Posts by tag: single sided swingarm

Featured Listing May 10, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale

Gary in Utah has several bikes Featured on RSBFS right now. Check them out too:

Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Update 5.15.2019: Now on eBay!

As prices of Honda’s V4 homologation bikes climbing ever higher with every 0-mile example that crosses the auction block, the only way for ordinary folks to get a taste of these classic Japanese superbikes is by picking up one of their smaller siblings. Sure, with just 399cc to play with, the VFR400R NC30 and the RVF400R NC35 aren’t as powerful, but they could easily be mistaken for their larger, more expensive stablemates and use the same engine configuration.

1998 Honda RVF400 for sale on eBay

I still think it’s a shame that bikes like this no longer exist. While electronic safety aids and engine management systems have continued to evolve, most bikes under 600cc have just one or two cylinders these days and are tuned for midrange power and reliability, not screaming revs. But there were no compromises with the NC35 and, while the claimed 59hp is obviously not going to scare anyone weaned on a modern 600, you have to work to access it: most of the power lives up around 13,000rpm, accompanied by the characterful drone of the “big-bang” firing order created by the 360° crank.

The very nature of the powerplant is uncompromising: a V4 is great for aerodynamics, power, and weight distribution, which is why the format is used by a number of modern superbikes and is common in MotoGP. But they tend to be a bit heavier than an equivalent inline-four and are a pain to work on because everything is so densely packaged. Contrary to appearances, the NC35 does not have ram-air, although the prominent intake snorkels do feed fresh air to the airbox. Gear-driven cams also speak to the engine’s racing intent, and the bike is still popular among track-day junkies as an entry-level superbike because of its sublime handling.

And while it might look like a reskin of the earlier NC30, the bike was heavily updated in other areas and they share very few major components. Styling continues the “baby superbike” theme, with a pair of smaller, cat’s-eye lamps in place of the RC45’s larger, round units, and the rear tire is skinnier. The NC35 used upside-down forks and switched to a 17″ rear wheel, which should save modern riders the headache of sourcing 18″ rubber. Thankfully, the NC35 used a conventional 17″ front wheel, instead of the RC45’s oddball 16″ hoop.

From the Seller: 1998 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale

Second up is this 1998 NC35. It is a very honest solid bike. I concentrated on trying to find low mileage, unmolested original bikes. They are getting very hard to come by. This NC35 has 8,667 miles (13,947 kilometers). I bought it from a dealer in Tokyo. They did a full service for me on the bike before taking delivery. The fairings and components are all Genuine Honda OEM except for the rear sets and the custom red tape on the wheels. The fairings are mint and the fuel tank is as well. The only flaw is the rub mark on the left rear cowling. The wheels and front brake rotors have mild corrosion on them and could use a good cleaning and powder coating. The bike is in original unrestored condition with no body or paintwork. Looks very nice as is sits but would make an excellent candidate for restoration since there are no cracks in the fairings or dents or scrapes in the gas tank. Bike runs just like new and is ready to ride. Bike will come with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use. Comes with one key.

I’d like to see $10,900 or best offer for this example.

Feel free to contact me at 801-358-6537 or by email: rmurangemasters@aol.com

The Honda RVF400R was only available in the US via grey-market imports from overseas or Canada, and the usual registration headaches can apply if you’re in a state with stricter laws, so be sure to do your homework. This example is being sold by the very knowledgeable Gary in Utah with a Utah title, looks very sharp, with low miles and a tempting price. Yes, these are much more expensive than they were just a few years ago, but $10,900 gets you a very cool bit of Honda history in a practical, reliable package. Honestly, I’m a huge fan of the NC30/35 and it’s one of the few Japanese sportbikes I would love one in my garage… Assuming I could get a CA registration for it.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1998 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale
Honda March 14, 2019 posted by

Repsol Replica in California: 1994 Honda NSR250R SP MC28 for Sale

Pretty much the only way this Honda NSR250R could be more desirable would be for it to be in Rothmans colors. Honestly, I’m not even the biggest fan of race-replica schemes, but nobody does them like Honda, and the Repsol colors are a close second. But even in its “generic” colors, the MC28 version of Honda’s two-stroke sportbike represents some of the most advanced technology of the time, from the obvious, ELF-designed Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm to the very trick PGM-IV electronic ignition system.

