Posts by tag: AMA

Featured Listing February 18, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR

This Featured Listing is part of the The Bob Benyo Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, Bob! -dc

Kawasaki won the AMA Superbike championship in 1981 and again in 1982, thanks in part to a young rider known as Eddie Lawson. To celebrate the championship and build better brand awareness, Kawasaki built a lime green replica race rocket in 1982 commonly known as the Eddie Lawson Replica (ELR). The official name for the bike was the KZ1000R, which was based on the “J” model KZ1000. Kawasaki modified the top end with parts from the GPz1100 to create a hybrid 1 liter super bike good for 102 HP and 130+ MPH. Besides, it simply looked screaming fast even when on its side stand (no center stand included). Today’s ELR is a 1983 model – which, technically, was called the Superbike Replica since in that year Lawson jumped to 500cc GP racing under the Yamaha banner. But to fans, these models will always be ELR – missing only the number 21 on the number plates. And speaking of 21, this particular bike probably scores a 21 on a scale of 1-10 when it comes to condition. Originally owned (and raced) by Terry Vance from Vance & Hines Racing, this KZ1000R has been reborn as a perfect-as-you-can-get example of the breed, with no part passed over. Read on from the seller, and dive deep into this glorious restoration.

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R Eddie Lawson replica museum quality concours d’ elegance award winning “OCD” restoration with all “NOS” body parts coming out of my private collection.

Multiple award winner just won “Best in class” in the Boca Raton concours d’ elegance for best restoration. The judges from the Pebble Beach event really thought it just came out of the crate! They were blown away at how perfect the restoration was.

This bike underwent a massive full nut and bolt “OCD” restoration at my shop Globe Motorcycles Limited. With over 500 man hours this was by far my most extensive restoration Gaston, Phil and myself have ever done. I used a full set of “Nos” body work so very hard to find I only have 2 full sets left. Digging in deep into my large inventory of “NOS” and spare ELR parts I use a massive amount of parts that are now impossible to find. There is over $15,000 worth of “NOS” parts on this bike.I will try to list them all but I am sure I will leave out so many that the new caretaker will see when he or she is staring at it for hours and hours.

The bike came to me from a collector that bought it from Terry Vance yes that Terry Vance. Terry had used it in late 1983 and into 1984 as his Kawasaki Pro Stocker winning the NMRA portion of the NHRA Winston World Finals (see the article in Cycle World 1983). Byron Hines was out to prove he could build any of the 4 Japanese brand engines into world class winners. After winning Terry used it as a display at the track but Suzuki was less then happy with that idea it ended up in the back of a shipping container for over 25 years. Missing many OEM parts and with the frame raked for drag racing (the original engine came with it as Byron built up a GPz1100 for the track) it was in need of some serious help. With only 1500 on the engine that was easy part of this project. I sent the frame to the best frame Dr. in the US GMD motorcycle frame shop outside Atlanta GA. Using the latest technology Kent brought the frame right back to OEM specs (not a fast or inexpensive process). Then the magic began.

More from the seller:
The engine:
Serial number kzt00je042085 the engine is believed to be the original that came with the bike. The ELR engine numbers are never close or similar to the frame numbers but have a specific range they fall into for 1982 and 1983. This is the engine that came with my purchase and is in the correct serial number range for an early 1983 ELR.

With only 1500 original miles it was disassembled inspected and reassembled with a new HD clutch and all new OEM seals and gaskets. The engine was painted with the correct low sheen while it was disassembled as the factory did so no paint whent where it does not belong. The engine side covers were refinished in the correct gloss black and the engraved covers highlighted with the correct gold paint.

The carburetors were completely disassembled ultrasonically cleaned, and painted just as the factory did, resembled and synchronized.

More from the seller:
The frame:
The frame and swing arm were sandblasted and treated for rust prevention primed and painted in the correct sheen using the best PPG products. All the bearings and seals replaced with OEM parts. All the cables replaced with OEM/NOS parts. The brake system was disassembled completely rebuilt with NOS/OEM parts boasting NOS/OEM front and rear rotors (can’t find them again $1400). The shocks were disassembled painted the correct gold and finished with original decals. The front forks were disassembled rebuilt with OEM parts and painted back to the original sheen and finished with the correct decal. The front and rear wheels were sand blasted primed and painted in the correct gold finish and the outer lip polished to the correct shine. The center spokes of the wheels still show the original small cuts from the machining when the wheel was manufactured (most restorers polish that away not good). NOS/OEM bearings/seals were installed(over 65 hrs just on restoring the wheels). The rear wheel hub/sprocket and chain assembly is NOS. Dunlop K400 series tires installed (K300’s not available). The grips, levers, mirrors, switches, end caps, foot pegs, turn signals, and all the hardware are NOS $$$$$. The seat cover and pading is NOS $$$$ it was the only NOS seat cover I have ever seen (priceless). The rear fender and chain guard are NOS. The Kerker KR exhaust, the side emblem, the hanger bracket assembly and the baffle are all NOS ($3000). The fuel tank, petcock, fuel gauge sender, fuel cap, side covers, front cowl, rear cowl, front fender, tail light, wind shield and rubber seal, emblems, and associated hardware are all “NOS” over $7000 worth of unobtainium. A ridiculous amount of NOS/OEM hardware was used, and the original hardware used was painstakingly individually prepped and re-stained in the correct dark green finish (not easy to do).

More from the seller:
Tell your wife this is a great investment that will only go up in value :). So here is the only chance you will probably ever have to own the best example of 1 of the 750ish 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R Eddie Lawson replica’s ever built for north america. It is like it came out of the crate with the exception of the Dunlop K400 tires. I will for sure cry when it sells but I blessed to have a few more ELRs they just wont be as perfect.

The original tool kit, owners manual, and 2 keys come with the bike. I have owned more then 20 ELRs in the 5 years and have the largest inventory of ELR parts so bid with confidence this bike will not disappoint. Please feel free to contact me with any questions 954-816-0806. Hit the Buy It Now and I will throw in my autographed custom painted 1983 Bell helmet.

The Kawasaki KZ1000R is a hot commodity in the market these days. And with the original bike nearing forty years of age, time, use and the lack of spares has taken its toll on the available pool. With lower volume and high demand, prices follow. Bikes that you remember “back in the day” that you could buy used for lunch money have suddenly jumped to stratospheric levels. ELR models definitely apply here, as even rough examples are selling strong. And restoring one is no picnic – for many original parts are no longer available. To rebuild a bike that has the history that this one does, to the level that this bike has been painstakingly recreated, would take time and resources beyond the imagination. Likely the best example of the rare breed known as the ELR we have ever seen on these pages (and we have seen some pretty good ones that now pale in comparison) this particular bike is available right now on eBay. Check out the auction here and be astounded by the workmanship. You might be shocked by the values as well, but perfection does not come easy or cheaply. Ding the Buy It Now bell and score a matching helmet complete with Steady Eddie’s gold signature. Destined for museum duty, this 1983 Kawasaki ELR reminds us of the high water mark of old school Superbikes. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR
Honda January 13, 2020 posted by

One Way or Another – 2004 Honda RC51 / RVT1000R Nicky Hayden Edition

Honda spent mega-$ designing their own V-twin Superbike, but reaped the benefits on both the AMA and WSBK scenes.  This owner has identified the 2004 Nicky Hayden commemorative as the RC51 for the long term, and has kept it beautifully for the next owner.

2004 Honda RC51  RVT1000 Nicky Hayden Edition

for sale on eBay

Similarly to their Superbike nemesis, Honda chose a 90-degree L-twin, and added PGM-FI fuel injection with two injectors per cylinder.  Power and torque were outstanding with 136 hp and 77 ft.-lbs., but the mystery resided in the alloy chassis.  At the ends of the lighter and more rigid frame, 43mm inverted forks and Pro-link monoshock were tuned to keep the 17-inch rubber on the tarmac.  The monoposto fairing wore a facsimile of Nicky’s livery, smaller sponsorship decals and white number areas front and rear.

Clearly an RC51 superfan, the owner’ states it’s his third of the model and is selling because he has another rider.  With just second oil change miles and celebratory paint, it’s a sparkling example without so much as a scuff.  A long but informative video is posted – here –.  From the eBay auction:

2004 Honda RC51 Nicky Hayden replica in absolutely mint condition. This is a 1 owner bike with only 3047 original miles. The condition is 10 of 10 and its all original with the exception of a Yoshimura exhaust, a modification that anyone should make if they own one because nothing quite sounds like a RC51 at revs.

