Posts by tag: inline four

Suzuki December 15, 2018 posted by

Superbike Saturday: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Replica for Sale

Ah, the Good Old Days, when a top-flight superbike could offer serious performance, all-day comfort, and room for a date-night passenger in the same package. An era when tires were skinny and powerbands were fat, when one steering damper probably wasn't enough, and engines were fully on display, stuck out into the breeze that served to keep them cool. But even back then, there were bikes that were more about synergy than brute power, bikes like Suzuki's GS1000S.

The GS1000S might not look much like a sportbike by today's origami-plastic-dart standards, but it most definitely was Suzuki's big-bore superbike. How do we know? Well, it was piloted in AMA Superbike racing by Wes Cooley, with engines built by "Pops" Yoshimura. Power output didn't match the Kawasakis and Hondas of the period, but the bike was relatively lightweight and its handling and braking were superior. Their racing success saw bikes with the blue-and-white color scheme retroactively known as "Wes Cooley" replicas, and who are we to argue with that logic?

Wes Cooley Replicas show up for sale fairly frequently, but real ones are pretty exceptionally rare: just 700 of the 1980 models were built, and even fewer were made in 1979, although the seller reverses these production numbers for '79 and '80. Regardless, it's a very rare bike. The 1980 bikes were updated with electronic ignition, slotted brake rotors, and other minor cosmetic changes, including a stepped seat for extra passenger comfort... on your superbike. Otherwise, you're looking at pretty typical 1970s UJM specifications: air-cooled dual-overhead cam inline-four displacing 997cc, five speed gearbox, and a dual-shock rear suspension.

The paint on this one looks very sharp, although there is some surface corrosion on the metal, and the seller mentions that the fork seals are original and will need to be renewed, along with the brakes. Although, how hard can that be? And as a bonus: vintage radar detector!

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S for Sale

I bought this motorcycle almost 40 years ago in Tonawanda New York. Of all the motorcycles I have owned in my life, this was always one of my favorites.  This classic Wes Cooley Replica commemorated the AMA championships Wes Cooley won in 1979 and 1980.  There were 700 replicas built in 1979 and only 500 built in 1980. This is one of the 500 built as a 1980 model. After moving to Florida in 1986, I didn't ride it as much and it ended up being stored in my garage. The bike has been stored for over 10 years.  

This bike is an original Suzuki 1980 GS 1000 S Wes Cooley Replica. Since there were only 500 of this model built of the 1980 model, it is one of the most sought after motorcycles in the last 40 years. As seen in the pictures the bike is in very good condition. I am the ORIGINAL OWNER and have title, bill of sale, owner's manual, shop manual, tool kit and assorted advertising flyers which will be included in the sale.

Recently, I decided to have it overhauled at St. Pete Motorbikes.  The gas tank was sent out for restoration and lined with an epoxy finish, new tires were mounted and balanced, intake manifolds replaced, front master cylinder and calipers fixed, O rings, oil and filters, plugs and battery have all been replaced. The bike runs great!

It's tough to part with my classic Suzuki, but I'm not riding anymore and would love for someone else to finish restoring it and enjoy this rare piece of motorcycle history. As you can see by the pictures, this is an amazing machine.  Minor scratches, some spots of paint missing and the gas gauge no longer works, but other that that, this beauty of 38 years and 21,165 miles is a remarkable piece of motorcycle history.  The radar detector I added so many years ago still works, as well as the rest of the gauges, turn signals and clock.  Somehow the side mirror glass popped out while being transported back to my house recently.

Keep in mind this bike is almost 40 years old, and the front fork seals are the originals and will need to be addressed as will the 40 year old brakes.  This motorcycle is being sold as is. 

Obviously, a perfectly-preserved original might be worth more, but this one works perfectly as a rolling restoration, and the radar detector will keep your insurance premiums low and block any windblast that sneaks around the comprehensive windscreen. This Wes Cooley replica might not offer knee-dragging lean angles or the grunt to keep up with modern superbikes, or even a V6 Toyota Camry,  but it's a pretty competent motorcycle, a classic sportbike you could ride every day.
-tad
Superbike Saturday: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Replica for Sale
Suzuki December 7, 2018 posted by

Never this clean: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R 750 SRAD

In 1996, Suzuki endeavored to make its GSX-R 750 reclaim its spot atop magazine tests, superbike grids and riders' wishlists with a redesigned frame that aped the RGV500 grand prix bike, and the introduction of the now-legendary SRAD ram-air system. Two years later, when this 1998 Suzuki GSX-R 750 SRAD was built, they had grown up even more, throwing fuel injection into the equation, which meant the little demon made 134 horsepower in a 394-pound chassis. The results showed up in 1999, with Mat Mladin taking the AMA Superbike crown on a final-year SRAD.

1998 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for sale on eBay

This 1998 Suzuki GSX-R 750 SRAD is from the first year of fuel injection, and has managed to avoid being crashed, stolen, hacked or hammered in that time. The seller says it sat in a collection for a decade or more, which definitely helped keep it out of nefarious hands. Trawl your local Craigslist for one of these, and you will be treated to a Murderer's Row of aftermarket fairings, street glow kits, poor lowering jobs and gaudy extended swingarms.

This one isn't without its blemishes, showing scratches and some surface rust consistent with 12,000 miles, but it's a one-owner bike with a de-rigeur period Yoshimura pipe and frame sliders. Not perfect, but much nicer than most.

From the eBay listing:

One Owner Gsxr750 1998 Srad ,fuel injection.
Been sitting for 10+ years,sat in a collection :
New fuel pump
injectors
520 Race chain and sprockets
all fluids were replaced (Brake ,oil/filter...)
K/N filter
ELkA rear shock re gassed
new battery
front and rear tires replaced
The tires,chain sprockets,fuel pump and injectors have never been ridden on all New ...
Yoshimura slipon and crash protection added back in the day
The bike has not been crashed all OEM but due to 20yrs it has marks,chips on it please look carefully .
Single seat was put on it for the first time last week otherwise it always sported the passenger seat including the owners book and first regt (also with the bike)
Very hard to find a Clean untouched gsxr750 1996-99 that hasn't been butchered.
clean title on non op

The mostly clean fairings, new running gear and fluid refresh are all positive signs that this is one of the good ones. These bikes still haven't hit the collectible market with any force, but it wouldn't surprise us if that changes pretty soon.

Never this clean: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R 750 SRAD
Featured Listing December 4, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R

The seller of this early-run 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R recently completed a fastidious restoration of the bike, down to changing the aged rubber charcoal canister strap for an OEM replacement. He also sourced new gaskets for the anti-dive system in the forks, which took some parts hunting, elbow grease and careful planning. The forks got a new coat of paint and fresh seals when the rebuild was done.

1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R for sale on eBay

The list goes on from there, including freshened carburetors and a couple invisible fairing repairs. The bike was evidently a solid rider before the current owner got ahold of it and made it into a running and riding museum piece. It has fewer than 7,000 miles on the odometer and was looked after properly over its life, so there shouldn't be much cause to worry about engine internals.

These bikes were far ahead of their time when they were launched, and forecasted aggressive riding positions, handling-friendly 16-inch wheels, full fairings and weight savings. By the time the Honda Hurricane came along two years later, Kawasaki was already preparing to refresh the Ninja 600R. The early bikes, known as the GPZ600R in other markets, pushed out about 75 horsepower (some say 76), which was good for 135 mph. The engines responded to revs, and contemporary reviewers said the bikes felt a little flat until the party got going around 8,000 rpm. Keep the engine on the boil, though, and the 600R would sing, and was nimble, if not totally sure-footed, on the tiny 16-inch tires.

From the eBay listing:

Completely original 1985 Kawasaki Ninja ZX600A California.
This is the first year of the Ninja, this model is a first run #2460 made 12/84. It has just 6610 miles. It was purchased in California by the first owner (it has the CA vent box) . I am the second owner and have put no miles on the bike other than test rides.
This is a rare bike in original/collector condition. No resto-queen here, this is the real deal. You are not likely to find another in this condition, and if you do you'll be faced with a great deal of work to get it into this ready to ride condition.
The bike starts and runs beautifully. I wouldn't make it a daily rider, but if you're a collector that likes to run your bikes - this is the one.
I found the bike in great condition, as the previous owner was an older rider who used the bike as a commuter and always stored it inside with proper storage habits.
The bike is in 99.9% original condition, with all original parts or updated OEM parts. It is the perfect survivor, the perfect collector (all original parts that were replaced are included).
This is my 4th nut-and-bolt restoration in the last 10 years (and likely my last). I’m moving to custom builds from here on out. In some ways it was the hardest restoration I’ve done, as I felt it was very important to keep the bike absolutely original and to be non-destructive instead of trying to reach “perfection”. I believe I’ve succeeded to the best of the situation – the following items have been addressed:
Fairing repair:
The previous owner dropped the bike in his garage, resulting in a the left turn signal hitting the wall, causing a silver dollar sized series of cracks around the mounting hole. The previous owner repaired the damage, but it was simply glued and the cracks were still visible.
I carefully grooved the cracks and seams, filled and repaired things properly with a professional plastic welding solution, I filled the area with vinyl body filler and sanded all things smooth.
It was professionally painted (only on the repaired spot) with perfectly matched paint and then clear coated to blend, and properly buffed. It is impossible to see the repair – except on the inside where you may see the weld seams when the fairing is off.
A similar process was followed on the nose cone, where a couple of scratches and rock dings necessitated proper attention. This repair is impossible to see as well.
Tank:
First, the tank has a very small, dime-sized impression on the back/top/left side (see photos) and the blue ring has age cracks (normal for an original bike of this age).
I have replaced the cap and repainted the outer cap ring (old parts included and in near perfect shape). I have also sourced and replaced an EOM fuel-level sending unit from England, as the old one failed due to corrosion.
The tank was fairly clean on the inside, but it was beginning to gather some rust on the surface. It was cleaned with muriatic acid and flushed, but still needed further cleaning – so I recently did a round with OTC rust remover. It’s very clean now.
New OEM petcock was installed as the original was beyond repair.
Forks:
If you are at all familiar with these bikes you know that they included a very complicated anti-dive system (known as ADVS) that used the front brake fluid pressure to dynamically control the compression dampening.
Great idea, but it was prone to leaking and corrosion over time - as there were many rubber parts inside. It is very common for the piston to corrode and leak out onto the fork – as was the case on the left fork of this bike.
As with the fairing, I carefully matched and repaired the paint on the fork, clear coated it, and completely overhauled the ADVS and fork seals with all new rubber (which is not easy to source BTW – OEM parts were found in England and Japan).
Everything was properly painted and overhauled – and all original fork stickers unaffected by the repairs. It is impossible to see the repair.
Brakes:
Just like all the other rubber on this bike, the brake calipers and levers were completely dried out and either seized or leaking.
I sourced all of the proper OEM seals for the calipers and primary/secondary cylinders and overhauled all, repainting a couple of items that showed corrosion.
The rotors were repainted and surfaces sanded and scuffed. Everything looks like new. New brake OEM brake pads have been installed on all three brakes as well (see photos).
Carbs:
The carbs were actually in perfect condition – but just like everything else, the rubber was dry. So, all new rubber gaskets were installed, and new fuel lines (I have placed a filter in-line as an insurance policy – not stock).
Misc:
Plugs, oil, filter, battery, chain, new charcoal box rubber strap (OEM), windscreen is original – outer face was sanded and polished, windscreen trim tabs replaced (OEM), etc. – no detail left out, all parts OEM.
Any small rust/dings were eraser sanded and airbrushed or spot brushed with the correct paint. These repairs are also impossible to see.
As you can see by the photos, everything on this bike is in great shape and very clean. It’s hard to believe a bike this old can still look this clean and perfect under the hood after all these years. It was a bit dusty, so I’ve cleaned literally every nook and cranny on the bike – including the entire motor (which was cleaned with bio-degreaser and toothbrush).
Please feel free to message me with any questions.

If the description doesn't convince you, the pictures will. If you're looking for a pristine version of the ancestor of modern sport bikes, look no further.

Featured Listing: 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R
MV Agusta December 1, 2018 posted by

Understated bruiser: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750S

When Massimo Tamburini was done laying waste to the sportbike world with the sinewy beauty and kneecap shattering performance of the Ducati 916, he wasted no time in returning to the Cagiva Research Center to one-up himself. The resulting MV Agusta F4 series plucked heart strings and squeezed adrenal glands in a totally different way, but its 20-year run as a pinup, racer and peerless track toy are evidence that Tamburini was a man whose talents knew no ceiling.

2002 MV Agusta F4S for sale on eBay

This 2002 MV Agusta F4S has the '02 evolution engine, which pushed out nearly 140 horsepower at the crank, up from just shy of 130 in the earlier bikes. This one is as bog-standard as MV Agusta F4s get, with no special packages or limited-edition packages. It is just a simple, classy Italian rocketship in its purest form. Down to the fantastic, classy and stone-simple livery, everything about these turn of the century MVs is classy.

The seller says this example is basically in showroom condition, and the digital dash shows fewer than 3,000 miles. From the photos, the bike looks very clean and well kept, with one or two little exceptions. The lovely stock exhaust has been replaced with a set of carbon fiber jobs that have been relieved of their emblems. The seller spends the description gushing about F4s in general and doesn't mention who made the pipes or what happened to the stock ones.

From the eBay listing:

One of the most beautiful motorcycles ever produced and a testament to Tamburini's engineering skills. Buy an MV and you really do get your own personal slice of the legend. An F4 to look at, to polish...and to admire.
An incredible slice of Italian exotica.
Mechanically reliable with a build quality that rivals any manufacturer, the MV Augusta F4 750 S is as stunning to ride as it is to look at.

With an engine derived from a Ferrari F1 engine, the 750S rides as good as it looks.

As an objet d'art, an icon, a talisman, F4S is peerless. As a modern high-end sportbike its performance is legendary.

Through fast, sweeping corners, the F4's slot-car stability, grippy Pirellis and effectively limitless cornering clearance permit as much speed and lean
angle as your skill and personal sphincter calibration can tolerate. If cornering speed is the name of the game, you're looking at a major player. Still, this is a
motorcycle that goes fast on its own rules, not yours. Carve your way through corners. No flicking. The F4 responds best to firm input, and not just through the bars. Weight that inside peg. Push the fuel tank with your outside knee. Relative to the average Japanese sportbike, it's like learning a new instrument. The tighter the road, the more effort it takes to make beautiful music together.

This 2002 750S is as clean as you’ll ever find. Virtually flawless in near-showroom condition with only 2817 miles.

Marin Speed Shop is the San Francisco Bay Area's premier Ducati, Triumph and Vespa dealer. We also specialize in rare and vintage and custom motorbikes.

All of our pre-owned inventory had been through a thorough multi-point inspection and comes with a 30 day warranty.

Extended warranties are available on most models

We can provide financing from one of our many lenders and can also arrange shipping.

Email us for more details

The $8,400 asking price is probably on the optimistic side even for such a low-mile F4S, but I won't be shocked if it grabs every bit of it.

Understated bruiser: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750S
MV Agusta December 1, 2018 posted by

Classic Italian Superbike: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America for Sale

I'm sure everyone who bought F4s, back when seemingly every version of that bike was a limited edition of one kind or another, was hoping to capture a bit of what  the MV Agusta 750S America offered: exclusivity, collectiblity, and ever-increasing values. It didn't necessarily offer class leading performance because, while MV was famous for its racetrack successes, their roadbike was relatively tame: power was average and the bike was fairly heavy, with performance-sapping shaft-drive.

Shaft-drive was a viable, and far more reliable alternative to chain-and-sprocket setups back in the 1970s, and both the Moto Guzzi LeMans and BMW R90S managed to be competitive machines in spite of the performance handicap of shaft drive. But MV supposedly included shaft-drive on their roadbike specifically to limit performance, so privateers couldn't simply buy a 750S and compete against MV's factory efforts. The new bike really embodied a shift in the motorcycle market, away from the practical, small-displacement machines MV was producing for road use in the 1950s and towards more powerful, expensive four-cylinder machines exemplified by the Honda CB750 and Kawasaki Z1.

The complete 750S was relatively heavy and engine was designed to be durable, to suit the bike's more grand touring mission statement. But its racing heritage shone through and the powerplant was pretty narrow, with gear-driven cams, exotic-looking sand-cast engine cases, and a complete lack of any filtration for the quartet of Dellorto carburetors. The original version displaced 742cc, made 69hp, and had drum brakes to haul the 560lbs wet machine down from the 130mph top speed. That sounds pretty unimpressive now, but was par for the course at the time among four-cylinder superbikes.

The 750S America that followed, known as the 800 Super America in parts of Europe, increased displacement to 787cc for a bump in horsepower and torque. It also moved the gearshift to the left-hand side in an effort to appeal to the US buyers, which makes sense considering it was marketed as the "America." This later version was still burdened with that heavy driveshaft, but Arturo Magni, who worked with MV Agusta's racing team during their heyday, manufactured a chain-drive conversion for the 750S. Magni is still in business, and maybe they can be persuaded to whip up another one for you, if you're so inclined.

From the original eBay listing: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America

Most of you know the history of MV Agusta, with their 37 world championships with the likes of Read, Surtees and Agostini. The story of this bike is that it was conceived by the U.S. importer, Chris Garville, as a limited-edition (200 for the 1975 model year) sport bike for the American market based on the existing 750 Sport; that bike became known as the 750S America.

This 1975 750S America was one of the earliest models imported into the US, with engine number 221012 and frame number 221009.

First of only two owners was the importer, Garville Corporation, where it was used in displays, shows and magazine tests: as featured in Cycle, Big Bike and Motor Cycle World to name a few. Ownership was then transferred to Peter Garville (brother of importer Chris) in where it stayed in his possession until 1990.

Included with the motorcycle is a large collection of: Factory correspondence to support its provenance, magazine articles specific to this particular motorcycle, period brochures, and spare parts.

For further information please see the recently featured May/June 2018 edition of the American magazine Motorcycle Classics -

https://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-italian-motorcycles/classic-mv-agusta-motorcycles/1975-mv-agusta-750s-america-zmwz18mjzhur

As second owner, I acquired the bike from Garville in 1990 by way of famed restorer Perry Bushong (one of the first MV Agusta dealers in the US). Perry and I have had a life long friendship and working relationship. When he heard that this bike was coming up for sale he knew that this bike was for me. When I heard the sound of the 4 into 4 exhaust I was hooked and that is when it became mine. In 1994 I had the opportunity to meet John Surtees at Daytona and he was kind enough to autograph the fuel tank. After that the bike was ridden sporadically, mostly at bike events, rallys and shows until 2014 when I took it back to Perry to ask him to do the restoration, which was completed in the Fall of 2016. We added the curved racing exhaust built by Dave Kay in England, something I had always wanted to do as it looks fantastic and sounds like no other motorcycle on the road!

Sadly in 2017 both Perry and Mr. Surtees passed away within one week of each other.

The 750S was $6,500 when new, the equivalent of around $40,000 in today's dollars. The starting bid for this one is $75,000 with no bids as yet, but plenty of time left on the auction. Fortunately, this machine has gracefully curved four-into-four exhaust pipes instead of the straight megaphones seen on earlier bikes that look good and sound better. There's a reason Yamaha's cross-plane crank has made such a big splash in recent years: traditional flat-plane crank inline fours are powerful, but can be a bit bland. But if you're expecting the sanitary rustle of a modern four here, you'll be shocked by the 750S America's shrieking exhaust note and the bike has thoroughbred handling to match, in spite of the weight.

-tad

Classic Italian Superbike: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America for Sale
Honda November 27, 2018 posted by

Last of the First: 1999 Honda CBR900RR

In the year 2000, Honda improved the CBR900RR, by then an aging living legend, to keep up with literbikes from the competition. The Yamaha had swept past Honda with the R1, and it was time for the CBR's next evolution. But this 1999 Honda CBR900RR represents the last and most up-to-date version of the original CBR900RR, which lit path for late-century Japanese sportbikes.

1999 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

By 1999, Honda had bored the engine out to 919cc, and re-thought the suspension, chassis and riding position to be slightly more relaxed than the cramped early bikes. Not only was the engine bigger, but it was blessed with lightened internals and Honda took measures to reduce friction in the rotating assembly. The bike clung to right-side-up forks and the funny 16-inch front wheel that helped make it a renowned handler.

This 1999 Honda CBR900RR appears to be in really good shape, save a couple marks on the chassis and some very light surface rust and dirt. It has a fair-enough 14,000 miles and wears stainless steel brake lines and a Yoshimura exhaust. The seller doesn't say whether the stock set up is available, but then again, the ad is thin on the ground with detail.

From the eBay listing:

Ok...this is as clean as they come, all serviced including valves...runs beautiful...all stock but braided steel lines for braking, tires, and Yoshimura bolt on exhaust wich souds beautiful...not loud, at all, yet it has 2 inch baffle...well made.Has 14k miles and I am not using it so mileage will not go up , titled in my name...please note pics DO NOT serve this bike well it looks better in person.

This bike is as clean as can be...what a survivor...all serviced and all stock VIN and warning stickers even the very tiny fuel on and off ...are intact....needs a good home...more info call 407-791-3584
If bike is paid for I could possibly deliver in the surrounding states for additional fee

The buy-it-now of $7,500 is a little optimistic for a bike that was built in its millions, though very clean examples that haven't been crashed, stretched, had their wheels chromed or otherwise been stepped on are getting harder to find.

Last of the First: 1999 Honda CBR900RR