Posts by Category: Bimota

Bimota July 17, 2018 posted by

Nice Curves: Low-Mileage 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

Tad first posted this one in December when it had a buy-it-now of $25k. It was relisted and eBay showed a sale at just over $10k. It's back now from the same seller with a buy-it-now of $15k or best offer. Thanks for the heads up, Donn! Links updated. -dc

The SB6 and SB6R were some of Bimota's best-selling bikes of all time, and featured what must be the mother of all beam frames. That distinctive, very rigid aluminum unit used Bimota's "Straight Connection Technology," designed to link the steering head directly to the swingarm pivot. This improved chassis rigidity at the expense of servicing: you pretty much have to unbolt the engine and swing it forward to adjust the carburetors, change the spark plugs, replace the front sprocket, or access the alternator drive that tends to fail...

Fortunately, this earlier SB6 at least features a set of Suzuki gauges, a good thing since the later Bimota units supposedly pack it in with unfortunate regularity. They may look fairly mundane, but least they work! The engine should be pretty reliable too, and powerful to boot: those gauges are matched to the inline four and five-speed gearbox from Suzuki's GSX-R1100.

I much prefer Bimota's follow up to this bike, the SB6R which pretty much embodies my favorite aspects of 1990s styling. Sure, the 916 might be the more iconic 90s design, but part of the reason is that it doesn't actually look like anything else from that era. The SB6R has the bulbous curves of the donor GSX-R, but with better colors, less weight, and more all-around Italian-ness.

But the strength of the original SB6 is that it looks like pretty much nothing from any era, unless you count Crea's weird, organic-nightmare bodywork kits from the era... Go ahead and Google that, and then promise me you'll never complain about Pierre Terblanche's 999 ever again. The SB6 is striking wrapper that contains all the analog performance you could ever want, along with a powerplant that should be at least easy to get parts for, even if it isn't actually all that convenient to work on.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

This is a one owner bike that has been stored inside a house.

Only 670 Miles!

The bike fluids have been drained and cleaned for proper storage. The bike is all original and near perfect.

It has never been on the market until now. I have had the bike in my house for over a year and just moved it to my warehouse and decided to let someone else enjoy it. I got the bike from a friend that knew the original owner and connected us.

I am open to fair offers. I listed the bike at top market price because someone might pay that. However make a fair offer and you might own this very rare, one owner Bimota.

Also, it has the Suzuki 1100 motor... Dyno specs in pics from years ago.

Since the seller "got the bike from a friend that knew the original owner and connected us," wouldn't that technically make this a two-owner bike? Even though the second owner only had it a year? Unfortunately, 1990s Bimotas were a bit unfinished from the factory, and great concepts suffered from pretty poor execution. If you had the time or money to go through your expensive Italian exotic to correct electrical faults and set up the suspension properly, you were left with a serious weapon for road or track. Of course, most buyers wanted their money to buy an actual, functioning motorcycle, and Bimota's kit-bike quality certainly hasn't helped values.  The $24,900 asking price is very ambitious for an SB6 but, with those kind of miles, maybe a collector who wants a very clean, low-mileage example of a very cool machine will bite. However, I'd say the seller's negotiation technique could be... stronger.

-tad

Nice Curves: Low-Mileage 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale
Bimota July 2, 2018 posted by

Cult of Personality – 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio

Bimota was on the rebound from their 2001 bankruptcy when the Ducati dual-spark 1000 caught their designers' eyes.  The naked / standard Delirio was midway through a beautiful friendship between the companies and was in production until 2011.

2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio for sale on eBay

Penned by designer Sergio Robbiano, the Delirio has the wonderful 992 cc desmodue, somehow finding room for underseat exhaust and 93 hp.  And while the trellis frame is familiar, the aluminum frame connectors and swingarm ends are special.  For a naked there are a surprising number of carbon covers and fairings, even a scoop for the oil cooler.  The premium suspension and brakes insure it will be an exciting way through 4.2 gallons.

Likely having had several maintenance services on its way to 3,800 miles, this Delirio had the required major service last year.  Ready for lots of trouble-free miles, as the owner relates in the eBay auction:

Very low miles, meticulously maintained, last services by Bimota Spirit in Raleigh, NC in March 2017, flushed fuel tank, tested and flushed fuel pump, changed and adjusted timing belts, oil & filter changed, adjusted and cleaned chain, flushed front and rear brake fluid, and comes with new tires. This beautiful exotic Italian naked bike was hand made by Bimota in Rimini, Italy, it comes with a 1000 cc Ducati DS highly evolved air cooled L Twin engine, with twin-plug form, it has several carbon fiber pieces such as front and back fenders, side panels, belt covers, and clutch cover, Brembo brakes & clutch master cylinders, Zard Exhaust, and 2nd generation ECU board. Hardly used, except for a few weekend cruises with friends, and never ever tracked or raced. This is a very rare and exotic bike, be one of the few Bimota owners in the world.

