Moto Guzzis as a BMW boxer with a funny engine configuration and Italian flair and you will get pretty close to the mark.

2001 Moto Guzzi V11 Sport for sale on eBay

The V11 Sport model is dominated by the engine. A 90 degree twin with cylinders that sit across the bike, the nearly 1100cc mill is tuned for torque rather than outright horsepower. With an engine like this, who needs bodywork? And while the bike retains traditional (and low maintenance) air cooling, there have been several concessions to technology. Most likely these came about due to EPA regulations, but let’s ignore that and simply enjoy how well the bike breathes throughout the rev range thanks to 4-valve heads, and let’s revel in the cold start capabilities and decent mileage thanks to Magneti Marelli computerized fuel injection. These pieces almost seem wasted on something as arcane as this throw back, but they are well integrated pieces that actually improve what is already a great riding bike.

From the seller:
Pristine V11 Sport. Unless there’s a new one in a crate in Italy then this is the lowest mileage V11 in existence – 1076!!. Taken out 2 to 3 times a year for shorts runs just to make sure everything is working perfectly. Absolutely perfect paint and mechanics – truly no scratches or imperfections.

Runs , stops and handles like the new bike it is. I bought it basically just to admire the fantastic Italian styling and colors but the motor is surprisingly strong with wonderful sounds. I’m slowly thinning my collection of high end low mileage collectable bikes. The one is truly the best. Buy with complete confidence.

These V11 Sports have gained in interest over the years. Moto Guzzi’s fits and starts and changes of ownership placed the brand – and the history – under considerable pressure. But somehow the bikes retained key Guzzi trademarks, and the key Guzzi feel. These are solid machines that do most things well. There is no doubt that the earlier LeMans and V7 machines are the most sought after, but even De Tomaso and later era bikes are gaining in popularity. Pricing remains relatively low for the newer examples, but condition and mileage generally vary wildly.

Many, many Guzzis are ridden to extreme; these bikes have an enviable reputation for longevity. Today’s bike is the opposite; this one has a scant 1,000 miles and change on the clocks (!). Treated more like a ultra rare homologation racer, this V11 Sport has barely been ridden, and appears to be in good shape. It is located in sunny California, but looks to have spent most of its life indoors. If I’m to nitpick I spy a bit of what looks like corrosion in some of the pictures, which would be likely if the bike is in a beach community. Ridden or not, sea air can do a number on most metals. Unfortunately, that makes the appearance conflict a bit with the ultra low miles. Perhaps that is not an issue with someone looking to ride. We do see these bikes come through now and again – so they are not totally rare – but this is certainly the lowest mileage V11 Sport we have posted. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Suzuki June 23, 2019 posted by

Blunt Force Trauma: 1990 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

For a flagship superbike, the Suzuki GSX-R1100 looked relatively primitive on paper: oil/air cooled engine, twin cradle frame, five-speed gearbox… But the sledgehammer personality of the early GSX-R1100 makes it more collectible today, next to comparatively polished in-era competition from Honda and Yamaha. It may not have been the most sophisticated bike, but it did the job, and the engine is famed for being durable and responsive to tuning, with a wealth of go-fast expertise out there for anyone looking to build a big, bruising retro sportbike. It’s a handsome beast as well, with old-school looks and more tasteful graphics than the later Gixxers, combined with more modern running gear like those 17″ wheels that allow for riders to fit modern, grippy rubber.

The air and oil-cooled inline four was always the star of the show. It has dual overhead cams and sixteen valves, but stuck with what is basically air cooling, which does seem like a strange choice. But in the wild days of the 1980s, motorcycle designers were experimenting with all sorts of technology to maximize power and minimize weight. Japanese sportbikes were suffering from no deficiency in the former department, but weight was still a bit of an issue. So in developing the various GSX-Rs, Suzuki took a page out of Colin Chapman’s book and decided that keeping things simple meant fewer parts to fail, less of them to weigh the bike down, and a whole type of fluid the bike wouldn’t need. Namely: coolant.

