Posts by tag: air cooled

Ducati January 8, 2020 posted by

CitiSmart – 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE

Arguably the pick of the SportClassic litter, the 2006 Paul Smart Limited Edition sacrificed practicality for the cool of a teal-framed monoposto.  This NYC example has moderate miles but is super clean.

2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for sale on eBay

Ducati’s air-cooled dual spark engine was originally used in the Monster, but its relatively plumbing-free presentation made it perfect for the vintage looking SportClassics.  92 hp on tap make it more than a design exercise.  The frame color and fairing harken back to the 1972 Imola winner, and spoked wheels ping appropriately.  Appointments are first rate with big 320mm Brembo disks and Öhlins dampers all around.

Despite city life and 10K-plus miles, this PS looks undamaged and clean enough to put right in the garage.  Even the Termignoni megaphones fit the vintage look well, though a quick spritz on the header pipes would do wonders.  From the eBay auction:

The motorcycle has:
-Termignoni slip on exhaust with ECU
-new clutch pressure plate, springs, and cover
-Motobox fender eliminator and tail light
-frame sliders
– aftermarket oil fill plug
***All original parts that were taken off will come with the bike***
The bike has always been garage kept on a battery tender and a Ducati Performance dust cover.
The major Desmo Service had been done at 7,411 miles. 
The bike has had 4 oil changes since then. I used Motul 300v 15w50.

While a low or no-mile example might push the mid-twenties, this auction shows a starting bid of $18K, just above the original MSRP.  Harder to quantify is the total production of just 2,000, and then considering only 500 or so made it to our shores, a pristine example like this might be worth a second look.

-donn

CitiSmart – 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE
Ducati December 9, 2019 posted by

Touchstone – 1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP

In a rare marketing maneuver, Ducati brought the 900 SS/SP to our shores only, a limited edition with adjustable suspension and carbon eye candy.  This example has been been maintained internally and externally, and looks ready to rumble.

1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP #412 for sale on eBay

The trellis frame which was light and economical to manufacture back then is now a classic Ducati feature, in some years gold or white, but silver for 1995 which goes well with the SP’s aluminum swingarm.  Ditto the air-cooled desmodue, a good air-cooled performer with 84 carbureted ponies, and though the future brought fuel injection and dual plugs, it’s a classically flexible powerplant.  Showa suspension was the big upgrade for the SP, along with carbon mudguards.  The cockpit has occasionally been described as “everything you need, and nothing you don’t”, and it’s the perfect layout for an afternoon on the back roads.

Seeming to be in much better shape than nearly 33K miles would allow, I’d presume a refinishing if not restoration.  The pictures are not super high fidelity, but show no apparent trauma.  A lot of carefully chosen niceties such as factory open airbox, Remus carbon mufflers, new lithium-iron battery – even new footpeg and shift rubbers !  Heads and cylinders were overhauled a few years back making this SP more ready for the long term.  Just a snippet of the comments from the eBay auction:

This motorcycle has been preserved exactly as one would want. Period. I have gone to great lengths to minimize any unnecessary changes that would otherwise compromise what Ducati intended this bike to be. Obviously a blood-red Italian work of art needs nothing in the way of cosmetics, so let well enough alone.

I felt the best use of any improvements would be more of personal expressions such as un- restricting the exhaust to allow the bike to actually sound like a Ducati should with a set of Remus canisters. These match the factory equipped carbon fiber components much better than any others in my opinion. To facilitate the most from the exhaust, I perfectly jetted the carburetors. No flat spots, nor burning eyes, and of course the results are impressive for the torque curve of an already excellent engine.

To welcome more fresh air into the carburetors, I added the Genuine Ducati air-box cover. I’m sure others with hole saws and hack-saw blades get the same results, but I chose OEM whenever possible. As far as the Slave Cylinder, the stock one seemed to lack feel and a clean return. Off it went and was promptly replaced by the excellent unit from Pro Italia. Regarding the braking system, it is what it is. Nobody was impressed when new, the same remains today. I added Ferodo pads at both ends and have felt these are aggressive enough for a spirited run through the curves.

The Supersports served as Ducati’s all-rounder before the Monster came along, and went to work, touring, and to the track without complaint.  This seminal Duc has done some miles but carefully, and been maintained as though it would be in the stable forever.  The ask for a high-mileage machine can always be debated, but at least the “make offer” button is available.