It was Honda’s take on the V-Twin replica racer, beating Ducati at it’s own game with multiple World Superbike Championships (Colin Edwards) and a AMA Championship under the late great Nicky Hayden whom also won the 2006 MotoGP championship with the Honda RC211V.

I’m selling this bike because its the 2nd RC51 in my collection and the other is more a rider so I might as well let someone else enjoy this beautiful bike. Add it to a collection or ride it, either way you can’t lose as you may never find a cleaner one offered for sale.

Hayden won the AMA Superbike crown in 2002, and was ushered into the factory Honda GP team making steady progress toward his 2006 championship.  After his death in a bicycle accident in 2017, the Hayden replica is now a sadder commemorative.  If not the singular superbike claimed by the owner, the RC51 is certainly in a select few, even at Honda with its multitude of winners.  Bidding is quite active and shows over $10,000 with four days left to run.

-donn

One Way or Another – 2004 Honda RC51 / RVT1000R Nicky Hayden Edition
Ducati November 20, 2019 posted by

Truth in Advertising: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale

It’s common for manufacturers to fudge things a bit when identifying their cars and motorcycles. Often, the name specifically referred to at least the approximate size of the engine, but liberties are often taken, especially when the displacement changes, but the name stays the same. The Mustang 5.0? Actually 302ci works out to 4948cc, which you should probably round down to 4.9 liters… But it’s pretty close at least, and sounds much cooler. Can you imagine Vanilla Ice crusin’ in his four-point-nine? Bike manufacturers are even worse about rounding things off to sound good. The Norton Commando 850 was packing 828cc, and the Ducati Pantah 600 had 583cc. Fortunately, Ducati redeemed themselves with the oddly-specific 888 SPO…

Until the introduction of the the also-accurately-named 851, Ducati made do with air/oil-cooled engines, and relied on their light weight and agility to compete against more poerful machines. Unfortunately, the handling of Japanese superbikes continued to improve by leaps and bounds, and the Italians knew the only way to stay competitive in production racing would be to evolve. Ducati’s 851 superbike was powered by an extensive redesign of their 90° v-twin that added liquid cooling and four valves per cylinder, with all eight actuated by the company’s famed Desmodromic system. The system basically eliminated valve float, although high mean piston speeds were a much bigger issue for a 10,000rpm v-twin. A more important advantage probably came from the ability to use more aggressive cam profiles to both open and close the valves.

The 888 that followed naturally used a slightly larger, more developed version of that engine. A six-speed gearbox backed by an exotic dry clutch gave racing credibility, along with that characteristic Ducati rattle that is often louder than the exhaust at idle, especially on a stock bike. Two versions of the bike were available in most markets: the 888 Strada and the higher-performance 888 SP5. The SP5 wasn’t road-legal here in the USA, so we got a bike that really slotted in between the two Euro versions called the SPO or “Sport Production Omologato” that was intended to homologate the bike for AMA racing. Unlike the Strada, the SPO had a solo-seat tail, upswept exhaust for more cornering clearance, and an Öhlins shock. A heavier steel subframe was used in place of the SP5’s aluminum unit, and the engine was basically in the same state of tune as the Strada, with around 100hp and a meaty torque band.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale

1993 Ducati 888 SPO with 4824 original miles and in excellent condition.  

Purchased new in the Seattle area and stayed a local bike all its life. Documented history throughout its 4824 miles, beginning from original purchase agreement in 1993 (pictured). Last full service (includes belts adjustment) done at 4600 miles in 2015. All major parts are original, including radiator (pictured) which shows matching usage/wear to the bike’s mileage. Pipes were upgraded to Ferraccis back when the bike was new, and coolant hoses were replaced during the last service in 2015. Also recently replaced the fairing fasteners to period correct OEM fasteners as the gold plating on the originals were faded due to age.

Title is free and clear, and comes with 2 original keys and owners manual. Stand is not included.

This bike has very low miles and includes the desirable, period-correct Fast by Ferracci exhaust is a nice option that should add a period-correct exhaust note. The seller is asking a very steep $16,500 for this one, but it’s very original, well-kept, and you’ll likely not find another in this kind of condition if you’re looking to grab an SPO for your collection.