That single-sided swinger increased weight, compared to a more conventional design, but Honda’s PGM-IV was incredibly advanced. The bike still used a pair of carburetors to fuel the 90° liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin, but every other component was cutting edge, taking sensor input from the throttle position, gear-selection, and rpm to create three-dimensional ignition maps for each cylinder and adjust Honda’s RC “Revolutionary Controlled” Valve.

There was no conventional ignition key on the MC28. Instead, you need one of Honda’s credit card-sized… cards that also housed the bike’s ignition map. De-restricting the MC28 is particularly difficult, since, ideally, you’d need to locate one of the factory HRC cards with a full-power map, or you’re stuck with the government-mandated 45hp. The SP version of the NSR seen here added a dry clutch to hook the 249cc twin to the six-speed cassette gearbox, along with lightweight Magtek magnesium wheels for reduced unsprung weight and a bit of additional flash.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Honda NSR250R SP for Sale

1994 Honda NSR250SP
Credit card model
HRC parts
Repsol colors
TSR expansion chambers and exhaust
TYGA triple crown
Ohlins shock
TYGA digital gauge
Racetech forks
Nissan disc brakes
Michelin tires
Excellent condition
Runs fantastic

Call or text for fastest response. 949-290-5162. Thank you, Brian. 

Great bike, but so many questions. Why is the mileage listed as “NA”? It’s located in California, but does it have a California title? Has it been de-restricted, or is it still rocking the Japanese-market 45hp? All of these things could conceivably influence the value of the bike significantly, and the $10,400 Buy It Now price suggests that the answer to the last two questions could be “no,” but it’s definitely worth messaging the seller if you’re interested in the bike.

-tad

Repsol Replica in California: 1994 Honda NSR250R SP MC28 for Sale
Triumph February 17, 2019 posted by

Mad About Saffron: 2000 Triumph Daytona 955i for Sale

This Triumph always makes me think of that classic Donovan song: “I’m just mad about Saffron, she’s just mad about me, they call me Mellow Yellow [quite rightly]” Honestly, it isn’t exactly mellow, but the Daytona 955i does look great in this pretty wild shade of yellow. It helps that the overall styling is simple and elegant, and there are no graphics to date the bike, but it’s still hard to believe this thing is nearly 20 years old now, and I think it’s one of the best-looking bikes of the period.

Designed as a road bike first and foremost, the 955i wasn’t intended to go head-to-head with sports multis from Japan. Which is a good thing, because in the rigorous instrumented testing that has always been popular for comparison tests when bikes are new, they blew the Triumph into the weeds. But while bench-racing and dyno comparisons may help sell the latest and greatest sportbikes and do offer an unbiased way to compare different machines, they don’t tell the whole story: then, as now, the Daytona is an excellent sportbike.

Back in the 90s Triumph made the calculated decision not to pitch their bike directly against the Japanese supertbike offerings. They knew they just didn’t have the resources to develop a bike that weighed less than, make more power than, or would turn laptimes within 1/10th of a second of them, so they went ahead and just made a pretty great all-around sportbike oriented towards the road. It’s a bit heavier, the riding position a bit more humane, the powerband more midrange-oriented, and the suspension just a little bit softer. All that meant the bike wasn’t the greatest at turning a hot lap, but a higher build-quality and timeless looks mean it’s a great bike for 95% of sportbike pilots, and those remaining 5% could ride the bike well enough

The original Daytona was available in three and four-cylinder versions, but only the triple got the nod for a redesign in 1997 seen here. It was redesigned in 2001 with a single, modern headlamp and a lighter, stiffer double-sided swingarm. That updated bike was much improved, but I prefer this earlier design, with the double headlight and the single-sided swingarm. This one appears to be in good condition, but miles aren’t especially low. The bike has the very cool undertail exhaust that several companies made for these when they were new, although I understand the official factory performance exhaust upgrade was the way to go for real improvements across the board.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Triumph 955i for Sale

This super bike is da BombDigity! It’s a real peach with only 21, 254 miles since birth. This machine is NOT for wimps or sissy-boys. When you grab the throttle on this 955cc, three cylinder throttle monster it’ll cause your ass to grab to seat OR… you just fall off. This monster comes with Triumph stock Brembo brakes on both tires. Speaking of tires these rubbers are brand new. Heck… wearing these rubbers just mike keep you safe in a Ron Jeremy movie starring Stormy Daniels. Remember what is was like to grab ahold of something and twist it and KNOW your day just got better? Well… This is the machine that will do that for you. This beast is fuel injected with an aftermarket Trident dual pipe under the seat. It already has the Battery Tender terminals attached to the batter so you can keep that battery fresh and ready to fire all year long. On a serious note though this example has never been track ridden and has only had two adult owners. This 2001 Triumph Daytona 955i is the bike that everyone wants to talk about and everyone loves to hear. 

This beast breathes through a larger, non-ram-air-equipped airbox with 46mm throttle bodies that feed a redesigned CNC-machined cylinder head featuring 1mm larger intake and 1mm smaller exhaust valves sitting at a narrow 23-degree included valve angle. New forged-aluminum pistons force a 12.0:1 compression ratio (over the previous 11.2:1 ratio), sitting atop stronger carburized connecting rods and a lighter crankshaft. This 955i pumps out somewhere in the neighborhood of 125 rear-wheel horsepower. On a dyno run that number bore with an impressive 128 hp at 10,500 rpm showing. The rear wheel is hung on a single-sided swing arm making for a killer look for sure.

The 955cc triple has no problem pulling the tall lower gears due to its stupendous amount of low and midrange torque. Big power starts at 4000 rpm (any lower than that requires a smooth throttle hand), launching the Daytona forward through the rev band like a locomotive on crystal meth; revs climb even quicker once the tach hits 7500 rpm, spinning up far faster than the old T595 ever could. The power continues to build up top, with the Triumph’s distinct exhaust timbre accompanying the blurring scenery.

The Triumph Daytona 955i can make time with the best of Japanese track weapons through the curves; it just generates its acceleration in a slightly less frantic manner. Despite the claims of a lighter crankshaft, the 955i still has a lot of flywheel effect. This can be a boon for riders less accustomed to the precise throttle control and gearbox manipulation necessary with a typical four-cylinder. Throttle application isn’t as critical, and sweeping turns where momentum is key allow you to showcase the Triumph’s stomping midrange. 

The best part of this bike is its near V-twin torque and low/midrange grunt with a four-cylinder’s screaming top end. The 955i is very deceptive in how it generates its speed. The gearing, especially in the lower cogs, is tall enough that the motor’s relatively loping gait fools you into thinking you aren’t really traveling that fast… until the next corner comes up. That tall gearing, however, when combined with the heavy flywheel effect, means care must be taken with downshifts during corner entries in the tighter stuff to avoid rear wheel hop.

If you’d like to come by and test ride this bike you must have in your possession a non-expired license with a motorcycle endorsement, you must have the full asking price of $5500USD in cash and you must let me hold the cash, your license and the keys to the vehicle you arrive in while you do the test ride.

Does anyone actually say “da BombDigity” anymore? Questionable taste in slang aside, this is a pretty great description of the bike, although the front brakes are Triumph-branded and not Brembo units. The seller does include the picture above showing damage to the tank with no explanation, and the scratch is gone in the other pictures, so it’s worth a message to the seller before bidding, considering he’s asking premium money for this one: the asking price is on the high side for a Daytona of this vintage at $6,500. Daytonas are especially appealing on the used market and offer pretty great value: they look great, have plenty of performance for all but the most hardcore road-racers, are reasonably reliable, and have been dirt-cheap for years now, although that’s bound to change sooner or later.

-tad

Honda February 13, 2019 posted by

Affordable Cult Classic: 1988 Honda Hawk GT for Sale

Styled like a Japanese Ducati Monster, Honda’s Hawk GT actually beat that bike to market by several years. It may have lacked a bit of sex appeal, but offered incredible versatility, reliability, and even some steering lock… The Hawk could scratch, commute, do some light-duty touring and, with a bit of work, made a great basis for a race bike. They’ve been extremely affordable for a while now, since they never really found an audience here in the US and are a bit too practical to be considered sexy, but fans love them, and low mileage examples like this one are pretty hard to find.

It was built around a simple, reliable 647cc 52° v-twin engine with liquid-cooling and three valves per cylinder. It was so reliable, in fact, it would go on to power thousands and thousands of Honda’s shaft-drive Revere and Deauville touring bikes. Hardly the most inspiring legacy, but it could push the little Hawk GT, also known as the NT650 in some markets and the Bros 650 in Japan, to a top speed of 107mph.

