Posts by tag: marzocchi

MV Agusta July 3, 2019 posted by

Respect the GOAT: 2005 MV Agusta F4 AGO #75/300

MV Agusta. Giacomo Agostini. Greatest of all time? Individually, these are storied names with a rich and successful history of racing at the top level. Together, they were an unstoppable force – allowing MV Agusta to exit the racing scene while still on top, and providing Agostini the platform on which to rack up an incredible number of wins and record number of championships. This bike – the 20005 MV Agusta F4 AGO series – was the first of the 1000cc F4 models to be produced, and it was released in very limited numbers. Today there are a lot of fake AGOs with the #1 number plate on the side (i.e. sticker), but these are not true collector models. The real AGOs are serially numbered as proof of authenticity, complete with the signature of the great one himself.

2005 MV Agusta F4 AGO #75 for sale on eBay

The F4 was the reboot of the famed MV Agusta brand in 1999. Initially released as a 750cc model, a punched-out 1 liter was offered by 2005. Utilizing the same hemispherical radial valve head and variable trumpet style intake (as designed by Ferrari F1 racing engineers), the bigger bike was burlier in most dimensions: 40 additional horsepower and 20 lbs of additional weight over the original F4 750 Oro – a known lightweight machine. When compared to the standard 750S model, the F4 AGO actually weighs *less* than the 750! Front forks are Marzocchi units, while the rear shock was originally a Sachs model – however this has been swapped out by the previous owner (see below). The rest of the AGO is pure graphics and the serialized number plate. Only 300 of these models were originally produced and distributed.

From the seller:
I am downsizing my motorcycle collection and this beautiful Italian stallion is up for sale. I’m sad to see it go but bikes like this are meant to be ridden and this one has spent the last few years being admired for its beauty more than appreciated for its performance. This is your chance to own a piece of MV Agusta history and motorcycle racing history as this bike celebrates the racing career of Giacomo Agostini. Google him if you don’t know who he is.

I obtained this motorcycle from Guy Webster of the Guy Webster Italian Motorcycle Museum in Ojai, CA after he started to liquidate the museums inventory. This bike was on display in Guy’s museum for many years. His “motoguy” sticker is still on the tank and can be easily removed, but in honor of the late motorcycle enthusiast I had decided to leave it in place. Guy had fitted an Ohlins rear shock. The original Sachs shock comes with the bike. The original red paddock stand is included. Certificate of authenticity is included. Comes with 2 keys. Bike is registered to me in the state of California, and is current and has a clear title. With 10,936 adult ridden miles the bike has been well cared for. Still has the original RG3 Arrow exhaust which sounds magnificent. Tires are in good shape.

Bike will also come with a Berzig center stand fitted specifically for this bike. Main oil pan gasket likely needs to be changed and one will be included with the bike. I will also include an oil filter and oil for your first oil change.

The rebirth of MV Agusta brought some fantastic Italian hardware to our shores. And while the numbers of units shipped did increase a fair amount, F4 models are still less plentiful than similar Ducati models, for example. That makes the F4 reasonably rare. The AGO model is known as a 300 unit production only – making it a rare model. Perhaps the most rare of all? This bike has over 10k on the clocks, meaning it is not a garage queen museum piece but an actual rider. It is not often we see these bikes with actual miles on the odometer, and it has nothing to do with the reliability or longevity of the bike. These are modern and well-engineered machines with top quality components throughout – and can take the miles and a fair bit of abuse. But given the cost, many see these as a bike to protect and save, rather than collect miles. This one was saved from that fate, but there is some regular wear apparent on the tank and fairing.

Located on the Central Coast of California, this F4 managed to get out on its fair share of sunny days. Devoid of snowfall or significant inclement weather, it looks like this bike lived where it could be used as intended. The problem is that makes a difference in resale value. An AGO model F4 1000 didn’t start out life as a cheap bike. The upside for collectors is that AGOs have not really made the turn in terms of value appreciate as of yet. And while a very low mileage museum dweller might set you back about $23k or more these days (still way below original MSRP, by the way), this slightly more used example is priced at a more reasonable $15k. Now that price is probably more in line with a nearly new base model F4 – but for the dosh you get the cachet of the rarer AGO model. In the long run the AGO is certainly in a better position to rise in value, just based on the numbers and historical fact. Check it out here, and then be sure and share your thoughts on MV Agusta F4s, and the pull of the AGO commemorative model. Good Luck!!