-donn

Touchstone – 1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP
Moto Guzzi November 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport

Update 2.4.2020: This bike has SOLD at Bonhams for $14,950. Congratulations to all parties! -dc

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

If ever there was a bike to show up to a cruise night on, surely the 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport is at or near the top of the list. The pundits all say it is the defining cafe racer shape, leaving the factory in the era before two-foot long license plate holders and 10,000 candlepower turn signals crept in to defile more modern machines’ lines. We tend to agree.

 

The V7 sport is adorned with absolutely nothing extraneous, its thin-tube frame, shapely tank and minimalist bodywork seem to embrace the prominent heads on the unmistakable Guzzi v-twin. Low bars, spoked wheels and twin chrome megaphone pipes complete the purposeful package.

 

Though it was made to celebrate and recall Guzzi’s mid-century racing successes, the V7 provides antiquated performance, with just 70 horsepower running through a very tall gearset. The mill revs quickly, but the eagerness is deceptive. Couple that with slightly scary drum brakes and a right-side-shift transmission and you’ve got a bike more suited to cruise nights than track days.

This 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport is in immaculate condition. All the paint and brightwork have a brilliant shine and appear to be blemish free. The seller says he stores her bikes in a climate-controlled facility on trickle chargers, so there should be no worries about the mechanical condition of the bike.

From the seller:

1973 Moto Guzzi V7

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

If Italian collector sports bikes could be rated for handling, the Motor Guzzi V7 Sport would certainly score a 98 out of 100 points. They can just read your mind in terms of negotiating the curvy roads. If motorcycles were rated for sex appeal the 1973 Motor Guzzi V7 would score 101 out of 100 points. I don’t know of anything that is quite so simply designed yet pleases the visual senses so much. And, yes, this bike has the rare original exhaust pipes with the fins, and the sand cast brake drums (not the ‘not so pretty’ disc brakes) which is just a little frosting on the cake.

This bike is in top flight condition and runs like a Swiss clock, it is kept on a trickle charger at all times. There are no known issues. Just try and find a nicer one!

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.

Check out the pictures and be a little amazed – you are seeing the best!

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

 

Even though it doesn’t fit our traditional fare, we’re in love with this classic Goose, thanks mostly to those magnificent lines. Though it may not be an adept canyon carver, there is a place in any collection for a classic, sexy cruise night machine like this one.

Featured Listing: 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport
Kawasaki November 21, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC

Update 2.4.2020: This bike has SOLD at Bonhams Las Vegas. Congratulations to all parties! -dc

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

 

In the wonderful world of Turbo motorcycles, there are the “make your own” types, and the factory turbo offerings. But this special model, the mighty Kawasaki Z1R TC, not only blurs the lines between the two camps, it is also the very first in the factory turbo column. You see, the Z1R TC was sold through Kawasaki dealerships as a new model. However it was not (technically) a factory effort. The offspring of a mixed marriage, ex-Kawi exec Alan Masek convinced the Big K brass to ship bikes to his Turbo Cycle Company (TCC). Given the sluggish sales of the warmed over Z1R, this was no big feat. TCC applied an American Turbo Pak kit to the stock machines, and shipped the resultant mutants to select dealerships with a $1,400 premium tacked on to the sticker price. Appearing to be a factory effort – but devoid of the factory warranty – the Z1R TC went on to gain an incredible reputation for speed, on/off switch turbo boost behavior (Jeckyl & Hyde anyone?), and questionable longevity. For Kawasaki it was a huge win with very little risk. Today, these rare bikes are coveted by collectors world wide.

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC!

The original Z1R TC bikes went out the door in stock Kawasaki colors; they were literally converted by TCC and kicked out of the shop. As the operation matured, several changes occurred. The first was a change to the exhaust plumbing and collector – in an effort to tame the boost. The next change was a new wastegate that limited boost to 6 PSI (the Gen I bikes had a fully adjustable wastegate). And finally the classic 1970s paint scheme emerged. These are all Gen II bikes, and can be identified by the “Molly Designs” logo on the tail section. With the new graphics the Z1R TC finally had the appearance to show off the induction upgrades. Today these Molly graphic bikes are the most desired of the Z1R TC set.