-tad

Truth in Advertising: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale
Yamaha November 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT

Update 11.27.2019: SOLD in less than three weeks! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Say you’re a Yamaha fan and you want to collect something significant. Where do you start? Well, rare homologation machines are always a great place to look. Think you want an OW-01? You might find that mighty machine to be very, very expensive, and not as rare as you think. If you really want to buy the right bike at the right time, the homologation machine to check out is the 1980s FZR750R variants. Built to go AMA Superbike racing, the FZR750R line was fast and trick, and continues to be an affordable collector option today. Take for example today’s Featured Listing: a 1987 Yamaha FZR750R “T” model.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT

To build the FZR750R, Yamaha invested in new technology. To build the DeltaBox frame, for instance, Yamaha adopted robotic procedures for folding and welding the thin aluminum components. This stiff but light frame housed the all-important, 106 horsepower “Genesis” engine. Sporting a unique valve train consisting of 5 valves per cylinder (3 intake, 2 exhaust), the Genesis engine family also maximized weight bias by canting the cylinder bank forward to place more weight lower and closer to the front tire. Between the high RPM capability offered by the airflow through the head (and straight-shot downdraft carbs) and the handling afforded by the chassis and ideal weight distribution, the FZR750R was a potent competitor on the racetrack.

From the seller:
Original 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT, #2** of 500 Homologation specials for 1987 , this is a Canadian market bike with 26290kms

This bike is a unrestored survivor in excellent overall condition and does not appear to have been raced (no drilled brake caliper bolts, axles etc etc) the exhaust has never been painted from new. There are some scratches to the protruding air intakes on both sides of the fairing as shown, the fairing is not cracked or split in any way in these areas.

This bike is in very original condition, with all the original reflectors, grips, handlebar ends leavers footrests, windshield and trim. The bike has been fully serviced: valve clearances done, carbs serviced and balanced, it has brand new Bridgestone Battleax tires front and rear, everything works as the should.

Comes with the original owners manual in English / French as it is a Canadian.

Asking Price: $5,950 USD

The anecdotal stories suggest that Yamaha dealers were discouraged to offering these homologation machines to buyers intent on utilizing them on the street; after all, Yamaha built these bikes to go racing. And while many FZR750Rs were raced, we have (thankfully) seen a number of these bikes show up on the street. Some have been reconverted from the race bike status. This particular example appears to have been saved the hard life of the race track, and has instead lived its life as a pampered street bike. That is a plus for collectors. That is not to say that this bike has not been used – with 16,000 miles on the all-metric clocks this is not a garage queen, but looks to be in complete and original form.

Yamaha produced but 200 of these particular bikes for the US market, and only 500 world wide. Those are some pretty low numbers by “Limited Edition” standards, and you are looking at the #2 bike in the production series. But before you think “that will cost me an arm and a leg,” the seller is only asking $5,950. That is right in the sweet spot of where these amazing machines are today, and an amazing deal when you consider that this was destined for AMA Superbike competition. The bike is located in Osaka, Japan, and the owner is willing to talk about crating, domestic shipping or (I hear vacation!) local pick up. Check out the picks and then drop Trev a line. Homologation bikes are hot, and the FZR750R has been the underappreciated step child of the genre. These are bound to go up, so we recommend picking up a great example before the market discovers them. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT
Harley Davidson July 24, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2009 Harley Davidson XR1200 (XR Cup)

Update January 2020: This bike sold this past December. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

In the wild world of rare sport bikes, we don’t often feature items from The American Motor Company. Sure, we post the occasional Buell or EBR sportbike, but few H-D offerings really meet the category of RSBFS standards. That is why I am happy to share this wonderful XR1200 with readers. While the stock XR1200 is not all that exciting to the knee dragging set, this particular XR was a Cup bike, and retained all of its hot rodding and rowdiness even though it has been converted back into a street bike. Possibly the ultimate bike nite ride, commuter, canyon carver, track day weapon and conversation piece, this 2009 Harley Davidson XR1200 converted XR Cup machine is looking for a new home.

