Posts by tag: Suzuki

Bimota October 21, 2019 posted by

From the Cape: 1998 Bimota SB6R

Bimota is known for taking the road less traveled – in order to travel that road faster and with more exclusivity. And while Bimota has had some brilliant successes and failures, it was the SB6R that promised mainstream potential. Housing a GSX-R1100 powerplant magically wrapped in aluminum and fiberglass, the SB6R weighed less than the Suzuki donor bike that gave up the engine and trans. Fast, powerful and looking like it was built to break speed limits everywhere, the SB6R is among the most approachable of the Bimota set, and always worth a closer look.

1998 Bimota SB6R for sale on eBay

While you would be forgiven to lust after a more exotic Bimota – say a VDue or Tesi – the SB6R is a work of art in its own right. Look closely at the details and let the fun begin. Where to start? How about that asymmetrical swing arm, complete with BIMOTA stamped out in raised lettering. Light, trick and very indicative of the level of workmanship. Check out the under tail exhaust poking out shotgun style over the rear wheel. Look at the solo saddle. No passengers on this ride, and there is no faux solo seat cover to confuse the issue. This is a rider’s bike. Check out the Bimota-logo instruments and spend some time on those lovely triple clamps. Yes, those started life out as billet blocks. Even the non-Bimota stuff is gorgeous: the rear Ohlins shock and placement, the right side up Paioli fork with carbon covering and quick release, and the Brembo binders all work together to create art.

From the seller:
On offer is this mint condition Bimota SB6R.
Corse exhausts.
Low mileage, well maintained and serviced recently.
I have also included an additional original rear wheel.
This prime example would make a great addition to any motorcycle collection.
Worldwide shipping is available at competitive rates.

In a sad twist of irony, it was the more exotic Bimota VDue that sealed the fate of the SB6R. With the recalls of the two-stroke machine pushing Bimota into bankruptcy, a mere 600 SB6Rs were produced – far fewer than anticipated. That makes this particular bike a bit rare. Unfortunately in this case rare does not immediately equate to expensive. While this was priced above $30,000 when new, these are laregely sub $10k machines today. And that makes them well worth the purchase. Where else can you find the exclusivity and panache that only a Bimota can give you – not to mention the handling and performance – for that kind of dosh? Sure, maintenance is a bit tough on many of these models due to the tight tolerances between the engine, frame and bodywork, but thankfully the Suzuki mill is well neigh bulletproof. Check it out here, as this one is looking for an opening ask of $9,900. That is more than many we have seen recently, but not out of the range of reason by any means. Good Luck!!

MI

From the Cape: 1998 Bimota SB6R
Bimota July 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

Update 8.23.2019: This bike has sold to an RSBFS reader! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

I’m unreasonably fond of the Bimota SB6R, making me possibly the very best or the very worst person at RSBFS to write up this particular Featured Listing. It’s hard to explain why. It’s not the prettiest bike of the era, but somehow the bulbous styling and classic graphics and general Bimota weirdness and current low prices just make it an object of lust for me. This example was originally posted here back in 2016 when it was for sale by the previous owner (for a considerably higher price), and now the current owner wants to pass it along to a new home.

Bikes of the era represent “peak Bimota” to me: earlier machines offered perhaps more of a racing pedigree and later bikes are more refined, but the big, bruising SB6 and YB11, the fabulous but temperamental V Due, the original Tesi, even the classic DB2 all epitomize the handbuilt, race-inspired engineering that exemplifies the brand, even if inconsistent build quality and impractical construction made them frustrating to own. What do I mean? Well the formula for the SB6R was simple: take the honking big inline four from the GSX-R1100 that weighed in at nearly 550lbs full of fluids and put it into a machine weighing in almost 100lbs less. That naturally required the body and frame to be virtually shrink-wrapped around the powertrain, and that led to issues with access when servicing them.

Luckily, that engine is pretty easy to take care of, once you gain access, and the bodywork is made up of very few pieces, making it relatively simple to strip it down. You still have to work around that massive aluminum beam frame, but at least you can admire its industrial beauty while you try to adjust the carburetors… The rest of the bike is as trick as you’d expect from a Bimota: the lowers on the right-way-up Paioli forks were carbon fiber and the fully-adjustable Öhlins shock was tucked in alongside the engine, with the remote adjuster slung underneath.

With supposedly just 600 made, you probably haven’t seen one in person. I’d always loved the front but felt the tail was a bit awkward, but finally seeing one in the flesh changed my mind completely. From the pictures, this one appears to be in very nice cosmetic condition. The miles are now pretty much what they were on the bike back then, which is the only real issue here: it’s largely been sitting as part of a collection, so it will need to be gone-through if you plan to use it on the road. Or on the track, if you’re that kind of lunatic.

From the Seller: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

I have a ’98 Bimota SB6R that I’d like to sell. I bought the bike from a friend who owned Austin Vintage Cycles. He bought it at the Mecum Jan. 2016 auction and has divested his interest in AVC. As such, he sold me the Bimota and a bunch of Ducati Bevel stuff. So neither of us have much info on the bike. However, I recently spoke with the previous owner who took it to Mecum. It was part of a 15 bike collection of interesting bikes all having low mileage in common. He told me he rode the bike once or twice, in 2014 or 2015 and it was ”very fast’’. He had the tank drained prior to the auction but couldn’t remember if the float bowls were drained; I’m guessing not. I’m not sure whether there’s a battery in the bike but it’s certainly dead if it’s there. The bike will therefore need a fairly extensive “going over” before being ready to ride, most likely including new tires. Currently, the bike and title are at the former site of AVC in Leander TX, just north of Austin. We will facilitate shipping with Federal, who we’ve used extensively and are comfortable with them.

  • Frame & Engine Numbers Matching: ZESSB6009WR000010
  • Only 2,505 Original Miles
  • Original Red Paint and Bimota Badges & Decals
  • Carbon Fiber Fairing Inserts and Wheel Covers (Front & Rear)
  • 5-Speed Transmission with Chain Drive
  • Electric Start with White Gauge Cluster (tachometer & speedometer)
  • Liquid Cooled 1,074cc Engine
  • Four Stroke, Transverse Four Cylinder w/DOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
  • Paoli suspension, Brembo brakes, Marchesini wheels
  • *156 bHP with 174 Top Speed (per Bimota)
  • *29.7 Seat Height and 419 lbs Dry Weight (per Bimota)

All lights and electronics work perfectly. There are blinkers and a mirrors installed so it will easily pass vehicle inspection in Texas.

Price: $8,000 $7,500

The seller is asking $7,500 for the bike, with reasonable offers considered. Obviously, it’s going to need a bit of servicing to get it running, but that’s honestly pretty common when you’re looking at a bike this old. In the plus column, it’s a Suzuki GSX-R1100 motor, so getting parts to make it roadworthy should be dead easy. In the minus column, that Suzuki motor is in a Bimota, which means that installing those parts could be a bit tricky. At the end of the day, the cosmetic condition appears to be excellent, which should be the primary concern for anyone looking to buy a Bimota, since those parts can be difficult and expensive to obtain. I love the SB6R, so hopefully the right person will pick this one up and get it running!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale
Featured Listing July 19, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 SP2

The 1991 Suzuki RGV250 SP2 was the baddest two stroke sportbike Hamamatsu was kicking out in the early ‘90s, with a dry clutch, wide-ratio box and fully adjustable suspension adding even more agility and precision to the little bike’s already lithe and precise nature. With 60-ish horsepower when uncorked and a shade over 300 pounds to push around, the updates meant the reedy little RGV could seriously hustle. As in, give supersports problems in the twisties hustle.

1991 Suzuki RGV250 SP2 for sale on eBay

Thanks to those crude, dirty little powerplants that make horsepower like the Middle East makes the oil to run them, the bikes didn’t need to be massively complicated to produce prodigious speed. With conveniences like oil injection, the bikes weren’t even that cumbersome to refuel, as long as you checked the oil level at gas stops, you were good to go.

This 1991 Suzuki RGV250 SP2 has been legally imported to the US and treated to a cosmetic restoration and some tasty Tyga go-fast pieces. The bike shows its age on many of the aluminum pieces and the dash, but the wheels and bodywork have been repainted and look excellent.

From the eBay listing:

This may be one of the best looking bikes Suzuki ever made, and this is one of the very rare SP2 versions!!

