Posts by tag: K1

BMW November 7, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1

This is the fourth motorcycle being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

In the annals of modern motorcycle history, the Japanese have the technological might, the Italians have the performance artwork, and the Germans… well, the Germans had a more conservative approach. Much of that has changed in recent years (witness the HP2 Sport, the S1000RR), but it was with the iconic K1 that BMW proved it had the technological chops AND an artistic feel without abandoning the company soul or ethics. You see, BMW wanted (needed) younger riders to join the brand. But their staid approach of “the gentleman’s transport” didn’t cut it with the youth. They wanted speed. But BMW was constrained by the 100 bhp limit imposed on bikes sold in Germany. So how to get maximum speed within the imposed power listing? Technology. Namely, aerodynamics. Thus the design and style of the K1 was born of function, and has gone on to become a bit of a legend.

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1

The life of the K1 started with a standard K bike – in this case a K100. This was the “new” architecture for BMW; the inline four cylinder motor flopped on it’s side and mounted crosswise on the bike. This allowed for a low center of gravity; the crankshaft runs parallel with the bike on the right side and made for easy power takeoff for the shaft drive. From those bones, the K1 started ingesting technology. The standard K100 engine was upgraded with 16 valve heads, higher compression and lighter connecting rods for extended high RPM running. ABS was a standard feature for US-bound bikes, but optional in other markets. Wanting to achieve speeds in the range of 150 mph, the K1 entered the wind tunnel and was shaped with a vengeance. The wheelbase was extended for greater stability. Check out the streamlines of the front fender, and the aerodynamic – yet protective – main fairing. The integrated tail section even contained saddlebags, which provided function AND airflow resolution. In all, there are seven pieces to the main fairing to harness and define the aero elements. Colors offered were Teutonic interpretations of yin and yang: either fire engine red with yellow accents, or a turquoise blue with yellow accents. Love it or hate it, either color combination stands out.

From the seller:
41,000km’s / 25k mi. This is a fantastic example of the timeless “ketchup & mustard” 1990’s BMW design icon.

Fully restored to new condition in Europe in 2014, this K1 is absolutely beautiful in every respect, and runs/operates perfectly. Heated grips, ABS, 100hp 16v, Marzocchi forks, Brembo brakes – 6,900 examples ever produced. Included with the sale is a hard bound folio detailing the ownership (U.K. and Germany) and restoration details.

Probably the best non-original K1 on earth: $15,000

Despite the techno wizardry, the end result was a 520+ pound, long wheelbase motorcycle that excelled at what BMWs always excelled at: eating up the miles. And with a price tag higher than most available motorcycles (MSRP of over $13,000), this hardly targeted the youth. Instead, BMW created a showroom magnet that pulled interested viewers in – and then sold them a different K or R bike instead. Sales of the K1 were slow, and the bike was under appreciated during it’s stay on the dealer floor. Time has been kinder to the model, and cannot erase the sensationalism built up around this pivotal motorcycle – even if it did not set the world on fire. Today these are rare machines that still represent the change of attitude in BMW management, and finding one that does not exhibit the ravages of time (think large expanses of thin bodywork and the possibility for damage) or abuse should be celebrated.

Today’s 19991 BMW K1 comes to us courtesy of the Stuart Parr Collection, and shows as beautifully as a new bike. Drool over the high resolution photography, and tell me this isn’t the cleanest K1 you have seen in the wild. I mean, it just looks *perfect*. And this is no zero mile “never gonna be ridden” garage queen either; this wonderful example has 25,000 on the clocks. We all know the legendary longevity of a BMW, and to find a rare K1 in the cosmetic condition such as this should make you sit up and take notice. Asking price is $15,000 and inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here. Good Luck!

