Posts by tag: single sided swingarm

MV Agusta May 3, 2021 posted by

Rhymes with Brutale – 2008 MV Agusta Brutale 910S with just 856 miles !

When the time came for MV Agusta’s naked superbike, design legend Massimo Tamburini lent his expertise, with gorgeous result.  Today’s Brutale is the quite super 910S, with outstanding cosmetics and miniscule miles.

2008 MV Agusta 910s for sale on eBay

The Brutale began its continuing run as a 750 in 2001, and the 909cc four was the tallest engine that would fit in the chassis without a more major re-design.  Agusta’s exotic valve head and 13-to-1 compression promised superbike power – 139 hp at 12,500 rpm.  A classic chrom-moly trellis frame held oversized Marzocchi forks and Sachs monoshock.  Nissin supplied their 6-piston calipers for the 310mm front brakes.  The moderate seat height, low bars, and 408 lbs dry weight made for a smaller-feeling and quick handling package.

Evidently owned by a collector that picked up a more riderly MV, this Brutale has been kept with an eye on the future.  Finishes are new-bike clean, and no nits can really be picked.  The headers might be the only proof that  this bike was actually ridden.  Just a sampling of the detailed comments from the eBay auction :

The metallic orange color looks spectacular in the sun and contrasts nicely against the black.  The paint was just freshly waxed.  My father was an automotive painter for 40 years and he and I have restored a couple cars together so am cursed with high standards for paint.  This MV Agusta’s finish is in spectacular condition, excellent quality, and a stunning color combo.  The motorcycle is in the condition as should be expected for having traveled only 856 miles and being kept covered in a garage.  It essentially looks like a new bike and is stunning.

This Brutale has been kept in great care and been regularly maintained and ridden every year.  There are absolutely no leaks and no drips.  The forks are excellent and not leaking.  It received oil changes every year.  The battery is strong and starts the bike up easily.  The 910cc 4 cylinder engine idles smoothly, revs smoothly, and feels like it has all the 137 horsepower it should have.  The engine and exhaust sound excellent.  The intake induction sound is intoxicating !  The brakes are excellent and without issue.  The clutch is excellent and without issue.  The tires are in excellent shape.  This Brutale rides as it should.

The Brutale 910S is such a fun and flickable machine!  They weigh only 407 lbs and have plenty of low down and midrange grunt while also pull at the top end too.  The seating position is very upright and very comfortable.  The styling, excellent fit and finish, and color combo make it the type of bike that one can just sit and admire in their garage… Or in their living room!

The 910S got great reviews for every facet of its performance, with praise for the design and build quality as well.  Though the $14K MSRP was how they got there, it wasn’t a popular “feature”.  MV Agusta’s have always been over on the exclusive end of the spectrum, and the Brutale is no exception.  The exotic-ness of the ask for this Brutale could be debated, but the next owner will certainly be able to say they got something special in return.

-donn

 

Rhymes with Brutale – 2008 MV Agusta Brutale 910S with just 856 miles !
Ducati April 1, 2021 posted by

Wouldn’t Start – 2004 Ducati 998S FE with 2 miles !

Always dressed in red, Ducat’s 998S Final Edition celebrated the tenth anniversary of the iconic 916 generation.  This very special order waited in its shipping crate until a few years ago, and since its factory road test, hasn’t seen a battery, gas, or oil.

2004 Ducati 998S FE for sale on eBay

Some specs show the 998S power as 100Kw, a nice round number and 136hp.  The cases were different than a base model, and had a deep oil sump to ensure the pick-up didn’t run dry.  Adjustable Öhlins dampers are all around, with 43mm forks and a progressive rocker arm for the monoshock.  Dry clutch and single seat naturalemente, with 320mm Brembo brakes and 17-inch Marchesini forgings.  The FE’s aren’t numbered but have a Final Edition plaque on the triple tree, right below the temperature gauge, which required some attention since the cooling system hadn’t had a major update to cope with the increased power.