From the seller:
You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. Many years ago when the best of the best was available, and that is what I was buying, these motorcycles were targeted for my collection by me.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened with the Ferrari market.

An exception is the Kawasaki Z1RTC.

More from the seller:
The rare bike in this ad is the 1978 Kawasaki Z1RTC. To me it is one of the greatest and rare motorcycle you can collect. It is a very limited production motorcycle especially in the Molly Graphics configuration. It is unbelievably fast and has an exhaust that is a thrill to listen to as it winds up through the gears. I purchased this Z1RTC from the original owner and it has not been taken apart or restored or manipulated. The original owner explained to me that this ZR1TC turbo is a Stage 3 which is the best of the best for Z1RTC turbos. The original owner told me he took the bike to a drag strip only once and turned 9.9 seconds in the quarter mile and described the feeling by saying, “it felt like his eyeballs were pinned to the back of his head”

The Z1RTC is all original except for the upgraded pressure gauge. Always kept on a trickle charger and ready to fly down the road.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

While the Z1R TC put Kawasaki on the map, not all was tea and roses. This was a serious motorcycle that demanded the best riders. Boost was not easily manipulated and the remainder of the stock Z1R pieces were not engineered for the upgrade. The complete lack of engine controls that we take for granted (computer controlled fuel injection, programmable ignition modules, rev limiters) made for a very fragile existence. There was actually recommendations in the manual that new owners upgrade to stronger valve springs, weld the crank and upgrade the clutch if the bike were to be used aggressively. When was the last time your owners manual made those types of modification suggestions? But given that there was no factory warranty, there was apparently little to lose.

These are mean, aggressive yet beautiful motorcycles. They chronicle an era where experimentation and entrepreneurship could coexist with a larger factory effort. And the epic bikes that resulted from these strange bedfellows strike awe and wonder in the hearts and minds of viewers – and riders. To find a totally stock Z1-R TC is an amazingly rare sight. This bike is very, very close to perfectly original, and has a very limited list of owners. It looks absolutely pristine and clean enough to eat off of – should you dare to commit such sacrilege. For those in the market for something unique and special, few bikes can compete with this beautiful 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC. If previous listings of this model are any example, this one will go quickly. Boost on, and good luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC
Yamaha November 18, 2019 posted by

Buck Rogers: 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo

The Turbo years were the wild west for technology mavens in the motorcycling world. For only a few short years did this persist, but while it did the space race was on! Every one of the Big Four came up with at least one turbocharged model, and each had its unique position in the market. Each had its own unique strength. And all had a common weakness. The 1982 Yamaha Seca Turbo was no different. Not the first of the factory turbo bikes – and definitely not the last – the Seca Turbo was the typical middle child. In many ways Yamaha jumped onto the turbo bandwagon with a #MeToo bike, but their interpretation of the breed did produce an interesting motorcycle. As far as factory turbos go, the Yamaha Seca 650 Turbo was a low-tech, low-buck affair. The whole Yamaha approach was a check-box effort, allowing them to play in this important space while presenting the least amount of risk. As such, the Yamaha Turbo is perhaps the least collected of the Big Four factory bikes. But that does not mean it is not worth a look.

1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo for sale on eBay

While Honda flexed their technological muscles (and deep cash reserves) in the creation of the liquid-cooled, computer-controlled CX500 Turbo, Yamaha warmed over the existing Seca with relatively little fanfare. Air cooling was the order of the day, as was the brace of carburetors. The turbo itself – a teeny-tiny 39mm unit from Mitsubishi – produced a meager 7-ish pounds of boost and was arranged in a “blow through” scheme to avoid the cost and complexity of fuel injection. The heads were new to provide for better airflow, although the bottom end was a modified version of the existing 650. Internals were strengthened, additional oil galleys were added for lubrication and cooling, and forged pistons were utilized. All told, the Seca was rated for approximately 90 horsepower (good for a quarter mile in the mid to high 12s).

From the seller:
Hi I’m selling my 1982 XJ650LJ Seca Turbo. Its in great shape. Replaced left front linker Lens with New OEM. The windshield has a small crack but does not affect function. Rebuilt Turbo, been sitting to long. Low miles.
Complete Service done. Oil Change, Spark Plugs, Carbs Rebuilt ETC ETC.