But the Hawk GT, aka NT650 aka Bros 650 had another designation: the RC31 and Honda’s competition legacy is visible if you look. Out back is the bike’s party piece, a Elf-Racing Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm. The front end had just one disc brake, but the bike’s relatively light 393lb dry weight meant stopping was adequate outside a race track, and a CBR600 front end with adjustable forks and an extra front disc and caliper is a popular swap.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Honda Hawk GT for Sale

1988 Honda Hawk 650 Low miles in mint condition. The Honda Hawk is the perfect choice for a low cost, fun good looking and reliable motorcycle. Single sided swing arm like its more expensive brother (RC30) and an excellent reliable power plant that is sure to give you more than ample power for every day use. You will be hard pressed to find a cleaner example of a bike that is 30 plus years old. Please feel free to call with any questions or for more information on this great machine.  Call  215 630 5952

It’s unfortunate the seller doesn’t include more pictures, but they are at least of high quality. There’s plenty of time left on the auction, with no bids yet at the $3,500 starting bid. These can typically be had for that number or less, although condition and the mere 4,000 miles mean this might still get snapped up by Honda collectors, since that’s still peanuts to pay for such a fun, reliable bike.

-tad

Affordable Cult Classic: 1988 Honda Hawk GT for Sale
Honda December 25, 2018 posted by

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

Long before “mass centralization” became a popular marketing buzzword for sportbikes, Honda was investing its bubble economy-inflated budget in a bike that took advantage of that very concept, the exquisitely-engineered VFR750R, otherwise known as the legendary RC30. Honda was so invested in sportbikes at the time that it actually sold an I4 and a V4 range of bikes concurrently, with their CBR and VFR filling slightly different niches. But when it came to their homologation bikes, Honda took their hard-won knowledge from the street-oriented V4 bikes and used it to develop the bike seen here, the VFR750R.

If you’re passingly familiar with Honda’s roadbikes, “VFR” probably evokes images of practical and engaging sport-touring bikes that lean on the sport end of the spectrum. This is not one of those bikes. The RC30 was developed to win production-based racing classes, specifically the then-new World Superbike Championship, although the ELF-designed single-sided swingarm hints at the bike’s endurance racing capabilities as well.

At the heart of the bike is obviously a compact V4 engine with a relatively narrow frontal area for good aerodynamics and very centralized mass, gear-driven cams for extremely precise valve control, and a 360°crankshaft that improved traction at the rear wheel, compared to a more traditional 180° unit. The concept of the 360° crank is that the combustion events are clustered close together, instead of spaced evenly throughout each engine revolution to allow the rear tire to “recover,” increasing traction and improving tire life. It also gives the bike a flatter powerband and a distinctive soundtrack that can be appreciated, even if your skills don’t extend to tire-spinning corner exits. The downside of a V4 is generally increased weight compared to an inline-four and tight packaging, especially with a 90° v-angle, as used here. Stripped of its fairing, the RC30 looks very dense and packed with mechanical bits, and V4s can be a bit of a bear to work on.

Reviews then and now describe it as an easy bike to take full advantage of, a bike that rewarded finesse, a bike that just did as it was told and allowed the rider to get on with winning. Power was unremarkable, weight was average, and nothing about the bike screamed “race winner.” But win it did, even against stiff opposition from Ducati, Bimota, Suzuki, Yamaha, and Kawasaki, and Honda only abandoned the V4 formula when it decided that rules in WSBK favoring v-twins were onerous and biased. So they built a v-twin and showed everyone they could win with those as well, but it was clear their hearts would always belong to the V4…

The RC30 is a handsome bike, with nearly perfect proportions and a wealth of amazing details, although it doesn’t have the easy wow-factor of something from Italy. It’s not often you can accuse Ducati of cribbing styling elements, but the 916’s taillights and distinctive single-sided swingarm look awfully similar to what you can see here. And unlike those Italian machines, every single component is carefully thought out to work as part of a complete package, and engineered to near-perfection.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

  • Long term ownership and fewer than 5,000 miles
  • 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30
  • Frame Number: 2100129
  • Engine Number: 2100162
  • Legendary 16-valve gear-driven DOHC 90 degree V4 engine
  • Reportedly fewer than 3000 produced
  • Single owner since 1990
  • Fewer than 5,000 miles from new.

