Posts by tag: track bike

Aprilia April 15, 2020 posted by

Road or Track: 2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R for Sale

If you’re looking for a track bike, your best bet is something as modern as possible, with broad parts availability. A reliable tool for going fast as effortlessly as possible. Something completely disposable. There’s a reason you see a ton of GSX-R600s and 1000s, R6s, the occasional SV650, even a new crop of Ninja 400 and other relatively modern tackle that offer anvil-simple reliability. Basically the opposite of this Aprilia RSV Mille R in almost every way. But personally, I know I’m nowhere near fearless enough to delude myself into thinking I’ll ever be more than a B-Group trackday rider, so I’m willing to make some sacrifices to style, and this would be at the top of my personal trackday bike list.

Styling is subjective and, while Aprilia’s first foray into full-size sportbikes isn’t exactly pretty, it didn’t make the mistake of trying to out-Ducati Ducati: the looks were wild and very modern, with a gorgeous aluminum beam frame and curving swingarm. Handling felt much more “Japanese” in terms of turn-in and agility, compared to the 996’s incredible mid-corner stability. Austrian firm Rotax eschewed old notions of what made a v-twin smooth and revvy, and created an engine with a relatively narrow 60° layout kept smooth with balance shafts, while four-valves and liquid-cooling gave it power to compete with the Bolognese brutes. In addition, they included something that seemes to have eluded Ducati until pretty recently: reliability.

So it was exotic, fast, blessed with excellent handling, and surprisingly durable. And it came with lots of trick equipment straight from the factory: Öhlins components at both ends, along with a steering damper from the famous Swedish suspension specialists, and a smattering of nice carbon bits. The biggest limitation here is that the bike is sporting what appears to be largely original bodywork. Certainly, it’s painted to look the part. That makes a trackday crash a pretty pricey proposition, so if you’re really planning to flog it, perhaps some less stylish trackday bodywork is in order.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R for Sale

With a total of 2,293 original miles this was a one owner bike bought brand new in 2000. A well cared for, great riding great sounding clean bike. Has been in indoor climate controlled storage for years. No ethanol fuel was ever ran through this bike. Also on a battery tender.

I purchased from original owner with the idea of making a track bike. I reworked the seat and put brand new Dunlap SportMaxx tires on both front and rear of the bike (high speed balanced). Change oil filter (K&N), fresh oil (Motul) all new fluids for brakes and clutch (Motul) and radiator. Pingel deadman kill lanyard switch was installed.  

Bike is safety wired for tech. I removed mirrors and installed mirror block off plates, removed turn indicators, tail lights, disconnected head light, etc. All wiring was not cut and factory din connectors are all labeled and properly routed and zipped tied for ease of re-installing lights. All stock turn indicators, rear tail light, mirrors, an extra Motul oil filter, Motul oil, Motul DOT5 brake fluid, full 5 of Sunoco race fuel, are all included in sale along with a manual and factory books & key. This bike has a clear clean Ohio title in my name and is street legal with lights installed.

This bike has Full Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes, carbon fiber fenders, chain guard, and side panels. It is completely stock except for chip and upgraded exhaust, installed by previous owner. Here is your chance to get a track made bike ready to go for cheap. I even have full Vanson race leathers and boots in another listing to make it a full race package. Can help with shipping but shipping cost is on buyer. Please check out photos as bike is sold as is and if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask. Thanks.

The asking price? $3,400 and that includes all of the road-legal equipment, making that a very nice price for a track-ready machine and a pretty screaming deal for an Italian exotic. I’m not the biggest fan of the RSV’s styling, but you can’t argue that the package offers tremendous bang for your buck: it looks very trick, the specification is amazing. I’ve always wanted one just like this as a track bike…

-tad

Road or Track: 2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R for Sale
Ducati March 31, 2020 posted by

Turnkey Racebike: 1993 Ducati 750SS for Sale

Ducati’s air-cooled 750SS might seem like an unlikely candidate for a racebike build. By 1993, a two-valve Desmo twin was antiquated technology, a quirky, charming curio by the sportbike standards of the day. But although competition duties had been handed off to the liquid-cooled, four-valve superbikes by the early 90s, it’s important to remember that versions of the lighter, simpler Desmodue were powering Ducati’s racebikes all the way back in 1981.