The real effort on the Seca Turbo was expended on the styling aspect. This bike practically screamed “futuristic missle,” even if the performance didn’t quite back it up. It did look the part, at least in 1982. Today it appears a bit dated, much like a Seca with a funky fairing on it. The underlying chassis was straight from the normally aspirated 650 Seca, although the Turbo did benefit from air assist forks up front, and an air shock in the back. That was relatively high tech for the times. At over 500 pounds dry, nobody would mistake the Seca for a sport bike, but testers in the day indicated that the Yamaha had minimal turbo lag and managed the twisty bits as well as its contemporary peers.

If all this sounds like I’m panning the Seca Turbo, let me set you straight: While the bike did not live up to the performance of the latter factory turbos such as the XN85, the CX650T or the mighty GPz750 Turbo, the Seca is still a good motorcycle and a great example of the experimentation that took place during this phase of motorcycle development. These are unique and fun motorcycles to ride, and certainly something you won’t see very often at your local bike night. The Seca Turbo – like all turbos – are relatively rare due to the fact that they were not big sellers. Time passed them over quickly, and by 1984-85 that party was over. This particular Seca Turbo looks to be in extremely decent condition for a rider, sports relatively low miles, and has been under the care of a turbo fan. The price is downright C.H.E.A.P. for such a unique bike, with a Buy It Now price of only $3,750. Check it out here, and get your boost on. Good Luck!!

MI

Buck Rogers: 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo
Benelli November 17, 2019 posted by

Almost Ostentatious – 1979 Benelli 250 Quattro

When most manufacturers were making 250cc singles do, Benelli – with help from new leader DeTomaso – showed their engineering chops with a super-smooth 250 inline four.  This rarity comes to you from northern Italy and shows nicely with just under 1,900 miles.

1979 Benelli 250 Quattro for sale on eBay

To accompany their newer and bigger offerings to the showroom, Benelli engineers shrunk the SOHC engine so that cylinder bores are just under two inches, but still makes 27hp ( at 10,500 rpm ! ) with 26mm carburetors.  Chassis and suspension are standard for the day, though the tank/seat fairing is quite innovative with integral tank pad and gauges built into the folded-looking tank.   Kick-starting is all that was required, and a single 260mm disk suffices with a drum rear.  The chrome and alloy interplay is completed by the 2-into-1 exhaust and alloy wheels.

Photographed on the road with a license plate, this 250/4 seems a very good survivor, with paint and chrome that fib about the many years since new.  The comments offer worldwide delivery and show their last crating job as evidence.  Notes are spare in the eBay auction:

Excellent unrestored bike, ultra rare first series, frame number 10008. 2 owners. 100% original. Sold by Benelli Bari dealer in southern Italy. 

Obviously for a Benelli fan or collector, a 250 Quattro would be a special purchase.  This one could be ridden to sample a cavallo di battaglia from the late 70’s, without worry of damaging a true museum piece.  We saw such an example go over $15K at Mecum in January, this one is about ninety percent of the value at slightly over half the ask.

-donn

Almost Ostentatious – 1979 Benelli 250 Quattro
Ducati November 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1977 Ducati 900 SD Darmah

Update 12.1.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

This is the third of four motorcycles being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

This 1977 Ducati 900 Darmah is an extremely early example of the bike that helped pull Ducati out of a slump in the mid-70s, and carries a roster of parts that is still enough to make sportbike lovers drool. By modern standards, it’s a bit of a minimalist, with bodywork kept scant and not much in the way of creature comforts — but in that simplicity lies its elegance.

Decked out with Campagnolo wheels, Ceriani forks and Marzocchi shocks out back, the Darmah’s chassis is a perfect match to its torquey 864cc square-case bevel-drive v-twin. Ducati’s signature air-cooled twin was given a mechanical going over in 2000 according to the seller, but its original lead engine seal has not been broken. The bike has just over 6,600 miles on the dial, which jibes with its untouched factory look.

