Posts by tag: Brembo

Ducati February 27, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R

I'm going to go on record here, and tell you that I was wrong. In fact, I think many people were wrong. We just didn't notice. You see, when the Ducati 916 was released it blew the world away with what a motorcycle should look like, sound like, and how one should move. Massimo Tamburini penned an instant legend; a svelte scalpel with a booming, throbbing heart. We fell in love. The world fell in love. And copy cats followed with the ensuing years - the 996, and the 998 just to name two. More of the same was good when it looked this good. And ultimately, we fell into a rut. Everything had to have the same narrow slit twin headlights, single sided swing arm, and exhaust cans hanging way up high. It was a look, and we liked it that way. Enter 2003, and the Pierre Terblanche-designed 999. Gone was the familiar face, the coke bottle side view, and that rear wheel hanging out with no visible means of support. The Ducati 999 climbed out of the rut in such a fantastic manner that people had a hard time following. History will show that the 999 failed to capture loyal Ducati buyers due to the polarizing looks. It was a love it or hate it sort of thing. But everybody who rode it loved it.

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R

Today the 999 is starting to get recognized for the amazing machine that it is. In person the lines and details on the bike make the 916 look like a Jr High School crush. And while pictures do not do it justice, the real thing draws your eye in to see more. This is a motorcycle that has presence with a capital P in a way the 916/996/998 simply cannot compare. And speaking of comparisons, let's talk performance. With a power plant based on the 998R unit (itself a major revision of the Testastretta engine), the 999R promised 150 HP pushing a sub-400 pound machine. That is both more powerful and lighter than the R bike that preceded it, and it shows on the road and on the racetrack. Stopping this missile is easy, thanks to the race-spec radial mount Brembos. And unlike the trio of bikes that came before, the triple nine has yet another crazy trick up its sleeve: comfort. With revised ergonomics that include a range of adjustments, the 999 is actually a platform you can ride without planning a trip to the chiropractor. The seller has good detail about this bike, so I will let him pick up the tale on this one:

From the seller:
The Ducati 999R was one of the most expensive to manufacture motorcycles Ducati created other then the Desmosedici. It had an invoice of $29,995 when new, $7000 higher then the S model which was the next lower upgrade over the standard 999 offered. The R had the same Ohlins Suspension, but the engine was treated to all sort of exotic changes including being a true 999cc in size from the 104mm bore, having Sand- Cast Crankcases, revised Ports with larger Valves, more aggressive Cams, higher Compression ratio, Titanium Connecting Rods, Knife Edged Crankshaft and 12-Hole Injectors feeding 54mm Throttle Bodies that added up to almost 15 HP more then the S model.

The end result was one of the most amazing refined motorcycles produced. It combined an incredibly smooth engine with insane amounts of torque along with an incredible chassis delivering unbelievable handling and astonishing brakes. It then wrapped all of this engineering and handling in Carbon Fiber Body Work finished in Ducati Red with fit and finish that has not been seen since.

More from the seller:
Living the Ducati dream, the owner (dealer) then installed all sorts of what have become “normal” Ducati ad on's. The Leo Vince Titanium Exhaust System sitting in a box new was close to $4,000. The Speedy Moto vented Clutch Cover and Pressure Plate was a foregone conclusion. The AMS Triple Clamps create a beautiful sight from the rider’s seat along with the Pmoto Master Brake and Clutch Reservoir billet covers. After Market Front Brake Rotors were dramatically lighter and replaced the stock Ducati items. The infinitely adjustable Rear Seats may take an engineer to adjust there are so many variables allowed. Also installed was Ducati’s Factory Shift Assist which can be seen to the left of the instrument cluster. There so much more as you can see in the images. What is great about this bike is that all of the stock parts (except the front brake rotors) are included with the sale.

A full service has been completed including Belts, Tires and Fluid changes. The motorcycle was inspected, the gas replaced with clear treated fluid and test ridden by a Ducati trained Tech.