The XR Cup (officially known as the Vance and Hines XR1200 class) was an American one-design series meant to offer aspiring racers an affordable and approachable package and allow them to showcase their talents at a national level. The rulebook was simple and comprehensive. Take one stone stock XR1200. Remove lights and other DOT required safety items. Apply the XR Cup modification kit ($3,500, sold via V&H racing), which comprised the only allowable performance modifications. Upon inspection engines were sealed to prevent further modifications. Spoon on some sticky rubber and go racing. Figure about 530 pounds and 80-ish HP race ready. From 2010 until 2015 fans were thrilled by relatively full grids, tight racing, and amazing racecraft. Hearing a full field of XR1200s roar down a main straight – each rider trying to draft, jostle or otherwise elbow his way past – was truly a sight to see. In the end it was a successful foray; the fields were big, the crowds saw a great show, and some truly outstanding talent learned their craft.

From the seller:
2009 Harley Davidson XR1200 11200 km (6960 miles)
EX-CSBK / EX-AMA XR cup.

Bike was bought new in 2009 to compete in the Canadian XR-cup.

Bike have compete in 2010-11-12-13 canadian XC-cup and some AMA XR-cup races. I have some races results.
Never been crash severely. Engine still have the XC-cup seal. From 2014 to 2017, the bike have run a few times on track for track days and track school.

Bike is registered and located in the province of Quebec, Canada (Montreal area). It’s on the road since 2017.

(Simon)
Price: $8,000 USD

More from the seller:
Full Vance & Hines race kit
Fiberglass belly pan (modified to fit kick stand)
Ohlins steering damper
Performance Machine 17″ front wheel
Fiberglass front fender
Number plate
Fiberglass rear section
Vance & Hines fuel pack
Vance & Hines exhaust
O2 delete kit
Oil cooler relocation bracket

More from the seller:
Gilles adjustable rear set
Biltwell handlebar
Biltwell grips
Bikemaster wideview mirrors
Bridgestone S21R tires (XR cup sizing)
Final ratio have been change for more top speed
Headlight : Baja Design LED Sqadron (with Skene smart dimmer)
Safety wire everywhere that need safety wire
DNA air filter
Lithium battery
Short levers
Custom paint job
full floating front discs
Suspensions: Racetech (front : G2R cartridge with 1.0 kg spring / Rear G3S with 2.2 kg springs)

More from the seller:
Spare parts / Extras
Final belt drive (new)
OEM front 18’’ wheel
3 different handlebars
OEM mirrors
OEM front fork cartridge
OEM exhaust system
O2 sensors
OEM tail section with seats
OEM passenger foot pegs
OEM headlight
OEM front fender
Shop manual
Brake pads
Amsoil 20W50 oil
OEM oil filter

The XR1200 series attracted both newer riders as well as some old hands. Unknowns competed alongside more featured names. Danny Eslick won the inaugural championship in 2010 before moving onwards and upwards. Participating in this series made stars out of riders; they were approachable, brave and heroic. Here is a video of the seller being interviewed in his native Canada. While not all of our readers can speak and understand French, enjoy the shots of the bike:

This is a pretty neat find and unlike many of the offerings you might find on RSBFS. This is a race bike with some history, while also being able to serve double duty as a street bike. It looks fantastic, will handle better than any stock HD you run across in your travels, and will out-handle many other motorcycles on the road, provided you are willing to give strong leverage to the wide bars, keep your momentum up, and avoid dragging hard parts. I can’t imagine having more fun at a track day, or getting more attention from fellow riders. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2009 Harley Davidson XR1200 (XR Cup)
Kawasaki July 10, 2019 posted by

Privateer Superbike: 1995 Kawasaki ZX-7R for Sale

We don’t post too many racebikes here on RSBFS. Ex-racebikes are tricky to value. By their very nature, they evolve and change over time to remain competitive and, unless a bike is retired immediately after an historic race win, it’s not likely to be in anything like “original” condition. That very word contradicts what racing is about: if something doesn’t work, it’s discarded, if something better is introduced, it goes on the bike. They get crashed and blown up and rebuilt and raced again. But this particular Kawasaki ZX-7R had too many impressive names attached to it to pass up.