From the seller:

By 1976, styling and fashion took precedence in the motorcycle world and dictated new features, such as market demand for higher levels of build quality and options – Ducati responded with the 900 Sport Darmah, the most advanced incarnation of the Bevel-twin yet. As with the 860GT (Giugiaro) Ducati decided to outsource the styling to longtime collaborator Leopoldo Tartarini, who had long associations designing for Ducati and Italjet.
This is a very early example – among the first production – and is a 6,600 mile original bike with factory Campagnolo wheels, Ceriani forks, Marzocchi shocks – considered the most desirable of the Darmah series.
The original lead engine case seal is intact, indicating original low mileage. The bike has non-standard, but period optional Conti tailpipes and K&N air filters.
Cosmetically and mechanically refreshed in circa 2000, the bike is in its second ownership and presents in beautiful overall condition today. A coveted Falloon report accompanies this bike and details every aspect of the machine thoroughly – it is summarized by Mr. Fallon as “One of the best I have seen”.
Please email with questions – no trades or purchase schemes please.

The bike can be viewed and the seller contacted at the Stuart Parr Collection. With a Falloon report in hand, an early production sequence and some very tasteful period mods, this is early Ducati gold. Asking price is $18.5k.

Featured Listing: 1977 Ducati 900 SD Darmah
Moto Guzzi November 2, 2019 posted by

Mean Green Machine: 2001 Moto Guzzi V11 Sport

The Moto Guzzi V11 Sport is one of the world’s most unique motorcycles – and we’re not just talking about the color here. Born from a more simple age, yet tastefully updated to modern specifications, the V11 offers all of the Guzzi DNA you desire yet provides for an experience more inline with current times. Still air cooled with funky across-the-bike v-twin cylinders, lots of crankcase webbing visible, a unique chassis with colored side plates and shaft drive, the V11 is a Guzzi you can live with. If you can live with the color. Do you want proof? This clean example shows 31,000 miles. It is a rider. It is a Moto Guzzi.

2001 Moto Guzzi V11 Sport for sale on eBay

From the seller:
Offering my Moto Guzzi V11 Sport for auction. The V11 marked a new direction for Moto Guzzi, using the engine from the venerable 1100 Sport which was showing its age. Guzzi enlisted Luciano Marabese to design a new bike around the 1100 engine when the company was in a state of flux. Before the Cafe Racer craze came into vogue, Marabese created a great cafe racer bike. Important here is Marabese not only dictated shape but also color: while the bike was offered in different shades, this lime green with the red accents was the color Marabese dictated as the proper color for the design. It’s the color that caught my eye when I first saw the bike in 2000.

Now 18 years later, I had an opportunity to purchase and ride one, but for me my time has passed for a bike like this. It’s a serious sport bike posture, and I’m too old to enjoy it for very long. As much as I love seeing the Mean Greenie in my garage, it’s not a great bike for me.

More from the seller:
Some bikes are their own thing, and this is one. If I were to try to describe riding it, I’d have to say it’s a Hot Rod. Meaning it’s not about handling, or braking, or precision. Hot Rodding is about the engine, pure and simple. Guzzi is sometimes considered the Italian Harley, and there are some parallels, but I’d say Harley pales in this comparison. This is a very distinctive bike, a badass, and it’s all about the engine. Something about the new chassis brings out something altogether different from the bike the original engine comes from.

My V11 comes with a complete Mistral exhaust, and an ECU flash to accommodate. Other mods are a tail tidy, (the license plate is still out at the end of the tail, not too far under the sub-frame), a Hyperpro steering damper and valve and spark plug covers done in matching red to the frame and ‘pork chops’. All OEM parts come with the bike but buyer must pay for its packaging and shipping. Recent maintenance includes a full valve service only a few hundred miles ago.

Good luck, you won’t be sorry if you win this bike. It is all that.

The very best part of this particular V11 is the price: the current bid is just over $1,500 at time of writing, and there does not appear to be a reserve set. That is a lot of Italian quality for not a lot of dosh – although we will have to watch this one to see where it goes. The bike looks more reasonably clean than the mileage would suggest, and some desirable modifications. Not too hot-rodded, not too far from stock, and still in presentable condition, this Guzzi has just been broken in. It is not perfect, but that also makes it authentic. If you are a Guzzi fan, you know that these power trains are bullet proof and good for many revolutions of the odometer. Outright performance will not be on par with a Japanese multi, but if you are in the market for a hyper-cycle then M.G. is not likely on your shopping list. Check it out here, drool over the pictures and watch the video. Green is the new black, and has never looked better. If you have the hankering for that V-twin throb but don’t want a potato, you could do far worse than a V11 Sport. Good Luck!!

MI

Mean Green Machine:  2001 Moto Guzzi V11 Sport