The first Ducati to use the then-new engine was the 500SL Pantah, first sold in 1980. The Pantah engine was developed by Fabio Taglioni as a follow up to the beautifully-engineered, but expensive to build and service bevel-drive v-twins. It had single overhead cams driven by toothed rubber belts, and two Desmo-actuated valves per air-cooled cylinder. Race bikes built from this platform were light and nimble, but were eventually outclassed in terms of outright power and were typically competitive in smaller classes.

Ultimately, larger variations of the Pantah engine found their way into Ducati’s second-tier sportbikes like the 900SS and the 750SS seen here. They were sold alongside the painfully expensive 851/888 and 916 that followed as a more affordable, easier-to-maintain alternative to those much more exotic machines. Power may not have been overwhelming, but the bones are good, and those Supersports machines provide excellent handling to go with their thumping Ducati charm.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati 750SS Race Bike for Sale

1993 Ducati 750 Supersport vintage racing bike:

  • Kehin FCR 39 Carburetor Kit
  • Sparker TCI-p4 inductive programmable ignition unit
  • Carrillo rod set
  • Keihin FCR carburetor kit
  • GP Shift
  • Woodcraft stands and hand guard
  • Replaced “Marion Fairing Stay” with Stock Fairing Stay
  • Installed Monster Cowl
  • Replaced clutch reservoir and mount
  • Installed Race Tech Gold Valve Kit
  • Replaced shock and Fork Springs
  • Full Motor Service
  • Rebuilt front rear brake calipers
  • Replaced brake pads brake fluid
  • Installed 1/2” seat pad
  • Replaced stock muffler
  • Oury grips
  • Repaired fiberglass side panel, upper fairing and tail section
  • Powder-coated Frame, swing-arm and wheels
  • Prepped and painted bodywork
  • Installed smoke windscreen
  • Installed Vortex V2 fuel cap
  • Ohlins rear shock

Ducati 750SS Spare Engine Complete 750F1 Cafe Race CCS AHRMA ($3,400)
This motor was built by Chris Boy of Motor course Performance, Fort Lauderdale FL. It was designed as a low stress motor, built with high compression pistons, Carrillo rods, lightened crank and internal gears, straight cut gears, wet clutch. Heads have custom manifolds as shown set up for FCR 4`mm carbs modest porting, standard valves and Vee Two “Daytona” gind racing cams from Brook Henry ($1500) and fresh clutch pack. Currently set up as constant loss ignition and starter plate is blocked off for cart starting. It made 79.5 RWHP at the MCP Dyno. Motor has approximately 40 miles on the most recent tune up, including valve adjustment, new clutch pack. It is in excellent condition and is plug and play. 

The seller does include a long list of included parts, and this bike appears to have been properly put together. Developing a competitive package can be time-consuming and expensive, and this appears to be a legitimate race bike built to AHRMA specifications, but $12,000 is still a hefty chunk of change for an early 90s air-cooled Ducati. Now if the seller planned to include that spare engine [sold separately!], this might start to look like a better deal. I love the air-cooled Ducatis and have long thought a Supersport would make a great trackday ride, especially considering their values until recently, but the price here seems ambitious.

-tad

Turnkey Racebike: 1993 Ducati 750SS for Sale
Honda March 19, 2020 posted by

Bantamweight Racer: 1981 Honda RS125RW for Sale

Today’s Honda RS125RW might be a bit obscure for most of our readers, and is certainly older than the bikes we usually feature here, but a genuine Honda Grand Prix machine is certainly worth a look whenever one comes up for sale! This one has plenty of patina, period stickers, and an apparently rare dry clutch for less weight and extra noise!

Honda’s Grand Prix racing motorcycles were based around four-stroke engines until the two-stroke MT125 was introduced in the 1970s. The MT125 was replaced in 1980 by the RS125RW seen here, and that machine soldiered on until it was replaced in 1987. The significantly updated RS125 introduced in 1987 was eventually developed into the dominant machine more familiar to most of our readers.

Powered by a motocross engine borrowed from the RC125M, the RS125R’s liquid-cooled, reed-valve engine made 30hp from 124.9cc with a bore and stroke of 56 x 50.6mm. The frame was a twin shock, steel duplex design, had disc brakes at both ends, and weighed in at 170lbs dry. It wasn’t considered cutting edge when new, but it was reasonably successful in competition and Honda continued to develop the bike and its successors as an over the counter racing machine available to younger racers honing their skills.

From the original eBay listing: 1981 Honda RS125RW for Sale

1981 Honda RS125R-W located at our shop in Santa Ana, California. The pictures in this auction were taken at our shop in Japan. This RS125R-W is in very good condition for its age. Engine has a super rare dry clutch. The previous owner said he rebuilt the engine before it was put away many years ago. RS125R-W are very hard to find now. This bike is the best we have had for many years now. And the only one we have had with a dry clutch. Bike will come with a new windscreen not mounted to the bike. There are no spares with this bike. Bike is sold as is, no returns. Look at the pictures carefully and ask questions before you bid. Sorry, no Paypal on this item. Again, bike is sold with a bill of sale, no title. Bike comes with what you see in the pictures in this auction.

The starting bid is $6,995 with a few days left on the auction and no bids as yet. This one is obviously a bit of a gamble, since parts to keep one running will be difficult to source. The engine is said to have been rebuilt, but I’d be prepared for the worst if it was my money. Experts might have a line on what they might need to actually ride it, and this bit of Honda racing history would obviously make an awesome display piece for your living room or the lobby of a business, if you just want to show it off in all its period patina.

-tad

Bantamweight Racer: 1981 Honda RS125RW for Sale
Triumph December 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale

I love seeing race and trackday bikes built out of unlikely candidates like this well-prepared, race-winning Triumph Daytona T595. After all, the whole point of the Daytona in the first place was that it wasn’t pretending to be just a numberplate away from placing at Brands Hatch. Instead, it was intended as a fast roadbike, with a focus on character, build-quality, and humane ergonomics. A gentleman’s sportbike. In this case, a bike for a very fast gentleman…

The original Daytona introduced in the early 1990s was available in three or four-cylinder flavors and it was a big, burly GT to rival bikes like the Kawasaki ZX11. The second generation seen here was codenamed the T595, although it was fairly quickly renamed the 955i to avoid confusion regarding its displacement. That’s the kind of thing that never bothered Bimota, and I wonder how many people ask SB6 owners if their bike is a 600… In any event, the bike displaced 955cc and was much lighter and more agile than the bike that preceded it.

That being said, the T595 really wasn’t intended for competition: the suspension was too soft, the motor biased towards a flexible midrange, as opposed to top-end power, and it was still just a tad too heavy. But this is a Triumph we’re talking about, and sportbikes are in their DNA. Fit some stiffer suspension, do a bit of headwork, swap in some custom-ground cams, and change out the stock wheels and bodywork for some lightweight parts. Voila: racebike! It’s obviously not quite that easy, but someone clearly put in the effort here: the description goes into great detail regarding the work and parts that went into building this successful racing machine.

From the Seller: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale

This is an off road only track bike, no street parts available. This bike dominated at the local track in the Formula Thunder class in early 2000’s. Once retired from active duty it was sold to its current owner in 2003. At that time it was taken to a well known local engine builder go through entire motor and chassis and make get it ready for its last race, a 4 hour endurance race. The motor was torn down and a full fresh build took place. Invoice provided for build. It was then broken in on the Dyno (see chart) and off to the races it went. Retired after the event, until it was brought in to us to find a new home. It had sat for a few years so we carefully went over it, good compression @185-200, changed oil, filter, flushed coolant, fresh fuel and bike came right to life!

Here is a quick list of the obvious and a note from professional Triumph engine builder Scott Zollars.

  • 885cc
  • Dymag magnesium wheels
  • Rare Yoshimura full exhaust
  • Attack Performance Triple clamps and rear suspension linkage
  • Pro Circuit Suspension re-valved front and rear suspension
  • Penske rear shock
  • Brembo Master cylinder and calipers
  • 320 mm rotors with custom caliper brackets for Brembo’s

“The cylinder head is a ported 885 from a speed triple. The cylinder liners are the aluminum with nickasil coating items from the earlier generation Super 3. In particular they are all number 2 cylinder liners as they had a tighter tolerance from the factory. The pistons were from the earlier Super 3 also as they were 12-1 hi compression pistons. The cylinder head was decked when it was ported. A final compression ratio of 13.0 sounds familiar. The cams are a custom grind from Web Cam. The valve springs are a custom set from Kibblewhite. The airbox is a crudely made custom item. However it proved to be very effective. The transmission gears were back cut. The shafts that the shift forks ride on were shortened to allow them to float in the case similar in fashion as to what was standard on R6’s etc. All rod and main bearings were the White bearings. Carillo connecting Rods. This is how I remember the bike being set up. Things may have changed since 2004 though” – Scott

From one of the local forums:

“05-15-2005, 12:47 AM – Scott Zollars was the man behind I-90 Motorsports race 885 Daytona. That bike dominated the Formula Thunder class at Pacific Raceway for four years.
Also he was involved with Jack Lilleys highly successful 595 Daytona. I think it was the first British bike to win a National in eighteen years? I know first hand that Scott is an expert with fuel injection, electronics, motors and fabrication”

Credits cards accepted, up to $150.00 documentation charge may be added.

Seattle Used Bikes
4905 Aurora Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98103
dave@seattleusedbikes.com
Closed Sun/Mon Find us on Facebook, Instagram and the Web

The seller also includes a short walkaround video of the bike running and the throttle being blipped. There are obviously more sensible track-day mounts, bikes that are simpler to get parts for and faster. But if I was in the market for a $7,000 track bike, I’d be very tempted by this Triumph. It’s obviously a highly-developed machine for that kind of money, and you couldn’t replicate it for anything like what the seller is asking: just the rare parts fitted would probably be worth the asking price, not to mention the hours spent building and tuning it. And if you’re looking to go racing in a vintage class, you could certainly do worse than starting with a competitive machine like this one!

-tad

Check out the other Triumph SUB has Featured on RSBFS: 1998 Triumph T595 with just 2,518 miles ! Dave notes that a deal is possible on the pair! -dc

Featured Listing: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale
Aprilia November 8, 2019 posted by

For Offroad Use Only: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale

By 2001, the entire quarter-liter sportbike class was basically dead, leaving the Aprilia RS250 Cup a bit of an orphan. Yamaha TZR250 production ended in 1995, Honda’s NSR250R in 1996, and the Suzuki RGV250Γ held out until 1998. But I guess Aprilia still had some of the older 90° RGV250 engines lying around, so they kept churning out bikes for a few more years. The bigger issue was their viability as road bikes: one of the biggest reasons for the classes’ demise was the increasingly stringent emissions regulations that favored cleaner-burning four-stroke engines, instead of the light weight, but very dirty two-strokes that powered these bikes. They don’t call them “smokers” for nothing…

So the 249cc powerplant was from Suzuki, with a few Aprilia-branded bits to make the claim that they’d tuned it extensively somewhat believable. The frame was an aluminum twin-spar unit like the donor bike, but what a frame: unlike the industrial units seen on the Gamma and NSR, Aprilia’s was gorgeously sculptural, as was the swingarm. Brakes were more than up to the task, since the very same triple-Brembo setup was used on much heavier bikes like the Ducati 916 and Moto Guzzi Sport 1100…

By 2001, new two-strokes weren’t legal for road use in many markets, including the US. The RS250 Cup got around this by not bothering to be a road bike. It was intended for a single-make racing series, although an awful lot of them turn up here on eBay with very few miles, suggesting folks bought them to collect and not to race. It’s not too difficult to source bits from the road-legal version if you’re looking to convert one, although that doesn’t appear to have been done in this case.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale

This is an Aprilia RS250 imported into the US for the Aprilia Cup club road racing series. It was sold as a race bike only so bill of sale only. This example was never raced and spent most of its life in a private motorcycle collection. The original owner added lighting, turn signals, horn, and other equipment typically found on a street bike. I have only ridden it 6 or 8 times in the years I have owned it but I recently went over it from nose to tail and made sure everything is in good working order. Other than the added street equipment the bike is as originally delivered by Aprilia. Having owned and road raced one of these for many years I am very familiar with them and this motor is quiet and tight. Factory shop manual is included with the bike.  Also includes a new Shorai lithium/iron battery.

The Aprilia RS250 Cup was originally a track-only machine, although the seller indicates that it’s been made nominally road-legal and that it has managed to accumulate 3,000k miles so far, and bidding is up to just $5,250 with a few days left on the auction. The projector-beam headlight isn’t stock, but actually works pretty well, although I’d replace those red-anodized fasteners with black as soon as I got the bike home. Obviously, any potential buyers should be wary if they intend to register this machine for road use, unless they just plan on converting it back to track-only configuration.

-tad

For Offroad Use Only: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale
Yamaha July 25, 2019 posted by

Purity of Purpose: 1998 Yamaha TZ250 for Sale

Laypeople often love cars and motorcycles with gratuitous stylistic frippery: air vents leading to nowhere, extraneous “engine beautification” panels to cover up the oily bits and wiring, unnecessary surface details to break up large panels. They don’t really understand the function of all those parts, or aerodynamic styling, so if it looks right, it is right. Purists also appreciate design, but often feel that good looks are a direct result of function, that that beauty is the natural result of effective engineering. Failing that, at least functional design has an aesthetic appeal all its own. Simplicity and lightness are especially important for racers, and sometimes the shapes that result look odd until you understand why they developed the way they did. In other cases, a pursuit of purity of purpose results in shape that just looks so right, like this Yamaha TZ250.

The TZ250 wasn’t simply a TZR250 with race plastics and the lights removed. It was  a pure racing machine, something privateers could buy directly from Yamaha and use to compete in Grand Prix racing. Everything on the bike is designed to help the bike make power, cheat the wind, or simplify servicing. Every component is as light as possible, and these featherweight machines are the model of elegant simplicity. Early versions were powered by a parallel-twin engine, but Yamaha switched to a v-twin in 1991, a liquid-cooled unit was basically one-half of the YZR500’s V4 and included a counterbalancer that made the engine much smoother, backed by a cassette gearbox for fast gearing changes trackside to maximize the bike’s narrow powerband.

The package was updated significantly in 1992, with subsequent changes amounting to a gradual evolution, refining and tweaking the package. The engine was updated in 1997 to allow the bike to run on unleaded fuel, as required by FIM regulations, while the 1998 version seen here introduced a sealed airbox with ram-air and oval-slide carburetors, along with revised bodywork that included the famous tapered tail.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Yamaha TZ250 for Sale

I have a very, very nice 1998 Yamaha TZ250 4TW available. I purchased this bike in 2015 from a Southern California racer. It had been raced recently. I have done absolutely nothing to the bike, so it is still in as-raced condition. Overall its in excellent shape. The tank is flawless save for a very small dimple (about 1/8″ across). The bodywork is very good, but has a few imperfections here and there such as chips and scuffs. Normal racetrack wear. It has been stored in a heated storage facility with very low humidity here in Montana.

It has 190 miles on the top end and MCE racing crank. 2003 bodywork and airbox conversion. Includes PitBull rear stand, but no spares.

You can send your shipper here to my home in Red Lodge, Montana or I can deliver to one of several freight forwarders in Billings, Montana for attachment to a pallet.

