Posts by tag: SB6

Bimota July 17, 2018 posted by

Nice Curves: Low-Mileage 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

Tad first posted this one in December when it had a buy-it-now of $25k. It was relisted and eBay showed a sale at just over $10k. It’s back now from the same seller with a buy-it-now of $15k or best offer. Thanks for the heads up, Donn! Links updated. -dc

The SB6 and SB6R were some of Bimota’s best-selling bikes of all time, and featured what must be the mother of all beam frames. That distinctive, very rigid aluminum unit used Bimota’s “Straight Connection Technology,” designed to link the steering head directly to the swingarm pivot. This improved chassis rigidity at the expense of servicing: you pretty much have to unbolt the engine and swing it forward to adjust the carburetors, change the spark plugs, replace the front sprocket, or access the alternator drive that tends to fail…

Fortunately, this earlier SB6 at least features a set of Suzuki gauges, a good thing since the later Bimota units supposedly pack it in with unfortunate regularity. They may look fairly mundane, but least they work! The engine should be pretty reliable too, and powerful to boot: those gauges are matched to the inline four and five-speed gearbox from Suzuki’s GSX-R1100.

I much prefer Bimota’s follow up to this bike, the SB6R which pretty much embodies my favorite aspects of 1990s styling. Sure, the 916 might be the more iconic 90s design, but part of the reason is that it doesn’t actually look like anything else from that era. The SB6R has the bulbous curves of the donor GSX-R, but with better colors, less weight, and more all-around Italian-ness.

But the strength of the original SB6 is that it looks like pretty much nothing from any era, unless you count Crea’s weird, organic-nightmare bodywork kits from the era… Go ahead and Google that, and then promise me you’ll never complain about Pierre Terblanche’s 999 ever again. The SB6 is striking wrapper that contains all the analog performance you could ever want, along with a powerplant that should be at least easy to get parts for, even if it isn’t actually all that convenient to work on.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

This is a one owner bike that has been stored inside a house.

Only 670 Miles!

The bike fluids have been drained and cleaned for proper storage. The bike is all original and near perfect.

It has never been on the market until now. I have had the bike in my house for over a year and just moved it to my warehouse and decided to let someone else enjoy it. I got the bike from a friend that knew the original owner and connected us.

I am open to fair offers. I listed the bike at top market price because someone might pay that. However make a fair offer and you might own this very rare, one owner Bimota.

Also, it has the Suzuki 1100 motor… Dyno specs in pics from years ago.

Since the seller “got the bike from a friend that knew the original owner and connected us,” wouldn’t that technically make this a two-owner bike? Even though the second owner only had it a year? Unfortunately, 1990s Bimotas were a bit unfinished from the factory, and great concepts suffered from pretty poor execution. If you had the time or money to go through your expensive Italian exotic to correct electrical faults and set up the suspension properly, you were left with a serious weapon for road or track. Of course, most buyers wanted their money to buy an actual, functioning motorcycle, and Bimota’s kit-bike quality certainly hasn’t helped values.  The $24,900 asking price is very ambitious for an SB6 but, with those kind of miles, maybe a collector who wants a very clean, low-mileage example of a very cool machine will bite. However, I’d say the seller’s negotiation technique could be… stronger.

-tad

Nice Curves: Low-Mileage 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale
Bimota June 21, 2016 posted by

Affordable Exotic: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

1995 Bimota SB6 R Side

Aside from the disastrous VDue, Bimota’s stock-in-trade was wrapping lightweight frames and fantastically exotic bodywork around reliable powertrains from established manufacturers. The magical formula that led to bikes like the Bimota SB6 seems so simple, it’s a wonder it took so long for other manufacturers to catch on: wrap too much engine in too little motorcycle, fit quality suspension, profit. But it’s obviously more difficult than it looks to make that formula work, and the Japanese tendency to overbuild was clearly blunting the otherwise very butch GSX-R1100’s performance: the SB6 made virtually the same power, but weighed a stunning 90lbs less than the donor Suzuki.

1995 Bimota SB6 Cockpit

With 1,700 built, the SB6 was one of Bimota’s most successful models, and that means that prices are relatively low for this Suzuki-powered blaster. It’s not a cutting-edge performer anymore but, with almost 150hp from the 1074cc inline four, huge midrange, and light weight, a well-ridden SB6 will certainly keep up with modern machines.

1995 Bimota SB6 Front

There are some very minor blemishes on this example, just some small chips around fairing fasteners. But aside from that awful touring seat pad that’d be in the garbage before I even got the bike home, the bike is pretty much immaculate and looks great in the very Italian tri-colore paintwork on the swoopy body panels. I personally prefer the look of the later SB6R, but there’s no doubt this is a very striking motorcycle.

1995 Bimota SB6 Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

9809 miles
excellent condition
72 year old owner can no longer ride
Well, that’s not all that much to go on, but considering the low mileage and the condition evident from the photos, maybe it’s all we need. This is a new listing, and there are no takers yet at the $4,800 starting bid. From what I’ve seen in the past couple years, an SB6 could be a very nice way to get a fast, relatively reliable motorcycle with exotic credentials, distinctive looks, and big, four-cylinder power. Keep in mind that, although the Suzuki powertrain should be easy to service, at least once you get access to it, some other parts like bodywork, electricals, and suspension parts could be hard to come by. It’s a real bummer when your beautiful Italian exotic is sidelined by unobtainable seals for those snazzy Paioli forks… So you’d never want one as your only ride but, considering what these Bimotas are going for, they’re looking very, very tempting at the moment.
-tad
1995 Bimota SB6 L Side
Affordable Exotic: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale
Bimota December 6, 2015 posted by

For your consideration: 1995 Bimota SB6

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1995 Bimota SB6 on ebay

I will to admit to hesitating before posting this one as the number of pictures is low, the paint job is apparently non-stock (per Bob @ Bimotaspirit) and mileage is higher than most Bimota’s.  But for many the SB6 is close-to-if-not the pinnacle of the 1990’s Bimota offerings and has even been listed as one of the sexiest Bimota’s ever built.

The 1990’s Bimota philosphy was pretty straighforward; take powerful Japanese engines, transport them into better handling chassis/frame, add better bodywork, exhaust systems, a few bits of trick like carbon fiber or billet footpegs. For the SB6, Bimota took the Suzuki GSX1100 engine (which put out about 150 hp) and placed it within a framework of big aluminium spars that curve from the steering head all the way down outside the engine.  The frame also incorporates the rear swing-arm pivots while the rear suspension was via an Öhlins unit placed horizontally.  The seat was a MotoGP style carbon-fiber floating design and everything was shaped to blend smoothly into the tank cover which like all the bodywork was a composite of carbon and fiberglass for lightness and good looks.  Oh there was also a Bimota designed exhaust the moved the exhaust under the tail/rear fairing unit.

Overall the SB6 was better looking and over 40kilos lighter than the GSX it was based on.  However it was also much more expensive than the standard GSX-R1100 and only 1140 units were built before Bimota stoped production to focus on the followup, the SB6R.

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This particular SB6 seems to have been painted with a style similar to the Bimota DB2 tri-colore, albeit with different colors.  It doesn’t look bad but probably won’t appeal to collectors looking for a full OEM setup.  Perhaps the OEM bodywork is available from the seller?

The bike has definitely been ridden as evidenced by the mileage and the pics the seller has posted.

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What is this SB6 worth?  I truly don’t know….on the plus side the SB6 is probably the most well-rounded model of all of the classic/pre-bankruptcy) Bimota models and a total of 1144 units were built so parts will probably be available with a bit of work.  On the negative side this SB6 seems to have non-stock turn signals, a missing rear mudguard, non-OEM paint, and the mileage might require some service (although the seller indicates fresh tires).

We tend to see more of the SB6R model that followed this one for sale here on RSBFS so info on current values of the SB6 model is kind of limited.  From what I was able to find, asking prices for a stock SB6 seem to be about 6,800 USD.  Current bidding on this one is at 4,650 with reserve not met and I think a fair price is somewhere in the middle.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

Note:  To see what a standard SB6 looks like, check out this RSBFS post from Aug 2013.

For your consideration:  1995 Bimota SB6
Bimota November 20, 2014 posted by

Featured Exotica: 1996 Bimota SB6

Update 11.21.2014: The seller has updated us that this SB6 has sold in just 24 hours. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

SB6_1

The fine folks from Rimini certainly have a different way of looking at the world. Ignoring all but performance and visual artistry, Bimota consistently delivers on both ends of the performance-art spectrum (DB3 Mantra notwithstanding). It takes a great deal of focus to beat the Japanese and Italian manufacturers at their own game while using their major engine & trans components, but that is exactly what Bimota has done, and continues to do. And this SB6 – S for Suzuki (GSX-R1100 engine in this case), B for Bimota, and 6 for the number of Suzuki iterations Bimota has created – is in great shape and looking for a new home. Of all of the classic (pre bankruptcy) Bimotas, the SB6 is probably the most well-rounded model – although that Gixxer powerplant still packs a major wallop!

Featured Listing: 1996 Bimota SB6

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Among the trio of Bimota founders you will find none other than Massimo Tamburini; the “Ta” in the Bimota name comes from his last two initials. You may remember Tamburini from such other hits as the Ducati 916/996/998 as well as the MV Agusta F4 series. With a design portfolio like that, you would expect something special, and the SB6 delivers on all fronts: From the tasteful mix of aluminum chassis, carbon bodywork, CNC-milled trees and miles of paintwork, to the chassis detail including the “peek-a-boo” offset rear shock and the under tail exhaust. Interestingly Tamburini (who we sadly lost in April of this year) was no longer a partner in Bimota after the mid 1980s, yet he continued to return and do contract work for his former company. His legacy is obvious in the SB6.

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From the seller:
1996 Bimota SB6. Original bike in excellent condition. Has 7,140 miles. It’s been in a private collection of 7 other Bimotas and many other bikes for the last 8 years. This is the last of the Bimotas in the collection; wasn’t planning on selling it, but maybe it’s time for it to go as well. Currently being serviced and new battery being installed.

Asking $7700 or serious cash offer for this Bimota. Bike is located in Paradise Valley, AZ. Clean/clear Arizona title. Appointments can be made for serious buyers to view the motorcycle.

SB6_7

This particular bike is a Featured Listing from RSBFS reader Tony. The asking price is *very* reasonable considering the condition of the bike and the mileage (yes, there are some folks that actually enjoy riding their Bimotas!). If you are looking for an exotic, you could do much, much worse than an SB6. And if you are looking for an SB6, this one should be worthy of consideration. Jump over here to take a look at all of the details on the bike, and then give the man a shout. While Bimota is still in the bike business, they don’t quite make them like this anymore.

MI

Featured Exotica:  1996 Bimota SB6
Bimota August 21, 2014 posted by

Inside Job: 1997 Bimota SB6

SB6_5

A bike with serial number 001 might be the cat’s meow, but bikes lovingly stored inside, well presented with high resolution pictures, and offered with low (read: almost no) miles will be what drive the pricing curve upwards. This 1997 Bimota SB6 is just such a bike. This is a great example of the breed, sporting only 49 miles since new. It’s always ironic how locating one rare bike invariably spawns a rash of similar machines – this is the second SB6 this week. Everything seems to go in cycles, and we appear to be in a Bimota vortex at the moment. So step into your hot tub time machine and let’s jump back to 1997!

1997 Bimota SB6 for sale on eBay

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From the seller:
Reluctantly for sale is my new 1997 SB6 Bimota. I purchased the bike from a Bimota dealer who has a collection of over 30 Bimota’s going all the way back to when Bimota raced two strokes. The dealer had two SB6s and agreed to sell me one. I have documentation from the dealer to verify the mileage on the bike. The dealer serviced the bike before I took delivery; I rode the bike around the block to make sure it ran properly, then removed the tank, drained the fuel and parked the bike in my den. I moved it outside to see if I could get better pictures but the paint has such a gloss that it reflects everything around it. The pictures don’t do the bike justice. The bike is all original, including the tires with the exception of the Bimota cool air kit and carb jetting. The dealer also has a tri color SB6 and liked the black wheels so he had the wheels on this one powder coated black, they are perfect and in my opinion look much better than the original silver. This is my fourth Bimota (YB6, YB10 and two SB6s). The 42 miles were put on the bike when it was delivered to the dealer to get it tuned properly then put in his collection and the last 7 miles were when I took it for a short ride to confirm the tune.

SB6_4

When Bimota built a bike during this era, they took the power train and major electrical components from a donor – in this case, a GSX-R1100. This allowed Bimota to save the development cost of these items, and allowed them to focus on performance, handling and just basic good looks. This grew from the kit building phase of Bimota, where a buyer would receive a frame, bodywork, and sometimes wheels and suspension components. All the rest came from a donor bike – the engine, trans, electrics, lighting, gauges and what have you. Slowly but surely, Bimota began creating whole bikes, and eventually they built honest to god factory-level machines. While they continue to use donor power, the rest is very much Bimota.

SB6_3

This bike looks fantastic for its age. If you believe in the collector adage that you should buy the very best example of a model you can find, this may well fulfill your SB6 bucket list. With monster power, stunning looks and handling that is relevant to this day, this Bimota will make someone an awesome ride… or artistic expression in your den if you prefer. Check it out here!

MI

Inside Job: 1997 Bimota SB6
Bimota August 19, 2014 posted by

Looking out for #1: 1995 Bimota SB6 Serial Number 001

SB6_3

In the world of collectibles, numbers matter. Key numbers are how many were produced, and how many people want one. The number of miles is pretty important, as is matching numbers in some cases. US-based buyers will be interested in the VIN number – fewer than 11 digits can create a registration hassle in some states. But to own the first bike produced in a series – the number 1 machine – is a whole different ballgame. This Bimota SB6 is listed as just such a bike. It is unknown how much of a difference the #1 bike in a series makes in terms of pricing, but I would guess it has to do with how coveted the bike in question might be. The Bimota SB6 is a popular model for the Rimini company (we see more “SB” models on this site than any other Bimota model). Does a serial number “001” make this super rare? All the cool cats seem to think so. Check it out here, and then visit the comments section and let us know what you think. Are you looking out for #1?

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1995 Bimota SB6 for sale on eBay

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From the seller:
1995 Bimota SB 6, 1st Year sn # 001. GSXR 1100 motor based sport bike.
For serious collectors, the chance to get a sn # 001 bike.

SB6_1

MI

Looking out for #1: 1995 Bimota SB6 Serial Number 001
Bimota August 16, 2012 posted by

Bimotus Maximus: Instant Bimota Collection For Sale!

Location: Mesa, AZ

Price: $75,000

Well you don’t see this everyday, a chance to purchase a whole gaggle of Bimotas (Bimoti?) all at once! Looks like someone is liquidating their whole collection. Without further delay, lets take a look at what you get!

Up first is Bimota’s crack at GP engine making with this 1998 500 Vdue with 0 miles. These pack about 110hp in a 500cc two-stroke and a light weight package.

Next is this 1991 YB10 Dieci which sports a 1000cc Yamaha in-line four and makes about 145hp.

This 1992 DB2 shares the motor of a Ducati 900ss as well as all sorts of trellis framing, even the swing arm. 1 of 34 tricolor models in the world.

Here we have a 1996 SB6 Series II came with a GSX-R1100 engine and had fancy suspension bits such as an Ohlins rear shock and some Brembo binders up front.

The 1997 SB6R also featured the GSX-R1100 engine as well as a hefty original price tag of around $35k.

Next is a 1997 YB11, which again featured a Yamaha liter engine. However this bike weight about 31lbs less than the standard Yamaha of the same year.

Lastly, we have a 1999 DB4 which again featured the Ducati 900ss engine of its time. Brembo, Ohlins, Paioli can all be found on this little number

So you get all 7 of these 90’s era Bimotas for a BIN prics of $75k (one for each day of the week). With the help of some previous listings/selling prices for all of these bikes and a calculator, I would put the total price of these at about $60k-$65k. Usually the thrill of collecting comes from the process of hunting down and acquiring collection piece by piece. If you don’t have time for that and love instant gratification, then you can certainly score a heard of Bimoti today! I would absolutely want to see detailed specs on each bike (mileage, maintenance, history, etc…). You can check out the auction here and start your instant Bimots collection today!

-JS

Bimota May 1, 2012 posted by

May 1st Mailbag — A Little Late but Worth the Wait

Hey guys,

Sorry for the delay this week but we got a ton of submissions, probably twice as many as usual. While I’ve passed on a few almost all made the cut. Thanks for your submissions and have a great rest of your week!

dc

Chris M shoots us his listing for a 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS. Just 5400 miles and located in San Diego. Good luck with the sale!

Perhaps the deal of the day (even with the goofy signals), Chris forwards the first of several sweet finds in the Toronto area. Here’s a 1996 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for just $4500 CAD. Doug needs to a leave a comment on this one!

Chris S. forwarded us this great looking 1985 Ducati MHR Mille in San Francisco. $21500, miles not disclosed.

Dan spotted this freshly imported 1989 Honda VFR400 NC30 for sale in Toronto. 27k kilometers, $6000 CAD.

By now you know I’m a sucker for mass produced sportbikes of the past that have somehow survived. This one strikes a chord with me as my first bike in college was an FZR 600. This one spotted by Louie has only 70 miles and is located in the Winston-Salem area. Seller is asking just $3400. {flame suit on!}

Gregg spotted another sharp Aprilia Bol ‘d Or RSV1000R in Reno for $9350 with under 5k miles!

Chris spotted an interesting 1992 Yamaha 3TJ FZR400RR for sale in Toronto. After conferencing with Doug, it appears it does have OEM bodywork though looks painted. For $2499 CAD might be worth a look for such a trick little machine. For those in the U.S., check out our sponsor SpeedWerks, who have extensive FZR400 experience on track.

Craig spotted this Red Bull Rookies Cup KTM 125 GP Bike on the WERA classifieds. It’s a brand new bike, never ridden, and has spares. $24k.

Adam forwarded this rare Bimota SB6 in New Haven for $9999. Rare because it’s actually been ridden nearly 9k miles!

Tim forwards us another nearly new track bike, a 2008 Honda CBR125 track bike with just 2km’s. For just $4500, this looks like a fun track day machine for a smaller rider.