One of the modern era’s few immediately collectible classics, the Honda VFR750R – better known as the ‘RC30′ – was created for just one reason: to win the World Superbike Championship, a feat it achieved in the nascent series’ first two seasons of 1988 and 1989. And while American Fred Merkel was bringing Honda its first two WSB crowns, Britain’s Carl Fogarty used an RC30 to win the TT F1 World Championship in 1988 and 1989, and the equivalent FIM Cup in 1990. No mere short circuit scratcher, the RC30 and its derivatives proved durable enough to win a hat-full of Endurance Classics too. That this latter requirement was also part of the design brief may be determined from the fact that a quick-release front fork and single-sided swinging arm – essential for speedy wheel changes – were part of an unrivaled specification that included a twin-spar alloy beam frame, 16-valve V4 engine with gear-driven cams, close-ratio six-speed gearbox and four-pot front brake calipers.

All of which did not come cheap: at the time of its launch in 1988 an RC30 cost near double that of other super-sports 750s. Despite the passage of time and progress of motorcycle technology, the RC30 remains a match for the latest generation of sports bikes but possesses an exclusivity that none of them can approach. ‘No other bike from the late-Eighties is lusted after like the RC30’, reckoned Bike, and few would disagree. And then there’s the exhaust note – loud, of course, but soulful enough to bring a pit crew to tears.

This RC30 was only very recently liberated from its second and very long-term owner. Purchased in the UK in 1990, fewer than 5,000 miles have been put on the bike since it was new. Not long after acquisition, the superbike was taken to the Isle of Man where it was driven around the race track, but not actually raced. In 1991 the machine was brought stateside. Regularly maintained since new, the previous owner reports that the RC30 was taken to the local Honda dealer for a pre-sale service within the last couple of months.

Fresh from nearly three decades of single owner care, this legendary machine is offered in excellent condition throughout. The engine starts readily, idles smoothly and has an abundance of power. The clutch is silky-smooth and brakes and suspension are near perfect. I would opt for a new pair of tires before serious road use and am happy to negotiate your tire choice in to the price.

This is a rare opportunity to acquire a motorcycling icon of performance and provenance and a must-have for a discerning collection.

For additional information and photos go to ClassicAvenue.com

V4s are all the rage these days, but Honda really pioneered them for modern motorcycle applications. Because who the hell else would want to design around such a packaging headache? Obviously, Honda has a history of doing things just because they can, practicality be damned: their oval-pistoned racebikes grew out of a staunch refusal to adapt to the changing technology of the Grand Prix scene and simply build a competitive two-stroke. And although that particular experiment was a failure, it shows the lengths to which Honda will go when they believe in an engineering concept. Luckily, the V4 wasn’t quite so complex and was ultimately vindicated by both in-period success and by the legacy it left behind. This example has very low miles and appears to be in very nice, original condition with an asking price of $44,900 and just one more day on the listing, so if you didn’t get what you wanted for Christmas this year and happen to have a bit of your holiday bonus left lying around…

-tad

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale
Honda November 3, 2018 posted by

Collectible Classic: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

For all the accolades it’s received, the Honda VFR750 RC30 is a subtle machine. To the uninformed, it doesn’t look all that special, especially now that single-sided swingarms have become fairly common. The proportions are good, it’s very compact, and the colors are classy: it’s a handsome bike, but doesn’t appear to be much more than another Japanese sportbike, although one that just looks right. And the spec sheet doesn’t really do much to give the game away either, although hints about that this is a very special machine…

The bike weighed in 458lbs with fuel, coolant, and oil, with power quoted at 118hp, good for a top speed just a shade north of 150mph.  It wasn’t especially lightweight, even at the time, and the power-to-weight looks decidedly tame now. Of course, numbers don’t tell the whole story. They never do. They’re just a useful metric, a way to compare apples to apples. I’m not good enough to test an RC30 against its peers and come away with anything useful to say, other than “that was cool.” And nearly thirty years later, I’m sure it’d be hard to understand the impact of a bike like this when it was introduced if you’re used to riding modern motorcycles, bikes that all learned a trick or two [or ten] from this one.

The RC30 might represent peak Honda: everything is perfectly engineered, and reviewers have always gushed about just how easy it was to get the most out of. As Pirelli says, “Power is nothing without control” and the RC30 was, by all accounts, an easy bike to ride fast, a bike that flatters the rider. The proof is in the pudding, as it were, and the bike won innumerable victories in Superbike and endurance racing. For a racebike, it had a surprisingly long shelf life, and was popular with both factory teams and privateers.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Honda VFR750 RC30 for Sale

  • VIN JH2RC3009LM200170, engine # RC30E-2200324 – matching numbers
  • only 642.8 street miles, never raced, one private owner from 1998
  • unmarked original paint, decals and finish
  • a 49-state ‘no smog’ L-model, one of approx. 316 to US-market spec.
  • climate controlled storage
  • clean, transferable Ohio title

118hp at 11,000rpm, red-line 12,500rpm, 51lbft torque at 7,600rpm, dry weight 400lb, over-square water cooled V4 DOHC, 6-speed, top speed quoted at 153mph

The RC30, a modern classic if ever there was one, was created solely to win the World Superbike Championship, a goal it met in the nascent series’ first and second years, 1988 and 1989. And while American Fred Merkel aboard his Team Rumi-sponsored purple and black RC30 was bringing Honda its first two WSB crowns, Britain’s Carl Fogarty used another RC30 to win the TT F1 World Championship in those same years, and the equivalent FIM Cup a year later in 1990. No mere short circuit scratcher or TT rocket ship, the RC30 proved strong lasting enough to win a bag-full of Endurance Classics, too. ‘That this latter requirement was also part of the design brief may be determined from the fact that a quick-release front fork and single-sided swinging arm – essential for speedy wheel changes – were part of an unrivaled specification that included a twin-spar alloy beam frame, 16-valve V4 engine with gear-driven cams, close-ratio six-speed gearbox and four-pot front brake calipers. All of which did not come cheap: at the time of its launch in 1988 an RC30 cost near double that of other super-sports 750s.’

Despite the passing of 30 years the RC30 remains a match for the following generation of superbikes but possesses an exclusivity that precious few of them can approach. ‘No other bike from the late-Eighties is lusted after like the RC30’, reckoned Bike. ‘And then there’s the exhaust note – loud, of course, but soulful enough to bring a pit crew to tears.’

This RC30 is a beautiful street example that is in stunning, as new, un-raced condition, showing 600-odd miles on the odometer. The original dealer was Cycle Sport Center, Inc. of Cridersville, Ohio. They sold it to Steve Bennett of Domi Racer Distributors, Inc. of Cincinnati, Ohio who rode the 600+ miles gently on the street, and then sold it, with a new set of tires, in late 1998 to the current seller, the first private owner. The bike has been meticulously stored unridden and maintained from then on. It comes with the original owners manual, unused tool kit, and the factory key.

A likely never-to-be-repeated opportunity to acquire an ‘as new’ RC30.

This bike, hidden away for 20 years, is in superb condition, so it can justify the label “museum quality.” It re-defines ‘as new.’ Its VIN tag, shown here, illustrates just how clean this bike is.

To maintain the RC30’s original finish, complicated by the use of several colors and many stick-on decals and stripes, it behooves the caretaker to take great care when moving it for photography and preparing it for sale. Remarkably, this bike has had the kid glove treatment from day one.

Foreign sales are invited. The buyer must pickup the bike from the seller. The seller can help with arranging third-party domestic and/or international transportation upon request, at the buyer’s expense. Pickup must take place within 21 days of the payment clearing the bank. Thereafter, storage will be charged at $10 per day.

Contact the seller via email in the first instant. Questions are invited.

Well, I think it’s always a good sign when the seller invites questions and the bike appears to be extremely clean, as you’d expect from a bike with just 600 indicated miles. Experts should feel free to chime in with opinions in the comments, and I’d love someone to fill me in on the signature that is visible on the tail section. I’m guessing it’s Bubba Shobert, who raced 500GP bikes for Honda, but the seller doesn’t seem to mention that little bit of trivia.

-tad

Collectible Classic: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale
Ducati August 26, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss Limited Edition #106/500

Troy Bayliss won the Superbike World Championship for Ducati three times between 2001 and 2008, on three different generations of desmoquattro superbike.  Ducati saluted his career with a great special edition -R in 2009, with his race number and Aussie flag livery.  Fittingly for a homologation special, number 106 of 500 has been improved for track use, but turned under 1,000 miles.