This Kawasaki is a bike from the glory days of World Superbike racing, when 750cc fours were pretty much the go-to configuration for everyone but Ducati. In stock form, the ZX-7R was a bit heavy at 450lbs dry, and the 748cc engine’s 105hp is decidedly underwhelming by today’s standards. But the bike made an excellent racing platform, and this version was kept in production for 7 years, a near eternity in terms of sportbike development and a testament to its sound design.

Of course, this isn’t anything like a stock motorcycle. The claimed 150+hp is impressive and the WSB-spec Öhlins forks and Brembo brakes that replace the stock Nissin six-pots are all very, very tasty, but it’s the frame that makes this particularly interesting: it was supposedly used in World Superbike racing by Anthony Gobert and obtained from famed tuner Rob Muzzy. The seller’s description goes into more detail below.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Kawasaki ZX-7R Racebike for Sale

1995 Kawasaki ZX7R Superbike. Works frame (WSB Gobert frame, Purchased from Muzzy in ’99), 2 Superbike motors: 800cc (for ’03) and 750cc. Fully kitted, Ohlins WSB forks, brembo brakes, everything. Spare valve springs (2 sets), valves, rods, pistons. 800 has Carrillo rods. Hasn’t been run for 15 years. Gets turned over now a couple times a year.

This is probably the finest privateer 1995 Kawasaki ZX7R Superbike ever built. The works frame (purchased from Muzzy in December of ’99) was supposedly Gobert’s. It was a World Superbike frame; done in Japan by Kawasaki. It was black when we got it. A work of art, they added a oil catch tank in the frame and welded a frame around the frame. It turned the bike from a pile of crap nightmare that would wind up and launch you at any second (with the fully built 150+ hp superbike engine) to a dream that is predictable and smooth. Which is why they won. Unfortunately those weren’t available to any of us, and we were lucky to get it for the 2000 season. After we got the frame, that bike won every club race and set track records in 2000 (beating the 1000s) until we had a Brembo rotor explode and put me in the ICU… ending that season. I raced it a few times since and we built a 800cc motor that put out 170hp (on the juice, no ram air) that ran with the 1000s of ’03. Unfortunately the KLS shifter broke during that national and we DNF’d. Later, it had a “tip over” in a practice due to a leak in a front tire, and it never got repainted. I got bodywork for it and never fitted it or painted it. Unlike the “works” bike Chandler rode and got claimed in the F-USA in 1996 (was just for sale on bringatrailer.com), these engines do NOT have the “works” gear driven cams. Those are not serviceable for privateers. This bike makes a ton of power with the conventional chain driven cams, works oil pickup, etc. Further, we still have a couple sets of valve springs (and tons of spares) which are now unobtainable. These motors can be serviced and freshened up. This will be an AHRMA killer.

This is obviously a well-developed package and should be a blast to ride. It also includes extra engines and spares to keep them running, although at that $25,000 asking price, you’d hope it would. There are cheaper ways to get into vintage [?!] racing, but none quite as evocative…

-tad

Privateer Superbike: 1995 Kawasaki ZX-7R for Sale
Kawasaki June 26, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 Mk II AMA Superbike

Update 8.3.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

RSBFS is pretty strict when it comes to what makes it on the site. And while we generally shy away from race-prepped bikes, this one got the attention of the entire RSBFS staff. It spoke to us, and we believe that it will speak to our readers in the same way. Because this 1980 KZ1000 AMA Superbike is a terrific specimen of the way things were. In the days when going professional racing in the US meant starting wtih a street-based machine, the KZ1000 was about as high-tech as you were likely to find. From there you did what you could to
address the flexi-frame geometry, the teeny-tiny brakes, and the limitation of the air-cooled, two valve motor. Aerodynamics for motorcycles was a new art and really didn’t exist for the masses, save for the occasional bikini fairing. The “standard” was as close to a sporting motorcycle as most manufacturers offered, even though they were a far cry from the race-bike-with-lights that you can find at your dealership today. And if you like the way your Kawyamhonzuki GSXCBR1ZX carves corners today – just like a race bike – you can look back at dinosaurs like this and be very, very thankful that competition improves the breed.

Featured Listing: 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 Mk II AMA Superbike

Starting life out as a 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 – before being prepped for a life on the track – this example has few ties back to the original bike that spawned the silhouette. Both the frame and the braced swing arm are modified right out of the Yoshimura heyday. Suspension has been updated to better handle the rigors of racing, including a pair of trick Fox “piggyback” shocks. The engine and electrics have been converted over to race bike usage, which means that there may be some mystery in terms of exactly what was done. The charging system appears to be total loss, with magnetos feeding the spark and no need for a large battery thanks to the lighting delete. Note the slimmed-down profile of the crankcase ends; removal of the end-mounted components (such as alternator) and custom aluminum plates narrow this critical dimension, allowing for greater lean angle before hard parts touch down. The smoothbore carbs with awesome looking velocity stacks complete the transformation from streetable standard to no holds barred racer. Neat custom touches abound, including the oil cooler installation mount (with braided steel lines, naturally), the aforementioned crank end plates, and the rear caliper bracket. The exhaust is another Yosh product, and tucks the pipes high and tight for maximum cornering clearance. The cockpit remains relatively stock looking, if you ignore the doctored speedo.

From the seller:
1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 Mk II AMA Superbike as it rolled off the track in 1990

This example defines the word “untouched”. Formerly raced by the late Dr. David Kieffer racer #122 of “Roughstock Racing” in AMA Superbike. What you see here is current photos of it’s unrestored condition including original paint and complete bike is as it rolled off the race track for the last time at Steamboat Springs Colorado Vintage races in 1990.
Features include:

-Race Prepared by Roughstock Racing
-Pops Yoshimura Frame and Braced Swingarm- No VIN# being race only frame
-Engine to frame bracing through Countershaft
-ARD Magneto ignition
-EPM Mags- unrestored 18” Rear & 19” front-typical surface marks
-29mm Mikuni Smoothbore Carbs
-Yoshimura 4/1 header with Velasco end section
-AP Lockheed front Calipers
-Grimeca rear Caliper
-Fox Racing Shocks and Koni set in spares
-Spare wheels with original rain tires- Sun USA front 19” x 2.75” DID rear 18” x 3.5”
-Small assortment of electrical spares
-Full gearing assortment
-Spare front rotors

More from the seller:
Engine fires up easy and sounds good. It is believed to be a big bore with a close ratio transmission but I cannot verify details. Any plans to use it for other than display and firing up should be preceded by a full teardown. Bike was in dry storage for many years after last race and was gone through for inspection of cams, carbs and basic components before being fired up again in 2015 and has been fired on occasion.

More from the seller:
Bike is located in Allentown, PA

Price: $25,000

Proceeds from the sale of this bike will go towards the Quarterley Racing / On Track Development program that supports four Moto America Junior Cup riders in Kawasaki Ninja 400’s. The team is headed by Dale Quarterley, former AMA Superbike Kawasaki rider. Look us up on Facebook.

The history on this bike is certainly interesting, and entertaining. The late Dr. David Kieffer – the former owner and racer of the bike – was a board certified orthopedic surgeon, but also a also a motorcycling enthusiast. He amassed an impressive collection of bikes during his lifetime, and actively raced as an AMA Pro in the Superbike class as well as the Colorado-based Motorcycle Roadracing Association (MRA). Lest you think this man was simply a rich doctor playing motorcycle racer, Dr. Kieffer was a fierce competitor and actually raced an RC30 in endurance events prior to it being officially homologated for AMA racing (at which time he entered the bike in Superbike events). That shows impressive commitment, but it was his off track activities that make him an inspirational figure. Being an orthopedic surgeon immersed in a sport where physical trauma is common, the good doctor not only raced against the competition but he also performed surgery on them (Fred Merkel, Scott Russell, Aaron Yates and Ricky Johnson, to name a few). According to some sources, Dr. Kieffer would provide medical aid to competitors who could not otherwise afford treatment (i.e. no insurance). As a result, he was nominated to be the AMA Sportsman of The Year in 1986.

Dr. Kieffer went on to contribute to medicine in motorsports in varying ways through his association with the AMA and FIM (including acting as Chief Medical Officer for FIM events such as MotoGP), and he left behind an impressive legacy of good. He also left behind an sizeable collection of machines – including this very period correct Kawasaki KZ1000 Superbike. The history is moving and significant. But Dr. Kieffer’s good works did not end with his passing. Proceeds of the sale of this bike will aid in young rider development under the guidance of road racing superstar Dale Quarterly, improving US talent into Moto America with the goal of feeding riders into the international scene. This is an amazing opportunity to acquire a rare and significant racer with history, and contribute to road racing in America at the same time. Check out the cool historic pics as well as all the recent shots. Then give Bob and call and strike a deal. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 Mk II AMA Superbike
MV Agusta June 1, 2019 posted by

More Art: 2008 MV Agusta F4 312R

It seems like we are seeing quite a few newer generation MV Agusta models crossing the block as of late. This sets up an interesting study of values and comparisons. It also highlights the feast/famine nature of the rare sport bike segment. The market is currently flooded with a variety of F4 machines, so if you are interested in an example from the storied MV Agusta brand you have a good opportunity to find a clean, low mileage bike across a number of price ranges – such as this 2008 MV Agusta F4 312R.

2008 MV Agusta F4 312R for sale on eBay

The F4 1000 lineup – comprising several different models – essentially all share the same engine configuration and primary chassis. That is a seriously stout foundation for any bike, as seen in the 166 HP base model F4 S. But the 312R is more. Much more, in fact. The 312R is two performance steps above the base S model, given that it is built upon the F4 R – which itself has a bump in HP to 174, and improved brakes and suspension. Take that F4 R, add another 9 ponies and special graphics, and you come to the 312R. Named after the bike’s target top speed of 312 kph (approximately 190 mph), the original 1000cc 312R was a limited edition offering. Today its performance is eclipsed by several more modern bikes – and it may get lost in all of the “Limited Edition this and Limited Edition that” MV Agusta noise, but is still a beautiful and respectable powerhouse with some real cachet.

From the seller:
Time to sell my beautiful 2008 MV Agusta F4 312R. Second owner. I bought this MV to use as a piece of ‘art’ in my man cave. I have never ridden it. The bike has never been down. The original owner rode it for a year, then displayed it in his house until my purchase in 2016. I am moving into a smaller house and will not have the space to show the bike, hence the reason for its sale. It has 2881 miles on the odometer. All fluids, except the brake and clutch, were drained in preparation for display. The battery was also removed. The prior owner upgraded the front Brembo calipers to a better spec Brembo caliper, he also upgraded the Brembo brake and clutch levers, added Rizoma grips and swapped the plastic trim pieces for OEM MV Agusta carbon fiber ones. The bike comes with all the goodies supplied by MV for the 312 owner, including the bike cover, tool kit and owner’s manual.

Created by the father of both Bimota and the Ducati 916 (and 996/998), it is hard to call the F4 anything other than gorgeous. The seller obviously thinks so, as this bike has adorned his man cave since purchased and has not turned a wheel since. I can’t tell if Count Giovanni Agusta – original founder of MV Agusta way back in 1923 – would be rolling in his grave, or proud that his humble motorcycles have transcended the plane of mere transportation. Either way, one cannot help but admit that a bike of this caliber would look stunning in any room of the house, provided that one’s spouse were on board with the concept. Prepped for the indoor motorcycle mannequin gig, this bike was drained of fluids and the battery has been removed. As a result, there are no “powered on” shots of the odometer – but the ad states the original owner put 2,881 miles on the bike before it was acquired by the seller.

The 312R was a homologation machine in the US with a mere 150 units imported to meet AMA regs. And while I doubt that the first owner ran that slick for 2,800+ miles, it does wear racing rubber properly and proudly. This is a rare sub model of a relatively rare machine; MV Agusta did not produce many bikes in the early years of the comeback, and they all carried a premium over peer bikes of the time. Thus, even a base F4 is a sight not often seen, and the other LE models even less so. The 312R is probably not the most rare – nor the most pricey – but stands out as one of the rarer examples of the MV Agusta offering set. That has not helped it out much at the checkout stand as of late; this beautiful example is being offered for a relatively scant $12,500. That is right in the money for other 312R models on the market, but well below the original MSRP. That could be a good thing, as predictive analytics indicate that the bike could be reaching the bottom of the curve. Nearly all bikes that are collector status today were available for less $$ at some point in their lives; nearly everything goes through a dip. The 190 mph question is if this is such a bike. The 312R is rare enough, and this example is in clean enough condition to ride that wave should it develop. Check it out here, and then check your crystal ball. Good Luck!!

MI

More Art: 2008 MV Agusta F4 312R