This FE showed the same two miles on RSBFS – back in 2018-, and has had one or two more owners since then, who also ( wisely ) declined to bring it from display to riding duty.  So far all the owners have been collectors, including racing driver Graham Rahal.  The seller’s comments comments from the eBay auction-

Limited production Final Edition model that has reportedly never been ridden. The bike was removed from the factory crate with 2 indicated miles in 2017, when Indy driver Graham Rahal acquired it for his private collection. It has not been started since, or had fuel or a battery put in. Factory equipment includes Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes, Marchesini wheels, and a graphics package specific to the FE. Power is supplied by a 998cc Testastretta L-twin paired with a 6-speed gearbox, and the original protective film remains on the engine covers and frame. The bike was acquired by a dealer in late 2018 from from Mr. Rahal’s collection.  I purchased the bike in January 2019.  Since I have owned the bike, it has been sitting in my garage as eye candy.

Both factory keys, the original tool pouch, and owner’s manuals are included with the sale.

The collector’s realm might be foreign to a weekly rider, not being able to hop on and enjoy.  Could be there are other diversions.  The 998S FE with its angular nose, air intakes, single-sided swingarm, and underseat exhaust might deserve to be saved for a future rider.  Or collector.  Looking forward to hearing from the new owner.

-donn

Wouldn’t Start – 2004 Ducati 998S FE with 2 miles !
Honda June 11, 2020 posted by

Vee Four: 1995 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale

Modern 400s are generally geared towards new or budget-minded riders, but can still be very capable sportbikes: I spent a session or two recently chasing one around Buttonwillow, and it turns out a Ninja 400 can work up a surprising turn of speed. In spite of that, they’re still pretty basic machines, specification-wise. But a couple decades ago, bikes like the Honda RVF400R NC35 gave nothing away to the most exotic roadgoing machines, other than a few cubic centimeters of displacement…

A race-bred V4 engine with a “big-bang” 360° crank, gear-driven cams, a distinctive single-sided swingarm and a rear wheel held on by a single large nut… there were no compromises on the NC35, other than those slightly tacky plastic snorkels jutting out of the tank that feed fresh air to the airbox. The 399cc only put out a claimed 59hp and most of the power is produced up near 13,000rpm, but what is available at lower revs is pretty usable and the bike won’t feel as sluggish as the meager power might suggest.

This example isn’t a particularly museum-quality bike: the tail section doesn’t look original, the no-name exhaust isn’t stock, and those polished wheels definitely aren’t going to be to everyone’s taste. The carbon intake tubes do look much nicer than the plastic originals, but again: not original. All of that also means the $11,990 asking price might be a bit on the high side for a bike that’s more an interesting rider than a really collectible example of Honda’s baby V4 sportbike.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale

In 1994, Honda introduced the RVF400, or NC35. Successor to the VFR400 (not confusing at all), the NC35 was two things: a mini-me of the legendary RC45 and one of the greatest 400s ever built. Just like its 750cc big brother, the NC35’s fit and finish was top-notch, and the model had all the trappings of a full-size superbike in a potent 400cc package.

Odometer is in kilometers (16,209 kms or 10,075 miles)

Ride away at a price you’ll love. Our selection of pre-owned powersports are certified to the highest maintenance standards, ensuring that all of our customers are not only riding in style, but that they’re also riding with safety in mind. Since 2018, we’ve dedicated our efforts to guiding and advising our clients about the best units on the market. We offer a wide range of options, and our professional team is here for your every need.

The RVF400R is pretty uncommon here in the USA, but not impossible to find if you look around, or have the means to import one. If the seller is willing to negotiate on that price, it could be a pretty cool rolling restoration while you track down original bits from overseas, or a really fun project if you raid the Tyga parts catalog for bodywork and performance upgrades…

-tad

Vee Four: 1995 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale
Honda November 1, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Euro Spec 1994 Honda RVF750R RC45 for Sale

Certainly one of the most sought-after bikes of the 1990s, today’s Featured Listing RVF750R RC45 was the follow up to Honda’s extremely successful VFR750R or RC30. Ultimately, the RC45 didn’t have the same success in racing as their earlier RC30, but it wasn’t for lack of effort. The RC45 was every bit as polished and exotic, and used the same basic formula as the RC30: light and stiff aluminum beam frame, V4 with gear-driven cams, and a single-sided swingarm. The RC45 was powered by a 749cc, 90° V4 with gear-driven cams and the “big bang” firing order that gave the Honda V4s their characteristic sound and improved traction coming out of corners. The cam gears were moved from the center of the engine as is typically seen in motorcycles, including the RC30, to the side of the engine to improve packaging, while sophisticated PGM-FI fuel injection replaced carburetors.

