Posts by tag: track bike

Honda November 11, 2017 posted by

Ready to Race: 1998 Honda RS250R for Sale

Unlike Honda’s NSR250R, the RS250R was Honda’s over-the-counter race bike intended for privateer teams. Of course, if you were a factory outfit, you could get your hands on something like the NSR250 or RS250RW, which honestly gets a bit confusing. Especially the fact that the NSR250 and NSR250R are completely different bikes, and the one with the extra R is the street version…

I think I got that all correct. Experts can feel free to excoriate me in the comments.

Regardless, the RS250R is most definitely a track-only machine, a singularly-focused Grand Prix device with zero-percent body fat. It was powered by a liquid-cooled, two-stroke v-twin with a bore of 54mm and a slightly longer stroke of 54.5mm. Up until 1993 Honda used a 90° v-angle, although this was changed in 1993 to a more compact 75° configuration.

I’d expect that, given the displacement and rev range involved, improved packaging trumped any increase in vibrations that might have resulted from the narrower angle between the cylinders. The later engine should be shorter front to back, which would allow it to be pushed further forward in the frame for better weight distribution and a longer swingarm. These were capable of over 90hp, depending on tuning, and weigh a stunning 223lbs dry.

Honestly, I think I’d much prefer the bike with some sort of race-replica paint job, maybe Rothmans or Repsol. But this solid red color is as “accurate” as any, since the RS250R came from the factory with unpainted bodywork, ready for whichever race team bought them to festoon with sponsor stickers, garish graphics, and team logos.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Honda RS250R for Sale

1998 RS250R NX5 Completely Restored With 100’s of Parts

This bike was a bucket list item (thanks to an old racing buddy) to be crossed off after turning some laps around the U.S., but now has to be cancelled because of injury and new career. It breaks my heart to sell it, but it has been sitting for a year (everything drained and stored indoors). This bike was Jeff Leggits (owner of Mach1 Motorsports) 98 RS250R and was COMPLETELY RESTORED!!! by maybe the best GP 2 stroke tuner/mechanic  in the U.S. Roland Cushway. Engine cylinders and carbs all done by Roland. Every bolt/part was taken off, cleaned, inspected, and either put back or replaced new. The engine is completely rebuilt… new clutch, pistons, seals, bearings, etc. The bike was then fired up and drained for storage. Small scuff on the swing arm (pictured) and small ding in the tank (easily repaired)

IF I HAD MY WISH, THE BIKE WOULD GO TO A COLLECTOR… that’s what kind of condition it’s in.

The list of new and used parts in so extensive I’m not going to list them all….I will document all the big items. I will ship any where in the world, but you will have to arrange it all. I won’t crate the bike, so keep that in mind when searching for shipping.

THERE IS WAY TOO MANY PARTS TO ITEMIZE (hundreds of new and used parts) SO I HAVE TO DO IT BY PICTURES…THERE ARE NO DUPLICATE ITEMS SHOT.

3 sets of pipes 2 of unknown origin 1 new stock set which is on bike (1 set is German and the other English)
2 new cylinders
2 new piston and 2 new pistons installed
Used crank in great condition
Crank in bike has two races on it (Roland said check after entire season)
Full A kit transmission gear set
4 new VHM head inserts
VHM head tool
VHM Power valve tool
Swedetech leak down
Broken in clutches (3)
New chains
New coils
New wiring harness
New battle rear sets
Tons of brake pads and levers
Stock and Penske rear shock (Penske on bike)
Used cylinder and 2 heads
Manual and setup notes (I will make a copy of the setup book because it has to go back to original owner)
2 sets of repairable body work
Spare tank with repairable dent

Bidding is very active on this little two-stroke race machine, but only up to around $8,000 right now. If you plan to do more than just display this bit of high-speed industrial art, that spares list is pretty key, and is actually one of the most appealing thing about this listing. Two-stroke race bikes require constant attention, and spares aren’t always easy to come by for a ten-year-old, limited production Honda racebike. The original listing includes plenty of additional photos of what bits are included, and it looks like there’s enough to keep this running for a long time to come.