MI

Respect the GOAT: 2005 MV Agusta F4 AGO #75/300
Benelli May 23, 2019 posted by

Across the Pond: 2003 Benelli Tre Novacento for Sale

It’s always interesting to see the disparity in terms of bike values, depending on market. It seems like you can make a decent living, finding bikes where they are cheap and plentiful, and shipping them to places where they ain’t… In Japan, the 250cc two-stroke sportbikes of the 80s and 90s are relatively cheap, although they obviously have an enthusiastic following. Here in the USA? They were never officially imported and, until certain models recently cleared the 25-year import restrictions, were extremely rare. I haven’t looked recently, but many classic Laverda models are much less expensive in Europe than here as well. Looking at the £3,650.00 asking price for this very cool Benelli Tre Novocentro, it looks like the same holds true for these stylish and quirky machines, since that works out to just $4,623.00 in US currency.

Obviously, the Tornado has rarity going for it, along with distinctive Italian looks. But it’s also a pretty functional motorcycle, with a solid 140hp from the 898cc three cylinder, good handling, and quality braking and suspension components. A six-speed cassette-style gearbox is probably overkill on a roadbike, but the slipper-clutch with an adjustable engagement point is pretty cool, as is the frame that’s glued-together using aerospace-grade adhesives. It lacks the radial-mount calipers and eyeball-flattening power of today’s fastest bikes, but these have more than enough performance to keep even expert riders entertained.

I’d take great pains to stay in front of other riders, to keep them confused looking up the tail of the Tre to see bright yellow cooling fans under the tail. With the underseat-mounted radiator, the engine could be mounted further forward in the frame for better handling. Parts are likely the biggest issue for any Benelli, although there were some minor issues with reliability, as you’d expect from a brand-new, low-production, high-performance Italian sportbike. Nothing that can’t be handled by the patient owner, but still a headache if you’re not prepared.

So what happened? Why wasn’t the revitalized brand a bigger success? Well partly it was the unknown of a newly-reborn brand flogging an expensive, top-shelf sportbike. But the bike’s original 900cc displacement was meant to allow it to be homologated for racing, and the bike was a victim of changing World Superbike rules that basically made 900cc triples obsolete, since the bike would have been uncompetitive in it’s original form. Later machines bumped displacement to over 1100cc, but that just made it a more effective roadbike as it was too large to race.

From the original UK eBay listing: 2003 Benelli Tornado Tre Novocentro for Sale

Here we have my truly iconic Benelli Tornado TRE 900                                                                       

These bikes made quite a stir back in the day – for some good and some bad unfortunately but now when you have one with all the modified bits dealt with and niggles ironed out they truly are an absolute brilliant thing to be out on when the sun comes out… My example is as expected – equipped with what was back then some top notch equipment and even by today’s standards it’s still quite trick 

The engine has had the cam chain replaced (June 2018) before the manuals suggest as this is very important – also the valve clearances done then too as these engines naturally sound tappety. The infamous recall mods – Z25 gear on the alternator shaft and clutch bolt all inspected and are fine. The suspension and brakes are from the best makes along with a titanium Arrow exhaust system – all original equipment…

The bike is in what’s arguably the best colour scheme of silver and green with black accents here/there and of course the rear yellow under seat fans. These bikes are really something else and the triple cylinder 900cc engine loves to be used – the sound up the revs is amazing and just puts a smile on my face EVERY TIME I take it out. The bike is 100% mechanically spot on – does everything expected of it and needs nothing doing. Please do all your research required online as these bikes were all made 2003-2004 so don’t be fooled by the late registered bikes for sale as they are all the same! 

Factory fitted alarm/immobiliser.

MOT until sept 2019 – only 16k miles…

I have documents – manuals – keys – history – receipts – V5 

The honesty part… The bike has a small crack along side the r/h front indicator as per pics due to being pushed into something in my garage and the tail unit has some mark where an item fell onto it… Neither are of any issue but want to point out faults also… My cars/bikes are only being sold due to an impending house move this summer and I need to downsize somewhat so please only genuine interest is wanted as were always busy.

Thanks for looking.

As stated before, the price is shockingly reasonable for a bit of functional Italian exotica, although maybe that’s considered expensive on the other side of the Atlantic? The 16,000 miles aren’t all that low, but the bike appears to have had considerate ownership by a knowledgeable enthusiast, and my understanding is that these Benellis are pretty robust mechanically, once you get your head around some of the unconventional engineering and idiosyncrasies. Parts availability would be the big unknown here, and I’d expect OEM bodywork to be nearly unobtainable. If there are any owners out there, we’d love to hear about your experiences in the comments!

-tad

Across the Pond: 2003 Benelli Tre Novacento for Sale
Bimota May 19, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio Azzurro

When it comes to motorcycle manufacturers, none seem to offer the combination of performance, artwork and mystique than iconic builder Bimota. Originally known for their frames and eventual frame kits for various engine makers, Bimota made the leap to become a full-blown motorcycle manufacturer utilizing Ducati power plants exclusively (with the exception of the ill-fated, in-house Vdue project). And by standardizing on a family of engines, Bimota was able to hyper-extend their focus on the art of performance. This maniacal frenzy of artistic and mechanical expression is best seen on the lesser-clothed machines – and this rare DB6 Delirio Azzurro is the perfect case study.

Featured Listing: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio Azzurro

All in all, there are seven different variants of the DB6 platform. All enjoy the same gorgeous trestle frame with aluminum side plates, Brembo binders, Marzocchi suspension (Ohlins for the R bikes) and air cooled, Ducati desmo engine. The earliest of the models – including today’s Delirio Azzurro – utilized the fuel injected 992cc dual spark mill, while later DB6 models were uprated to the 1100 (actually 1078cc) format. The Azzurro is one of the more rare versions of this already rare bike, offering some exclusivity due to the graphics and purpose. As the story goes, Bimota created this version of the DB6 as a tribute to the Italian soccer team for winning the World Cup. Football – or soccer as it is known in the US – is a very big deal throughout most of Europe, South America and Australia. World Cup winners are heroes in their home country, and being Italian the 2006 World Cup winners received a special edition Bimota. A total of 23 bikes were produced in this striking livery with a only a few being offered to the public. Grazie!!

From the seller:
This bike is one of 23 ever made and was given as a gift from the Italian government to one of the 2006 Italian World Cup championship players. A New York collector bought this bike and stored it in his climate controlled garage. I purchased the bike from him when he was relocated back to Europe and have displayed it in my office in my home ever since. This bike has less than 1000 miles on it. It is number 8 of 23.

Price: $ 25,000
Contact: tonybosi@gmail.com
or 201.206.4572

Artfully executed from frame to swing arm, polished and anodized to show striking contrast, fitted with top-notch components throughout with performance on tap thanks to light weight and Ducati torque, the DB6 Delirio Azzurra is a sharper, crisper, rarer Monster. It retains all of the rideability traits of the naked bike – upright seating, low weight and simply less clutter and farkles, but loses none of its potency when the going gets twisty. With miles of ground clearance, compliant suspension, boat-anchor brakes and exclusivity that only a hand-built, limited production machine can bring this is the bike you want to be on to show the world you’ve made it in style.

With fewer than 1,000 miles on the analog/digital clocks, this particular example has spent more time being seen than being ridden. But when you have artwork that looks like this, one might just have to reconsider the other side of the equation. Certainly the value with any collector piece such as this relates to condition, and lower miles simply equate to the perception of better condition. Mechanically sympathetic readers might cringe at “hangar queens,” but there are many facets to the hobby; the artistry that goes into a Bimota makes for collector appreciation even while static. This uber-rare Bimota is looking for a new home. If you are a riding fan, a Bimota fan, a Ducati dual spark desmo fan, a football fan (or even a soccer fan), or a fan of all things Italiano, this is something you should be checking out. Interested readers can give Tony a ping via phone or email. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio Azzurro
Ducati March 24, 2019 posted by

Small Batch: 1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Behold the mighty Ducati F1 special edition “Laguna Seca.” Essentially a factory hot rod based on the F1 (a 750cc version of the Tourist Trophy), the Laguna Seca shared a special tier with the two other limited edition models, the Santamonica and the Montjuich. All of the special models were named after race tracks where a Ducati rider pulled a first place rabbit out of a hat. In this case, it was Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli prevailing at the 1986 Battle of the Twins (BOTT) event at the famed California track. The Laguna Seca was closest to the Montjuich in spec, the differences being largely related to the intended target audience: North America. As such, changes were basically limited to emissions and noise controls. The rest is pure 1980s Ducati goodness; rough and ready, light and lean. The seller has written (or copied?) a good story of the Laguna Seca (and the F1 model in general), so I will let him pick up the tale:

1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Frame no. ZDM750LS*750059*
Engine no. ZDM750L1*750194

Less than 300 examples made

Only 6,500 miles from new

Considered by many enthusiasts to be the last of the ‘real’ Ducatis, the race-styled 750 F1 first appeared in 1985. Ducati had already enjoyed considerable success with its Pantah-derived F2 racers in FIM Formula 2 racing – Tony Rutter winning the championship four-times running between 1981 and 1984 – so a ‘750’ version was the logical next step.

First seen in prototype form in endurance races in 1983, the F1’s 748cc engine was the latest in a long line of stretches applied to the original 500c ‘belt drive’ Desmo unit that had first appeared in the Pantah in 1979 – a street-legal updated version of the mid-’80s TT1. A markedly over-square design of 88×61.5mm bore/stroke, the F1 engine produced around 60bhp and functioned as a stressed element within the frame, the swinging arm pivoting in the rear of the gearbox. Clearly visible above the deliberately cut away fairing sides, the aforementioned frame attracted almost as much attention as the engine: a trellis of short, straight tubes, it has formed the basis of every road-going Ducati since, as well as the first Desmosedici Moto GP racers. In the fashion of the day, the F1 came with a 16-inch front wheel, while braking power was provided by state-of-the-art triple Brembos. The stock F1 was complemented by a series of hand-built, limited edition, race replicas – Montjuich, Santamonica and Laguna Seca – the last inspired by Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli’s famous ‘Battle of the Twins’ race victory at Daytona in 1986. Today the evocatively named F1 and its derivatives are highly prized by Ducati collectors.

Much like the Montjuich, the Laguna Seca came with bigger Dell’Orto carburetors, higher compression ratio, bigger valves, and straight-cut primary drive gears. And talk of 95bhp at 10,000rpm! But unlike the Montjuich, it came with a larger, quieter muffler.

There were some small changes between the two bikes, namely in the Laguna’s parts from the new Paso. The delta-spoked one-piece 16-inch Oscam wheels and the brake discs, but not the four-piston ‘racing’ Brembo front calipers, came from the 750 Paso, as did the wider front fender. Other changes included a ‘Lucky’ signature steel gas tank, revised foot peg bracketry and a plastic rear sub-fender attached to the swing arm. Most Laguna Secas came with a solo seat and were built in limited numbers (perhaps as few as 296.)

Not a lot of history about this particular example, although the read is a good one (reminds me of Ian Faloon). The only point of note I see on this bike is the non-standard Ohlins external shock reservoir strapped to the left side of the iconic trestle frame chassis (original shock was a Marzocchi PVS 4). Any other changes are unknown with the facts given, and with only 3 pictures to work with there are many questions left unanswered. But with only 6,500 miles, this beauty is undoubtedly clean and very rare. I’m not sure if proper etiquette deems we refer to this as the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Laguna Seca Raceway, but the connection is very clear. Also clear is the asking price: a not insignificant $24,900. That is a bit higher than we usually see these bikes offered – although the seller appears open to a lesser figure – so if you’re in the market for one of these beautiful and rare model Pantahs you should act quickly. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on the F1 model Ducatis: are you a fan? Good Luck!!

MI

Ducati December 22, 2018 posted by

Suit That’s Red – 1992 Ducati Paso 907 I.E.

– Sold on the buy-it-now while this post was being scheduled, hopefully to a sharp RSBFS reader !

Like a back-lit tinsel tree in its hometown Santa Monica, this rather red Paso is all dressed up for Xmas.  The last-generation desmodue was a fuel-injected 9th inning home run, which unfortunately couldn’t extend the Tamburini model into extra innings.

1992 Ducati Paso 907 I.E. for sale on eBay

The all-enclosed Paso was one of the first Ducatis under Castiglioni stewardship, intially as a 750cc and later a 904, both with a single Weber.  More linear electronic fuel injection and 90 hp came in 1991, transforming the ride.  Hiding under the soap-bar is a peculiar square-tube frame, and Marzocchi suspension peeks out.  Brembo made both the four-piston calipers and wide 17-inch wheels.  Intakes and vents are arrayed over the fairing with the aim of funneling cold air to the airbox and radiator, and warm air out and away from the rider.

With nearly 48,000 miles, a full rebuild and restoration is likely in this Paso’s past, and though there’s no mention of it in the auction, the buy-it-now is in the upper end of the range.  No evident damage and it’s spotless all around.  Nothing out of the ordinary except for a missing turn signal lense and a nicer seat cover.  From the eBay auction:

This final year example of the 907ie is offered in the classic Ducati red livery. Showing an astonishing 47,926 miles, the bike looks like it has a fraction of that. Regular servicing by a local independent shop has kept the bike in fine riding condition. A recent trip to the shop ensured that the bike was ready for sale.

The 907 I.E. got high marks for its torquey delivery, spot-on fuel injection, hydraulic clutch and 17-inch wheels.  The all-encompassing body was an acquired taste though, and production never really got much over 1,000 per year, ensuring its rarity.  This Paso would have some stories to tell, about some long sporty tours and that season getting a makeover.  And a super previous owner…

-donn

Suit That’s Red – 1992 Ducati Paso 907 I.E.
Cagiva November 16, 2018 posted by

9/16ths Scale: 1998 Cagiva Mito

Legendary motorcycle designer Massimo Tamburini had a long and storied career. From co-founding iconic motorcycle manufacturer Bimota, to penning some of the most striking designs in motorcycling history for the likes of Cagiva, Ducati and MV Agusta, Tamburini has been responsible for many a rider’s dream machine. You might have seen some of his design genius in bikes such as the Bimota KB2, the Tesi 1D and the DB1. For Ducati he was involved with the 851/888 and the Paso and had a hand in the Supermono works. But his greatest contribution to motorcycling – his most admired design theme – was around the Ducati 916. Everything that came after it was simply a small step along this theme – including the 748/996/998 and the entirety of the MV Agusta F4 lineup. So strong was this theme that the design language translated to smaller machines as well, which is where we pick up the story on today’s fantastic Cagiva Mito.

1998 Cagiva Mito 125 for sale on eBay

Powered by a single cylinder, liquid cooled two stroke, the 125cc Mito was considered as an entry level sport bike for Europe’s small-bore crazed culture. Popular in areas where larger capacity motorcycles are prohibitively expensive due to taxes or license requirements the smaller scoots are immensely popular and technologically advanced. In the case of the Mito, that technology includes design elements straight off of the legendary 916, including twin headlights and the tail section. Nifty hardware includes the twin-beam aluminum frame, asymmetrical rear swing arm with preload-adjustable rear shock, Brembo binders (that’s a single 320mm unit up front), 40mm Marzocchi front forks (including steering damper), 7-speed transmission and an estimated 34 HP (stock) at 12,000 RPM. Tipping the scales some 15 under 300 lbs, this is a race track replica rocket provided you are of suitable stature with the skills to keep the revs on the pipe.

From the seller:
This machine is virtually new as it only was ridden 399 km since its conversion from a stock 70mph (110 km) bike to one that will show 112 mph(180km) on the speedo.Its collectibility is enhanced by its 7 speed gearbox and of course the styling, which was done in the spirit of the Ducati 916.Being a 2 stroke machine,many states allow small displacement bikes plates for highway use or find a track site to enjoy this super handling lightweight. The mods we performed were not optimized for competition, but were done to keep the reliability and add to the enjoyment of the bike.Recently upgraded, cleaned fuel system,and new battery was fitted.

The seller claims this particular Mito has been hot-rodded, but not much info is included as to what was actually done. Generally this is done via boring out the displacement and porting the cylinder. Expansion chambers and silencers are other popular mods to help two strokes breathe better and make more power. Other than the unknown mods, this is a low mileage example that appears clean in the few, blurry photos. This has all of the hallmarks of an Evo I machine, with both the 7-speed gearbox and the tri-spoke wheels. Later Evo II models went to a more robust 6-speed gearbox and a different set of wheels. Any Mito is potentially collectible – after all we do not see them every day here in the US – but there is not enough data to determine if the 7 cog bikes are any more valuable than the 6 speeders. Either way you are in good company; even the vaunted Barber Motorsports Museum proudly highlights the Mito in their extensive collection.

This is not an auction, but rather a straight-up buy it now listing. Pricing is a fair $6,500 (especially for the low miles!), although the states in which you can register this bike might not be one in which you reside. Even if not used on this street, this little Mito will eat larger bikes alive on a tight and twisty track. Smart buyers are encouraged to check first, ask lots of questions, and do your homework. So who *doesn’t* want to have a mini-916 in their quiver? It’s great for show, and from the mods sounds like it is ready for some GO. Check it out here, and let your inner child racer run free. Good luck!

MI

9/16ths Scale:  1998 Cagiva Mito
Bimota October 27, 2018 posted by

Early-Production 2009 Bimota DB7 for Sale

Bimotas are unparalleled garage ornaments: blessed with exotic components, striking looks, and wild graphics, they’re two-wheeled art and look every bit the barely-tamed racebikes they’re purported to be. Unfortunately, they’ve also been pretty hit-or-miss when it came to the actual riding, often from bike to bike. Set up for any Bimota is key and, in spite of claimed advantages in terms of power, weight, and componentry, their bikes have sometimes struggled to even match the bikes they were built to supposedly outperform. But by the time of the company’s rebirth in the early 2000s, they’d gotten their act together, and today’s DB7 is one of the best bikes in the company’s history.

Of course, improvements in performance and quality aside, we should still at least briefly touch on the elephant in the room: cost. The Ducati 1098-powered Bimota DB7’s $35,000 asking price was in no way a good value. It definitely wasn’t $10,000 better than the hot-rod Ducati 1098R of the same year, a bike that made significantly more power and even weighed a couple pounds less than the “lightweight” Bimota… But if you’re fixated on something like that, you’re missing the entire point: Bimotas of this period are for well-heeled connoisseurs with money to burn, and they’re not intended to make financial sense.

I love 90s Bimotas, but some of the details are a bit crude and they’re a complete pain to work on: those gorgeous aluminum beam frames significantly limit access to the bike’s oily bits, and the overall “kit-bike” quality meant the brand’s reputation suffered. It didn’t help that the major manufacturers had been honing their craft. When two motorcycles with the same engine have a 150lb weight difference, the lighter machine can’t help but be faster. But by the late 1990s, bikes like Yamaha’s R1 and the Suzuki GSX-R1000 offered the same level of performance as Bimota’s creations, but with much better reliability, and at a third of the price. So Bimota focused on creating bikes like the DB7 that offered an incredible level of craftsmanship and detailing, even if they weren’t any faster.

I’m not a huge fan of the stacked projector-beam headlamps, but this is the kind of machine that gets more an more impressive, the closer you get. The detailing is incredible, especially the heart of the beast, or maybe the skeleton if we’re staying with the anatomical metaphor… Bimota doesn’t generally build their own engines, and the bikes’ claim to fame has always been their frames. They started experimenting with hybrid frames that combined multiple materials with the SB8R, the idea being to obtain different performance characteristics for different areas of the frame. In the SB8’s case, it was designed to shift weight forward for better weight-distribution and handling. In the DB7, the frame is an evolution of the earlier DB5/6 that used a combination of trellis structures for the frame and swingarm, connected to stiff machined aluminum sideplates, a design similar to MV Agusta’s modern roadbikes and their upcoming Moto2 machine. In the Bimota DB7, the tubular trellis is replaced by oval-section tubing, and the overall effect is similar, and the bike looks light and agile, even at rest.

Of course, improvements in performance and quality aside, we should still at least briefly touch on the elephant in the room: cost. The DB7’s $35,000 asking price was in no way a good value. It definitely wasn’t $10,000 better than the Ducati 1098R of the same year, a bike that made significantly more power and even weighed a couple pounds less than the “lightweight” Bimota… But if you’re fixated on something like that, you’re missing the entire point: Bimotas of this period are for well-heeled connoisseurs with money to burn, and they’re not intended to make financial sense.

From the original eBay listing: 2009 Bimota DB7 for Sale

The DB7 was Bimota’s first superbike after their rebirth in 2003, and it featured Ducati’s 1098 Testastretta Evo engine. The engine isn’t the only impressive part–in addition to Bimota’s home-brew oval tube trellis frame, this bike is packed with top-shelf components like Marzocchi forks, Brembo Monobloc calipers, and the fully adjustable ExtremeTech rear shock. But what truly makes this bike stand out is the way this bike is made.

Ugh, I know what the seller means by “home-brew” but wow, is that the wrong phrase. Bimota literally made their name developing sophisticated frames that offered significant handling advantages, compared to machines from major manufacturers, and this one, while not necessarily better than the frame that forms the basis of the 1098, is a piece industrial art. The $21,000 starting bid is pretty steep, but these are some of the best bikes Bimota ever made. Sure, you could get a decent Panigale 1199S for that money, but those things are everywhere in Southern California…

-tad

Early-Production 2009 Bimota DB7 for Sale
Laverda August 15, 2018 posted by

Overnight Success: 1984 Laverda 1000 RGS Executive

When you think “high speed touring” the usual suspects usually begin with BMW and then taper off quickly towards some muted, former sportbike, Japanese road missile (think Connie or otherwise). All good choices, to be sure. But if I challenged you to narrow your answer to cover the 1970s and 1980s, what would you say? BMW still comes to mind… but not a whole lot else. We’re not talking about the two-wheeled Winnebagos with which the Big Four did battle across the decades. We are talking about packing a briefcase and a small bag and streaking across the autobahn/autostrada at max velocity for an overnight trip. Compared to the rather staid Beemers, today’s RGS Executive was as exotic as a Ferrari, and just as rare.

1984 Laverda 1000 RGS Executive for sale on eBay

The engine powering the RGS was Laverda’s long-serving and very charismatic three-cylinder 981cc engine, the legacy of the Jota. With the latest spec mill having a smoother 120° crankshaft – instead of the less refined 180° lumpy crank timing – and rubber mounts the big triple was very nearly civilized. But what really made the RGS was the bodywork. With a large, aerodynamic fairing, comfortable seat and swoopy tail section the RGS was spit and polish on the basic bones that were born in the mid-1970s. The top spec of the lineup – the Executive model – added fairing extensions for even more weather protection, bar risers and matching color-coded hard bags. Performance was strong for the time, suspension was courtesy of Marzocchi, and cast wheels and Brembo brakes rounded out the package. Expensive, exclusive and totally unique, the Laverda RGS Executive stands out as an icon from a manufacturer that has created quite a few.

From the seller:
I bought this Executive early this year with only 2500 miles. It was stored away in a warehouse since the late 80’s. It had the original Laverda FIAMM battery and original tires when I took possession. I performed the usual tasks that one does to a bike that’s been dormant for several years. I replaced the battery, tires, rebuilt front and rear brakes, clutch, front end, rebuilt carbs and did an added some fresh oil. I also installed a Sachse electronic ignition. It runs flawlessly but has some cosmetic issues. It’s an all original bike with original paint. It has a baseball size dent on the tank which can be seen in the photos. Also has an area on the topside of right pannier that’s been scratched or scuffed. The right side fairing extension is cracked. The aluminum piece of the right pannier fell of on the road and is missing. The original tank had old fuel in it for 3 decades and it was full of sticky gunk so an NOS tank was purchased installed. As you can see in the picture the NOS tank has a dent. The original tank was mint on the outside but the inside nit so much. The original tank recently fell over on my bench and now has a golf ball size dent in the same area as the installed tank. The bike will include the spare tank and if the buyer wants the original battery and phantom tires they will be included as well. All the cosmetic mishaps occurred while bike was in storage.

While the Laverda family threw in the towel in 1985, the company continued the occasional spasm of activity through the 1990s – including a rather audacious reboot attempt that unfortunately failed. Last owned by Aprilia and now fully shuttered, one can consider the long run of Laverda to be from 1873 until about 2004. That’s a run of over 130 years, for those of you counting along at home. And during that time Laverda made a name for itself as building motorcycles for real men; motorcycles with substance. This RGS Executive is one of the final models offered by Laverda, and remains a beautiful and collectible machine. Outclassed by the fit, finish and demonic attention to detail of the Japanese, the RGS brings something to the party that cannot be matched by any other motorcycle.

This particular RGS Executive is a very low mileage example: only 4,430 original miles claimed by the seller. That is not a lot of travel for a long-legged beast like this one. Overall the bike looks to be in decent shape, but there are some very obvious (and unfortunate) cosmetic issues. The grips are also not stock items. Keep in mind that we are talking about a low-volume, mostly hand-built machine from a defunct manufacturer. Parts specific to this model will be pricey and hard to find, although the fan base and support group for Laverda remains strong. Does the low number on the odometer equate to a high number at sale time? Given the rarity of the Executive model, there must be interest – but we really don’t have enough current data to determine value. Certainly the $15,900 OBO ask is strong, but not horribly out of line across the last 10 years or so. Check out this rare beauty here, and enjoy another cool bike that you won’t see every day. Good Luck!!

MI

Overnight Success: 1984 Laverda 1000 RGS Executive
Featured Listing May 25, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 2007 MV Agusta F4 Senna with 85 Miles !

Buying an exclusive commemorative, one would hope for a low-mile example. This F4 Senna has but delivery miles and has never been registered.  Its rarity is enhanced by the as-new condition.

2007 MV Agusta F4 Senna with 85 miles !

Recalling the great Formula 1 champion and benefiting his charity for children, the MV Agusta F4 Senna was first displayed in 2002, and was renewed for the 1000cc model in 2006-07.  Hard to call 174 hp “standard” but it is expected from every 998cc F4 with Weber-Marelli multi-point injection.  The suspension is equally qualified with 50mm Marzocchi forks and the Sachs monoshock with adjustments for high and low speed rebound.  No electronic nannies, but radially-mounted Serie Oro Brembo brakes, Ohlins steering damper, and Agusta’s Engine Brake System ( which acts similarly to a slipper clutch ) round out the rideability aids.  Fit and finish is luxurious, the grey and black livery accented by the red frame and alacantra seat.

Never registered and only recently titled, the Senna has spent its days on display.  It looks every bit the part of a superb model which hasn’t been used, in contrast with most which have a few thousand miles.  Here are the owner’s comments:

Never registered, first titled at the end of 2017. The bike was purchased at a private collectors auction last year.  I have copies of the original MSO and Bill of Sale showing the original purchase price of $29,995.  Comes with original stand and cover along with an MV Agusta helmet bag.  The bike is in overall excellent condition with one small defect, it appears something fell against it while in storage for the original owner causing a scuff on the left side fairing which is very difficult to see in photos.  I highly recommend an inspection done in person.  Will help with shipping arrangements.  Own the lowest mileage example I’ve ever seen! Asking $18,500 but open to offers from a person who will treat this motorcycle as art like it deserves.

Agusta executive Claudio Castiglioni and Senna were friends, ensuring that the benefit to the Instituto Ayrton Senna was not just a marketing exercise.  As well as being a premium model with outstanding components, the F4 1000 starts with a superb Tamburini design, with Ferrari’s assistance in the engine department.  The owner Chad asks $18,500 and welcomes offers on (716) 901-6046.

Featured Listing – 2007 MV Agusta F4 Senna with 85 Miles !