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Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1

Warning!

This post is in our archives. Links in this post have been updated to point to similar bikes available to bid on eBay.

This is the fourth motorcycle being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

In the annals of modern motorcycle history, the Japanese have the technological might, the Italians have the performance artwork, and the Germans… well, the Germans had a more conservative approach. Much of that has changed in recent years (witness the HP2 Sport, the S1000RR), but it was with the iconic K1 that BMW proved it had the technological chops AND an artistic feel without abandoning the company soul or ethics. You see, BMW wanted (needed) younger riders to join the brand. But their staid approach of “the gentleman’s transport” didn’t cut it with the youth. They wanted speed. But BMW was constrained by the 100 bhp limit imposed on bikes sold in Germany. So how to get maximum speed within the imposed power listing? Technology. Namely, aerodynamics. Thus the design and style of the K1 was born of function, and has gone on to become a bit of a legend.

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1

The life of the K1 started with a standard K bike – in this case a K100. This was the “new” architecture for BMW; the inline four cylinder motor flopped on it’s side and mounted crosswise on the bike. This allowed for a low center of gravity; the crankshaft runs parallel with the bike on the right side and made for easy power takeoff for the shaft drive. From those bones, the K1 started ingesting technology. The standard K100 engine was upgraded with 16 valve heads, higher compression and lighter connecting rods for extended high RPM running. ABS was a standard feature for US-bound bikes, but optional in other markets. Wanting to achieve speeds in the range of 150 mph, the K1 entered the wind tunnel and was shaped with a vengeance. The wheelbase was extended for greater stability. Check out the streamlines of the front fender, and the aerodynamic – yet protective – main fairing. The integrated tail section even contained saddlebags, which provided function AND airflow resolution. In all, there are seven pieces to the main fairing to harness and define the aero elements. Colors offered were Teutonic interpretations of yin and yang: either fire engine red with yellow accents, or a turquoise blue with yellow accents. Love it or hate it, either color combination stands out.

From the seller:
41,000km’s / 25k mi. This is a fantastic example of the timeless “ketchup & mustard” 1990’s BMW design icon.

Fully restored to new condition in Europe in 2014, this K1 is absolutely beautiful in every respect, and runs/operates perfectly. Heated grips, ABS, 100hp 16v, Marzocchi forks, Brembo brakes – 6,900 examples ever produced. Included with the sale is a hard bound folio detailing the ownership (U.K. and Germany) and restoration details.

Probably the best non-original K1 on earth: $15,000

Despite the techno wizardry, the end result was a 520+ pound, long wheelbase motorcycle that excelled at what BMWs always excelled at: eating up the miles. And with a price tag higher than most available motorcycles (MSRP of over $13,000), this hardly targeted the youth. Instead, BMW created a showroom magnet that pulled interested viewers in – and then sold them a different K or R bike instead. Sales of the K1 were slow, and the bike was under appreciated during it’s stay on the dealer floor. Time has been kinder to the model, and cannot erase the sensationalism built up around this pivotal motorcycle – even if it did not set the world on fire. Today these are rare machines that still represent the change of attitude in BMW management, and finding one that does not exhibit the ravages of time (think large expanses of thin bodywork and the possibility for damage) or abuse should be celebrated.

Today’s 19991 BMW K1 comes to us courtesy of the Stuart Parr Collection, and shows as beautifully as a new bike. Drool over the high resolution photography, and tell me this isn’t the cleanest K1 you have seen in the wild. I mean, it just looks *perfect*. And this is no zero mile “never gonna be ridden” garage queen either; this wonderful example has 25,000 on the clocks. We all know the legendary longevity of a BMW, and to find a rare K1 in the cosmetic condition such as this should make you sit up and take notice. Asking price is $15,000 and inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here. Good Luck!

MI

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