The selling price: $16,495
Mileage: 3,642
VIN# ZDM1UB5W85B013323

For more information please contact: ted@automaniagp.com
You can also visit the Automania website

This is one very beautiful 999R, and it is sporting a wealth of upgrades and very few miles. It has had a recent service. If you dream of a Ducati R bike, this should be your wake up call. The 999 series were superior in every way to the previous generation. These are also the bikes that are next up on the value-appreciation escalator. As people realize how capable these machines really are AND begin to understand how good these bikes really look you will see a run on them. They have come of age. There is subtlety in this beauty; the 999 just needed a few years for us to mature - and admit we were wrong. But I'm not wrong about this - there is a whole lot of bike for $10,000+ less than a heavier, slower 998R will fetch. That is a bargain in the making, and a future standout for collectors. Look closely. Then admit it. You were wrong too. Give Ted a ping when you are ready to 'fess up. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R
Ducati February 26, 2019 posted by

Doing the math: 2002 Ducati 998R

Sold before we could post it! This immaculate 998R is going to a new home after someone committed to the $26k BIN. -MI

In the game of "there's no substitute for cubic inches" the Ducati 998 was a step above that which came before. The last of the 916 lineage, the 998R model was everything that a 916 enthusiast could hope for. More engine, with more torque and power. More suspension and more adjustment. More championships, and unfortunately, more price. Visually, the 998 (as well as the 996 that preceded it) resemble the fabled 916. But the 998 was everything that the 916 strove to be in the initial version. And the 998R? It was even more.

2002 Ducati 998R for sale on eBay

As is Ducati custom, the "R" bikes are something just a bit more special. Ignoring the limited edition numbered plaque on the headstock for a moment, the R bikes have always been equipped with the best of the best - from suspension to brakes. But even more so, the power plant of the R model has been one step ahead of current year Ducatis. The 996R model foreshadowed the 998 in displacement. And the 998R, with a revised bore/stroke combo, a model-specific oil pan, cams, and more, really displaced 999cc. That's right folks - this is really a 999R in Tamburini clothing (for those that prefer it to the Terblance design that followed). From an engine perspective, it is mechanically closer to the 999 than the 996 (and not just numerically). Easily the most recognizable form in the motorcycling world, the 998 utilized the general bodywork, single sided swing arm and high exhaust of the 916 to create a beautiful - and terrifically potent - road missile.

From the seller:
For Sale is my 2002 Ducati 998R, #461 of 700. I have owned the bike since August, 2006. It currently has less than 6600 miles and is in excellent shape. It has always been titled and licensed in California, since new and the current registration (in my name) is good through Jan 2020. It has been stored in a climate controlled garage since I bought it 12 years ago. There is no evidence that it was ever abused or raced. I have many receipts from the previous owners dating back to early 2003.

This bike is in very original condition as a street legal model. The paint is beautiful with one noticeable scratch on the lower portion of the fairing. Everything works properly (gauges, lights, controls, horn, etc). It has Marchesini Magnesium wheels with older Pirelli tires. Ohlins suspension front and rear with an Ohlins steering damper. I have added the wiring mod to allow the bike to idle in neutral while on the side stand. Also, a new Yuasa battery (May 2018). It comes with all the additional goodies. I will include the front and rear stands, a factory 998R shop manual, a complete factory tool kit, the 998R owner’s manual, and the factory Plaque of Authenticity.

More from the seller:
The most current service to the bike (June/July, 2018) was performed by Scott Watters, owner of Motoservizio in Signal Hill, Ca. Prior to starting his business in 2002, Scott worked at Ducati dealerships as a factory trained mechanic. He also was a Fast by Ferracci mechanic for Doug Polen (AMA 1994), Vance and Hines mechanic for Thomas Stevens and Anthony Gobert (AMA 1997-98), Doug Polen (FUSA 2000), Dean Mizdal AMA 2001. All were racing Ducati MCs.

The recent servicing included:
4 valve service
New cam belts
All fluids fully changed (oil/filter, coolant, fork oil/seals/bushings, and brake fluid)
New air filters
R&R fuel pump, new filter, new hoses, and cleaned tank interior
Clean the headlight shells inside and out

Again, the bike is in excellent condition and is ready to be ridden hard or put on display.