Total displacement of the new V4 was almost identical to the earlier bike to squeeze under the limit for to meet World Superbike regulations, but the bore/stroke were changed significantly from 70 x 48.6mm to 72 x 46mm, making the engine more oversquare to reduce piston speed and increase revs. Titanium connecting rods helped reduce reciprocating mass and magnesium castings kept the overall weight of the engine down, while a slipper clutch helped keep the rear tire from locking up during downshifts.

Showa adjustable suspension components at both ends of the aluminum beam frame kept the odd-size 16″ front wheel and 17″ rear wheel in contact with the ground, with the rear hoop mounted to a distinctive, ELF-developed single-sided swingarm that helped ease wheel changes during endurance racing events. So why didn’t the RC45 match the RC30’s success, particularly in WSBK? Well, the RC30 was incredibly innovative when it was introduced, so perhaps the competition from the other manufacturers had just caught up to Honda. I’ve also heard rumor that the new engine was incredibly difficult for privateers to tune. Regardless, it was still an amazing piece of engineering from Honda, and one of the most desirable superbikes of the era.

From the Seller: Full-Power Euro Spec 1994 Honda RVF750RR RC45 for Sale

This is the very first RC45 model to be brought into South Africa (one of only 3), it was imported brand new. I bought it from a collector and since then have fitted new tyres, chain, battery and had all the fluids replaced. She rides beautifully and sounds eargasmic, note that this is the full power model as noted by the ED demarcation on the PGM-Fi. 34,000km (21,250 miles). All bodywork and the screen is OEM Honda, and the only aftermarket bits are the Yoshi exhaust, and the indicator deletion. (Which are readily available from Honda, and can be arranged). No rust or oxidation due to our favourable, dry climate, and careful storage by myself and the previous owner. Tool kit and paddock stand will be included in the sale.

A rare opportunity to own, ride and enjoy the ultimate 90s superbike. A reasonable asking price of $35,000 includes free shipping and crating to any location, worldwide. Please contact Justin via email justin@redladder.co.za

Just 200 were made worldwide, making this a very rare machine. The mileage isn’t barn-find-low, but Hondas are built to last and this still appears to be a very sharp machine. Keep in mind that these are incredibly rare, finding the parts and an experienced specialist to refresh your 0-mile RC45 could be a real headache. This one looks ready to ride and enjoy!

-tad

Featured Listing: Euro Spec 1994 Honda RVF750R RC45 for Sale
Honda May 10, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale

Gary in Utah has several bikes Featured on RSBFS right now. Check them out too:

Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Update 5.15.2019: Now on eBay!

As prices of Honda’s V4 homologation bikes climbing ever higher with every 0-mile example that crosses the auction block, the only way for ordinary folks to get a taste of these classic Japanese superbikes is by picking up one of their smaller siblings. Sure, with just 399cc to play with, the VFR400R NC30 and the RVF400R NC35 aren’t as powerful, but they could easily be mistaken for their larger, more expensive stablemates and use the same engine configuration.

1998 Honda RVF400 for sale on eBay

I still think it’s a shame that bikes like this no longer exist. While electronic safety aids and engine management systems have continued to evolve, most bikes under 600cc have just one or two cylinders these days and are tuned for midrange power and reliability, not screaming revs. But there were no compromises with the NC35 and, while the claimed 59hp is obviously not going to scare anyone weaned on a modern 600, you have to work to access it: most of the power lives up around 13,000rpm, accompanied by the characterful drone of the “big-bang” firing order created by the 360° crank.

The very nature of the powerplant is uncompromising: a V4 is great for aerodynamics, power, and weight distribution, which is why the format is used by a number of modern superbikes and is common in MotoGP. But they tend to be a bit heavier than an equivalent inline-four and are a pain to work on because everything is so densely packaged. Contrary to appearances, the NC35 does not have ram-air, although the prominent intake snorkels do feed fresh air to the airbox. Gear-driven cams also speak to the engine’s racing intent, and the bike is still popular among track-day junkies as an entry-level superbike because of its sublime handling.