2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss Limited Edition #106/500

An major update for 2009 was the use of the testastretta “Evoluzione” engine, with a majority of titanium internals making 180 hp and 99 ft.-lbs. torque right off the showroom floor.  The archetypal trellis frame has been beefed up for the occasion, and components are the best that Öhlins, Brembo, and Marchesini had to offer.  Hidden in the carbon fairing are traction control with eight settings, and a data storage and analysis module.

Always intended for the track, the owner Chris has made a few choice mods but fewer miles.  Recent heavy maintenance was done on time not miles, either way ready for a new rider.  Kyle Racing suspension upgrades are advertised as more linear for the monoshock and adjustable for the triple-trees.  Most take-off parts and limited edition swag are included, and an aftermarket set of track bodywork could be negotiated.  Chris’s description:

Basics: 983 mi, single owner purchased from Ducati Winchester. #106/500. Waiting on paper title from DMV. Major service was done last year (belts/fluids/etc) and has 25mi since. New Supercorsa front and rear installed at that time.

Mods:
-Dan Kyle triples, rear linkage, and revalved shock w/spring rated for 185# if i remember correctly
-Vortex rearsets
-Clutch cover is aftermarket but I don’t remember who made it
-Race exhaust and ecu have always been on the bike
-1/4 turn throttle installed

Stock parts included:
-rearsets
-DDA module but no associated CD or manual
-standard exhaust and ecu
-clutch cover
-Bayliss LE plaque and bike cover
-rear shock w/linkage and triples

Bad:
-nick and small scratches on tank in seat area
-tank has expanded slightly, making contact with the factory steering stabilizer
-belly pan has 1/4″ crack on brake side

Though all 1098’s are better suited for the track than the road, #106 with Chris’s set-up might be even more so.  Most 1098’s have low mileage, and -R’s even less, but despite a nick here and there, this example’s condition is remarkable.  The 1098R is a high plateau in the superbike landscape, the Bayliss commemorative a peak, and this particular LE a great combination of more and less – power to weight, mods to originality, collectibility to miles.  Chris asks $24,500 and can be reached by email – here –.

Featured Listing – 2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss Limited Edition #106/500
Ducati August 24, 2018 posted by

R Favorite – 2008 Ducati 1098R #70/300

In -R trim, the Ducati 1098 was actually a homologation special with the new 1198cc engine.  In a win-win for the dealerships’ best customers, Ducati ceded some trackside modifications to get increased displacement, meaning that the showroom -R came with equipment that the racers would need, and street riders normally could just dream about.

2008 Ducati 1098R for sale on eBay

After the 999 styling debacle, the 1098 returned to classic Ducati superbike design, and a revised cooling system took some of the urgency out of escaping stop-and-go traffic.  180hp made for an instantaneous exit when conditions allowed, and though factory traction control kept the rear wheel under the bike, as the suffix implies the -R is really better suited to the track.  Suspension, brakes and wheels are very high spec, with Ohlins twin-tube monoshock, Brembo 330mm monoblock brakes, and forged Marchesini alloys.

Offered by a specialty auto dealer in St. Louis, this 1098R looks excellent for its 11,000-plus miles.  Normally a few high-end farkles would be expected, but they’re really not needed on an -R.  From the eBay listing:

This example is in phenomenal condition. Never having been laid down, all fairings, handlebars, and and levers are original. This bike is still completely in stock form. It runs and rides perfectly. While we are not a motorcycle dealer, the previous owner is a long term local client who owns a buys only top-notch merchandise. This 1098R is said to never have been tracked, and it shows. The condition is as good as it gets.

This -R has been ridden though not on the track, and likely dealer-maintenance could easily be verified.  Presuming this will make a rider happy, some riding and shop visits are probably better for the bike than a long time in the foyer and yearly oil change.  The 1098R offers massive performance in a now-classic trellis frame and carbon fairing, and the race dash offers timing and analysis.  The ask looks right up there until you look at the MSRP, which was double that just ten years ago.  Worth a close look if you have ready access to some fast roads…

-donn

 

R Favorite – 2008 Ducati 1098R #70/300
Honda August 3, 2018 posted by

Unconventional NC30: 1992 Honda VFR400R for Sale

Purists and Honda fans might want to avert their eyes now… Styled like a baby RC30, the VFR400R NC30 has long offered Honda V4 thrills and character in a more affordable, less intimidating package. Of course, the steady rise in RC30 prices means that values for the NC30 are on the way up as well, as the bike has always been like a gateway drug for folks craving a Honda V4 rush. But because the NC30 was made in greater numbers and the bike has been pretty affordable, the bike can be considered less sacred, and is more likely to be subjected to modifications…

At a glance, you could easily confuse an NC30 for an RC30. The design is intentionally very similar, although the NC has smaller headlights and looks overall a bit like an RC that’s been through the wash in hot water. It shares the RC’s beam frame design, Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm, and V4 configuration. And the difference in displacement and overall performance is mitigated by a substantial weight disparity: the NC weighs 401lbs wet, compared to the RC’s 488lbs wet.