The final model in the original 916-based line, the 998R stands out as the pinnacle example of that model. It shares all of its good looks and characteristics with the legend, yet boasts more power and better *erverything* across the line. If you are in it for the collection, this is a must-have bike. If you are in it to ride like Troy Bayliss (but undercover, without the polarizing graphics of the Bayliss Edition), this is still a must-have bike. This is a bike you can ride today and it will still be appreciated by the people you pass. Not bad for a design that reaches so far back; it is really that timeless. Check it out here, and don't wait long. It is not cheap, but we do not see 998Rs of this caliber often. Two more than a 996, 82 more than a 916, and one less than a 999 - you do the math. Good Luck!!

MI

Doing the math: 2002 Ducati 998R
Aprilia February 9, 2019 posted by

Do you Tuono? 2007 Aprilia Tuono R Factory

Often considered the newer, younger upstart to the Superbike scene, Aprilia dates back to the end of World War II as a manufacturer. Originally a builder of bicycles and mopeds in war-torn Italy, Aprilia leveraged a partnership with Austrian company Rotax and began to build bigger scooters - including a string of very successful 250cc road racers. Many well-known knee draggers - folks like Max Biaggi, Valentino Rossi, Loris Capirossi, Roberto Locatelli, Marco Melandri, Álvaro Bautista, and Jorge Lorenzo to name a few - achieved championship status on an Aprilia 250cc race bike. The connection with Rotax remained over the years, and in 1998 Aprilia launched the first of the big bore models - the RSV - based on a 1000cc Rotax 60 degree V-twin. As the years passed and Aprilia was acquired by Piaggio, the larger models continued, as did forays into racing in both WSBK as well as MotoGP. So clearly Aprilia knows something about building sporting motorcycles.

2007 Aprilia Tuono R Factory for sale on eBay

The Tuono is fundamentally a RSV sport bike sans clothes. Much like the Monster lineup from Ducati, the Tuono features a more upright seating position, wider bars and what is generally considered more adept at navigating in the city. Also in parallel with Ducati, the "R" spec of an Aprilia model offers tastier suspension bits, more carbon fiber, lighter weight and a higher level of performance. In the case of the Tuono, you are looking at approximately 9 lbs of weight carved off of the standard model, Ohlins suspension and top-notch Brembo binders. You also get a gold anodized frame - which doesn't add any performance but definitely gives you that bling factor. And while the Italians are known for their two-wheeled artistry, every once in a while they paint from a palate of colors not ordinarily found in nature; this seems to be one of those times.

From the seller:
Original owner - over 12 years. Rare bike. Factory edition with Ohlins front and rear, carbon fiber and forged OZ wheels in blue. I upgraded the stock steering damper to Ohlins as well. Akrapovic cans with PC 3 custom dyno tune - runs fantastic. CRG levers, Puig screen, tank grips and fender eliminator. Stock parts included. Recently installed new stator and regulator. Forks rebuilt within last 2500 miles. All major work done professionally at Eurosports in Pa. Newer Pirelli Diablos.

No doubt this is a striking, if not interesting looking bike. If you are concerned with becoming another "me too" Monster rider, this could be your escape vehicle. Rare by the numbers but not necessarily high on the collector list, this particular example has just over 17,000 miles on the clock. Not a lot of picture, but definitely a lot of bike. Located in New Jersey, you can check it out here. Do you Tuono? Let us know! Good Luck!!

MI

Do you Tuono?  2007 Aprilia Tuono R Factory
KTM February 7, 2019 posted by

Teacup: 2016 KTM RC390 Cup Bike

Right here we have an interesting dilemma. Race bikes are definitely cool, but used machines really need to have some star power and proven history to have value. Track day bikes - also known as hacked street bikes - are relatively cheap but usually thrashed pretty hard. Brand new race-spec bikes are rare, and nearly always very, very expensive. But what if you could find a new and competitive race bike built for a current race series - but reliable and valid for use on practically any track day you might have in mind? And what if it was reasonably priced? Enter today's cool 2016 KTM RC390 Cup Bike, advertised as NEW.