-tad

Ready to Race: 1998 Honda RS250R for Sale
Ducati November 10, 2017 posted by

Unlikely Racebike: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

One school of thinking about fast bike riding posits that the goal is speed, and that the motorcycle itself is a mere tool for achieving that end. But although a track-day GSX-R makes plenty of sense from a purely practical point of view, practical can be a little boring, so why not go fast with a bit more style? A buddy of mine is a fan of the MV Agusta F4 and found an example hiding in the Pacific Northwest with a shockingly low price a while back. Apparently, the rear wheel bearing failed [“Oh, don’t worry, they all do that…”], leaving the bike an unrideable, but repairable albatross around the owner’s neck, and he was selling it at a shockingly low price. It might seem like sacrilege to turn Tamburini’s masterpiece into a track hack, but let’s face it: that’s where it belongs, since it sucks out loud as a road bike. And it just seems much cooler to go racing or track day riding on something like an F4, or a Bimota YB9, or today’s Ducati SportClassic Paul Smart 1000LE.

Powered by the twin-plug “Dual Spark” version of Ducati’s air and oil-cooled two-valve v-twin that was good for a claimed 92hp, the SportClassic line wasn’t especially fast in a straight line, and you’d think that, racing cues aside, the Paul Smart is more of a bike for posing during weekend espresso runs to the local cafe than the foundation of a race-winning machine. In stock form, you’d basically be right: obviously, wire wheels aren’t ideal for a real performance machine, and that air-cooled engine isn’t exactly a powerhouse. But Ducati really don’t seem to know how to build something purely for posing, and the basic platform is very sound. Throw in some top-shelf suspension bits like the Öhlins TTX rear shock and FGRT819 forks on this bike, replace those heavy wire wheels with some magnesium hoops, fit some lightweight bodywork, build a big-bore engine with the very best parts, and the result is something pretty special.

Obviously, if you plan to actually race your collectible Ducati, you’ve got to carefully build the machine to meet specific class requirements. Luckily, that’s already been done in this case. According to rider “Fast Frank’s” web bio, it looks like this Paul Smart was prepped for the AMA’s PRO Moto-GT2 or maybe the Lightweight Superbike class. Racers can feel free to chime in in the comments.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE Race Bike for Sale

2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000 Limited Edition Road Racer

This bike has an Excellent history of winning races and Championships at the hands of Fast Frank

Chassis Specifications:
AIM Dash
Ohlins FGRT819 forks with DLC coated for tubes, forks built by Fast Bike Industries
NCR adjustable offset triple clamps
NCR Fairing Bracket
Custom built Ohlins TTX rear shock (built by Ohlins USA)
Brand new Marchesini Magnesium Wheels
ETI Carbon/Kevlar Fuel Tank, underside of tank covered in Gold heat resistance tape
New Brembo HP Front brake Rotors
Brembo RCS19 Brake and Clutch master cylinders
Brembo Mono Block front brake calipers
Lightened rear brake rotor
Spiegler brake lines
Vortex Clip-ons
Air Tech Fairing and seat
Custom Paint by Asher Finishing (the flags on the tank are hand painted)
Hand made Aluminum belly Pan
Carbon fiber vented front fender
Carbon fiber rear fender
Fast Frank Front and rear wheel quick change kits
Under mount rear brake caliper
Shorai Lightweight battery
75% of hardware is Titanium
DID ERV3 520 Chain
Motion Pro Rev 2 Throttle
Rizoma Brake Lever Guard
Quick Shifter