We’ve gotten used to 200hp road missiles but, with sophisticated electronics needed to help manage these beasts, I think we sometimes underestimate just how much fun a pure, unadulterated 60hp motorcycle can be when it’s this light and this thoroughly developed.

The rise in prices will also likely lead to purists being more offended by bikes like this one. Honestly, the modifications, although fairly extensive, are pretty tasteful, carefully thought out, and easy to miss at first since the bike retains the iconic HRC colors. Personally I’m kind of a fan of endurance-racing squinty-eyed headlamp setups like this. Airtech makes some neat ones for the GSX-R and ZX-7 and it makes a great, but maybe too-familiar design look fresh.

Head on over to eBay for a whole bunch of additional pictures of this little resto-mod.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30 for Sale

This bike has been a project to build a very cool VFR400 I have worked on over the last couple years after I purchased it from a friend who owned it for quite a few years. This bike has been in the US for many years, it does not suffer from much of the corrosion issues that many new Japan NC30 imports are plagued with. This bike has a 17 digit VIN, which is how I bought it. Currently titled and reg’d in Arizona this bike IS LEGAL TO REGISTER IN CA with the 17 digit VIN. 

This NC30 is turn key, ready to ride, track day or display in your collection. EVERYTHING is new or fresh.

The following is BRAND NEW in last few weeks:

  • Complete fresh paint and bodywork $3500
  • Brand new Bridgestone S21’s front and back, no miles  $350
  • Brand new Tyga Full exhaust System $800
  • New Tyga fork adjusters and re-freshed forks $300
  • Freshly powdercoated wheels front and back $300
  • New Thermae upper and lower oversized radiators $600
  • NC35 17″ rear wheel $350
  • Full service front to back, oil, filter, coolant brake fluid front and back.

You can probably not build an NC30 like this for less… and I have more in it than I am asking for!!!

This is a 1992 VFR400. It is wearing a Tyga Suzuka Style cowling with an NC35 solo style tail section. The bodywork has just been freshly professionally painted in RC30 style classic Honda tri colors.

  • The bike is on an NC30 3.5×17″ front wheel with NC35 rotors, the rear wheel is an NC35 17″.
  • Wheels freshly powdercoated and wearing brand new Bridgestones. 
  • Tyga Performance Full Stainless exhaust system with carbon can. 
  • Tyga Performance rear sets
  • Tyga Performance fork caps with Full rebound adjustment
  • Ohlins rear shock
  • Thermae Oversized race radiators
  • HRC rear brake reservoir
  • Samco hoses
  • Braided brake lines

This NC30 is very clean and well sorted, it has a rare Ohlins rear shock, the NC35 17 inch rear and looks incredible with the Suzuka style bodywork. The bike is very clean for its age, please look at the photos with the lower bodywork removed. No leaks or mechanical problems, carbs recently cleaned, jetted for exhaust. Everything works, currently the bike does not have front blinkers installed, but I have a Tyga set that can go with the bike and be installed at your discretion. 

All other electrical works as it should, and it has an updated reg/rec, so no issues with the stock Honda ones that often fail. This bike is also equipped with an aftermarket top speed de-restrictor to get around the JDM 180 kph limit.

Not a stock NC30 by any means, but I think it has all the right mods, looks incredible and will make someone VERY happy… and you will NOT see another one like it at your next bike night!

Please check out all the pictures, contact me with ANY questions or if you need more photos!!!

So it’s not completely original, and it isn’t even close to stock, but the seller is obviously a knowledgeable enthusiast. Modifications like the NC35 rear wheel make plenty of practical sense and, if you’re looking for the V4 experience on a budget and have an irreverent streak, that $10,500 Buy It Now price represents a screaming deal.

-tad

Unconventional NC30: 1992 Honda VFR400R for Sale