2016 KTM RC390 Cup Bike for sale on eBay

The little KTM shares a lot of DNA with its bigger brother, the RC8. Sure, it's a smaller displacement bike - often mistakenly identified as "entry level" here in the US - but that does not mean that technology has passed it by. With a short, straight tube frame chassis in trademark orange, the RC390 features WP suspension including upside down forks. Motivation is provided by a liquid cooled, single cylinder four stroke with double overhead cams and four valves per cylinder. Figure approximately 44 HP nearing the neighborhood of 10,000 RPM (although the sealed race bikes may have slightly less), and more torque down lower on the rev range than any of the small bike twins. A slipper clutch is standard, as is the Brembo designed brakes and fly by wire throttle with fuel injection - certainly not entry level equipment. Dry weight for the standard machine is just about 300 lbs even.

From the seller:
2016 KTM RC 390 Cup Bike. Bike has never been titled and sells as a new bike.

Was $10,000 $ave over $4,000! The KTM RC Cup racebike, it is a track-only (NOT STREET-LEGAL) version of the RC 390. The race-prepared motorcycle is sold ready for competition, with over 40 KTM PowerParts and other improvements to enhance its racing performance. The engine of the bike comes sealed for use in the MotoAmerica series and it gets a performance exhaust by Akrapovic The racebike features fully adjustable WP inverted forks fork and WP racing monoshock with high-/low-speed compression and rebound damping, adjustable preload and adjustable shock length. It also gets a taller windshield with race style tail fairing and belly pan. Throttle response is a very important factor in racing, so the KTM RC Cup racebike receives RC8 R-like throttle assembly. Moreover, there are also CNC-machined race-spec rearsets and foldable levers on the bike, along with many other PowerParts, including front and rear trackstands.

The RC390 Cup machine is likely one of only a handful of turn key racers you could buy new in the past decade, fully set up out of the crate (the Moriwaki 250 and Aprilia 250 Cup are the others). Yes, it fits smaller riders better. Yes, to be fully qualified for MotoAmerica you need to be younger than 22. But adults can hoon on this all day long during track days, thanks to the proven reliability of these tough and quick thumpers. And isn't that what you want in a track day bike? A ready supply of spares, minimal parts that can be damaged in a crash, and reliability to ensure that you maximize your track time - all in an affordable package that is light weight and easy to handle. For those less selfish, you may even have an aspiring young racer in the house that is looking for a sponsored ride. Either way, the price of entry is a mere $5,995 Buy It Now - super cheap for a racer! Check it out here. I know it does not have three trillion horsepower, but this can carve a line far better than any GX Busja mega displacement streetbike. If a MotoGP bike is out of your price range, this MotoAmerica eligible racer might be a better fit. The only problem you will have is trying to wipe the smile off of your face. Good Luck!!

MI

Teacup:  2016 KTM RC390 Cup Bike
Ducati February 5, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2004 Ducati 999R FILA

Mid-aughts Ducati was no stranger to dressing up their street bikes in World Superbike drag, spitting out special editions left, right and center, but they put a little bit of extra muscle under the stylish suit with the 999R FILA. Built to celebrate Duc's 200th win in World Superbike competition, the FILA got a 10 horsepower bump over the standard bike, bringing the L twin to a total of 146. The special paint was slathered on carbon fiber bodywork, which was draped around a WSBK-style swingarm.

The bikes also got adjustable Ohlins forks and shock, forged wheels from Ducati Corse and radial brakes, which weren't yet standard equipment on race replicas. This 2004 Ducati 999R FILA has been ridden sparingly in its 15 years, but the wear marks on its stick tires belie that it has been used at least partially as intended. Though it was used, the pictures show that it is still incredibly clean and fully ready for the new owner to enjoy.

From the listing:

FILA 999R Perfect condition. 1,700 miles. Orginal tires and all factory parts and a nice cover included. Bike was run and started regularly with the oil changed often. An amazing bike. Rare and crazy low miles. Includes Rear Stand. Marc 818-606-347three

A picture of the gauges in the listing shows 1,976 miles, not 1,700, but 200 miles is so few it's almost not worth mentioning. The bike is listed at $16,800, not quite $2,000 less than the last 999R FILA we highlighted. With so few around, nice ones like this should keep their value.