To keep the bike operating within the appropriate temperature range, Suzuki employed a high-capacity oil pump, a dedicated oil circuit for the cylinder head, and oil jets for the bottom of the pistons. The system was dubbed “SACS” for Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System, and it featured on the Gixxer lineup from the bike’s introduction until 1993. The GSX-R1100K introduced in 1989 bumped displacement to 1127cc from the original bike’s 1052cc and featured a set of 38mm Mikuni “Slingshot” semi-flat slide carburetors for a claimed 143hp and 75lb-ft of torque. Compared to today’s cutting edge superbikes, the GSX-R1100’s 462lb dry weight is still pretty portly and this version of the bike wasn’t especially successful in international racing, but the bike’s fat powerband meant the bike was a highway blaster par excellence and it was a popular choice for drag racing and all-around hooliganism here in the US.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

11,225 ORIGINAL miles, bike is in exceptional condition for a 29 year old machine. Untouched, original and exceptionally clean, but not perfect. Bike has been garaged since new. I had not started it or ridden it in about a year. I installed a new battery and drained the fuel bowls and it runs like new. Title is in my name and there are no back fees on registration.  Please feel free to ask me any questions.

Bidding on this clean, original example is up to $7,100.00 with several days left on the auction. This is one of my favorite sportbikes of the period, and this one looks like the perfect candidate for someone who wants a collector they can actually ride: condition appears to be good, but not perfect, and miles are low, but high enough to encourage the new owner add a few more. Suzuki sold lots of these when they were new, but very few remain in anything approaching collectible condition.

-tad

Blunt Force Trauma: 1990 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale
Bimota June 16, 2019 posted by

Air Male – 2008 Bimota DB5R

Happy Father’s Day to all once and future Dads !

Emerging from the shadows of bankruptcy, Bimota introduced a supersport based on Ducati’s air cooled dual-spark engine, penned by Tamburrini disciple Sergio Robbiano.  This second generation DB5R has the 1078cc engine, premium appointments, and an exciting and award-winning design.

2008 Bimota DB5R for sale on eBay

The core of the DB5R is Ducati’s 1078cc L-twin, with Marelli fuel injection tuned for Bimota’s exhaust good for 95 hp and a nice 76 ft.-lbs. torque.  The lines of the chro-moly trellis frame echo through the seat sub-frame and fabricated swingarm.  Frame connectors show off Bimota’s CNC machining as the bodywork and accessories showcase their carbon fiber technique.  Premium Öhlins and Brembo components complete the luxurious but sporty picture.

Straight out of Silicon Valley, this DB5R is engaging even with the signs of a minor low side, the seat console more easily corrected than the scratched engine case.  Not many miles but the new owner might be in for belts and tires.  The aftermarket mirrors aren’t a bad match but stock would be my choice, plus a little reflector-ectomy.  The first order of business would be more pictures.  Comments from the eBay auction:

Original owner, bought from Scuderia West SF ( no longer sells Bimota but they can service it ) and original cost was around 40K.

It’s a beautiful and great winding road machine, but selling it as I don’t have much time to ride, and feel sorry for the machine.

Only rode casually around the Saratoga Mountain.

4046.8 Miles

Ducati 1100DS engine ( any Ducati shop can service it )

Updated with STM slipper clutch, Carbon mirrors ( so you can see the back )

‘DB5R’ number plate

Minor scratches on tail cover and engine cover. Repaired areas on edge of tail cover.

‘Service Required’ indicator always on ( the dealer could not figure out how to turn it off )

Comes with the owner’s manual, racing stand, and a battery tender.

The DB5R reviewed as a fine handler even if the dual-spark 1100 wasn’t too exotic.  A pair of tank pads might be in order, as the winged tank was maybe a little too skinny for a good grip.  Each Bimota model has its place on the peacock – rhinoceros spectrum, and the DB5R seems to be right in the middle, with a very together design built on a modern but uncomplicated powertrain.  With just a few hundred sprinkled over the globe each year, you won’t see yourself coming and going.  Just right to ride to the bike show, collect a ribbon, and ride home.

-donn

Air Male – 2008 Bimota DB5R
Ducati June 12, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1993 Ducati 900SL Superlight #826

6.23.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Everyone has their personal definition of what’s essential and what’s superfluous, but for many, the early 1990’s Ducati SuperSports had everything you needed and nothing you didn’t.  The 900SL Superlight had one less seat and several kg.’s less weight thanks to some carbon appointments and Marvic composite alloy wheels.  RSBFS reader Steve has similarly added nothing to his Superlight that isn’t required, but made a few choice upgrades.

