Posts by tag: inline four

Suzuki September 22, 2019 posted by

Pun Free Post: 1982 Suzuki GSX1000S Katana for Sale

One of these days, I’m going to write a Suzuki GSX1000S Katana post that incorporates all of the “edgy styling” and “sharp detailing” and “cutting edge design” jokes into one, long sword reference, every sentence carefully forged into a kind of Damascus steel masterpiece of bad puns. Today is not that day though. Instead, I’ll focus on the bike and spare you my attempts at metallurgical humor. Let’s be honest here: the Katana was not a brand-new bike, even though it certainly looked the part when it was introduced in 1981. In fact, the styling was really the only forward-looking element of the design, aside from a set of anti-dive forks.

The engine was Suzuki’s proven air/oil-cooled 1074cc inline four with standard five-speed gearbox from the GS1100, hung in a traditional frame with a twin shock rear suspension, and a 19″ front wheel matched to a 17″ rear. That familiar and bullet-proof mill featured DOHC, 16-valve heads and Suzuki’s TSCC “Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber” to put out 111hp, but the 511lbs dry weight obviously blunts performance somewhat.

It’s not that the Katana was slow, exactly. How could a big four-cylinder motorcycle with slippery, wind-tunnel aerodynamics ever be slow? But it was decidedly old-school, and the GSX-R that followed immediately in its wake showed the real way forward for the sportbiking world. With a bit of work, the Katana will handle well enough, but if you think “muscle bike” instead of “sportbike” you’re probably less likely to be disappointed. Top speed was a claimed 147mph, with tested speeds coming to within a few ticks of that, but it was reportedly pretty terrifying at anywhere near that speed. Best keep it around the ton and just enjoy the old school flexibility.

Slower speeds also permit you to bask in the attention you’re likely to attract, since this is the kind of bike that turns heads wherever you go. Styling was done by former BMW designer Hans Muth and his firm Target Design, and the result was hugely polarizing, but certainly not boring. Later bikes even got the pop-up headlight that looks like was always intended for that tiny nose cone. I’ve personally always been a huge fan of the gauge cluster, where the overlapping faces of the primary dials save space and generally look pretty trick.

Teased in 1979 and introduced in 1981, the bike came to the USA in 1982 powered by a smaller version displacing 998cc to stay under the 1025cc limit for Superbike competition, but but the full 1074cc version came hot on its heels in 1983. The seller simply refers to it as a “Katana” and it’s entirely possible we could have the 1000cc or the 1100cc version here.

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Suzuki GSX1000S Katana for Sale

I’m selling a beautiful Katana out of my personal collection! It is one of the first 1000 of production! The bike runs awesome, in good weather it will start and idle 90% of the time without the choke! It was totally gone through buy RR Restorations! New, brakes, battery and tires. The carbs, front and rear calipers and anti dive have all been professionally rebuilt! With only 11K miles I hate to see it go, but its time for someone else to enjoy it as I did! The bike come with a money back guarantee! However, your deposit is none refundable and buyer is responsible for return shipping! This is a beautiful bike that will turn head anywhere you ride it! If you have any questions please feel free to ask! Please free to make and reasonable offer! I don’t have to sell it, just what to make room for another! The bike runs, rides and everything works the way it should!

The buyer is completely responsible for shipping and the arrangements if needed! I will help the shipper in any way possible!

Katanas have proven popular as the basis for resto-mod projects, owing to their relatively low values, readily-available parts to maintain and tune the strong, reliable engine, and the wild design that even today looks like some dimension-hopping refugee from an alternate, much cooler future 2019 than the one we actually got. This one should probably be left alone though, with maybe just some updates to the fork and shock to keep the bike’s wayward high-speed handling in check. It’s not completely original, with the Kerker exhaust, but looks way too clean in general to chop up, even in the name of “improvements” and, at $7,000 is still a relative bargain.

-tad

Pun Free Post: 1982 Suzuki GSX1000S Katana for Sale
Yamaha September 21, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Low mileage 2000 Yamaha R1

Update December 2019: This bike has been sold to an RSBFS reader. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

As we spill countless pixels on aging, air-cooled weapons of yesteryear, bikes that ride on weird anti-dive forks and odd-size tires, it’s easy to forget that machines like the first-generation Yamaha R1 are quickly approaching classic status but can still hang with modern stuff. As traction control and other rider aids become the norm, that is less and less true, but to the average guy, the difference is still miniscule.

That’s why bikes like today’s 2000 Yamaha R1 are so appealing. For starters, it’s an example of a bike that carries the weight of every superlative and cliched modifier you can stack on it. Game changer? Yep. Fastest of its time? Yep. Racebike with taillights? Yep. In 1998 when this first R1 bowed, there simply was no equal in any dealership. More refined rides existed, but as would-be road racers soon found out, this thing would see the big end of 140 before the end of the street (if you had a straight, deserted road you might hit upper 160’s) and make long sweepers into tight esses.

This 2000 Yamaha R1 has been very well looked after, with less than 5,000 miles on the dial and just a few small blems to show for its 19 years. It has brand-new tires, and a recent carb clean, oil change and tank flush. A D&D exhaust is the only deviation from stock.

From the seller:

I am the second owner of this absolutely stunning 2000 Yamaha YZF-R1 with only 4874 miles (may go up slightly for short ride). A true game changers and a definite appreciating classic. Aside from the D&D slip on exhaust this R1 is completely stock. Brand new tires (Michelin Pilot Power). Just had a carb clean, oil/filter change and tank flush performed. The bike runs fantastic – as good as it looks. No leaks. Transmission works great as does all lights/blinkers/horn. This bike is turn key ready to ride needs nothing!

There are a few small paint imperfections that I have pointed out in pics. Nothing serious but I know how nerve wracking it can be buying a bike sight unseen. Please check the pics and video. Any questions just ask.

Location: Houston, Texas
$4750 Negotiable.

You can see a start up/running video of the bike here:

Make no mistake, at $4,750 OBO, this thing will move quickly, and it won’t be long before that price is absolutely unheard of for an unmolested early R1.

Featured Listing: Low mileage 2000 Yamaha R1
Kawasaki September 13, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Kawasaki Ninja 1000R

Born to succeed the venerable Kawasaki GPz900R, the 1986 Kawasaki Ninja 1000R spent two glorious years at the top of the list of world’s fastest production bikes before giving way to the ZX-10R, whose longevity has yet to meet its bounds. But for its fleeting moment in the sun, the 1986 Kawasaki Ninja 1000R was very close to all things to all people. With anti-dive forks, a single-shock swingarm and the best part of 125 horsepower, they were truly astonishing sportbikes.

But those were the days before race replicas became everything, before comfort was seen as a detraction more than a benefit, and the bikes had plush seats, reasonable pillion perches, reasonable riding positions and stopped the wind effectively. They were just as happy to cruise the slab as they were to scare the burritos out of you on a track.

This example is as close as you’ll come to winding the clock back to 1987 or so, when lightly used Ninja 1000Rs still patrolled dealership floors. It has some light crazing on one side from being leaned against a wall, but apart from that, it’s a stellar, low-mile example of the name. The seller says the only things that have been changed from factory spec are the tires and grips. It has been ridden sparingly and stored in a heated garage since the seller bought it in 2001. The treatment has paid off, too, as every original rubber piece looks almost as good as new.

From the seller:

Up for sale is my original unmodified 1986 Kawasaki Ninja 1000r.
This bike has all original paint and mechanicals, the only items that have been changed are the tires and grips.
The 6898.4 miles are all original and the bike has never seen rain with me or the previous owner.
I’ve owned this bike since 2001 and haven’t ridden it much in those years but have kept it inside a heated garage the whole time.
This bike starts right up every summer when I take it out for a short ride and it sounds great, I’ve only used non ethanol fuel in this the entire time so there is no damage to the fuel system or carbs.
All the plastic and rubber parts are still soft and pliable as they have had no exposure to sunlight or rain, the seat is still as soft and flexible as when new.
The windshield is also original but the black accent paint on the inside edge pretty much all flaked off so it’s clear now all the way through, as you can see from the pictures there is some cracking at the screw holes but the windshield is still very clear.
The tank has a small paint chip on the left side and some paint damage on the left fairing where it appears a prior owner parked to close to a wall which you can see in the pictures, I choose to not touch up these areas as I wanted this bike to stay all original.
This would be a great addition to any motorcycle collection as it looks as good today as it did 33 years ago.

$5900.00
apache1479@hotmail.com

These truly original and truly market-changing bikes are becoming rarer and rarer, especially the beautifully kept non-restored examples. At $5,900, this bike is an easy way in to an incredible late-80s street machine.

Featured Listing: 1986 Kawasaki Ninja 1000R
Kawasaki September 11, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1997 Kawasaki ZX-7RR N2

12.28.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Maybe it’s the Ninja Turtles paintjob, or the twin headlights or the gaping air scoops that flank the headlights, but the 1997 Kawasaki ZX-7RR oozes with purpose. After all, nothing about a lime green-and purple single-seater sportbike says “ride me to work.” These are the colors of losing your chicken strips up the inside of a dentist on a Ducati. This is the livery of a long day in the general district courthouse followed by indefinite license suspension.

The 1997 Kawasaki ZX-7RR was built to homologate the bikes Rob Muzzy was tuning to within an inch of their lives for AMA Superbike and Formula USA competition. Aside from the fairly obvious single-seat tail section and deleted passenger pegs, the bikes had beefier Nissin brakes, fully-adjustable suspension and 41mm flatslide carbs.

With Doug Chandler and Scott Russell on board, the ZX-7RR’s predecessor took four AMA Superbike titles in the 1990s, as well as a brace of Daytona 200s courtesy of Russell. Eric Bostrom also rode a ZX-7RR in the latter half of the ‘90s.

Thanks to the big flat slides, a tall first gear, the ZX-7RRs made pretty miserable street bikes, which led to most of them being stripped of their street equipment and thrown around amateur road racing series and track days with abandon. To find one as blemish free and low mileage as this one is a real rarity.

This 1997 Kawasaki ZX-7RR N2 is completely stock except for an air-valve mod, and has done less than 6,000 miles. It resides in Canada, but the seller says he has explored importing it to the U.S. and does not anticipate any serious issues.

From the seller:

I have for sale a 1997 Kawasaki ZX7RR in very good or even excellent condition. This fine example has been ridden only 9500km (5900mi) by its original owner. The seat cowl, tank, upper cowl and fender are scratch and dent free. There are a few paint chips and a small rub mark on the muffler that I have tried my best to point out in the pictures. I can provide more pictures if desired.
The bike is stock with the exception of the seat pad which I had re-upholstered.

I believe I am the third owner and I have had it in my collection for 6 years. Although not ridden during that time, I periodically started and ran the bike and kept fresh fuel in it. I did recently ride it to the local garage for a safety inspection and everything performed as a like new bike should.

I live an hour and a half east of Toronto, Ontario and would consider delivering the bike to the New York City area or Buffalo NY. This model may be imported into the USA (VSP312) via an importer to whom I would supply the paper work including the ‘Recall letter’. i have installed a MPH speedometer face as required for US importation.

I am asking $16,000 for this clean example of a ZX7RR.

At $18,500 $16,000 U.S., the bike is priced as a rare collector bike, and a low-production piece of AMA history. Considering that similar homologation mounts from Honda and Yamaha of this vintage are going for more than double that, this Kawi represents something of a bargain.

Featured Listing: 1997 Kawasaki ZX-7RR N2
Yamaha August 21, 2019 posted by

What’s in a Name – 1997 Yamaha YZF1000R Thunderace

Never a champ in the showroom, the YZF1000R bided the factory’s time until the R1 was ready, and is a smashing buy on the used market.  This one is in rather special condition with just 9,000 miles.

1997 Yamaha YZF1000R Thunderace for sale on eBay

Yamaha offered the liter-sized YZF offshore for several years while we had the comparable but heavier FZR.  For one year before the R1 appeared, the Thunderace showed the refinement of the Genesis and EXUP systems in a ergo-friendly package.  Part of the refinement was weight control, tipping the scales at 430 lbs. dry.  Reputed close relations to the YZF750R gave great handling, and the 20-valve engine reported 145 hp.  Analog 38mm Mikuni carburettors were helped by electronic ignition with throttle position sensors providing another data point to the EXhaust Ultimate Power valve, which alters exhaust collector volume to increase flow.

With only two owners over 22 years, this YZF looks excellent.  If the new owner is a rider, new rubber will be required.  From the eBay auction:

1997 YZF1000R in beautiful, extra clean condition. Never crashed. Very original stock motorcycle except for installation of a Yoshimura Stainless Steel Exhaust.  Lockhart tank bra, original tool kit and aftermarket rear stand included.

9,000 original miles on the odometer. Recent carburetor rebuild and carb synchronization. New air filter installed. Bike runs excellent, very fast and tons of torque. No leaks anywhere. Can provide video of cold start and engine running if desired.
Lights, blinkers, horn and gauges all work as expected. Good battery. Brakes in good condition. Tires are OK but should be replaced soon.  This YZF is an excellent, well kept example of a very unique and rare motorcycle. All original factory installed labels and stickers are still in place. Very nice bike for a Yamaha collector.

The YZF1000R was the transition model between the FZR1000 and the venerable YZF R1. Although Yamaha manufactured this model from 1996 thru 2002 for the European market where it was sold as the Thunder Ace, it was available in the United States for only one year in 1997 and was marketed and sold as the YZF1000R.

Yamaha claimed a drag coefficient of just .29 for the roomy fairing, but reviewers groused about the right wrist affecting gas mileage.   The torquey powertrain offered smooth acceleration from 2,000 to 11,500 rpm and 100 mph in second gear !  This model never had a chance to develop a following here, but became a distinctive Euro sport-tourer.  A good value for the buy-it-now, this example could go back to two-lane two-up, or be shown as a mint single-year rarity.

-donn

What’s in a Name – 1997 Yamaha YZF1000R Thunderace
Yamaha August 13, 2019 posted by

Museum Piece: 1986 Yamaha FZ600

It’s not every day you see a 1986 Yamaha FZ600 restored to museum quality sporting a fuel tank that has never had gas in it. There are plenty of nice ones around, but their value isn’t commensurate with a full restoration, and most have been ridden enough to just be cool old-school riders. This one is the exception. It hasn’t cracked 3,000 miles, and the seller completed most of a cosmetic restoration with the intention of making a time capsule.

1986 Yamaha FZ600 for sale on eBay

According to the listing, most of the  bodywork is NOS, and we assume that includes the fuel tank, since its almost 2,500 doesn’t jibe with the notion that it has never had gas in it. Still, you really just won’t see a more perfect example of a bike from the dawn of fully-faired race replicas.

The 1986 Yamaha FZ600 was designed to tap into rising demand for 500cc GP-aping street bikes, and used a modified version of the engine from the XJ600. It was something of a parts-bin special, sharing its engine and brakes with a raft of contemporary Yamaha offerings. It was replaced in 1988 by the much better known and better-loved FZR600. But there is nothing like the original, and this bike embodies its era wonderfully.

From the eBay listing:

99% perfect FZ600 museum piece. I purchased this bike about 5 years ago as a display only keeper.
The bike was in perfect running order but hasn’t been started since it’s minor cosmetic restoration.
If the next owner chooses to ride it, at minimum it will need a battery and gas (the tank is NOS and has never had fuel in it. Other than that it might need a carb cleaning at the most.

When I purchased the bike it was a little beat up cosmetically, nothing major just a scratch here or there. Over the last 5 years I replaced all flawed items with NOS parts including most body panels. My intention was to bring it back to showroom condition.

The FZ is 100% stock, unmolested and is a perfect as you will find, you will not be disappointed.

US sales only/ shipping is buyers responsibility/ 0 feedback bidders will be canceled unless I am assured you are serious.

With more than five days left in the auction, bidding on this cool time capsule has yet to eclipse $3,000. If this keeps up, someone is going to snag a deal.

Museum Piece: 1986 Yamaha FZ600
Suzuki August 2, 2019 posted by

Just Right: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R400R for Sale

Update 8.2.2019: This seller has upgraded to a Featured Listing. The bike is back on eBay and is now NO RESERVE! Good luck to buyers and seller! Links updated. -dc

I’m a big fan of smaller, less powerful sportbikes. Sure, maybe that sounds like I’m not a real motorcycle enthusiast, since I’m not addicted to excessive horsepower… But I’ve always found that chasing peak power to be a bit of a pointless exercise: there’s always something newer and faster. I really can’t use the power most of the time anyway, especially on the road. And let’s be honest: neither can most of you. I love the idea of a 250cc inline four, but the meagre power output and small physical size mean they’re probably not practical for my 6’2″ frame, but something like this Suzuki GSX-R400R might be perfect.

Many sportbike fans don’t realize that it was really the GSX-R400 that came first in 1984, a year before the GSX-R750 was introduced. Although they could be easily forgiven, since it wasn’t available in all markets. Unlike the bigger 750 and 1100 versions, the 398cc inline four was actually liquid-cooled, and produced a claimed 59hp, a power figure that didn’t really change throughout the different versions, since it had more to do with government regulation than actual performance. It was the lightest, fastest 400 four-stroke on the market when it was introduced, although other manufactures quickly jumped on the bandwagon and the whole class was hotly contested throughout the 80s and 90s.

The GSX-R400 was redesigned for 1986 and introduced SATCS, Suzuki’s “advanced, three-way cooling system” that used both water and oil to cool the engine. So basically like a normal liquid-cooled engine… I assume it incorporated an oil-cooler so they could tie it in with the bigger, “oil-boiler” SACS bikes, but technical details are pretty scarce online, so I’d love input in the comments. Those 1986 bikes also used an oddly modern-looking rectangular headlamp that wasn’t popular, so the 1987 bikes went back to the twin-round lamp setup. 1988 saw the bike styled to tie in with the whole GSX-R lineup, with “baby Slingshot” looks, a new aluminum frame, regular-old liquid-cooling, and a set of “slingshot” carburetors, along with a shorter wheelbase and a claimed 352lb dry weight. 1989 seen here was virtually the same bike, but added the “R” at the end of the name, probably for added poweR…

The seller is asking $4,999.00 for this particular GSX-R400R. It needs a little bit of mechanical attention to make it a runner but, as you can see from the pictures, it doesn’t need much cosmetic work. The original listing has plenty more pictures if you need convincing.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 GSX-R400R for Sale

This is a 1989 Suzuki GSX-R400R GK73. I found this bike in Japan back in 2015, it was a very rare color for 1989, few of them were made and it really caught my eye as being especially unique. The GK73 was an interesting model with the aluminum frame and liquid cooled engine. 

I imported this GSX-R legally from Japan and it has a clean and clear U.S. title with plate and street registration.

I did a mini restoration on this bike, it still needs a small amount of work so I am selling it AS IS (at a loss as well as I have over $6000 in it).

The bike currently does not run. I have rebuilt the carbs with the Litetek kit replacing all internal o-rings and seals. I had the bike running well but the fuel inlet o-rings weeped so I replaced those with original Suzuki new OEM ones. One of these leaked and the carbs needed to be synced… somewhat defeated and pulled away on other projects this is how I left the bike. So it will run, but you will at a minimum need to pull carbs and check the fuel inlet o-rings and make sure they are seated/installed properly and then double check carbs, re-fit and sync. The bike has a decent battery installed and all electric/lights work as they should.

The bike has had a FULL service front to back and has ZERO miles on the following. 

ALL fresh fluids front to back, brake fluid, coolant, engine oil. New spark plugs. Front forks were rebuilt with new fluid and seals, brand near tires on freshly powdercoated wheels with new bearings and valve stems.

I had the bike completely repainted in the stock colors and using all of the original OEM bodywork! The originally paint had some sun fading and typical scuffs and scratches for its age but no major damage. Likewise the wheels had some marks and corrosion so I had them powder coated, I did not get an exact match of the bronze type color Suzuki used on this unique paint scheme but it is pretty close!

This is a VERY nice GSXR-400R, most of the ones I have seen in Japan and elsewhere need a lot of work. I have done all the hard stuff (and costly work $$$!!) already, it will just need a few hours put into the carbs and some tuning work to have a VERY NICE rider!

I can help arrange shipping anywhere in the U.S. or world wide including crating!

It’s in California and claimed to be “plated” here but definitely do your homework. It’s not perfect, but the simple mechanical work indicated by the seller is something you’d expect of any bike this age, and the cosmetics look really sharp. I’ve ridden a Honda NC30 and you might think that the 60hp of a JDM 400 sounds pretty weak, but you might be surprised. Sure, you do find yourself twisting the throttle to the stop more often than on other bikes, but it means you get to run the bike to redline more often as well. If you and your buddies regularly head out to terrorize the freeways at 160mph, you will find a 400 underpowered. But if twisty canyons are more your thing, you might love something like this.

-tad

Just Right: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R400R for Sale
Honda August 1, 2019 posted by

Just Hop on and Rip: 1993 Honda CBR900RR for Sale

Performance is a moving target. In the 1970s, the Norton Commando was a “beast” with 750cc, around 60hp, and a 115mph top speed. These days, many entry-level machines can match those performance targets, and you can pick up bikes with engines as large as 2500cc and power north of 200hp. But at the time, Honda’s CBR900RR “Fireblade” was a revelation. With 111hp on tap, power wasn’t eye-opening on its own, but the new CBR packed big-bike power into a compact, light package that weighed just a couple pounds more than the company’s own CBR600.

Many sportbikes are built with racing in mind, and those compromises sometimes make for sacrifices for street riders. But the CBR900RR was envisioned as a pure sporting streetbike, and some of the odd choices were made to improve subjective feel, instead of lap times. The right-way-up fork? Lighter than an upside-down unit at the time. The odd displacement kept the bike as narrow as possible, and gave the flexible response and torque desirable for a streetbike. The only real misstep was the 16″ front wheel intended to speed up the steering, something it did only too well. It also means limited tire choice then and now.

At 893cc, the Fireblade was obviously too big for superbike racing and it gave up a significant displacement advantage to bikes like the GSX-R1100 and FZR1000. Bore and stroke were uncharacteristically long-stroke for a pure sportbike at 70x58mm, compared to the 78x59mm of a GSX-R1100K. That makes sense since the CBR engine was basically a stroked 750. It still could rev, obviously, but the long-stroke motor was more compact than something with bigger bores would be and also gave the motor a big spread of torque that was perfect on the road, both priorities for the new sportbike.

The result of this unconventional thinking was one of the all time great sportbikes of all time, and was loved by street racers and hooligans then, and remembered fondly by the ones that managed to survive into middle age. Like many Japanese sportbikes, they were thrashed and crashed, but the CBR900RR was always a little bit special, and many solid examples can still be found if you look. This particular example isn’t pristine, but it looks like a solid survivor. However, the seller’s suggestion that you “Hop on and RIP!” doesn’t inspire much confidence that the bike hasn’t been abused just a little over the years…

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Honda CBR900RR for Sale

1993 Honda CBR900RR Fireblade SC28, Honda’s Original Superbike. Chain-Driven MONSTER! Red White Blue Edition! Independent Dual Headlights. Excellent condition – starts instantly. Oil changed this season. New Tires. What a ride. This bike has been lovingly maintained for 19 years. Regularly ridden – not sitting in a corner, being polished and stared at… Hop on and RIP! Pulls like a CBR Fireblade should. RARE FIND! PRIVATE PARTY TRANSACTION. Personal, Private Collector. Actual miles are 32K. I have over 50 hi-res photos of the bike. If you’re interested – call me and I’ll forward via email – 847-971-8487. Two Brothers Exhaust. LOOK Seat. Brand New – Original-Style Side Mirrors (not installed). Meticulously maintained.

PRIVATE SALE – NOT A DEALER TRANSACTION

Mileage discrepancy – 22K on ODO, Actual mileage is 32K.

  • Two Brothers exhaust
  • LOOK Seat
  • Brand new, original-style side mirrors (not installed)
  • Meticulously maintained
  • Excellent condition – starts instantly
  • Oil changed this season
  • New tiresAsking $5,500, OBO.

I can arrange shipping, should you require. You can also fly in and drive it home! I’m located 12 miles north of O’Hare Intl. Airport (ORD).

Specs:
CBR900RR (893cc) SC28
The first generation CBR900RR was introduced in 1992 with an 893 cc (54.5 cu in) inline-four engine. It set a precedent for light weight in the super bike class, being much lighter than other large-displacement bikes of the time. The CBR900RR was based on an advanced research stage model known within Honda as the “CBR750RR”. 

With the objective of equaling the acceleration of competitors’ flagship sport bikes, Honda increased the stroke of its inline 4-cylinder engine, raising the displacement to 893cc. Complementing its power performance were the bike’s dry weight of just 185 kg, wheelbase of 1,405 mm and a body almost identical to that of the advanced research stage model. 

Let’s start with the bad: there’s a small ding in the tank, a few cracks in the fairings, the brake light lens is aftermarket, the blue aftermarket seat doesn’t really match the paint, the mirrors are tomahawk-y, the rear fender and signals have been, ahem, eliminated… The less said about the lazer-cut chain guard the better. And the Two Brothers exhaust has been chopped significantly. That being said, the $5,500 price isn’t horrible, considering the demand for really clean examples. Maybe a rolling restoration project? Assuming it’s been as carefully maintained as the seller claims, you can start trolling eBay for clean OEM fairings, or have a set painted to match. Track down a nice period-correct end-can… In the meantime, you can just hop on and RIP!

-tad

Just Hop on and Rip: 1993 Honda CBR900RR for Sale