Featured Listing: 2004 Ducati 999R FILA
Moto Guzzi January 18, 2019 posted by

The Manly Ride: 1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans

My knowledge of French comes courtesy of car manufacturer Renault (pronounced Run-Not) who marketed Le Car in the 1970s. It came with Le Tires, Le Hubcaps, and Le tiny little motor. But it was, according to Renault, a car. Popular Mechanics dubbed it a French VW Rabbit, low on style but practical and useful. Thankfully the Italians speak foreign languages better than we Yanks. And in Italian, Le Mans is not merely The Men, but rather a reference to a popular French vacation locale along the Sarthe river. Oh, and also the name of a pretty famous racetrack known for endurance competition. And unlike Le Car, the Le Mans is high on style, while still offering practicality and performance. Today's find is a first generation 850cc example in Le Euro trim.

1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans for sale on eBay

The Moto Guzzi Le Mans was introduced in 1976. Today we think of these as Gen I machines, however there was no such official nomenclature for the original release; that came with the introduction of the Gen II design. There were two different builds of this model, referred to as Series One and Series Two. The Series One bikes were the first (approximately) 2,000 examples, and the most rare. The Series Two bikes had some minor cosmetic changes (different seat, rectangular tail light, black fork sliders, etc), and numbered approximately 4,000. Either way you look at it, the first generation of the Le Mans is relatively rare today - especially one wearing original patina and remaining relatively stock.

From the seller:
1978 Moto Guzzi Lemans euro. I've owned and cared for this bike since early 2001.

It started it's life in London,England, was moved to Los Angeles, where i purchased it, and now lives in Ohio where i now work. I have a bit of paperwork on the provenance of the bike. This Moto Guzzi is a very low mileage bike that is all original except for raask period rearsets and side covers. I have the original foam seat, front turn signals, and one of the original sidecovers. The right side cover was lost 20 years ago on a freeway. All of these items are included and in excellent condition.

The aftermarket seat was an item I purchased from Italy 15 years ago. It has proved to be a good looking, functional piece for this bike. This Guzzi runs like a freight train, like original, unmolested lemans should. Only Guzzi and Ducati savvy mechanics have touched this bike it's whole life.

The euro models have non matching frame and engine numbers, all can be traced, and a short headlight frame, and no bright orange fairing paint job. This bike has an excellent original patina, no crashes, dents, etc. Engine is very tight, with only some minor weep dusting at the back. Makes you wonder why people ever had to restore these bikes. All gauges, electrical work as expected.

These early Moto Guzzis can be thought of as very similar to air-head era BMWs. The hardware layout of air-cooled twin with longitudinal crank, pushrod two-valve heads, inline transmission and shaft drive is the same - if you bent the Beemer's cylinders upwards 45 degrees per side. Brakes on both are Brembos. Swap the Bing carbs for Dellortos and you have Le Guzzi! Blip the throttle and the torque roll is the same between the Italian and German machine. So too is the driveshaft reaction that causes the rear of the bike to raise under throttle, and drop when the throttle is cut. But resemblances end there. Unlike the Teutonic autobhan stormer, the Le Mans is just so, well, Italian. The Le Mans looks faster, offers a reasonably stout 80 HP thanks to high compression pistons, and offers the immutable "cafe racer" look before that look was a collector thing.

This particular bike started life across the pond, but now lives in the US. As a result it wears some cosmetic differences compared to officially imported examples. The owner(s) have also made some mods, all which look to be non destructive. The black side covers look period correct, but the originals were color coded to the bike (fun fact: not all Le Mans models were red/black). So this is not perfectly original as if it were parked in a museum since Day 1 - but you should age this well. At 41 years new, this bike is just hitting its mechanical stride, and is perfect for a rider. Prices are always hot for pre-80s Guzzis, and this one is starting right at the five figure territory (with no takers as of yet). Check it out here, and then hit the Comments for a compare and contrast: How do you take your vintage Guzzi? Would you prefer a plain V7, or the Le Mans? Let us know, and Le Good Luck!!

MI

The Manly Ride:  1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans