Posts by tag: Desmo

Ducati September 6, 2018 posted by

An Original: 1995 Ducati 916 Monoposto

If "916" were the punchline, the joke would surely start out with: "These two Italians walk into a bar...." And while it is true that the 916 was the love child of Massimo Tamburini's striking design and Massimo Bordi's shrieking new v-twin, the 916 was no joke. This was a watershed bike for Ducati - catapulting it into overnight fame (the world conveniently forgetting that Antonio Cavalieri Ducati and sons had been in business since the mid-1920s, and successfully selling motorcycles since the 1950s). The world's press organizations ran out of superlatives to describe the visual impact of this revolutionary motorcycle - backed up by a string of World Superbike championships for Carl Fogarty. Pricey and rare, the 916 reset the sporting motorcycling performance bar - far higher than any other motorcycle available in the day.

1995 Ducati 916 with 1,300 miles for sale on eBay

Utilizing components and approaches that are commonplace today, the Ducati 916 broke new ground 24 years ago. Mass centralization and packaging resulted in an impossibly narrow frame, tight cockpit and ideal weight distribution. The single-sided rear swingarm - a nod to racing and speedy tire changes - dominated the right side view. Exhausts were tucked up high and tight under the seat, an arrangement that enhanced ground clearance (introduced by Honda's revolutionary NR750). Ohlins suspenders were fitted front and rear, as were top-notch Brembo binders. The motive power was courtesy of an updated/uprated 851/888 mill, liquid-cooled with 4-valves per cylinder (desmo actuated, naturally) and fuel injected. Peak power (114 HP) was at a stratospheric 9,000 RPM - very impressive numbers for a twin.

From the seller:
11 months, 609 miles since the following:

- Cam belts
- Battery
- (2) Michelin 4-GT
- Fuel pump
- Slave cylinder upgrade (Yoyodyne)
- Battery cable upgrade
- Brake\Clutch fluid and coolant flush
- Coolant hoses
- Front\Rear suspension complete rebuild
- Spark plugs and air filter
- Oil change (synthetic) and filter

Adult owned and ridden. Maintenance above has been performed by a very reputable shop in Hudson Valley, NY. All Ducati quirks have been replaced and/or upgraded. Only OEM or better parts and materials used. I will provide all documentation and associated costs. Bike runs beautifully, is set up for a 212lbs rider and has Kakimoto carbon slip-ons. Mileage is not a typo..1,300. Bike needs nothing.
Serious inquires only.

Early gen 916s are certainly on the collector list. This was such a revolutionary machine that it continues to stand out nearly a quarter of a century later. Follow on releases widened the focus by offering models with two-up seating (bi-posto), as well as even sharper offerings in the form of SP and SPS (precursors to the R model). But it is the original model - the standard issue, monoposto format - that started the fire that continues to burn so brightly to this day. So successful was this design that Ducati continued to evolve this silhouette through the 996/998/1098/1198 series. Even the Panigale contains elements common to the 916, as does the MV Agusta F4, thanks to Tamburini's influence.

This particular 916 is a 1995 model. Mileage is listed as 1,300 with pictures to prove it. For such an iconic motorcycle, that seems tantamount to sportbike treason. Apparently half of the miles listed were put on the bike in the last 11 months, back when the last major service was done. Props to the seller for having a complete service completed. Speaking of service, the 916 was more service-intensive than contemporary Japanese bikes, but time has proven that the shorter maintenance window is not really problematic. With original vivid red livery, gold frame and matching wheels and swingarm, this is a neo classic that will turn heads for decades to come. This is the bike that started a new revolution in design and performance. The $10,250 opening ask has yet to be answered, but for a clean bike in this type of condition with this few miles it's not a bad place to start. Check it out here, as we don't see too many original 916 models come our way. This is a good looking example of the bike that dropped a hand grenade into the Japanese-dominated market place - is that enough to make you want to pull the pin? Good Luck!!

MI

An Original: 1995 Ducati 916 Monoposto
Ducati August 24, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1997 Ducati 900SS CR in rare yellow!

Update 9.6.2018: Now on eBay. Leave your comments below. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

The Ducati 900 SuperSport line can trace its lineage a long way back. If you overlook the change from bevel-driven valve actuation to rubber belt drive, you can trace the DNA well into the 1970s. If you are looking for bleeding edge technology and the latest fads, you are missing the point. This is a motorcycle that is more than a collection of parts, even though the parts are very, very good. The Ducati SuperSport is a raw, basic sport bike that talks to the rider and gives willingly. With tons of great noise, torque, stability and panache, the SuperSport offers up a unique experience that is very Ducati.