And while it might look like a reskin of the earlier NC30, the bike was heavily updated in other areas and they share very few major components. Styling continues the “baby superbike” theme, with a pair of smaller, cat’s-eye lamps in place of the RC45’s larger, round units, and the rear tire is skinnier. The NC35 used upside-down forks and switched to a 17″ rear wheel, which should save modern riders the headache of sourcing 18″ rubber. Thankfully, the NC35 used a conventional 17″ front wheel, instead of the RC45’s oddball 16″ hoop.

From the Seller: 1998 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale

Second up is this 1998 NC35. It is a very honest solid bike. I concentrated on trying to find low mileage, unmolested original bikes. They are getting very hard to come by. This NC35 has 8,667 miles (13,947 kilometers). I bought it from a dealer in Tokyo. They did a full service for me on the bike before taking delivery. The fairings and components are all Genuine Honda OEM except for the rear sets and the custom red tape on the wheels. The fairings are mint and the fuel tank is as well. The only flaw is the rub mark on the left rear cowling. The wheels and front brake rotors have mild corrosion on them and could use a good cleaning and powder coating. The bike is in original unrestored condition with no body or paintwork. Looks very nice as is sits but would make an excellent candidate for restoration since there are no cracks in the fairings or dents or scrapes in the gas tank. Bike runs just like new and is ready to ride. Bike will come with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use. Comes with one key.

I’d like to see $10,900 or best offer for this example.

Feel free to contact me at 801-358-6537 or by email: rmurangemasters@aol.com

The Honda RVF400R was only available in the US via grey-market imports from overseas or Canada, and the usual registration headaches can apply if you’re in a state with stricter laws, so be sure to do your homework. This example is being sold by the very knowledgeable Gary in Utah with a Utah title, looks very sharp, with low miles and a tempting price. Yes, these are much more expensive than they were just a few years ago, but $10,900 gets you a very cool bit of Honda history in a practical, reliable package. Honestly, I’m a huge fan of the NC30/35 and it’s one of the few Japanese sportbikes I would love one in my garage… Assuming I could get a CA registration for it.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1998 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale
Honda March 14, 2019 posted by

Repsol Replica in California: 1994 Honda NSR250R SP MC28 for Sale

Pretty much the only way this Honda NSR250R could be more desirable would be for it to be in Rothmans colors. Honestly, I’m not even the biggest fan of race-replica schemes, but nobody does them like Honda, and the Repsol colors are a close second. But even in its “generic” colors, the MC28 version of Honda’s two-stroke sportbike represents some of the most advanced technology of the time, from the obvious, ELF-designed Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm to the very trick PGM-IV electronic ignition system.

That single-sided swinger increased weight, compared to a more conventional design, but Honda’s PGM-IV was incredibly advanced. The bike still used a pair of carburetors to fuel the 90° liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin, but every other component was cutting edge, taking sensor input from the throttle position, gear-selection, and rpm to create three-dimensional ignition maps for each cylinder and adjust Honda’s RC “Revolutionary Controlled” Valve.

There was no conventional ignition key on the MC28. Instead, you need one of Honda’s credit card-sized… cards that also housed the bike’s ignition map. De-restricting the MC28 is particularly difficult, since, ideally, you’d need to locate one of the factory HRC cards with a full-power map, or you’re stuck with the government-mandated 45hp. The SP version of the NSR seen here added a dry clutch to hook the 249cc twin to the six-speed cassette gearbox, along with lightweight Magtek magnesium wheels for reduced unsprung weight and a bit of additional flash.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Honda NSR250R SP for Sale

1994 Honda NSR250SP
Credit card model
HRC parts
Repsol colors
TSR expansion chambers and exhaust
TYGA triple crown
Ohlins shock
TYGA digital gauge
Racetech forks
Nissan disc brakes
Michelin tires
Excellent condition
Runs fantastic

Call or text for fastest response. 949-290-5162. Thank you, Brian. 

Great bike, but so many questions. Why is the mileage listed as “NA”? It’s located in California, but does it have a California title? Has it been de-restricted, or is it still rocking the Japanese-market 45hp? All of these things could conceivably influence the value of the bike significantly, and the $10,400 Buy It Now price suggests that the answer to the last two questions could be “no,” but it’s definitely worth messaging the seller if you’re interested in the bike.