MI

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1
Kawasaki January 10, 2018 posted by

Mean and Very Green: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale

Forgoing the elegance and class of the European sportbikes, Kawasaki’s unabashedly garish ZX-7R, or ZXR-750 as it was known in other markets, is splashed with jagged graphics in vivid green, white, and blue. Not a modern, metallic, beetle-green, of course. Kawasaki’s impossibly green green, with the un-self-consciously adolescent “Ninja” in fluorescent lettering splashed across the tank, along with a pair of HVAC air tubes that don’t actually feed a pressurized airbox, just direct cooling air at the cylinder head… I hated these bikes when I was younger. But I’d buy one in a heartbeat now, since I could ride a Ninja with a sense of humor about the name, and not be worried that people might think I had a pair of tabi boots in my closet and some shuriken in my sock drawer next to a pair of nunchaku…

The ZX-7R was Kawasaki’s entry into the hotly-contested 750cc superbike class in racing and on the street, their answer to the Suzuki GSX-R750, Yamaha’s YZF-750R, and Honda’s RC30. At the time, the 750cc inline four was the go-to configuration in World Superbike competition, unless you were Ducati. Of course, each manufacturer built limited-production homologation specials to help create the very best foundation for their World Superbike entries, except for Honda, whose RC30 was basically an homologation special to begin with.

The ZX-7R sold in 1991 is generally known as the “J1,” so what’s going on here with what the seller claims is a “K1”? Although they provided a wide range of tuning parts for their ZX-7/ZXR-750 that allowed them to compete successfully, Kawasaki didn’t really create an homologation special until the 1991 model year’s ZX-7R K1. The K1’s solo seat and aluminum tank meant it was was lighter, while flat-slide carbs and higher compression meant the engine made a bit more power and could rev a bit higher. Different ratios with a taller first gear were better for the track, but made stoplight getaways a clutch-slipping pain. Price was nearly double the stock bike, but worth it if you wanted to be competitive.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale

Some of the most exotic motorcycles ever sold to the public were built during the 1990s, the golden era for homologation Superbikes.  For sale is a rare and wonderful example of such a motorcycle – a limited edition 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 production-based race bike.  

The Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R K1 was a special limited edition of Kawi’s ZX-7R used in AMA Superbike. Kawasaki enjoyed tremendous success in competitive racing with this bike, and plenty of that tech made it to the ‘civilian’ version. Required to produce 500 examples for homologation purposes, Kawi packed this bike full of features like 39mm Keihin flat-slide carbs, an aluminum gas tank, and a close ratio six speed transmission with an exceedingly tall first gear. All these goodies nearly doubled the MSRP compared to a base ZX-7R, but for the lucky 142 riders in the US who got to buy one, it was well worth it.  Weighing 10 pounds less than a base ZX-7R, the K1 had a tweaked engine with higher compression and a redline that was 500 rpm higher. This powerplant produced 120 horsepower at the crank, leading to a top speed of just under 160 miles per hour. (from the website bike-urious).
This particular model has only 3,100 miles and starts, runs and rides beautifully…and sounds great with Muzzy exhaust.  The upper fairing near the right side mirror has a couple small cracks (don’t ask), but the bike is in remarkably nice shape overall and shows no sign of having been down.  A new lithium battery is included, as well.

Please Note:  I’m listing this bike for a friend who has an exceptionally nice collection of motorcycles for sale, including other homologation bikes (Honda VFR750R RC30, Yamaha FZR750R OW01, numerous rare Ducati’s), a Vincent Black Shadow, an Ariel Square Four, two BSA Gold Stars, a 1937 UL Flathead Harley Davidson, etc. (additional photos included above).

These are very rare and were extremely expensive when new, and there’s been plenty of interest in sportbikes of the late 1980s and early 1990s recently. The starting bid for this ZX-7R K1 is $18,000 with no takers yet and several days left on the auction. The last one we featured sold for $14,500 back in 2015, so $18,000 seems like a fair price for this very clean, low-mileage example but maybe a bit high for a starting bid?

-tad

Mean and Very Green: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale
BMW September 11, 2017 posted by

Blade Runner Meets Kraftwerk: 1991 BMW K1

Looking back, it’s hard to see any way the BMW K1 would have ever been anything but controversial, with such a heinous striking profile and the infamous Ishihara test livery, but BMW came at its design as only the Germans can: With an eye for both problem solving and pushing the envelope.

1991 BMW K1 for sale on eBay

The K1 was aimed at pushing BMW into the youth market, catering to buyers who wanted the sporty fairings and race bike queues of Japanese and Italian machines, while satisfying its core group of high-speed touring-oriented buyers.

So, the Bavarians threw a 1,000-cc longitudinal four cylinder at the equation, and then added shaft drive and a single-sided paralever swingarm. The engine was limited by BMW to 100 horsepower, which meant achieving 150-mph autobahn blasts would require aerodynamic trickery.

Enter the now-dated bodywork, which caused either reverence or revulsion, and achieved an 0.38 drag coefficient.

The 1991 BMW K1 for sale here wears the most controversial red and yellow color scheme, and is in very nice condition with a couple caveats. The seller says the ABS was removed when they purchased the bike, though it was supplied with all the ABS parts. They do not say whether it was reinstalled. The digital clock is also broken.

On the upside, it comes with a full titanium Remus exhaust.

From the eBay listing:

Selling My 1991 BMW K1. I purchased this ICONIC motor bike with a great sounding REMUS exhaust system installed. The first for me hearing this type of sound from a BMW motorcycle, Sweet. The ABS System was also removed when purchased. I didn’t ask why, but the parts came with the bike. It has a very strong engine and power train that launches the bike effortlessly and the Remus exhaust isn’t overpowering with noise while cruising. New battery and tender purchased last year, tender also sold with bike. This BMW K1 is a daily rider and will be sold as such. Starts every time. Display cluster LCD clock not working properly.

Clear title in My Possession. Sold in As Is condition.

The starting bid on this rare and wild beast is $5,500, and with more than six days left in the auction, it has yet to attract any bids.

Blade Runner Meets Kraftwerk: 1991 BMW K1
BMW January 12, 2016 posted by

Time-Capsule Space Ship: 1993 BMW K1 for Sale

1993 BMW K1 L Side Front

A flawed motorcycle that nevertheless succeeded in its intended mission, BMW’s radical K1 was tasked with changing public perception of the slightly stodgy brand and, although it didn’t actually sell particularly well, it certainly managed to send the brand off in a new direction. A bit too futuristically-styled, and possibly a bit too ambitious in terms of technology, it certainly shook things up for BMW, and it also helped them prepare for stricter emissions requirements that were in the pipeline, something their airhead flat twin wouldn’t be capable of meeting. The K100’s liquid-cooled inline four and offshoot triple found in the K75 would make that much easier, and a sportier version for the four found its way into the K1.

1993 BMW K1 R Side

While a liquid-cooled inline four sounds pretty conventional, BMW of course had to do it their own way, and the long-stroke, Bosch-injected, longitudinally-mounted engine was laid-over on its side to keep the center of gravity low. This generally has the disadvantage of a pretty long wheelbase and the de rigueur telelever shaft drive is pretty heavy, but this was intended as a sport-touring machine, not a pure sportbike: with 516lbs to pull around, that torquey motor made for a bike that was reasonably fast, but certainly no road-burner.

1993 BMW K1 Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1993 BMW K1 for Sale

This bike came from the factory as pictured – special order Silk Blue with no K1 decals. This machine was professionally stored in a collectors climate controlled warehouse for over 20 years. I purchased the bike with 976 miles on it in January 2015. I have only put about 250 miles on the bike.

This machine is nearly perfect. One small V shape crack is shown on the pictures below. The ABS sensor also needs to be reset.

This is really a one of a kind motorcycle that is just about new in every sense.

1993 BMW K1 Rear Suspension

Unable to compete in the changing landscape of Japanese supersports in the early 90s, the bike was discontinued in ’93. It’s a bit of an odd duck today: it doesn’t offer much that appeals to traditional BMW enthusiasts with its inline four and very limited cargo capacity. The fairing panels are subject to cracking and the limited airflow means those bits of plastic can get very, very hot. And it’s not really very sporty compared to Japanese or Italian bikes of the period.

1993 BMW K1 Front Brakes

These certainly aren’t display pieces and, with prices relatively low, a nice K1 could make a pretty neat alternative for riders obsessed with quirky. However, with under 1,200 miles on the clock and a starting bid of over $10,000 this example is for collectors only. Most of the bikes were painted up in some pretty lurid red/yellow paint schemes, but this particular example is a very restrained, traditional blue that will probably help it appeal to BMW enthusiasts looking to complete their collections.