Engine Specs:
2009 Ducati M1100 Engine (cases are lighter, stronger and have top mount ign pickup and oil sprayers under piston)
Lightened, balanced and knife edged crank
Carrillo Rods
1098 Crank Main bearings
Pistal 100mm 1123cc Pistons
Millenium tech bored and plated cylinders
JPrecision CNC ported heads with 47mm intake and 41mm exhaust valves
MBP Valve collets
Low resistance closing rocker springs
NCR Race Cams
NCR Large Oil Cooler
Micro Tech ECU
Magnesium Valve Covers
NCR Magnesium Side engine cases
Ducati Slipper Clutch
SC Projects Racing carbon muffler with Termignoni Headers
Tip Over Sensor
Ducati Superbike Stator/rotor (lighter weight)
Lightened primary and cam gears
Billet aluminum cam belt pulleys
Custom 8mm Spark plug wires
MotoCorse over sized throttle bodies and velocity stacks with K&N filters
Billet engine breather

I normally try to edit parts lists down a bit, but this one is pretty exhaustive and the inclusion of some choice NCR parts suggests very deep pockets: this obviously not some quick-and-dirty conversion from a salvage-titled roadbike into an affordable trackday ride, it’s a fully-developed, race-winning machine. The starting bid is set at $44,995 which is probably far less than it cost to build. Obviously, the owner will never recoup their investment, and their loss is your gain, assuming you have a air-cooled Ducati racebike-sized space in your garage and enough skill to take advantage of this example’s well-developed handling.

-tad

Unlikely Racebike: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale
Honda November 4, 2017 posted by

Size Doesn’t Matter: 1991 Honda RS125 for Sale

For some people, a race replica just isn’t enough. And if you want the real thing, a genuine racebike can be very pricey to run, and parts might be literally, not just figuratively, impossible to find. Sure, you can occasionally buy an NSR500V, but can you find parts to rebuild the engine? No, you cannot. Sometimes not at any price. But unlike the NSR500V or even the much more widely-produced RS250, Honda’s RS125 is an over-the-counter, full-on racebike that manages to be affordable, at least in the world of zero-percent-bodyfat racing machines.

Why are they so much less expensive? Well, they were always meant as entry-level racers, so costs were lower to begin with, and they made more of them. There are fewer parts involved as well, and those parts are less likely to be made of unobtanium. Ultimately, part of the reason the RS125 is so light is that there’s really not much there: the tiny, 124.4cc two-stroke single and six-speed gearbox are dwarfed by the aluminum frame that appears to be welded up from cast and extruded sections like a bit of industrial art. Hell, the engine is basically dwarfed by the airbox on later models. The whole thing is draped in raw, lightweight bodywork, and a primitive electrical system complete the package for an all-in dry weight of under 160lbs.

Basically, an RS125 weighs about 40lbs less than an average adult male. Which means that, if you’ve ever half-carried, half-dragged a drunk buddy into his apartment, you should have no problem whatsoever loading an RS125 into a van or truck, ramp or no ramp.

Keep in mind that, while the RS125 might spec out like some sort of dinky learner bike or a hopped-up moped, it’s serious stuff: that incredibly low weight and highly-strung engine producing 40hp mean the power-to-weight ratio on it is fairly shocking. The heritage is there as well, since both Loris Capirossi and Dani Pedrosa both won 125 championships on RS125s. From what I’ve read, it’s so light it even crashes differently than larger machines: once they go down, they tend to skim along instead of tumbling, minimizing damage. Which is nice because whether you’re using this for track days or actual competition, you’re going to need to wring its goddamn neck, everywhere, all the time.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Honda RS125 for Sale

Honda RS125. Very nice very original bike in excellent condition. The bike was stored for many years so it has very low hours. Small but mighty she will hit 130mph and will lap a GSX-R1000 on a tight track. Most track bikes have a hard life but this one is in fantastic shape with no damage at all other than a scrape on the clutch cover and that is about it . All the brakes work well and the motor starts straight up and runs like a banshee. The motor picks up on the throttle so fast it’s frightening. I actually have a pair of RS125s and will be selling the other one after this one to save confusion. The  opportunity to buy a real factory race bike doesn’t come along often so make the most of it now. There is  obviously no tile with this bike as it’s a race bike. No title. 

I can ship all over the world at good rates.