The $14,500 Buy It Now the seller is asking for this TZ250 is a pretty good price, from what I’ve seen. It unfortunately doesn’t include any spares, which presents a headache if you’d like to use it regularly for race or trackday riding. You’ll obviously want to go through it thoroughly before using it, as it has been sitting for a couple years, but these are designed to be easily torn down and rebuilt, with crankshaft removal possible with the engine still in the frame and gearing changes to the cassette box taking only a half hour or so. Many TZs are being actively raced in AHRMA and other series, so I believe obtaining parts to keep them running isn’t prohibitively expensive, but these are a dying breed and represent the end of an era.

-tad

Kawasaki July 10, 2019 posted by

Privateer Superbike: 1995 Kawasaki ZX-7R for Sale

We don’t post too many racebikes here on RSBFS. Ex-racebikes are tricky to value. By their very nature, they evolve and change over time to remain competitive and, unless a bike is retired immediately after an historic race win, it’s not likely to be in anything like “original” condition. That very word contradicts what racing is about: if something doesn’t work, it’s discarded, if something better is introduced, it goes on the bike. They get crashed and blown up and rebuilt and raced again. But this particular Kawasaki ZX-7R had too many impressive names attached to it to pass up.

This Kawasaki is a bike from the glory days of World Superbike racing, when 750cc fours were pretty much the go-to configuration for everyone but Ducati. In stock form, the ZX-7R was a bit heavy at 450lbs dry, and the 748cc engine’s 105hp is decidedly underwhelming by today’s standards. But the bike made an excellent racing platform, and this version was kept in production for 7 years, a near eternity in terms of sportbike development and a testament to its sound design.

Of course, this isn’t anything like a stock motorcycle. The claimed 150+hp is impressive and the WSB-spec Öhlins forks and Brembo brakes that replace the stock Nissin six-pots are all very, very tasty, but it’s the frame that makes this particularly interesting: it was supposedly used in World Superbike racing by Anthony Gobert and obtained from famed tuner Rob Muzzy. The seller’s description goes into more detail below.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Kawasaki ZX-7R Racebike for Sale

1995 Kawasaki ZX7R Superbike. Works frame (WSB Gobert frame, Purchased from Muzzy in ’99), 2 Superbike motors: 800cc (for ’03) and 750cc. Fully kitted, Ohlins WSB forks, brembo brakes, everything. Spare valve springs (2 sets), valves, rods, pistons. 800 has Carrillo rods. Hasn’t been run for 15 years. Gets turned over now a couple times a year.

This is probably the finest privateer 1995 Kawasaki ZX7R Superbike ever built. The works frame (purchased from Muzzy in December of ’99) was supposedly Gobert’s. It was a World Superbike frame; done in Japan by Kawasaki. It was black when we got it. A work of art, they added a oil catch tank in the frame and welded a frame around the frame. It turned the bike from a pile of crap nightmare that would wind up and launch you at any second (with the fully built 150+ hp superbike engine) to a dream that is predictable and smooth. Which is why they won. Unfortunately those weren’t available to any of us, and we were lucky to get it for the 2000 season. After we got the frame, that bike won every club race and set track records in 2000 (beating the 1000s) until we had a Brembo rotor explode and put me in the ICU… ending that season. I raced it a few times since and we built a 800cc motor that put out 170hp (on the juice, no ram air) that ran with the 1000s of ’03. Unfortunately the KLS shifter broke during that national and we DNF’d. Later, it had a “tip over” in a practice due to a leak in a front tire, and it never got repainted. I got bodywork for it and never fitted it or painted it. Unlike the “works” bike Chandler rode and got claimed in the F-USA in 1996 (was just for sale on bringatrailer.com), these engines do NOT have the “works” gear driven cams. Those are not serviceable for privateers. This bike makes a ton of power with the conventional chain driven cams, works oil pickup, etc. Further, we still have a couple sets of valve springs (and tons of spares) which are now unobtainable. These motors can be serviced and freshened up. This will be an AHRMA killer.

This is obviously a well-developed package and should be a blast to ride. It also includes extra engines and spares to keep them running, although at that $25,000 asking price, you’d hope it would. There are cheaper ways to get into vintage [?!] racing, but none quite as evocative…

-tad

Privateer Superbike: 1995 Kawasaki ZX-7R for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale July 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2017 Suter MMX500 for Sale

Update 7.8.2019: We’d like to take this opportunity to thank Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes for being a sponsor of RSBFS! From Amatumoto, “This 2017 Suter MMX500 at reduced price will not last long, so if there is someone out there that has been pining for a reliable 2-stroke GP500, they should act soon.” Contact Amatumoto today! -dc

So, I’m going to have to try not to gush uncontrollably here, because this is one of the coolest bikes we’ve featured recently. A real, live Suter MMX500, a “what if” race-replica from a parallel universe where MotoGP racing never made the switch from two-stroke to four-stroke power. A labor of love built by Eskil Suter of Suter Racing and a bunch of guys who never got over their addition to premix fumes.

Forget all of your shed-built Grand Prix homages with RZ500 engines stuffed into R6 chassis and painted up in Marlboro racing colors. No disrespect intended, but this is what you’re looking for, the ultimate paean to the snarling, lethal machines that carried Rainey and Schwantz and Mamola to greatness.

The looks may be stealth-fighter modern, especially in this example’s matte carbon finish, but the spirit of those older machines is still there, married to absolutely state-of-the-art racing technology. It’s powered by a compact, fuel-injected two-stroke V4 with a pair of counter-rotating cranks based on the Swissauto/MuZ500 raced by Suter in 1998 and 1999. Apparently Suter “had a few crankcases kicking around from the 500cc V4 design,” and frames are, obviously, their specialty.

I’m always fascinated by how two-strokes can be mounted in the frame: a lack of cams, cam-drives, or valve gear means they’re ludicrously compact, and often oriented in ways not at all intuitive for someone weaned on four-strokes. In this case, the engine is laid over on its side, rotated 90 degrees from what you’d expect, facing forward. So more like a >4 really, at least if you’re looking at it from the left-hand side…

The bike may be tagged as a 500, but it actually displaces 576cc, with an undersquare 56 x 58.5mm bore and stroke in an effort to deliver a bit more midrange and help the bike avoid racebike service intervals. Suter acknowledges that most of its customers are skilled enthusiasts, not win-or-crash racers, and the changes to the formula make for a more manageable ride that still captures the feeling of a two-stroke MotoGP machine, but is less likely to spit a rider off in an evil highside when they get in a bit over their head…

Modern electronics and fuel injection help there as well, while offering improved rideability and a better spread of power. Of course, the delivery is still two-stroke abrupt and, with 195hp at 13,000rpm pushing just 280lbs, power-to-weight is still fairly astonishing, so the two-stroke GP character is intact, just slightly more refined.

Head on over to the original listing for the bike, as there are plenty of additional photos for you to drool over.

From the Seller: 2017 Suter MMX500 for Sale

SUMMARY

Model: Suter MMX 500

Origin: Switzerland

Engine: Suter

Last Service: 490 km

Colour: Carbon

Suspension: Ohlins

Brakes: Brembo

OZ 17″ wheels

Availability: Immediately in our store of USA

MODEL INFORMATION
Bike in good condition and ready to race. Extra parts included with the bike: rear stand, pistons, rings, reeds gaskets, fiber+steel clutch plates, plugs + caps, filters, front stand, windscreen, seat, engine stand, service manual, owner manual, cover.

Spares list:

Pistons, rings, carbon reeds, gaskets, and o-rings; enough for 2 complete rebuilds

fiber/steel clutch plates

plugs & caps

Spare seat #5 of 99

Engine stand, front & rear service stands

Parts, service & dash manuals

bike cover

This is the very first Suter MMX500 I’ve seen for sale. With just 99 made, I’m assuming they were all snapped up before they were even finished by well-heeled track day and racing fans. If you’ve got $115,000 $95,000 lying around and decide to buy this, please let me know what track days you’ll be attending, because I need to see an MMX500 in action. The craftsmanship and passion that went into its creation are impressive, as you can see from the images. Of course, the price is shocking, but this is a very rare opportunity to purchase one at any price, so refinance your home, sell that sailboat, or sell that kidney, and pounce before someone else does.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2017 Suter MMX500 for Sale