The DS liter is revered as one of the most fun engines around, this time in a designer package.  Bimota has moved on to a edgier-looking naked Impeto ( as well as a naked Tesi ! ) but you can rest assured there won't be another parked at the coffee stop.  Early on a student of Tamburrini, Robbiano was taken way too early in a motorcycle accident.  The award-winning DB6 is a fine record of his time in Rimini...

-donn

Cult of Personality – 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio
Bimota June 12, 2018 posted by

Naked Italian Supermodel: 1998 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Look, I'll get this out the way up front: the Bimota YB11 does not "look way cooler with the bodywork off." Since the missing bits appear to be included, I'm going to assume, for the purposes of this post, that a lack of taste is the actual reason the bodywork isn't currently in place. Don't get me wrong, I love Bimotas shorn of bodywork: the minimalist frame, the simplified construction, the elegance. But with that headlight and tail sections in place and the rest missing? It just looks unfinished. It might run cooler though... Anyway, differing aesthetic opinions aside, the YB11 is certainly an affordable way to get into quirky Italian exotica: we're obviously comparing apples and oranges here, but you can generally pick up 90s Bimotas for the price of a new Ducati Scrambler.

Stripped of much of its bodywork, this YB11 looks like it might have more in common with an Aprilia Tuono or a KTM Super Duke than a modern liter-class superbike. The 145 horsepower claimed by Bimota for their mildly-tuned version of Yamaha's five-valve Genesis inline four means the YB11 is closer to “supernaked” than “superbike” in terms of power, as well. Certainly, the 1002cc displacement means it isn’t eligible for superbike racing classes.

But just as bikes in the supernaked class are less powerful, but sometimes more fun than full-blown superbikes, top-end horsepower might impress when you’re comparing stat sheets over a beer, or railing at 10/10ths on a race track, but it doesn’t necessarily translate that well to the real world. Take a look at the YB11’s 80 lb-ft of torque and 400lb dry weight: the Genesis engine has a famously fierce midrange and the bike is claimed to start pulling savagely from below 4,000rpm. Modern superbikes do make much more top-end horsepower, but also weigh a bit more and produce very similar amounts of torque, so you can imagine that a YB11 will still make for a very exciting ride.

Obviously, this old-school superbike comes from a much simpler time, something that’s easy to see once the bodywork is removed. One look under the skin of a YB11 alongside something like Ducati’s new V4 Panigale and you can see just how complicated modern superbikes have become, since modules and wires and hoses pack every available nook and cranny. It's a good thing the new Panigale has a heavily truncated frame, since I'm not sure where you'd fit a regular one. So no, an old beast like this Bimota isn’t as good as something truly modern. But you also shouldn't worry too much about more modern bikes running away from you out on the road.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 for Sale

A beautiful work of art that looks like it was designed by Michelangelo, this bike is super-light (Superleggera) + excellent handling with 51mm front fork tubes (largest ever put on a production cycle!) + Brembo brakes front +rear, carbon fiber everywhere/ high perf. ARROW exhaust system/ 145H.P. with 12:1 lightweight forged pistons in a 1002cc Thunderace Yamaha engine with lightened quick-rev. crankshaft. Bodywork is off presently cause it looks way cooler with it off, but I do have all the parts that go with the bike.

I'm not clear from the seller's description whether the "12:1 lightweight forged pistons... with lightened quick-rev. crankshaft" are components from some sort of engine rebuild or if he's suggesting they were included in the original YB11. I'm pretty sure that Bimota made no internal changes to the stock powerplant and if the engine was rebuilt or otherwise modified, I'd love some more detail regarding what was included and why it was done. Bidding is active with a few days left on the auction, but only up to a bit more than $4,000 at this point. Aside from the missing bodywork [it is included in the sale as you can see below], this bike does look like it's in very nice shape, but Bimotas of this vintage are still a tough sell, so someone still might get a good bargain.

-tad

Bimota May 29, 2018 posted by

Motown – 2000 Bimota SB8R

Bimota was fighting its way back from the V-Due debacle and brought forward the SB8R, based on Suzuki's 996cc V-twin.  This example appears to have components from an SB8R Special, sporting all carbon bodywork and so even lighter.  It hails from an area more known for NASCAR but should be at home on any back road.

2000 Bimota SB8R for sale on eBay

The WSBK Series was in Bimota's plans when their designers looked into the SB8R, and though that wasn't to be, the design is a smashing collaboration between the boutique frame and mass-market powertrain manufacturers.  The aluminum perimeter frame has carbon connectors and 137 hp on tap from the Suzuki engine.  Bimota's engineers tweaked the fuel injection with 59mm Marelli throttle bodies and underseat exhaust, resulting in a more SBK experience, as does the adjustable Paioli suspension.  Carbon fairing and carbon seat subframe lead to a ride 45 or so pounds lighter than the TL1000.