So the downside is you need to pretty much be an wiry teenager or a waifish supermodel to ride an RS125 in the first place. The upside is that, if you are a wiry teenager or a waifish supermodel, or are just built like one, parts aren’t impossible to find. And many bikes come with huge spares collections, since actively raced two-stroke 125s tend to accumulate those things, and spare parts don’t make much sense to keep when you’re selling on the bike they fit. The Buy It Now price for this example is $5,999 although it doesn’t indicate if any spares are included, or are even available.

-tad

Size Doesn’t Matter: 1991 Honda RS125 for Sale
Ducati July 18, 2017 posted by

“For Off Road Use Only”: 1992 Ducati 888 Corsa for Sale

Update 7.18.17: We originally saw this 888 Corsa last September and the seller was reportedly looking for $75k. This bike is back on eBay and has a buy-it-now of $60k. Links are updated. -dc

1992-ducati-888-corsa-r-side

This Ducati 888 Corsa isn’t some roadbike that was stripped of lights and accessories. It is one of a claimed 30 built in 1992 explicitly for racing and came ready for battle, naked except for the parts both inside and out needed to make it go fast and be competitive in World Superbike racing.

1992-ducati-888-corsa-dash

Powered by a liquid-cooled, four-valve development of Ducati’s air and oil-cooled Desmo L-twin engine, the 851 and later 888 marked Ducati’s return to relevance. The air-cooled bikes certainly handled well, but were significantly down on outright power and, as the Japanese Big Four continued the rapid development of their four-cylinder sportbikes, just couldn’t compete in terms of outright performance.

1992-ducati-888-corsa-front-wheel

Hung in one of their tubular trellis-style frames, the new Desmoquattro featured fuel injection and generally made less peak horsepower than competing four-cylinders, but produced its torque-rich power across a wider range, allowing riders to get on the power sooner for better drive out of corners. That, in addition to the displacement advantage granted to them compared to the 750cc inline fours, gave the new four-valve Ducatis a significant advantage, and they were very successful in World Superbike with the 851, 888, and later with their 916.

1992-ducati-888-corsa-front

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Ducati 888 Corsa for Sale

This bike is one of 30.
Only 30 were produced in 1992 for Ducati race teams.
Don’t know how many are left in the world.
The bike has Termignoni exhaust.
The front brakes are one carbon rotor and one conventional rotor.
Bike is titled as an off road track only but it is titled.
From 1989 to 1992 the frame was white and a red body.

Unfortunately, the listing doesn’t include any information about the bike’s history. As a race bike, there’s likely been an evolving roster of components, unless the bike’s been off the road for a long time, and I wonder what’s going on under the skin. Witness the mismatched front discs that use two different materials and the modern radial front brake and clutch master cylinders. The bike is obviously clean and in excellent shape, and bidders don’t seem put off by the spare listing: at almost $32,000 the reserve has not been met and there are still several days left on the auction.

-tad

1992-ducati-888-corsa-throttle

“For Off Road Use Only”: 1992 Ducati 888 Corsa for Sale
Kawasaki June 27, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 2015 Kawasaki Ninja H2R for Sale

Sometimes, bikes are meant to be accessible, and offer real-world riding fun and performance. Sometimes, they’re just meant to showcase potential, to flaunt a manufacturer’s capability, to kick sand in the face of competitors. The H2 and H2R fall into this category. Does anyone actually need a nearly 300hp track-only motorcycle? Of course not. Reviews of the bike regularly use phrases like “mind-blowing” and “I needed to change my shorts.” Sure, it’s really too heavy for a track bike, doesn’t fit into any race-legal category, makes too much power to be practical, and will probably cause nearby dB meters to melt but, as a statement of what’s possible, you can’t beat the Kawasaki H2R.


