Posts by tag: Desmo

Ducati April 4, 2019 posted by

Godfather: 1998 Ducati 916

In 1994 Ducati unleashed the equivalent of a nuclear weapon in the face of a sport bike field full of conventional weaponry. That year Ducati introduced the legendary 916 - and commenced an enviable run of WSBK world titles (four within a five-year span). Simultaneously offering a quantum leap in twin-cylinder performance (horsepower, rev limits, packaging), the 916 was also stunningly beautiful. Even today the lines on a 916 are distinctive and striking. From the twin narrow headlights, to the high mounted exhaust cans, to the single sided swing arm with endurance-styled quick-change rear wheel, to the straight-sectioned chrome-moly chassis, nearly everything on the 916 forced us to rethink what we knew about how motorcycles were designed and how they performed.

1998 Ducati 916 for sale on eBay

The original 916 spanned from 1994 through 1998 - eventually making way for the 996, and ultimately the 998. But even in the first generation of this model, Ducati spared little expense on components. The 916 was a fair sight more expensive than contemporary Japanese machines, making it more exclusive. But far from a glittering farkle with no real purpose, the glory of the 916 was that it worked. It worked for all of the moto magazine editors and testers. It worked at the racetrack. And thanks to its good looks, it worked on the showroom as well. Ducati created a massive following with the 916 as designer Massimo Tamburini played off speed and style like his own personal yin and yang. To say it was a winner is stating the obvious... after it already happened.

From the seller:
I have a nice 1998 ducati 916 that has been part of my collection for about 4 years
bike is nice and near mint shape has about 7732 miles .bike always starts and rides nice
valves have been adjusted in this machine. comes with a clear title. bike does have some add ons as you see in the pics
vin#zdm1sb8s6wb013367
asking 8500

Today the 916 is not quite the performance explosion it was 25 years ago; time, after all, will catch up with all of us. But there is no denying that it stands strong and proud despite the time that has passed. There is no embarrassment when showing up on a 916 - whether it is a local bike nite event, a weekend canyon ride, or even a track day with your buddies. The 916 looks great, pulls strong and handles well. You just need to remember that this WAS cutting edge during its time - but technology inexorably creeps forward. Take the brakes, for example. The 916 shipped with top-shelf Brembo calipers clamping down on huge disks. But modern riders won't confuse them for monoblock calipers and radial master cylinders. Nor will the 114 horsepower astound a modern liter bike rider. Again, it was more than adequate in the day, but by today's numbers is not truly remarkable. But even today few motorcycles have represented the total package of looks, performance and commercial success.

Today's example is a clean 1998 model (last year of the original 916 run). It has but 7,700 miles on the clock, which equates to fewer than 400 miles a year. There are a few add ons that I can see - the Termis and ubiquitous open clutch cover are but two - but nothing appears to have been hacked or unconditionally changed. I could do without the stickers, but those can be non-destructively removed. The seller even refers to a recent maintenance (a four-valve desmo adjustment is not an insignificant task when replacing shims), although there is no mention of when the belts were last changed. Still, this is a good looking specimen of a fantastic motorcycle. The 916 is a collectible motorcycle, and prices are on the rise. The earliest, cleanest and rarest examples of the 916 have risen most quickly, but even the base model is growing in value. This one has an opening ask of $7,999, with reserve in place. The ad text states an $8,500 asking price, so it looks like the reserve might be set close to the opening ask. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Godfather: 1998 Ducati 916
Ducati March 24, 2019 posted by

Small Batch: 1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Behold the mighty Ducati F1 special edition "Laguna Seca." Essentially a factory hot rod based on the F1 (a 750cc version of the Tourist Trophy), the Laguna Seca shared a special tier with the two other limited edition models, the Santamonica and the Montjuich. All of the special models were named after race tracks where a Ducati rider pulled a first place rabbit out of a hat. In this case, it was Marco "Lucky" Lucchinelli prevailing at the 1986 Battle of the Twins (BOTT) event at the famed California track. The Laguna Seca was closest to the Montjuich in spec, the differences being largely related to the intended target audience: North America. As such, changes were basically limited to emissions and noise controls. The rest is pure 1980s Ducati goodness; rough and ready, light and lean. The seller has written (or copied?) a good story of the Laguna Seca (and the F1 model in general), so I will let him pick up the tale:

1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Frame no. ZDM750LS*750059*
Engine no. ZDM750L1*750194

Less than 300 examples made

Only 6,500 miles from new

Considered by many enthusiasts to be the last of the ‘real’ Ducatis, the race-styled 750 F1 first appeared in 1985. Ducati had already enjoyed considerable success with its Pantah-derived F2 racers in FIM Formula 2 racing – Tony Rutter winning the championship four-times running between 1981 and 1984 – so a ‘750’ version was the logical next step.

First seen in prototype form in endurance races in 1983, the F1’s 748cc engine was the latest in a long line of stretches applied to the original 500c ‘belt drive’ Desmo unit that had first appeared in the Pantah in 1979 – a street-legal updated version of the mid-’80s TT1. A markedly over-square design of 88×61.5mm bore/stroke, the F1 engine produced around 60bhp and functioned as a stressed element within the frame, the swinging arm pivoting in the rear of the gearbox. Clearly visible above the deliberately cut away fairing sides, the aforementioned frame attracted almost as much attention as the engine: a trellis of short, straight tubes, it has formed the basis of every road-going Ducati since, as well as the first Desmosedici Moto GP racers. In the fashion of the day, the F1 came with a 16-inch front wheel, while braking power was provided by state-of-the-art triple Brembos. The stock F1 was complemented by a series of hand-built, limited edition, race replicas – Montjuich, Santamonica and Laguna Seca – the last inspired by Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli’s famous ‘Battle of the Twins’ race victory at Daytona in 1986. Today the evocatively named F1 and its derivatives are highly prized by Ducati collectors.

Much like the Montjuich, the Laguna Seca came with bigger Dell’Orto carburetors, higher compression ratio, bigger valves, and straight-cut primary drive gears. And talk of 95bhp at 10,000rpm! But unlike the Montjuich, it came with a larger, quieter muffler.

There were some small changes between the two bikes, namely in the Laguna’s parts from the new Paso. The delta-spoked one-piece 16-inch Oscam wheels and the brake discs, but not the four-piston ‘racing’ Brembo front calipers, came from the 750 Paso, as did the wider front fender. Other changes included a ‘Lucky’ signature steel gas tank, revised foot peg bracketry and a plastic rear sub-fender attached to the swing arm. Most Laguna Secas came with a solo seat and were built in limited numbers (perhaps as few as 296.)

Not a lot of history about this particular example, although the read is a good one (reminds me of Ian Faloon). The only point of note I see on this bike is the non-standard Ohlins external shock reservoir strapped to the left side of the iconic trestle frame chassis (original shock was a Marzocchi PVS 4). Any other changes are unknown with the facts given, and with only 3 pictures to work with there are many questions left unanswered. But with only 6,500 miles, this beauty is undoubtedly clean and very rare. I'm not sure if proper etiquette deems we refer to this as the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Laguna Seca Raceway, but the connection is very clear. Also clear is the asking price: a not insignificant $24,900. That is a bit higher than we usually see these bikes offered - although the seller appears open to a lesser figure - so if you're in the market for one of these beautiful and rare model Pantahs you should act quickly. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on the F1 model Ducatis: are you a fan? Good Luck!!

MI

Ducati March 6, 2019 posted by

Tripping the Light Pantahstic: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600SL for Sale

Ducati's original "round-case" v-twin may be one of the most beautiful engines of all time but, while tower shafts and bevel gears may be a very precise way to operate valves, they sure aren't an economical one. Think about the shimming that must be done during assembly; it's a very labor-intensive way to construct an engine, not at all suited for mass-production. The Ducati Pantah that followed showed the way forward, and is the grandfather of all modern Ducatis. Introduced in 1980 in 499cc form as the 500SL, it grew to 593cc in 1981 as the 600SL seen here. The styling is very distinctive, like nothing else being produced at the time, and handling was up to the standards expected of Ducati.