-tad

1993 BMW K1 L Side

BMW August 22, 2015 posted by

Agent K – 1990 BMW K1

Produced in 1988-93 at a rate of just over 1000 per year, BMW’s 90’s flagship was sporty though quirky.  They have a cult following of BMW die-hards and engineers, enchanted by the aerodynamics and 100 hp.  Also offered in red with yellow graphics ( ketchup and mustard ) and basic black, the blue metallic with yellow is a good compromise.  The condition, originality, and accessories make this K1 something special.

20150821 1990 bmw k1 right

1990 BMW K1 for sale on eBay

20150821 1990 bmw k1 left

Responding to impending emissions rules, BMW developed the straight-four in the early 80’s for the K100.  The K1 was the first K-bike with 4 valves per cylinder.  With a steel backbone frame using the engine as a stressed member, the stable K1 was made for extended 150 mph runs on the autobahn.  BMW’s new Paralever shaft drive is in a single-sided monoshock rear suspension, with more conventional front forks.  Early ABS brakes use 305mm front disks and 285mm rear.

20150821 1990 bmw k1 front  20150821 1990 bmw k1 left rear

The 7-piece fairing achieved a drag coefficient of .38 ( a record .34 with rider tucked in behind the windscreen ), though the slippery fairing traps heat from the engine.  The 1000cc K-engine also generated a secondary vibration in the midrange, causing complaints from some riders.  The seat fairing has built-in panniers, though soft bags might be required for a long trip.

20150821 1990 bmw k1 binnacle  20150821 1990 bmw k1 left rear wheel

The owner has put a wealth of information and history in the eBay auction:

I purchased the bike from an avid BMW collector in Boise. I had the bike delivered directly to the dealership and had them go from front to rear of the bike and fix/replace anything that was in need of repair. I told them to not even attempt to start the bike as it sat for almost 2yrs.. told them to replace fuel pumps/filters/fluids/battery, and do a complete service on the bike, and tires are 85% new. This bike at 25yrs old runs good as new, and handles as new. The only thing this bike needs is a new home.

Included with the bike:
– Tool kit and tire repair kit. (original)
-3M Protection around rear box lids to prevent scratching (applied on date of original purchase)
– Cee Baileys Headlight protector (applied on date of original purchase)

Australian made Staintune Stainless Steel Performance Exhaust. ($1,200.00 to purchase now, and Staintune does not carry this part number any longer, refused offer of $900.00 and exchange for OEM exhaust at last bike rally)

Wonderful Bonus to this bike is the ORIGINAL Tank Bag with both original Rain Covers. Additionally, the original saddle bags and original K1 Rain covers.

20150821 1990 bmw k1 left detail  20150821 1990 bmw k1 right rear wheel

The first 20,000 miles on this K1, must’ve been extremely careful, as there doesn’t appear to be a mark on it.  Very original, the only aftermarket parts appears to be the Staintune exhaust.  The collection of accessory soft bags and rain covers are unavailable except on the used market and a useful addition.  Forward looking in design and engineering, the K1 marks a time when BMW peeked over the slippery slope of sportier bikes, which they would address later in the 1990’s with the -RS and -S 1100cc twins…

-donn

 

 

 

Agent K – 1990 BMW K1
BMW January 16, 2015 posted by

Does the K stand for Kiwi? 1990 BMW K1

K1

The BMW K1 is a controversial machine. Looking like Buck Rogers crossed with a “Pimp my ride” paint job, the K1 was produced in limited numbers and bought by even fewer buyers. Despite the fact that they were not sought after by the BMW faithful (or anybody else), those that have owned or ridden the K1 praise it for all the qualities you would expect from BMW: good fit and finish, high grade components, overall usability and lack of performance. For all of its spaceship good looks, the K1 was meant to maximize its use of 100 HP for cruising purposes. The bike is heavy (500+ lbs) and suffers some heat build-up as the result of the inline four buried under the multi-piece fiberglass bodywork. The K1 does sport the first instance of the BMW Paralever swingarm, which incorporates both the swingarm and the drive shaft in unison and removes much of the typical drive shaft jack that plagues earlier examples of the marque. In cruise mode the K1 is relatively efficient and within its design envelope, meant to eat miles all day long. If you don’t like attention when you ride, perhaps this is not the ride for you. For all others, these are relatively rare (fewer than 7,000 produced), and most have high miles and/or bodywork damage (after all, there is a LOT of bodywork). You’ll have to travel to NZ for this one; but if you are already close, it could be a great find.

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1990 BMW K1 for sale in New Zealand

K1_4

From the seller:
This is a 1990 BMW K1 in immaculate condition.

It has had two owners since new, both New Zealand Police Officers.

New in NZ it has travelled 22,300 kms (about 14,000 miles) and is in excellent condition. It has always been garaged and rarely taken out in the rain. Both owners are motorcycle enthusiasts and have used the bike sparingly to keep the miles down.

This bike is good enough to be a show piece in a BMW motorcycle dealers shop

I have original tools and owners manual, even have the original paint touch up kit.

I doubt you will find a better example anywhere.

K1_2

MI

Does the K stand for Kiwi?  1990 BMW K1
BMW June 27, 2014 posted by

The Right Ingredients, Wrong Colors: 1990 BMW K1

The BMW K1 was one of the Bavarian company’s earlier attempts to move into the sport bike/tourer segment. While the paint scheme may at first look like it was done by some primary school students after a trip to McDonalds, it was still a BMW product which meant under the bodywork was some serious engineering.

1990 BMW K1 for sale on eBay

1990 BMW K1 for sale

The 1990 K1 came equipped with a 1000cc four cylinder that sported fuel injection, an early ABS system and aerodynamic bodywork designed to reduce rider fatigue while maximizing top speed cruising. The bodywork even included built-in lockable storage areas. Basically, the big K1 proved to the world that the designers at BMW could be creative.

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As posted last year on RSBFS by Mike, “This is one of those bikes that really deserves a place among the rare and collectable here on RSBFS. It has all of the elements of a future classic: Styling, performance, low production numbers and initially high price tag…This was a technically superior machine that simply fell down flat on the showroom floor.”

The last listing on RSBFS for a 1990 K1 in this color scheme was back in May of last year and the bike brought in a cool 13k so there is definitely a market for these bikes.

Opening bid is $7500 and the Buy-It-Now price is a smidge under 12k.

MG

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from the seller:

First time I saw one of these bikes I knew I just had to have one! It has been extremely hard to find one in this great condition! I purchased this bike from the second owner. Bike was reported to have been sold new out of BAVARIAN MOTOR WERKS in Cincinatti to Robert Pitcairen Jr – best known as the attorny for Pete Rose and the Cincinatti Bengals. It has been garage kept and professionally serviced since new. Never abused or damaged, with just over 16,038 actual miles looks like a new bike (or better). Draws crowds whenever it is ridden. Runs, sounds and rides amazing, smooth 5 speed transmission, BMW’s proven shaft drive system, triple disc ABS brakes, lots of power from the 1000cc liquid cooled 4 cylinder, handles nice and has exceptional wind protection. All body work very clean and scuff free, windshield clear as are gauge lenses. Heated grips are standard too. Bike comes with special edition FMW touring bags and full cover too. Don’t miss out! You will not be dissapointed!

The Right Ingredients, Wrong Colors:  1990 BMW K1
Kawasaki April 15, 2014 posted by

1992 Kawasaki ZX7R for sale in Santa Monica

1992 Kawasaki ZX7R for sale K1

This is one of those listings that sell themselves from the owners description and lovely pictures. A huge RSBFS fan favorite, the K1 needs little introduction. This example has a tick over 15k miles and the starting bid is at $7k reserve not met. While it’s been fitted with CV carbs and various other street riding improvements/adjustments, it includes most of the stock bits should you want to restore it in the future.

dc

1992 Kawasaki ZX7R K1 for sale on eBay

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from the seller:

You are bidding on a 1992 ZX7R, true K model as you can see in the VIN.

If you’re not aware of the R models they came with an Aluminum tank, Magnesium motor covers, a special Race transmission with a very tall 1st gear (not great off the line by the way), a solo tail section with special lightened subframe, larger cams and higher HP, reservoir shock, higher redline and the very cool Flatslide carbs which retail for around 2500 or so on bike bandit by themselves! This bike is truly worth more in parts but as you know…few of these left as it is.

A bit of a long story on this one so please bear with me. First and foremost, if you are looking for a true collectible, there are very few of these left and even less in this condition. I literally checked Ebay and a few other various sites a couple times a month (for last few years) in hopes of finding one when this one finally came up. Almost closed on one from HI last year but we had a challenge connecting to close the deal and the freight would of been pricey. This particular bike is more of a PROGRESSIVE restoration. I’m told I”m the 4th owner and as such have worked on it a bit myself to correct some flaws, etc. Haven’t had it terribly long but spent a bit more $ on it.

Reason I’m selling. I bought this bike to hold in my office with two other highly collectible bikes as these 3 were the top of the class back when I was still goofing off at Willow, etc. At the time, Scott Russell was the man and this was his bike of choice. Anyway, I spend a lot of time working in Asia and by luck would have it, I came across a VERY special GP bike that I simply MUST HAVE. So much so that I’m selling all 3 of my rides to get it and then some! Getting it into the US has been a hassle but I can’t wait to get my hands on it. The other two bikes I just sold to a local well known vehicle collector (to remain nameless) and sure enough, he has a ZX7R already in his arsenal.

I was told by the last owner that he was the 3rd owner but haven’t confirmed it (he’s a motorcycle mechanic to boot so probably why she runs so well). I haven’t had it long and to be honest, I really don’t need to sell so please understand that I will not take a low ball offer.

Back to the bike…

Bodywork is in amazing shape. Nose looks like brand new without even a rock chip. Clearly someone replaced it although I’m not sure where you could find a near new one. There’s a small fingernail scratch on the left edge but you can barely notice and barely worth bringing up, it truly shines like it’s one day old.
Sides have a few knicks but again, exceptionally good shape. I’ll post a bunch of picture to see. Tank is near perfect, tiny little knick on top but very small and a small rock chip but again…very nice! Tail is in good shape, no cracks, side plates look great but there’s a chip in the paint by reservoir and a couple of scuffs on the under edge. It’s really difficult to pull the seat back off where the storage compartment is so that area has some rub marks from the seat tabs. Thing is, they didnt make a ton of these bikes so the tail section mechanicals are a bit jimmy rigged from factory.

Headlights, signals and taillight are all like new.

I replaced many of the non OEM bolts so that’s all good to go. Also replaced all 3 rotors as others weren’t in as good of shape but looks good now. While I was at it, cleaned calipers and put new pads all the way around.

Shock is an aftermarket Penske unit and as such, rides great with it although if you’re an OEM fanatic like me, you could easily sell and likely find a nice stock one to replace it with.

Frame has some wear and tear for a 22 year old bike, no scrapes or damage of any type but some wear marks in the paint just from services, maint, riding…etc. Wheels are great shape, no marks, bright green and in excellent shape.

Swingarm is a little problem for me… It’s the stock one but it looks like he may of painted or power coated. Looks beautiful condition wise but the color is off a little from the frame. Enough that I would likely redo it if I don’t sell but again, I’m a fanatic so not sure it would bother you as you can only tell under certain light.

All signals, rear wheel valance, fender etc are fine shape…no worries there.

Rearsets are NOT OEM although pcs of them are. You could easily find the right parts on Ebay and get it back to factory if desired.

The last owner (as a bike mechanic) didnt want the hassle of dealing with the flat slides as they make it VERY hard to ride on the street not to mention they need a lot of tuning… Therefore, he put on a set of CV carbs for rideabilty. However, it does come with a pristine set of OEM flat slides, the proper air box and a spare bright green windscreen. They too are worth quite a bit but exceptionally hard to find so keeping with the bike. Wouldn’t take long to put them back on, just may require some tuning after.

Bike runs GREAT! Starts right up but it’s a cold blooded machine so needs the choke. Chain is near new and tires are new as well. Just registered it in California so plates are good for a year. As you can see from pictures, has a Muzzy exhaust and I DO NOT have the OEM system although I do see them on Ebay from time to time.

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1992 Kawasaki ZX7R for sale in Santa Monica