I bought this bike in Japan about 3 years ago. It was legally imported into the U.S. and it has a clean and clear Arizona street title and plate. In most cases with 11 digit VIN bikes you will not be able to register this in California.

This is a very rare Sport Production II version of the VJ22, the SP2 came with a dry clutch, the wide ratio transmission, fully adjustable suspension front and rear and aluminum lower triple clamp and rotor carriers.

This is a lower mile original bike. I STILL HAVE THE ORIGINAL EXHAUST AND REARSETS if you want to put the bike all the way back to stock!

Very low original miles at around 10k, not raced or abused. This bike had some light scratches and sun fading on the bodywork so I went about the painstaking task of getting all the OEM bodywork repainted in original colors! I have also just powder coated the wheels back to an original gloss white.

The bodywork is all original and the paint is perfect with zero miles since it was restored. The bike has brand new Michelin Street Radials, new valve stems, full service front to back including all new fluids, plugs, coolant, new air filter,brand new Tyga Full Exhaust system, new Tyga rearsets and brand new chain and sprockets!!

Bike starts on 1 to 2 kicks when cold and 1 kick when warm. All electrics work and it has a good battery installed. All wiring is intact and original. Oil injection in place. The bike comes with a complete new carb rebuild and full jetting kit, carbs are currently stock and fine, but this kit will allow you to jet the bike for your location/conditions.

There is some light corrosion that I have not attempted to clean up on various parts of the bike as seen, so it will clean up even better than it looks now. ! Some fading on the passenger seat, and to a lesser degree the rider seat as well, bit no tears.

Have not seen an early RGV VJ22 SP with the banana swingarm this clean in a very long time, and few of these survive in Japan…those that do are not cheap…or not for sale. Don’t sleep on this one….really one of the nicer 250 two strokes from my collection.

PLEASE CHECK OUT MY OTHER LISTINGS FOR MORE BIKES!!!

The auction is live for almost another two weeks, but with a Buy-It-Now option, we doubt an RGV this nice will hang around too long.

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 SP2
Featured Listing July 10, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R400RR

It’s not a new thing to scan a sportbike forum and find a subset of self-professed sportbike cognoscenti espousing the virtues of supersport 600s over literbikes for daily street use and getting the most out of yourself on a mountain road. The big bikes, they argue, are almost too much for most racetracks, let alone furniture-lined ribbons of arboreal asphalt. A 600 is a much better tool here. You’ll get more out of yourself and the bike without getting to certain-death velocities within the 50 yards between one hairpin and the next. But what if there were something out there even better suited than a 600? A bike that has enough power to get out of its own way, but makes you really work for breakneck speed? 

1991 Suzuki GSX-R400RR for sale on eBay

Enter the 1991 Suzuki GSX-R400RR. The RR means this is the sport production version of Suzuki’s second-tier early ‘90s Gixxer, so its handling and chassis are even sharper than the base model’s, and it has enlarged carburetors, a close-ratio box and short wheelbase to enhance its ability to carve a corner. 

With 60 horsepower to the back wheel from a screaming, 15,000 rpm four banger, you’re not gonna run down even a 15-year-old 600 on a straight stretch, but there’s a good chance you’ll reel them back in when things get curvy. And even if you don’t, you’ll be able to approach the limit without necessarily doubling the speed limit. 

This 1991 Suzuki GSX-R400RR comes from our friends at Moto2 Imports and, as is their way, is in immaculate shape. It has been treated to a new chain, fluids and carburetor cleaning and is fully de-restricted. 

From the eBay listing

1991 Suzuki GSX-R400RR SP Available for Sale – $9,999 or Best Offer

Never available in the US, the Suzuki GSX-R400RR is known for its razor sharp handling and competitiveness on the track. Way ahead of its time design-wise, the 400RR combines power and light weight in a super nimble chassis. Not a replica, but a true factory SP model with upgraded engine, suspension, frame and transmission (details below). Weighing under 350lbs with 60hp at the rear wheel, upside-down forks and big 300mm discs, the 400RR is amazingly fun and capable on both the road and track. Imported direct from Japan, this machine is in excellent mechanical and cosmetic condition with 9,500 miles (15,295km). Bodywork is all original in 9/10 condition and frame/engine/components are super clean. Bike has been fully serviced with rebuilt carburetors, new battery, fluids, filters, spark plugs & chain. De-restricted and making full power. Starts/runs perfectly and all lights/horn/signals working properly. Contact Moto2 Imports with any questions or for additional information.