Ducati introduced the 900SS in 1990, and though it was a solid seller, Ducati took the opportunity to make a limited edition.  Planning to release 500, the factory bowed to the market and eventually produced over 900 Mk. 1 examples, just a couple of hundred destined for our shores.  The air cooled 904cc L-twin had newer Mikuni carburettors and scored 78 hp and 62 ft.-lbs. torque.  Upside-down Showa fork and rear monoshock were both fully adjustable on the Superlight.  Floating rotors differentiate the 320mm Brembo front brakes, with Gold Line four piston calipers.  Innovative Marvic wheels used an aluminum rim and magnesium centers.  Carbon mudguards and alloy swingarm walked the weight reduction walk.

Steve has eased the 904’s breathing with a K&N air filter and Staintune exhausts.  A Corbin seat firms things up for the rider, and braided lines do the same for braking performance.  Cosmetics are excellent and belie the 16,589 miles.  A few not-installed ugrades and NOS parts are included as Steve notes in his comments:

1993 Ducati Superlight #826

This is the cherished Superlight MK1, of which only 952 were made worldwide, 200 for the U.S. market. If you’re familiar with this bike and model year, you’ll know that it’s meant to be well ridden and properly cared for as there are not many left in this condition. The bike is in great condition and still has many original parts, unless otherwise noted.

The bike is located in Northern California, always garaged and covered. The previous owner was a collector located in Texas. The bike was serviced by AMS Ducati out of Dallas, TX during that time. No significant modifications have been made, keeping it in original condition. Some minor changes are as follows:

Open airbox (see photo)
Staintune Slip-on Exhaust
Braided brake lines
Yoyodyne Clutch Slave
Corbin Seat
Motobatt Battery

Comes with a few extras:

OEM Blank Key
NOS Handgrips
NOS Seat
Upgraded CA Cycleworks Coils (Unused, not installed)

Also have some performance parts that will be made available to the buyer as well. Ohlins shock and FCR41 carbs, not included with sale.

Asking: $13,000 USD 

Going on twenty-five years old, the Superlight had the friendly handling of the SuperSport line, but with nicer appointments and a number on the triple tree.  Though second fiddle to the 916 back in the day, the Superlight’s tractable power and limited numbers have made it a very sought after SuperSport.  Steve’s has been nicely preserved and wants only a caring new owner.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1993 Ducati 900SL Superlight #826
Laverda June 6, 2019 posted by

The Other Woman – 1979 Laverda Formula 500

Known here mostly for bigger GT’s, Laverda tried to tap the European mid-size market in the 1970’s with a 350 and 500cc twin.  A single marque race series was developed to drum up interest, pre-dating the IROC and BMW Boxer Cup.  Surprisingly, the four year series generated only 200 or so racers, making it a rare bird indeed.

1979 Laverda Formula 500 Mk. 1 for sale on eBay

Laverda knew their way around a parallel twin and the DOHC motor with uprated cams and 10.5:1 pistons delivered 52 hp.  It has a six speed transmission with a tall first and closely spaced ratios befitting a racer.  Marzocchi provided forks and dual rear shocks, with Brembo supplying dual front disks, most surviving because of the requirements of the race specification.  Though a full fairing was added, road-worthy lighting and electrics were removed, keeping the dry weight to 338 lbs.  Menani clip-ons had a forward offset to stretch the cockpit as did the sand-cast alloy rearsets.

Though both Formula 500’s previously seen on RSBFS were overseas, this one was re-commissioned at Moto Borgotaro in Brooklyn and currently resides in SoCal.  Evidently this Formula was restored early on by the late Mike Waugh, owner of Montydons  in Britain and Laverda luminary.  It bears the bumps and scrapes of many moves but appears complete and correct.  A replacement for the cracked windscreen might have to be custom made but is very do-able.  Comments from the eBay auction:

This very Formula 500 is one of the two Laverdas pictured on the cover of the Brooklands book,”Laverda 500 Twins 1977-1983″.  The book is a compilation of reviews, company materials and magazine articles, one of which features this motorcycle.  The bike belonged to Mike Waugh, owner of MontyDons, a UK specialist restorer of Laverda 500’s.  Waugh was well-known in the Laverda community.   Quoting from the article written by John Colley, “Little is known of this Mark 1’s history.  It was discovered in Wales after being ‘laid up’ for many years, and is one of the very few [Mark 1’s] brought to the UK”.  Even fewer were shipped to the States.  Mike restored the bike.

In the close up of the photo of the Formula 500 Mark 1 on the bike’s cover and again in the article inside, note the additional holes drilled in the faring at the upper and lower bracket mounts.  These correspond exactly with the bike, as does the license plate mount and orange wheels.