But before the Pantah, there was one of Ducati's most infamous misfires, corporate thinking that led to a failed experiment with parallel twins. It all made so much sense: a parallel twin has similar two-cylinder character and compact dimensions that improve packaging, while a single head saves production and material costs, as well as weight. What could go wrong? Well basically everything. The 500GTL might have looked like a winner on paper, but pretty much rejected everything that fans of the marque loved, and was famously unreliable as well. Luckily, Ducati engineer Fabio Taglioni had continued to develop a new v-twin, just in case...

The new engine incorporated toothed rubber belts to drive the overhead cams instead of tower shafts and gears, or the chains that were popular in other high-performance motorcycles of the period. This made assembly and mass production of the new engine a relative snap, but passed the costs on to the owners: regular belt changes are a traditional part of the Ducati ownership experience, although that particular maintenance chore can be handled by a home mechanic, and even the two-valve Desmo valve adjustment isn't all that difficult.

On the plus side: the push towards standardization and mass-production also meant that Ducati's signature Desmodromic positive valve actuation now appeared on all models, and not just their SuperSport machines, giving the 600SL pretty good power for a two-valve v-twin of such small displacement.

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600SL for Sale

If you are a collector of classic and iconic sportbikes - or would like to become one - here is something you might want to investigate. The Ducati 600 SL Desmo "Pantah" was the first of the next generation of Ducatis, powered by an updated L-twin desmo motor with valve actuation done via toothed rubber belts instead of the traditional bevel drive. The belt driven valvetrain was instrumental to production volume for Ducati, as the older bevel drives required a great deal of time-consuming, skilled adjustment during assembly. Belt driven valves made true mass production a reality.

Was in storage for the past 10 years (with no petrol in the tank). Will need tune up/oil change. Carburetor was rebuilt 2 years ago.

Nice original condition motorcycle come with its original no rust Conti pipes. Will need very little work to bring it back to mint show room condition. Comes with spare Desmo Belt.

These used to be very affordable bikes, but the seller is correct: these are now definitely collectible and, considering how many were made, you don't see them up for sale all that often. The $10,000 Buy It Now price is ambitious, but maybe not totally outrageous, considering the general condition. However... this one does have 69,000 miles on the odometer, which means it definitely isn't low-mileage. The Pantah engine is pretty rugged, and parts should be available to maintain or restore, or you could even box up the original engine and build a hot-rod 900 that should bolt right in with just a few modifications...

-tad

Tripping the Light Pantahstic: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600SL for Sale
Ducati February 27, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R

I'm going to go on record here, and tell you that I was wrong. In fact, I think many people were wrong. We just didn't notice. You see, when the Ducati 916 was released it blew the world away with what a motorcycle should look like, sound like, and how one should move. Massimo Tamburini penned an instant legend; a svelte scalpel with a booming, throbbing heart. We fell in love. The world fell in love. And copy cats followed with the ensuing years - the 996, and the 998 just to name two. More of the same was good when it looked this good. And ultimately, we fell into a rut. Everything had to have the same narrow slit twin headlights, single sided swing arm, and exhaust cans hanging way up high. It was a look, and we liked it that way. Enter 2003, and the Pierre Terblanche-designed 999. Gone was the familiar face, the coke bottle side view, and that rear wheel hanging out with no visible means of support. The Ducati 999 climbed out of the rut in such a fantastic manner that people had a hard time following. History will show that the 999 failed to capture loyal Ducati buyers due to the polarizing looks. It was a love it or hate it sort of thing. But everybody who rode it loved it.

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R

Today the 999 is starting to get recognized for the amazing machine that it is. In person the lines and details on the bike make the 916 look like a Jr High School crush. And while pictures do not do it justice, the real thing draws your eye in to see more. This is a motorcycle that has presence with a capital P in a way the 916/996/998 simply cannot compare. And speaking of comparisons, let's talk performance. With a power plant based on the 998R unit (itself a major revision of the Testastretta engine), the 999R promised 150 HP pushing a sub-400 pound machine. That is both more powerful and lighter than the R bike that preceded it, and it shows on the road and on the racetrack. Stopping this missile is easy, thanks to the race-spec radial mount Brembos. And unlike the trio of bikes that came before, the triple nine has yet another crazy trick up its sleeve: comfort. With revised ergonomics that include a range of adjustments, the 999 is actually a platform you can ride without planning a trip to the chiropractor. The seller has good detail about this bike, so I will let him pick up the tale on this one:

From the seller:
The Ducati 999R was one of the most expensive to manufacture motorcycles Ducati created other then the Desmosedici. It had an invoice of $29,995 when new, $7000 higher then the S model which was the next lower upgrade over the standard 999 offered. The R had the same Ohlins Suspension, but the engine was treated to all sort of exotic changes including being a true 999cc in size from the 104mm bore, having Sand- Cast Crankcases, revised Ports with larger Valves, more aggressive Cams, higher Compression ratio, Titanium Connecting Rods, Knife Edged Crankshaft and 12-Hole Injectors feeding 54mm Throttle Bodies that added up to almost 15 HP more then the S model.

The end result was one of the most amazing refined motorcycles produced. It combined an incredibly smooth engine with insane amounts of torque along with an incredible chassis delivering unbelievable handling and astonishing brakes. It then wrapped all of this engineering and handling in Carbon Fiber Body Work finished in Ducati Red with fit and finish that has not been seen since.

More from the seller:
Living the Ducati dream, the owner (dealer) then installed all sorts of what have become “normal” Ducati ad on's. The Leo Vince Titanium Exhaust System sitting in a box new was close to $4,000. The Speedy Moto vented Clutch Cover and Pressure Plate was a foregone conclusion. The AMS Triple Clamps create a beautiful sight from the rider’s seat along with the Pmoto Master Brake and Clutch Reservoir billet covers. After Market Front Brake Rotors were dramatically lighter and replaced the stock Ducati items. The infinitely adjustable Rear Seats may take an engineer to adjust there are so many variables allowed. Also installed was Ducati’s Factory Shift Assist which can be seen to the left of the instrument cluster. There so much more as you can see in the images. What is great about this bike is that all of the stock parts (except the front brake rotors) are included with the sale.

A full service has been completed including Belts, Tires and Fluid changes. The motorcycle was inspected, the gas replaced with clear treated fluid and test ridden by a Ducati trained Tech.

The selling price: $16,495
Mileage: 3,642
VIN# ZDM1UB5W85B013323

For more information please contact: ted@automaniagp.com
You can also visit the Automania website

This is one very beautiful 999R, and it is sporting a wealth of upgrades and very few miles. It has had a recent service. If you dream of a Ducati R bike, this should be your wake up call. The 999 series were superior in every way to the previous generation. These are also the bikes that are next up on the value-appreciation escalator. As people realize how capable these machines really are AND begin to understand how good these bikes really look you will see a run on them. They have come of age. There is subtlety in this beauty; the 999 just needed a few years for us to mature - and admit we were wrong. But I'm not wrong about this - there is a whole lot of bike for $10,000+ less than a heavier, slower 998R will fetch. That is a bargain in the making, and a future standout for collectors. Look closely. Then admit it. You were wrong too. Give Ted a ping when you are ready to 'fess up. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R
Ducati February 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2001 Parking Space Odyssey – NEW 2001 Ducati MH900e

Update 2.13.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to Iconic Motorbikes for the buy and to our seller. -dc

Following a very eventful motorcycle auction weekend in Las Vegas we find this immensely collectible Ducati MH900e with zero miles and never-been titled MSO status. The internet darling of 1999, the Terblance-designed homage to the original Mike Hailwood edition has always been considered to be rolling artwork. Today's example shows just how much this bike resonated with the collecting community. Born at the turn of the century in numbers limited to just 2000, the MHe "evoluzione" was a radical design that remains unique to this day.

2001 Ducati MH900e with zero miles for sale on eBay

The underpinnings of the MHe are more pedestrian than the rest of the bike. Powered by a standard dual spark L-twin familiar to any SuperSport, Monster or Sport Classic rider, the MHe offers adequate performance along with that booming, traditional Ducati sound. But it is the details that make this pile of parts stand out. The frame is a straight-section trellis that have defined Ducati for decades - but it is linked to a single-sided swing arm of artistic proportions. The intricate layout of that piece of kit alone make the bike stand out. But combine the throwback cafe fairing and round headlight with that Buck Rogers tail section complete with high shotgun style pipes and a hybrid style emerges.

From the seller:
I purchased two of these MH900e's in 2002, I rode one for years and this one has been various living rooms as art for the past 17 years. This Ducati #20 came from the original internet purchaser in Ontario. It is still on the original MSO from Ducati (never titled) I had the bike un-crated and prepped for display at the now defunct Santa Rosa Ducati dealer. I still have the original crate sides with #20 on each side, If wanted I am happy to dig them out of my warehouse for you. This bike is as delivered, NO flaws, nicks, scuff, etc. Has not been exposed to sun, dampness, extreme heat etc. A pampered Wine country life since 2002...... All the extras are present, never worn XL T-shirt, Plaque, Stand, manuals, tool roll, optional Ducati cover, plus period launch Magazines. No disappointments, second only to one in a crate 🙂 lowest # (20) I have seen for a while. Inspections welcome, this bike is located in Sonoma, Ca.

Before you scoff and make some claims that the seller rode this with the odometer disconnected or similar, note that this intelligent individual purchased TWO bikes: one to show and one to go. That is either investment savvy or total Bologna commitment. Either way it provides for a brand new, never registered, zero mile example available to an entirely new crowd some 18 years after production has ceased. And given that the seller has all of the Ducati specialty items included with each bike this is really like purchasing a new MHe.

The fly in this "as new as a bike in a box" ointment is how much these bikes have risen in value over the years. The most recent MHe we posted was a mid-$20k ask, and the Las Vegas motorcycle auctions completed just last weekend showed even stronger pricing. Of all the Ducati Limited Edition models, the MHe may well be the most bankable. At the $35,000 Buy It Now, this may be the most expensive MHe we have seen yet - and proof of the continued earning potential of the model. Check it out here. The new status essentially means it has sat for 18 years, but my assumption is that the next caretaker already has a coveted indoor habitat identified. Review the pics and the details, and make the man an offer. It's not every day we find a brand new Ducati MH900e on our pages. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing:  2001 Parking Space Odyssey – NEW 2001 Ducati MH900e
Ducati February 5, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2004 Ducati 999R FILA

Mid-aughts Ducati was no stranger to dressing up their street bikes in World Superbike drag, spitting out special editions left, right and center, but they put a little bit of extra muscle under the stylish suit with the 999R FILA. Built to celebrate Duc's 200th win in World Superbike competition, the FILA got a 10 horsepower bump over the standard bike, bringing the L twin to a total of 146. The special paint was slathered on carbon fiber bodywork, which was draped around a WSBK-style swingarm.

The bikes also got adjustable Ohlins forks and shock, forged wheels from Ducati Corse and radial brakes, which weren't yet standard equipment on race replicas. This 2004 Ducati 999R FILA has been ridden sparingly in its 15 years, but the wear marks on its stick tires belie that it has been used at least partially as intended. Though it was used, the pictures show that it is still incredibly clean and fully ready for the new owner to enjoy.

From the listing:

FILA 999R Perfect condition. 1,700 miles. Orginal tires and all factory parts and a nice cover included. Bike was run and started regularly with the oil changed often. An amazing bike. Rare and crazy low miles. Includes Rear Stand. Marc 818-606-347three

A picture of the gauges in the listing shows 1,976 miles, not 1,700, but 200 miles is so few it's almost not worth mentioning. The bike is listed at $16,800, not quite $2,000 less than the last 999R FILA we highlighted. With so few around, nice ones like this should keep their value.

Featured Listing: 2004 Ducati 999R FILA