Featured Listing: 1997 Ducati 900SS CR!

The SuperSport of the 90s came in 3 models: The SS CR (cafe racer) you see here, the SS SP (sports production) with upgraded suspension & brakes, and the SS SL (SuperLight). Originally only the SuperLight was available in yellow, while the SSCR and SSSP shipped in red livery with either gold or white accents depending upon the year. All had the same engine and chassis. The yellow CR is definitely an anomaly in the SuperSport world, and in many ways is the best looking of the bunch. The lighter color shows off the curves of the "just enough but not too much" bodywork. Thumb the starter and the 2-valve, air cooled desmo twin barks to life, idling with a pleasing lump. There is not a lot of RPM to play with by Japanese specs, but with torque available from 2,500 on up to redline, all is extremely usable. The twin arrangement creates a narrow profile and a comfortable cockpit.

From the seller:
1997 Ducati 900SS CR in the rare yellow

34,915 miles. High compression pistons. Termignoni carbon fiber slip-ons in exceptional condition. Open airbox with K&N filter. Brembo full floating cast iron rotors (as found on the SP). STM clutch slave cylinder. Stock forks were rebuilt/resprung several years ago. There's a very small ding in the tank but overall the bike is in outstanding condition.

Best of all...

The bike has been freshly serviced by TJ at MotoUnion in WI--ZERO miles since the valve adjustment and belts (OEM) were replaced (except what I may put on between now and when it sells). Carbs were just professionally cleaned and tuned—new jets and adjustable needles.

More from the seller:
Also replaced, with zero miles since:

· New Shorai battery

· New 520 sprockets (aluminum rear)

· New DID ERV3 520 chain

· New Dunlop Q3 tires

· New spark plugs

· New grips

· New EBC HH brake pads

· Fresh Motul RBF600 brake and clutch fluid

· Filter and full synthetic oil change

The modifications have been carefully selected and things like the windscreen and fenders are still OEM. The maintenance has thoroughly been done, so you'll have nothing to do but ride for thousands of miles.

I may be able to help with delivery between Chicago and Deal’s Gap in early September.

The hot rod bible for the SS lineup is pretty standard. This owner has made some tasteful, effective mods without thrashing the basic concept or idea. Weight is reduced, performance increased, yet reliability is not affected. The Termis are de rigueur, and add to the already fantastic soundtrack. Ditto for the airbox mods. The brake upgrade is not often seen on a CR, and takes braking to a whole new level. And the proof here is in the pudding; 34k miles and going strong. These motors are amazingly reliable and resilient; keep up with basic maintenance, belt changes and valve adjustments and you have a bike worth keeping long after the current fad has passed. Sure, at lower speeds the steering can be a bit heavy, but the platform is so stable across the sporting speed regime that it is hard to find much to fault. Maybe it isn't the fastest bike out there, but as a rock solid performer you would be hard pressed to find a bike that delivers the goods so consistently.


1997 Ducati SS CR

Asking price: $3950

Contact Adam Miller: plus790@hotmail.com

The best part of these iconic Ducatis: they are downright affordable to own. This bike has more cost in hi-po parts than the asking price for the whole package. Maintenance is not the nightmare that some make it out to be (easily handled by a backyard mechanic, or by a local shop), and reliability is astounding for a bike that sounds so good. Performance is more than adequate for aggressive street riding, and longevity of the basic bits has been proved time and again by high mileage bikes. Heck, these things even get great gas mileage (stock: 50+ mpg, modified: in the 40 mpg range) - if that sort of thing appeals to you. And this is not a sell job; several RSBFS staffers swear by these things with their own cash as long-term owners. Adam - who is no stranger to sport bike collections, is looking to thin his herd a bit and this beautiful 900 SSCR needs a new home. Drool over the pictures and then ask yourself how you could afford NOT to add one to your stable. You'll be glad you did!

MI

Featured Listing: 1997 Ducati 900SS CR in rare yellow!
Bimota August 17, 2018 posted by

Styling Exercise: 1998 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale

Bimota's stock-in-trade has always been aggressive, lightweight racebikes for the road but, every once in a while, they throw us a curveball. Or even the occasional knuckleball like this DB3 Mantra. An unapologetically road-biased machine, Bimota's third Ducati-powered special featured upright ergonomics, an oval-section trellis frame shared with the later DB4, a roto-molded fuel tank that included a storage cubby at the back in an ill-advised nod to practicality, and styling could be called "wild" if you were feeling gracious.

It was polarizing then and now, but if you like the looks, you shouldn't let anything discourage you from buying one: the hard parts are all easy to service, reliable, and pretty entertaining. Ducati's air and oil-cooled two-valve v-twin has been around forever, and is relatively simple to service and parts are readily available to maintain them. Yeah, the regular belt-changes are kind of annoying, but easy to do if you know your way around an engine, and the valves generally aren't too much of a problem either. And if the bike's 85 claimed horses from the 904cc twin don't adequately blow your hair back, you can build yourself a high-compression, 944cc monster that should do a pretty good job of stretching your arms.

The styling was slightly insane, but the bike handled very well, with a 43mm Paioli fork out front and an adjustable Paioli shock out back. The oval-section trellis frame was stiff and very light: just 11 pounds. Basically, it was a lighter, weirder, much more expensive Monster with better suspension. Like all Bimotas, it makes no sense from a financial perspective, as performance advantages over a Monster that cost half as much were minimal. But 454 Mantras found buyers, which makes the bike pretty much volume production for Bimota.

This example is a second-generation Mantra, with updated styling at the front, tubular handlebars instead of raised clip-ons, and Antera wheels to replace the earlier Marchesini hoops. I have a soft spot for these, as it was one of the first bikes that, as a non-rider, really caught my eye when it was new. Weird as they are, I still kind of dig the DB3 and would have one in a collection if I could afford to:

A: Have that plastic, burl-wood dash replaced with something stupid, like genuine wood or some nice carbon fiber.
B: Replace the horrible four exhaust pipes and the ludicrously-styled hangars with something much simpler.

Remove the taller screen, fit some simple bar-end mirrors and have fun.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale

This is an excellent example of a DB3. 400+ made, 23 in red. Very few in the US. Very low mileage at under 9200. Ducati 900 engine just has been serviced with new belts, oil and plugs. New AGM battery. New Conti tires. Previous owner removed the complicated fuel pump system and now it is just gravity fed.

Here are the 3 issues. Without a choke cable, it is a little hard starting until fuel gets in the carbs. With a cable, I imagine it would go on the first try. Once started, restarts fine. Tach works 50% if the time, loose connection? Lastly has a slight whistle noise at an exact rpm. Ducati said it is caused by lack of the factory air box. It hurts nothing, just the flow of air... These are 3 minute things, but I go for full transparency. The bike is in great shape. Very unique Italian styling.

"Very unique Italian styling" might be the epitome of understatement in this case. But the bones are good and the DB3 should make a pretty great weekend roadster for cruising, carving up traffic, and shocking onlookers. "What is that?" is something I'd expect you'll hear pretty often, riding the Mantra. So what's it worth? Well the Bimota pedigree and rarity certainly makes it more valuable than an equivalent 900SS or Monster powered by the same engine, with similar performance. But by how much? Values for 90s Bimotas are currently at a bit of a low-ebb, although I doubt that can continue forever. Bidding on this one is very active and up to just about $5,000 with another day left on the auction.

-tad

Styling Exercise: 1998 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale
Ducati August 9, 2018 posted by

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca

The 1980s were a period of gestation for Ducati, hitting their sportbike stride with the move from the bevel drive motors to the now-ubiquitous rubber belt-driven desmo valve train. And while Japan focused on technology such as four valves per cylinder, liquid cooling and a constantly changing array of multi-cylinder configurations, Ducati stuck to what they knew: a robust L-twin with simple (and light) air cooling, desmodronic valve actuation, and a steel trellis frame. The F1 lacked the refinement and outright power of the Japanese competition, but the magic was in what wasn't there; the F1 weighed less than the competition, and the narrow configuration of the twin made for a compact and very agile racer. Although time and technology left it behind, the F1 and its variants remain a significant era for the Cagiva-owned company.

1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

Sitting on the cusp of the next era (the legendary 851 was released this very same year), the F1 was becoming long in the tooth before its time. To bridge the gap to the next model and keep interest in the F1 alive, Ducati released three special editions: The Santamonica, the Montjuich and the Laguna Seca. These limited edition models consisted of unique paint schemes and minor changes (some cosmetic, some performance related). Power across the three remained identical, while some of the running gear changed based on markets and need. All of these special edition bikes run 16" wheels front and rear, and all have special cosmetic touches to highlight the fact that they are unique. The Laguna Seca utilizes a steel gas tank (unlike the aluminum model on the Montjuich), and the wheels, brakes and fender are Paso items. Yet despite the archaic configuration and Cagiva parts bin raiding, any of the F1 specials remain collectible high-points in Ducati model history.

From the seller:
This bike is a 1987 Ducati Laguna Seca, one of 200 produced to commemorate Ducati's victory at that California track. From ’86 to ’88 Ducati would release a trio of special edition F1’s in celebration of the machine’s various successes around the world – the Montjuich, Santa Monica, and Laguna Seca. The Laguna Seca spec commemorated Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli winning the 1986 “Battle of the Twins” at the iconic, technical Northern-California circuit . In addition to wearing a Lucky Lucchinelli livery, the F1 Laguna Seca also boasts a decal of Lucchinelli’s signature on the tank of the limited edition Ducati. I purchased this machine in 1999 from the original owner's estate in Southampton, NY with 614 kilometers on the odometer.

Currently this bike is in excellent condition and has travelled a mere 848 kilometers since new. It has been made more streetable by the conversion to Mikuni carbs, but the original Dell'Ortos are included in the sale price. All other parts of the bike are original except for the tires. The original Pirelli MP7S tires are included as well. It has been started regularly and taken for occasional local rides. I believe this to be the 189th Laguna Seca produced as evidenced by the VIN ZDM3GA3M0HB750189. This is a classic, rare Ducati that is difficult to find in any condition and would make a great addition to any sophisticated collection of Italian motorcycles or a great weekend ride with sympathetic Ducatisti.

In the past these F1-based specials have generated strong interest and stronger prices. There has not been too much interest in this particular example, which is strange due to the low mileage and clean, excellent condition. The opening ask is $15k; and while not exactly pocket change it is far from the highest opening for one of these models. In fact, I would consider it right on the money based on history. The paintwork looks clean and where modifications have happened (i.e. carb replacement, new tires) the originals are included in the sale. That is important for a collector, but maybe less so for someone intending to ride this beast. And who wouldn't want to? I can practically hear the bark of the exhaust through the Conti pipe, feel the rumble of the L-twin loping just off idle, and imagine what my neighbors might think. Raw and crude in many respect, this relative relic is a riot riding on 16" rubber.

Unfortunately, this looks to be another low mile icon destined for a comfy parking space somewhere inside. One can always hope to see and hear it run in anger, but at this price that will likely be a rare occasion. Still, it is nice to see that this Laguna Seca example did rack up some mileage up to this point. It has also survived the ravages of time and corporate changes that befell Ducati. This is a wonderful and rare survivor that deserves a good home. And despite the fact that the historic track for which it was named has itself gone through some naming changes, the Ducati F1 Laguna Seca will remain a significant model for the brand and a major collectible for those with the means and taste. If you are among that group, be sure and check it out here. And then you can jump back to the comments and share your thoughts: which F1 model do you covet - if any? Good Luck!!

MI

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca
Ducati August 2, 2018 posted by

Sponsored Listing: 2000 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale!

Update 9.25.2018: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Iconic Motorbikes is the Premier Sponsor for RSBFS. Thank you for supporting the site, Adam and team! -dc

If you have the Desmodromic Flu, the guys over at Iconic Motorbikes have the cure! And it's a very, very yellow pill to swallow! The whole range of Ducati's Tamburini-designed superbikes are likely at a low-ebb in terms of values, so if you've ever wanted one, now's probably the time to buy in. From the 916 that was introduced in 1994 through the end of production with the 998 in 2004, the package evolved constantly with improvements to the frame, engine, and fuel system. But the looks stayed largely the same, and the Ducati 996 offers up some pretty good value at the moment.

2000 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale at Iconic Motorbikes

The 996 is obviously the middle-child of the line: it's not the collectible original or the best-developed of the bunch, but has improved power and reliability compared to the 916 and prices are generally lower than the 998. Handling for all of them was superlative, and if you really think you're a good enough rider that you'll "get bored" with the 996's mere 112hp, more power to you. But somehow I still think there are guys who can lap faster than you on a nice R6...

Its ergonomics are famously uncompromising, but the aftermarket Corbin seat seen here which should help somewhat, and the dash is wonderfully simple: just speedo, tach, temp gauge, and a row of idiot lights. None of which should probably be completely trusted, since this is a Ducati after all. The exhaust on this one isn't original, but I personally wouldn't want a 996 with the stock cans and Ferracci's bits were apparently rebadged Arrow or SilMoto parts, both of which were of good quality.

This example has under 13,000 miles on it and has been well-maintained. There are a few minor blemishes, as described, and it looks like the battery vent tube came loose at some point and a bit of acid damaged the clutch cover, but it's mostly hidden behind the bodywork. As I've said before, very few bikes look good in yellow, but the Tamburini superbikes somehow pull it off, in spite of the relatively unbroken slabs of bodywork. To me, that's always been the genius of this design: those side panels are huge and basically flat, barring a few small vents and bulges, and yet the bike still appears lithe and elegant.

From the Seller: 2000 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale

Fully Serviced & Ready to Go! Amazing Condition!

Very few motorcycles look good in yellow, but the Ducati 996 is one of them! Pure Italian style and beautiful in person, this example is one of the cleanest we’ve come across.

Maintenance is absolutely critical for four-valve Ducatis, and this 996 has had a complete service: belts, fluids, tires… It’s literally perfect mechanically and is ready to go. As far as the body is concerned, it is in amazing condition indeed, with only 12,741 miles on the clock. Many of these 996s have a little hazing or discoloration in the headlights, but not this one: they’re crystal clear, just like new. The motor was tuned by a well-known Ducati expert, and more info is available to interested buyers. Tires are brand-new and still have the nipples, so you’re good there too!

There is one mark on the back of the tank, perhaps caused by some leathers or a jacket rubbing. But it’s a raised mark, so I’m thinking we can polish it out. I took some Mothers Cleaner to it, but it still needs a little more work. The clutch cover shows some very minor stains, as you can see from the one picture, but most people replace them anyway to expose the dry clutch and help it run cooler.

The bike is fitted with a set of carbon fiber Fast by Ferracci cans and a Corbin seat which is a must-have, as the original seats may as well have been made of wood… They are brutal.

Want to see her in person first? Fly into LAX, we’ll come get you as we’re only about 15 minutes from the airport.

The asking price is $7,390 and, although you can find examples of the 996 for as low as $4,500 you could very easily end up spending the difference to make it right. I've seen this bike in person and it is exactly as described: it's not technically perfect, but it is tastefully-modified, very clean, well-maintained, and ready to go. Basically, it's what you'd expect from a bike that's been owned since new by a well-heeled collector who regularly rides his bikes.

-tad

Sponsored Listing: 2000 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale!
Ducati July 26, 2018 posted by

1974 Ducati Mk.3 450 Desmo

Hard to believe it was just 1968 when engineering director Fabio Taglioni put Ducati's street eggs in the desmo basket, having used the valve actuation technique in race machines for several years.  The Mk.3 line included 250, 350, and 450cc singles, and while this last-year model hasn't run in a while, its low miles and great cosmetics make it look worth some effort.

1974 Ducati Mk.3 Desmo for sale on eBay

The original bevel-drive engine uses separate cams to drive each valve, singing to 8,000 rpm on their way to 30 hp.  The Dell-Orto carburetor with a throat just over an inch in diameter handles the fuel mixing, and while there is an electrical system, starting is by a left side kick lever.  The Mk.3 gained a 5-speed transmission, helping keep the single on the boil.   The chassis has a hunch about the future of the engine being a stressed member, but in this case the steel backbone keeps things together.

A limited amount of this bike's long history is available, but it looks to be an older restoration and re-paint in a typical Ducati chrome yellow.  The age makes the correctness of details way beyond my knowledge base, but maybe a knowledgeable reader can point out a great original component or glaring faux pas.  The owner says this in the eBay auction:

Up for sale a beautiful 1974 Ducati single Mark 3 450 motorcycle.  10,785 miles show on the odometer.  This used to be a blue Mark 3 originally.  The original seat will be included.  Clear title in hand.   The bike has not been started in years, so it will need to be sorted out if you want to put it on the road, no battery. Sold as is with no returns.  Light scuffs and scratches from years of storage.

Many of the elements on the Mk.3 appear almost comically lightweight, but the magic 100 hp/liter was still just over the horizon.  With the gear driven desmo and cable brakes, not much to refurbish in the return to service.  But a careful inspection and slow start are advised, brake and shifter are not on their usual sides...

-donn

1974 Ducati Mk.3 450 Desmo