This bike, identified by VIN in its entry registration, went to the Isle of Man in 1999.  It is not however, one of the six Formula500 (Mark II’s) Slaters entered in the 1980 Formula 2 TT, winning the Team Prize.   Included in the sale are the original race number 124 decals that were on the bike at the Isle of Man.  The decals were removed and preserved.
An extremely scarce set of original factory special tools for the Laverda 500 comes with the bike, as does the original shop manual, Brooklands book and original one-sheet marketing print.
I bought the bike in late 2014 from a PA collector who had owned (but never started) the Laverda for many years.  Soon after, I brought the bike to respected Laverda specialist Motoborgotaro, in New York City.   Peter Boggia thoroughly inspected, serviced and recommissioned – but did not restore – the bike.  The last time the bike was run, was in October 2015.

No sense challenging DMV with a time machine like this, it really belongs in the vintage races.  Reviewed as more 250 than 500 sized, a suitably classic rider might want to try it on before committing to purchase.  This could be a total gem with not much more than a large tube of elbow grease, though track preparation would be more involved.  Either way the Formula 500 might not be practical but sure is easy on the eyes.

-donn

The Other Woman – 1979 Laverda Formula 500
Bimota May 19, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio Azzurro

When it comes to motorcycle manufacturers, none seem to offer the combination of performance, artwork and mystique than iconic builder Bimota. Originally known for their frames and eventual frame kits for various engine makers, Bimota made the leap to become a full-blown motorcycle manufacturer utilizing Ducati power plants exclusively (with the exception of the ill-fated, in-house Vdue project). And by standardizing on a family of engines, Bimota was able to hyper-extend their focus on the art of performance. This maniacal frenzy of artistic and mechanical expression is best seen on the lesser-clothed machines – and this rare DB6 Delirio Azzurro is the perfect case study.

Featured Listing: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio Azzurro

All in all, there are seven different variants of the DB6 platform. All enjoy the same gorgeous trestle frame with aluminum side plates, Brembo binders, Marzocchi suspension (Ohlins for the R bikes) and air cooled, Ducati desmo engine. The earliest of the models – including today’s Delirio Azzurro – utilized the fuel injected 992cc dual spark mill, while later DB6 models were uprated to the 1100 (actually 1078cc) format. The Azzurro is one of the more rare versions of this already rare bike, offering some exclusivity due to the graphics and purpose. As the story goes, Bimota created this version of the DB6 as a tribute to the Italian soccer team for winning the World Cup. Football – or soccer as it is known in the US – is a very big deal throughout most of Europe, South America and Australia. World Cup winners are heroes in their home country, and being Italian the 2006 World Cup winners received a special edition Bimota. A total of 23 bikes were produced in this striking livery with a only a few being offered to the public. Grazie!!

From the seller:
This bike is one of 23 ever made and was given as a gift from the Italian government to one of the 2006 Italian World Cup championship players. A New York collector bought this bike and stored it in his climate controlled garage. I purchased the bike from him when he was relocated back to Europe and have displayed it in my office in my home ever since. This bike has less than 1000 miles on it. It is number 8 of 23.

Price: $ 25,000
Contact: tonybosi@gmail.com
or 201.206.4572

Artfully executed from frame to swing arm, polished and anodized to show striking contrast, fitted with top-notch components throughout with performance on tap thanks to light weight and Ducati torque, the DB6 Delirio Azzurra is a sharper, crisper, rarer Monster. It retains all of the rideability traits of the naked bike – upright seating, low weight and simply less clutter and farkles, but loses none of its potency when the going gets twisty. With miles of ground clearance, compliant suspension, boat-anchor brakes and exclusivity that only a hand-built, limited production machine can bring this is the bike you want to be on to show the world you’ve made it in style.

With fewer than 1,000 miles on the analog/digital clocks, this particular example has spent more time being seen than being ridden. But when you have artwork that looks like this, one might just have to reconsider the other side of the equation. Certainly the value with any collector piece such as this relates to condition, and lower miles simply equate to the perception of better condition. Mechanically sympathetic readers might cringe at “hangar queens,” but there are many facets to the hobby; the artistry that goes into a Bimota makes for collector appreciation even while static. This uber-rare Bimota is looking for a new home. If you are a riding fan, a Bimota fan, a Ducati dual spark desmo fan, a football fan (or even a soccer fan), or a fan of all things Italiano, this is something you should be checking out. Interested readers can give Tony a ping via phone or email. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio Azzurro