-tad

Repsol Replica in California: 1994 Honda NSR250R SP MC28 for Sale
Triumph February 17, 2019 posted by

Mad About Saffron: 2000 Triumph Daytona 955i for Sale

This Triumph always makes me think of that classic Donovan song: “I’m just mad about Saffron, she’s just mad about me, they call me Mellow Yellow [quite rightly]” Honestly, it isn’t exactly mellow, but the Daytona 955i does look great in this pretty wild shade of yellow. It helps that the overall styling is simple and elegant, and there are no graphics to date the bike, but it’s still hard to believe this thing is nearly 20 years old now, and I think it’s one of the best-looking bikes of the period.

Designed as a road bike first and foremost, the 955i wasn’t intended to go head-to-head with sports multis from Japan. Which is a good thing, because in the rigorous instrumented testing that has always been popular for comparison tests when bikes are new, they blew the Triumph into the weeds. But while bench-racing and dyno comparisons may help sell the latest and greatest sportbikes and do offer an unbiased way to compare different machines, they don’t tell the whole story: then, as now, the Daytona is an excellent sportbike.

Back in the 90s Triumph made the calculated decision not to pitch their bike directly against the Japanese supertbike offerings. They knew they just didn’t have the resources to develop a bike that weighed less than, make more power than, or would turn laptimes within 1/10th of a second of them, so they went ahead and just made a pretty great all-around sportbike oriented towards the road. It’s a bit heavier, the riding position a bit more humane, the powerband more midrange-oriented, and the suspension just a little bit softer. All that meant the bike wasn’t the greatest at turning a hot lap, but a higher build-quality and timeless looks mean it’s a great bike for 95% of sportbike pilots, and those remaining 5% could ride the bike well enough

The original Daytona was available in three and four-cylinder versions, but only the triple got the nod for a redesign in 1997 seen here. It was redesigned in 2001 with a single, modern headlamp and a lighter, stiffer double-sided swingarm. That updated bike was much improved, but I prefer this earlier design, with the double headlight and the single-sided swingarm. This one appears to be in good condition, but miles aren’t especially low. The bike has the very cool undertail exhaust that several companies made for these when they were new, although I understand the official factory performance exhaust upgrade was the way to go for real improvements across the board.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Triumph 955i for Sale

This super bike is da BombDigity! It’s a real peach with only 21, 254 miles since birth. This machine is NOT for wimps or sissy-boys. When you grab the throttle on this 955cc, three cylinder throttle monster it’ll cause your ass to grab to seat OR… you just fall off. This monster comes with Triumph stock Brembo brakes on both tires. Speaking of tires these rubbers are brand new. Heck… wearing these rubbers just mike keep you safe in a Ron Jeremy movie starring Stormy Daniels. Remember what is was like to grab ahold of something and twist it and KNOW your day just got better? Well… This is the machine that will do that for you. This beast is fuel injected with an aftermarket Trident dual pipe under the seat. It already has the Battery Tender terminals attached to the batter so you can keep that battery fresh and ready to fire all year long. On a serious note though this example has never been track ridden and has only had two adult owners. This 2001 Triumph Daytona 955i is the bike that everyone wants to talk about and everyone loves to hear. 

This beast breathes through a larger, non-ram-air-equipped airbox with 46mm throttle bodies that feed a redesigned CNC-machined cylinder head featuring 1mm larger intake and 1mm smaller exhaust valves sitting at a narrow 23-degree included valve angle. New forged-aluminum pistons force a 12.0:1 compression ratio (over the previous 11.2:1 ratio), sitting atop stronger carburized connecting rods and a lighter crankshaft. This 955i pumps out somewhere in the neighborhood of 125 rear-wheel horsepower. On a dyno run that number bore with an impressive 128 hp at 10,500 rpm showing. The rear wheel is hung on a single-sided swing arm making for a killer look for sure.

The 955cc triple has no problem pulling the tall lower gears due to its stupendous amount of low and midrange torque. Big power starts at 4000 rpm (any lower than that requires a smooth throttle hand), launching the Daytona forward through the rev band like a locomotive on crystal meth; revs climb even quicker once the tach hits 7500 rpm, spinning up far faster than the old T595 ever could. The power continues to build up top, with the Triumph’s distinct exhaust timbre accompanying the blurring scenery.

The Triumph Daytona 955i can make time with the best of Japanese track weapons through the curves; it just generates its acceleration in a slightly less frantic manner. Despite the claims of a lighter crankshaft, the 955i still has a lot of flywheel effect. This can be a boon for riders less accustomed to the precise throttle control and gearbox manipulation necessary with a typical four-cylinder. Throttle application isn’t as critical, and sweeping turns where momentum is key allow you to showcase the Triumph’s stomping midrange. 

The best part of this bike is its near V-twin torque and low/midrange grunt with a four-cylinder’s screaming top end. The 955i is very deceptive in how it generates its speed. The gearing, especially in the lower cogs, is tall enough that the motor’s relatively loping gait fools you into thinking you aren’t really traveling that fast… until the next corner comes up. That tall gearing, however, when combined with the heavy flywheel effect, means care must be taken with downshifts during corner entries in the tighter stuff to avoid rear wheel hop.

If you’d like to come by and test ride this bike you must have in your possession a non-expired license with a motorcycle endorsement, you must have the full asking price of $5500USD in cash and you must let me hold the cash, your license and the keys to the vehicle you arrive in while you do the test ride.

Does anyone actually say “da BombDigity” anymore? Questionable taste in slang aside, this is a pretty great description of the bike, although the front brakes are Triumph-branded and not Brembo units. The seller does include the picture above showing damage to the tank with no explanation, and the scratch is gone in the other pictures, so it’s worth a message to the seller before bidding, considering he’s asking premium money for this one: the asking price is on the high side for a Daytona of this vintage at $6,500. Daytonas are especially appealing on the used market and offer pretty great value: they look great, have plenty of performance for all but the most hardcore road-racers, are reasonably reliable, and have been dirt-cheap for years now, although that’s bound to change sooner or later.

-tad

Honda February 13, 2019 posted by

Affordable Cult Classic: 1988 Honda Hawk GT for Sale

Styled like a Japanese Ducati Monster, Honda’s Hawk GT actually beat that bike to market by several years. It may have lacked a bit of sex appeal, but offered incredible versatility, reliability, and even some steering lock… The Hawk could scratch, commute, do some light-duty touring and, with a bit of work, made a great basis for a race bike. They’ve been extremely affordable for a while now, since they never really found an audience here in the US and are a bit too practical to be considered sexy, but fans love them, and low mileage examples like this one are pretty hard to find.

It was built around a simple, reliable 647cc 52° v-twin engine with liquid-cooling and three valves per cylinder. It was so reliable, in fact, it would go on to power thousands and thousands of Honda’s shaft-drive Revere and Deauville touring bikes. Hardly the most inspiring legacy, but it could push the little Hawk GT, also known as the NT650 in some markets and the Bros 650 in Japan, to a top speed of 107mph.

But the Hawk GT, aka NT650 aka Bros 650 had another designation: the RC31 and Honda’s competition legacy is visible if you look. Out back is the bike’s party piece, a Elf-Racing Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm. The front end had just one disc brake, but the bike’s relatively light 393lb dry weight meant stopping was adequate outside a race track, and a CBR600 front end with adjustable forks and an extra front disc and caliper is a popular swap.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Honda Hawk GT for Sale

1988 Honda Hawk 650 Low miles in mint condition. The Honda Hawk is the perfect choice for a low cost, fun good looking and reliable motorcycle. Single sided swing arm like its more expensive brother (RC30) and an excellent reliable power plant that is sure to give you more than ample power for every day use. You will be hard pressed to find a cleaner example of a bike that is 30 plus years old. Please feel free to call with any questions or for more information on this great machine.  Call  215 630 5952

It’s unfortunate the seller doesn’t include more pictures, but they are at least of high quality. There’s plenty of time left on the auction, with no bids yet at the $3,500 starting bid. These can typically be had for that number or less, although condition and the mere 4,000 miles mean this might still get snapped up by Honda collectors, since that’s still peanuts to pay for such a fun, reliable bike.

-tad

Affordable Cult Classic: 1988 Honda Hawk GT for Sale