See all 24 HD pics and cold start video at link below:

Youtube video link (copy and paste into browser)

https://youtu.be/LcJc3IYwSJQ

Race-spec SP model upgrades include:

Fully-Adjustable Suspension

Close-Ratio Gearbox

Shorter Wheelbase

Larger Carbs

Upgraded CDI with Throttle Position Sensor

Legally imported with EPA/DOT paperwork for US street use. Will come with US title.

Moto2 Imports can arrange affordable shipping coast to coast.

For $9,900, you’re looking at a fully-sorted grey market machine that is among a class of bikes that have been spiking in collector popularity on these shores. 

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R400RR
Featured Listing June 29, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV 250M in Canada

There are so many iterations of the Suzuki RGV 250 Gamma running around that you either need to be a savant to keep them all straight, or refresh yourself every time one comes up. There are VJ21s, VJ22s, VJ23s and a bunch of SP variants in between. Some are corked, some are uncorked, which means, depending on the variant, you get anywhere from 40-odd to nearly 70 horsepower. 

What you have here is a 1991 Suzuki RGV250 M, a UK-market screamer that was delivered without any restrictive bits and a full stable of about 65 horsepower in a bike that weighed the best part of nothing. We’re talking Suzuki DRZ400 territory for a focused street/track bike with more than 30 horsepower on the 400 and a set of sticky tires and cutting edge suspension. 

Unfortunately for the United States, there was no need for mass-market, fast 250s, as tiered licensing has never been a thing here, and insurance on a 600 is pretty cheap. So, newly licensed riders could hop on a CBR600 and never have to worry about fouled plugs or fuel mixture. The shame, of course, is that advanced riders who didn’t want the thrust of a supersport or literbike never got their hands on 250 two strokes, which have a habit of showing up higher-horsepower mounts.

This RGV250 has been ridden extremely sparingly since being moved to Canada 15 years ago, and shows little wear and tear. It looks like it could use tires, but comes with a raft of spares, including complete bodywork and a replacement fuel tank. 

From the seller: 

Original 1991 RGV 250 M 

Not a grey import 

Original UK spec model with 65hp, sourced in the UK and imported by myself

Road Legal in Canada, with proper registration

Comes with the following spares, Complete of extra bodywork, extra fuel tank, factory service manual, factory owners manual, top end gasket kit

Full decal kit to make extra body work into Lucky strike replica.

Originally had 5300 miles on it and changed the clocks for kilometer ones to make legal in Canada.

I have owned this bike for the last 15 years or so and only done about 300km on it.

New battery

Runs great 

Truly a collector’s item.

This bike is in ORIGINAL condition and has been in storage since it was last ridden in 2012

Price: $10,000 USD
Contact seller Stuart at csi347007@gmail.com

As you can see from the video, there are no flies on this little beast. For more information, contact seller Stuart at csi347007@gmail.com.

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV 250M in Canada
Featured Listing June 26, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Tastefully modified 2001 Suzuki TL-1000S

The Suzuki TL-1000S was a monster of a sport naked that came out a little bit before the thirst for such things got really desperate, and then promptly got swamped in the publicity surrounding the TL-1000R superbike, which was supposed to beat Ducati at its own game. 

Unfortunately for Suzuki, the TLR whiffed as a racebike, but its market share still eclipsed the TLS, and some handling bugaboos for both bikes eventually spelled the TL nameplate’s end. 

But for those who caught on, the 2001 Suzuki TL-1000S is still an amazingly competent canyon stalker, a sort of bug-eyed Japanese Tuono. With a sporty riding position, big brakes, USD front suspension and nigh-on 120 horsepower on tap, they’re fully equipped to scare you witless. 

And this one has been tweaked and tuned heavily but tastefully, making it pretty close to the ultimate street TL. The list of mods is long, and we’ll let the seller give you the full rundown, but here are the highlights: Ohlins suspension front and rear, Brembo monoblocs, gold Carrozzeria forged wheels and a Yoshimura exhaust. 

The Ohlins set up not only brings a big splash of bling, it also takes care of Suzuki’s weird rotary damper rear suspension set up, which some riders reported could overheat and become scary. 

From the seller: 

2001 Suzuki TL1000S with clear Colorado Title: ~9000 miles
– OEM tank & fairings with minor nicks & scratches for its age
– Ohlins shock
– Ohlins R&T Fork (with Lindeman Engineering tune)
– Ohlins steering damper
– ride height adjuster for rear
– Taller tinted windscreen (by Puig)
– Carozzerria forged alloy wheels (3.5″ front/6 inch rear)
– Braking wave front rotors/lightened rear rotor + stainless lines
– Brembo monoblock calipers in front (from GSXR 1000)
– Brembo 19mm front brake master cylinder
– Brembo race rear caliper + Ladybird armless mount
– Yoshimura full stainless exhaust system (professionally restored/polished from Europe)
– Corbin front saddle
– 3″ riser handlebars
– emissions equipment removed
– Lightweight Lithium battery with charging pigtail
– Smart TRE + Yosh box programmed ECU
– Samco radiator hoses
– Pro-Tek rearsets + Vanzuki alloy rear brake reservoir
– Titanium nuts & bolts (swingarm, rear axle, front/rear brake rotors…)

If that list doesn’t make you jump at the chance to get your hands on this beast, ice runs in your veins. The bike is located in Colorado and the seller is asking $6,000. Shipping arrangements and costs are on the buyer. You can contact the seller at pekingduc1@gmail.com

Featured Listing: Tastefully modified 2001 Suzuki TL-1000S
Bimota June 22, 2019 posted by

A Better Italian Twin? 2000 Bimota SB8R for Sale

Update 6.20.2019: We last saw this bike in March of 2018 and bidding ended just shy of $10k. It’s back on eBay with a buy-it-now of $17,875. Links updated. -dc

Ducati has come a long way in terms of service costs and reliability. The four-valve Bologna twins have always offered good power and a bulging midrange, sure. But you really had to pay for it in the era of the 916. These days, 15,000 mile intervals between major services help keep costs down and the bikes on the road instead of in the shop but, back in the late 1990s, if you wanted a sports v-twin you could ride every weekend, you were probably looking at something like the Suzuki TL1000R. The duck-billed styling may not have appealed to everyone, the bike was a bit porky, and handling was a bit variable, owing to the rotary damper, but the engine was powerful, flexible, and made the right thumpy big-twin noises with a set of aftermarket cans fitted. That fact wasn’t lost on Bimota when they went looking to build the SB8R their own v-twin superbike, although I’d bet it was more likely that Ducati wasn’t interested in selling them any 4V twins, since I doubt Bimota was really worried much about reliability and cost…

Of course, for a while there, it seemed like the liquid-cooled, four valve, 996cc Suzuki v-twin was the small-block Chevy of the era, since it was used by Suzuki, Cagiva, and Bimota, and probably even a few others I’ve forgotten, and got stuffed into everything from sportbikes to roadsters to sport-touring bikes. Backed by a six-speed gearbox, the 138hp engine was plenty powerful and very reliable, especially compared to the charismatic, but sometimes temperamental Ducati unit. The biggest issues with the TL1000S and TL1000R were their slight weight problem and the packaging problem “solved” by an innovative but underdeveloped rotary rear damper that had a tendency to overheat and stop damping, leading to the lethal reputation of the earlier TL-S.

Bimota solved both problems. Reducing weight was pretty simple, since that’s always been Bimota’s thing anyway. It helped that the rear subframe didn’t need to be engineered with a passenger in mind, and the bike was otherwise liberally sprinkled with lightweight materials. Of course, their other thing has always been frames, and this one is deserving of the Bimota name: it’s an exotic composite unit, assembled from aluminum beam and carbon fiber elements for maximum strength and minimum weight. That new frame allowed a traditional shock to sit alongside the engine, like a Panigale, and solved the packaging issues. Styling is… different. One of the trademarks of a sports v-twin is the overall narrowness of the package, a result of having only two pistons. Sure, one of them is usually thrashing away at 4,000 feet-per-minute, pointed at your crotch, but that’s a small price to pay for for torque, aerodynamics, and character. But somehow the SB8R is positively bulbous, although it does make much better use of the original Suzuki headlamp. It’s a good-looking bike, but those intake tubes that snake over the tank from their inlets at the top edge of the fairing completely block your view of the controls, so new riders may fumble around a bit and errantly honk, cancel turn-signals, or shut the bike off until they memorize their location.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Bimota SB8R for Sale

Limited-production track ready motorcycle. #3 of around 150 produced total. Aluminum & carbon fiber frame. 1,000cc engine producing 135hp and 5 speed manual transmission. 3,245 miles shown, but the title is mileage exempt

“1,000cc engine producing 135hp and 5 speed manual transmission. Revs kinda high on the freeway, but it’s Italian!” Obviously, this is a dealer reselling the bike, but you think they could at least get the basics right… Anyway, aside from the fact that we’re apparently missing a gear in the gearbox, it’s mostly what you’d expect from a 3,245 mile bike, and includes a set of Arrow carbon cans, along with a few anodized accessories of dubious taste. The broken turn signals are a bit of a concern, since they appear mismatched, are non-standard, and could easily have been repaired before posting the bike up. It’s a minor issue, but it suggests that maybe this bike isn’t quite as carefully preserved as it appears. Bidding is up just north of $7,000 with another day left on the auction. Mid to late 90s Bimotas are currently at a low ebb in terms of value, so if you aren’t afraid to buy a bike that might need a bit of attention to turn it into something that really performs as it should have straight from the factory, or if you’re just looking for some very cool garage jewelry on the the [relatively] cheap, now is the time to buy.

-tad

A Better Italian Twin? 2000 Bimota SB8R for Sale
Aprilia June 7, 2019 posted by

Silver Bullet: 1996 Aprilia RS250 for Sale

Two-strokes are among the purest expression of the sports motorcycle. They’re incredibly light, packed with innovative technology, and have none of the electronic frippery of today’s cutting edge machines. That’s not to say I don’t appreciate ABS and traction control and rain-modes and a dozen different throttle maps and ride-by-wire, it’s just that those bike need them to harness the excess power they make. There’s not much excess of any kind on a two-stroke sportbike like this Aprilia RS250.

Aprilia didn’t design their own engine, they simply rebadged and slightly modified Suzuki’s excellent RGV250 engine and slotted it into their gorgeous aluminum frame, with an asymmetrical “banana” swingarm to match. As with most other bikes in the class, it was liquid-cooled, two-stroke, 249cc 90° v-twin. At 56×50.6mm, the bore and stroke were much more oversquare than rival Honda’s 54×54.5mm. Unfettered by the government regulations that strangled Japanese-market bikes, Aprilia claimed some possibly unrealistic crankshaft power figures. But a well-tuned bike should make very similar power to an unrestricted and properly set up RGV, NSR, or TZR.

Forgoing the wild graphics of Japanese competitors, the RS250 was pretty simple, and even their race-replica designs were surprisingly classy and subdued. It doesn’t have any distinguishing stylistic flourishes, other than that sensual frame, it just looks right, the epitome of 90s sportbike-ness, stretched over smaller, leaner mechanical components.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Aprilia RS250 for Sale

Nearly flawless 1996 Aprilia RS250 with only 3,197 kilometers (1,986 miles). Purchased from the original owner, who meticulously cared for it and it shows. Bike is ultra clean. Bike runs as good as it looks and comes with fresh tires front and rear. Bike will come with new fluids and fresh carb cleaning. Bike is completely stock except for the HID headlight system. All fairings are 100% genuine Aprilia factory OEM. This RS250 will come with a Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use. 17 digit VIN.  Please text 801-358-6537 for more pictures and questions.

As the seller says, the bike really does look “ultra clean.” And it should, with just under 2,000 miles on it! I’m a huge fan of the silver color. Silver can be kind of bland, but the RS250 is such a good-looking bike, it seems a shame to cover it up with garish graphics. The HIDs may not be to everyone’s taste, but do improve the bike’s visibility to other, often highly distracted drivers. First generation bikes seem pretty hard to find, and the price on this one is just $9,500! But move fast, since there are just a few hours left on the auction…

-tad

Silver Bullet: 1996 Aprilia RS250 for Sale