Named after the fabled two-stroke triple of the 1970s, the new H2 is a much more well-rounded beast: it’s got actual brakes and a frame that doesn’t hinge in the middle, for example. It’s heavy, at 475lbs full of fuel, but that just helps add a bit of stability to keep the supercharged engine’s power from looping it over backward at every opportunity. That’s certainly something it has in common with the old two-stroke: shocking performance. And striking looks: the older bike was fairly conventional-looking but came in some wild, 70s colors. The new machine is seriously evil-looking with a bright green trellis frame and mirrored bodywork that looks stunning in person.

To clarify, if you’ve seen one of these on the road, you were most likely looking at the road-legal H2 version of the bike. That makes do with around 200hp and comes with a headlight, taillight, and  rear-view mirrors. The H2R ditches all of the DOT-required frippery and replaces the mirrors with a set of evil, mantis-forelimb-looking winglets made of carbon-fiber that will set you back a cool $1,500 a piece if you tip the bike over… The slick-shod R also comes with 35psi of boost and somewhere near 300hp that’s accompanied by an ear-splittingly loud exhaust. Seriously, you won’t be able to ride this track-only bike at any race track that has a dB limit, and British journalists weren’t even able to test the bike on their home turf because it is too loud for most tracks there.

So what is the H2R? It’s an indulgent track day toy, a living room showpiece, a collectible motorcycle that’s likely to appreciate in the future. Today’s featured listing is several years old but is basically a brand new motorcycle, and comes with all the factory goodies.

From the seller: 2015 Kawasaki Ninja H2R for Sale

H2R! Yes! For sale, real! You can buy it today! Not wait for 8 month from the factory just has 99 miles on it without any issues, the bike looks like brand new. (May ride it more until time of sale.) I can  modify this bike for street legal also, the headlight, mirrors, turn signals, number plate holder, tires, must change. I can do it for $1500 for you. But as I heard it is not able to register in CA still. Registration will be by you. I do just technical job. 

It comes with:
Great 400 page service manual, owner’s manual 
OEM tools
Great NiNJA coffee table book (Value $800)
Front and rear OEM H2R Kawasaki Stands (value $1800)
Tire warmer (value $900)
The bike imported and ready to register in your name 
Can ship all over the world for just $3000 (include insurance) in 3-5 days.
As the custom Tax in importing countries may be high, we can make the bike as CKD (remove fairings, wheels, forks, tank and pack in as parts) for free!
H2R made just 20 in 2015 and 20 for 2016. no 2017 production anymore.  

you may find more pictures and movie in this link: https://www.cycletrader.com/listing/2015-Kawasaki-NINJA-H2R-121673996

The H2R sold for $53,000 when it was new. This one is basically new, with barely 100 miles on the odometer, and the seller is asking $49,000. For the second year, the frame was changed from the lurid, metallic green seen here to a silver to match the bodywork. It’s classier and more subtle for sure, but I think that sort of misses the point. This bike exists to be outrageous, to shatter eardrums, to overwhelm, to offend. The “regular” H2 might have been at least on the same planet as more familiar machines, but the H2R is on another level altogether.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2015 Kawasaki Ninja H2R for Sale
Suzuki May 11, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Suzuki TL1000R Racer/Track Day Special for Sale

In the 90s, Ducati captured the imagination of race fans and road riders alike with their exotic, race-winning v-twins, and the Japanese were forced to play catch up on track in in the showrooms, as they’d largely been relying on highly-developed, but less emotional inline fours in World Superbike and endurance racing. The rules of World Superbike certainly favored v-twins at the time, and the Japanese seemed to believe that was all there was to their success, “If a tiny little company like Ducati can do it, we can too!” Unfortunately, both Honda and Suzuki missed their opportunity to cash in, producing “Ducati-killers” that failed to understand exactly why people bought Ducatis in the first place. The Honda SuperHawk was a very good motorcycle cursed with a tiny gas tank and handling that was never really intended to measure up to the track-focused 916, with handsome but fairly bland looks. And Suzuki’s TL1000R was a massive failure in terms of its Ducati-slaying ability as well. They’d already built their road-focused TL1000S, so the TL1000R should have been a no-brainer. But while the 916 was narrow, sleek, and very focused on speed, the TL-R was bulbous and heavy, with handling limited by the controversial rotary rear damper carried over from the TL-S. The rotary damper worked fine in theory, but overheated in practice, resulting in sometimes scary at-the-limit handling. Luckily, today’s Featured Listing, a track-ready TL1000R goes a long way towards rectifying those shortcomings.

Why use a rotary damper in the first place? Well a bike with a 90° v-twin is generally very narrow [unless you’re on a Moto Guzzi], light, smooth and torquey, but presents packaging challenges. Ducati’s front cylinder lies nearly horizontal, making for a very long engine and a correspondingly long wheelbase. Suzuki rotated their engine back in the chassis, but that left little room for a traditional rear shock, and they used a compact rotary damper in its place. It was a proven concept, but the execution left a bit to be desired…

Although the TL1000R was considered a sales flop at the time, low prices and that absolute peach of a v-twin have made it a very appealing roadbike. Keep in mind that Suzuki used this engine to power a whole range of their own bikes, and it was used by plenty of other manufacturers as well. It is reliable, reasonably powerful, and sounds great with a set of aftermarket cans. The TL1000R was a fundamentally sound bike, with all of the elements to be the everyman v-twin Suzuki advertised, but the execution was flawed. Power is never going to rival modern Ducatis, unless you throw a ton of money at the engine. But pounds can be shed, and handling improved with a swap to a more traditional rear shock and good suspension set up.

Today’s Featured Listing goes back to the TL-R’s original stated intent and systematically fixes problems: a complete modern GSX-R1000 front end with a Brembo master cylinder, lightweight bodywork, updated rear shock by Penske, and an Aprilia RS250 solo tail that lightens the bike visually as well, making it the sleek machine it always should have been.

From the seller: TLR1000R Race Bike for Sale

TL1000R for sale, bill of sale, no title, was built frame up piece by piece. Specs follow:

Engine – stock internally, Sharkskinz airbox, M4 full exhaust – rear sections have been modified to pull the exhaust closer to the swingarm for cornering ground clearance, Power Commander III. Yes, I know it’s not really a superbike with the stock motor, but the rest of the modifications mean it’s not SS legal.

Chassis – LE rear link and Penske shock, 04 GSXR 1000 forke/triples – LE valved and lengthened, Woodcraft clipons, Vortex upper triple clamp, Ohlins steering damper, Sato rearsets

Brakes – Brembo radial m/c, 04 GSXR 1000 calipers with spacers to run 320mm TLR rotors, rear caliper is a Wilwood PS-1 in a captured spacer setup (Pro Fab did the swingarm modification and all the machined parts), Goodridge stainless lines

Body – Sharkskinz body with Honda RS250 tailsection. Rear subframe is all fabricated aluminum.

Misc – Wire harness has been thrifted and ECU has been relocated to the front in fabricated aluminum holder. Clutch m/c is a brembo radial. Throttle is from Yoyodyne, probably more little stuff that I’m forgetting.

$6500, located in Indianapolis

Email is best for me: motorsport.studio at geemale.com

I love the Aprilia RS250 tail section, and the Gulf Racing colors work for me too: I’d love to do a track Ducati 916 up like that! Honestly, $5,600 seems like a heck of a deal for such a fully-developed bike. I’ve no idea if it’d make a competitive racebike, but if you like twins but don’t want to risk your precious 998R in the fast group at a track day, this might be just the ticket. I fully understand why folks would choose something like a GSX-R or R6 as a trackday ride, but it’s the funky stuff like this that interests me.

-tad

Yamaha May 4, 2017 posted by

Track Weapon: Nico Bakker-Framed 1980 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale

I was almost hesitant to post this monster, concerned that our passionate but sometimes purity-obsessed readers would find it less of an object of desire and more an abomination. For sure, this Nico Bakker-framed Yamaha TZ750 is a mongrel, a beast. A chimera, if you will. The engine? A ferocious liquid-cooled two-stroke four-cylinder race engine and six-speed gearbox from the TZ750, which alone should be enough to at least give this thing a second look. The Bakker frame is from 1980, although it was purpose-built for the TZ to cure the bike’s notoriously sketchy handling. But then you’ve got mismatched 17″ wheels, modern-ish suspension and R6 bodywork. Hey, at least it’s almost all Yamaha-sourced!

And as a racing machine, the bike’s constant evolution is far more in keeping with the original intent than some perfectly preserved collectible. In a way, it’s even cooler than a period-correct TZ750: each and every one of those is a piece of history and should probably be cared for as such and ridden with kid gloves. This? It will handle better than folks like Kenny Roberts, who raced the TZ750 back when it was new, could ever have imagined and mere mortals can take it to the track and ride it in anger. And possibly not die.

When introduced in the 1970s, the TZ700 and TZ750 that followed became the bikes to beat on racetracks in Europe and in the United States, where they dominated AMA racing for years. This was a motorcycle from the era where engines were making rapid leaps in terms of raw performance, while suspension design, tire technology, and handling advanced more slowly: even the early bikes with just 90hp were shredding rear tires and trying to eject their pilots. By the time 1980 rolled around, the TZ was making much more like 140hp in a lightweight package that was good for 185mph top speed, with solid reliability.

Early machines used a frame with a twin-shock rear suspension that was later updated one with thicker tubing and a monoshock in 1975. Unfortunately, handling was never much more than “adequate,” with pilots hanging on for dear life as much actually riding them, which explains the Nico Bakker frame seen here, something the seller claims is just one of five made for the TZ. Nico Bakker is, of course, one of the most talented frame designers of all time, and his work has graced racebikes, low-volume specials, and even production roadbikes built by everyone from Suzuki to Laverda.

From the original eBay listing: Nico Bakker-Framed 1980 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale

This is a 1980 Nikko Baker chassis TZ750. Number 5 of 5 that were built for the Big TZ. Yamaha used these aftermarket chassis to rectify the problems with their ill handling factory chassis. These frames were far superior to the stock units and Yamaha used them until they figured out a solution for their own. This bike has been modified with the correct pieces to keep it AHRMA and WERA legal. It is a weapon in any Vintage class you care to run it in. Nikko Baker used the Full Floater style rear suspension with a link and conventional type shock. As apposed to the limited adjustability of the stock mono shock modified backbone Moto Cross unit Yamaha was using. An Ohlins remote reservoir unit replaced that. Upgraded fork tubes ( conventional style ) from a late model Honda CBR900RR with adjustable internals from KPS suspension. Set up for a 180 lbs rider. A 17″ Honda 5 spoke 3.5, aluminum wheel is used up front with 310mm HRC rotors and 4 piston Nissan calipers for stopping power. A billet Yoshimura top triple tree and aftermarket billet clip ons. As for the rear wheel it has a 3 spoke 17″ Marvic 5.5 Magnesium wheel. Taking advantage of readily available, easy and inexpensive parts instead of the custom Nikko Bakers hand formed tank and tail section. A 2001 R6 tank was used along with a 2004 R1 race tail section. Fits excellently and can be aquired all over incase anything gets damage in a crash. We use the stock style fairing still. Nothing works as well or keeps the integrity of the original TZ like the stock unit. All the original body and engine parts that came on the unit go with the bike also. Like stock Yamaha forks and triple trees, Astrolite wheels ( 18″ x 5.0 rear and 18″ x 3.0 front ) Spondon front calipers, and hand formed aluminum fuel tank ect. Tank is about $2500 to $3000 and over a year wait time to get.

Engine wise it has a complete rebuild on her and every go fast goodie made for the TZ750. New Renstar individual cylinders with reed cages, Renstar billet crank shafts, new transmission ( set up and cut by Paul Gast ) Lentz chambers with 10″ aftermarket aluminum silencers. Along with the 40mm Lectron high velocity power jet carburetors Magura 1/4 turn throttle and cables and Brembo radial master cylinder . It has all the best stuff to make an amazing Vintage liter bike slayer.  Bike comes with loads of spares too. Cylinders, heads, crankshafts, rod rebuild kits, pistons clutch parts, transmission, gearing and tons of spare Lectron tuning needles and parts. Also have the original factory round slide Mikuni carbs and cables. Plus more misc parts and gaskets.

I have only one issue. I couldn’t source out a new Ignition stator and box. So after unit was completed i sent it out to be gone thru as a precaution. It will be back and installed on unit by time of delivery.

Is it a pure collectible museum-piece? Absolutely not, not even close. Is it beautiful? Well, if pure function is your idea of beauty, then maybe it is. Keep in mind that if you’re a fan of originality and want something closer to the stock TZ750, the seller does mention that the original bodywork, wheels, and other parts will come with the bike, although I’d want to verify exactly what that includes before dropping money if that’s the direction I wanted to go. I’ve got no idea how to value something like this, but the seller obviously does: the Buy It Now price is set at $45,000. The comments section is open, so let me know what you guys think about this beast! And remember: keep it civil guys.

-tad

Track Weapon: Nico Bakker-Framed 1980 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale
Yamaha January 18, 2017 posted by

Turn-Key Racer: 2011 Yamaha Moto3 Racebike for Sale

The recent Honda and Yamaha race bikes we’ve featured have been factory racing motorcycles with real pedigree, and are collectible exotics as well as functional tools for going fast. This little YZ250F-powered Yamaha racebike is a mutt, with a tuned dirtbike engine, custom frame, and RS125 plastics, but we all know that mutts can make the best pets!

With the move of all forms of prototype racing from two to four-stroke engines, the new Moto3 class replaced the entry-level 125cc Grand Prix series with four-stroke 250s like this one, while Moto2 bikes were powered by 600cc engines, and top-level MotoGP bikes ran 990cc or less, at least to begin with… “Stinkwheel” fans the world over were devastated, but racers quickly adapted to the new rules, as they always do.

This particular machine is obviously no garage queen, but looks clean and well put-together, with a very cool composite frame that looks like it might be made up of steel tubes and aluminum side-plates, a bit like a Bimota, along with plenty of go-fast goodies and RS125 bodywork. The listing includes plenty of detail and, if the seller is to be believed, the bike is very competitive in the AHRMA “Sound of Singles” class.

From the original eBay listing: 2011 Yamaha Moto3 Road Race Motorcycle for Sale

2016 AHRMA SOS3/Moto3 class National Championship winning bike.

2011/12 BMGP/2 chassis, subframe alloy fuel tank reinforced YZF swingarm by Framecrafters.net.

Powered by a highly modified 2005 Yamaha Yz250f engine. Big carb, dyna ignition, Webcam #9, Wossner hi-comp piston, newer head/valves, R/D under cut trans, Barnett billet clutch assembly, newer crank, custom exhaust.

Running gear; wheels, forks, brakes, controls, bodywork, etc. are 2002 Honda RS125.

MOTORCYCLE IS IN COMPLETE OPERABLE AND SAFE RUNNING CONDITION

Last raced October 2016 at the AHRMA-Barber Vintage Festival finishing 2nd both days to KTM factory pro racer Chris Filmore . January 2017- Complete detail/clean, oil change, heat cycle and general inspection performed. 

All history and service is documented and comes with the machine.

Spares that come with the machine:

  • Engine parts; gaskets, seals, etc
  • Crash parts; controls and bodywork, etc.
  • complete spare ignition
  • 2nd subframe (short)
  • 2nd set of Marchessini wheels (full rain)
  • tire warmers
  • front and rear paddock stand
  • gearing, chain, suspension springs
  • extra Brembo caliper and other brake parts
  • complete spares list provided on request

So it’s not a collectible exotic fit for display in an office or living room, but it is a functional racebike that should be relatively easy to keep running: that YZF motor may not have the headbanging powerband of a tw0

Turn-Key Racer: 2011 Yamaha Moto3 Racebike for Sale