The owner hints that this is a race bike on its way back to road duty, and though there are no mirrors or signals, it looks way too nice to have ever actually done a race season.  Maybe a premium track day machine.  From the eBay auction:

Spectacular all carbon fiber bodywork steals the show at motorcycle gatherings.  The awesome intake sound through the huge snorkels is hard to describe and really enjoyable.

Starts, runs, rides perfectly.  Fantastic canyon or track day motorcycle.

Great ride due to its light weight (395 lbs dry),  fully dialed suspension, torquey TLR engine (though with Bimota's own EFI and throttle bodies), and awesome Arrow race exhaust note. Engine and transmission gone through with everything returned to stock configuration.

All new fluids and ready to go except needs new street tires -- pick per your preference. Carbon fiber clip on handle bars, special race rear set foot controls, Arrow carbon fiber racing mufflers. All the trick stuff that Bimota did on this design such as the self supporting carbon fiber subframe/tail, hybrid aluminum-carbon fiber main frame, mean intake snorkels, rear shock placement (forward for mass centralization)...

Even Laverda patron Francesco Tognon couldn't turn the tide at Bimota, after their WSBK sponsor bailed early in the season.  Revitalized in the early 2000's, the company has a new race team and a line of bespoke machines.  Very special but not in the giant killer way of the race-derived SB8R generation.  This auction has seven days to run and appears to have had a starting bid but no reserve.  Something to keep an eye on...

-donn

 

Motown – 2000 Bimota SB8R
Bimota May 1, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

I've mentioned this before, but everything just sounds cooler in Italian. If you want to intimidate someone, just shout gibberish at them in German: anything you say sounds clipped and military and very, very serious. But yell at someone in Italian, and it just sounds like you're trying to very emphatically seduce them. I mean, Italian car and motorcycle manufacturers don't even have to try, they just basically describe the thing, and it still sounds cool, exotic, and expensive. A Maserati Quatroporte? You mean a Maserati "Four-Door"? And bikes are even lazier: Testastretta is just "Narrow Head" and Desmosedici sounds plenty exotic, but it's just "Desmo Sixteen [Valves]." Today's Featured Listing Bimota YB10 Dieci might be the worst offender though. In English, it's just the "Yamaha-Bimota #10 Ten."

While giving your bike a simple, two-digit number for a name may not be all that creative, it suits Bimota's pragmatic approach to making impractical motorcycles. Seeing the potential in the powerful, efficient, and reliable engines being churned out by the Japanese manufacturers packaged into overweight, overbuilt, and under-suspended roadbikes, they took that performance and stuffed it into machines as much as a hundred pounds lighter. Spared any need to be affordable or practical, Bimota was free to experiment with exotic, weight-saving materials, the newest ideas in frame design, and the best suspension components available at both ends. Bimota's creations might not have been very versatile, but they were pretty good at the one thing they were supposed to be good at, which was going fast and looking cool. Okay, I guess that's really two things...

Of course, the fact that they were freed from any need to be practical also means that they can be a real pain to service. The stiff, light aluminum beam frame that was Bimota's signature during this period was wrapped tightly around the engine to keep weight down and centralize mass, so many of their bikes need to be pretty much completely disassembled before you can perform basic maintenance. Thankfully, they were also designed with body panels that are easily removed with a minimum of fuss. Seriously: look closely at those plastics and note how few seams and mounting points are visible: the tank cover, seat, and tail section are all one piece.

Of course, there's a downside to that simplicity as well: drop a modern sportbike and you might just have to replace a couple sections of fairing or a side panel or two. But when your bodywork consists of just four or five separate pieces and only 224 machines were ever produced... Well let's just say that if I owned a Bimota Dieci and planned to ride it regularly, I'd order a set of Airtech fairings and have them painted up to look like the original parts, then hang the stock bodywork on my livingroom wall.

I'm not sure exactly what changes were made between the 1987 YB4 and the 1991 YB10, but the bodywork and frame look suspiciously similar. That's no bad thing, as Italian vehicles always do seem to get better with each successive generation as the kinks are worked out, right up until they finally get it right and then promptly discontinue the model. Similar-looking Yamaha-engined Bimotas were powered by 750 and 400cc versions of their five-valve Genesis liquid-cooled inline four, but this is the big daddy, motivated by a nearly stock 1002cc engine and five-speed gearbox from the FZR1000 that produced 145hp. With a claimed weight of 407lbs, nearly 70 less than the donor bike, the slippery superbike could hit a tested top speed of 172mph, with stability provided by the fully adjustable 42mm Marzocchi upside-down forks up front and an adjustable Öhlins shock out back, which the seller has helpfully photographed for prospective buyers.

From the Seller: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

VIN: ZESS8YA23MRZES041 In 1991 the first of 224 (total production) YB10 Dieci machines were produced with many of the best bits from previous models. Named Dieci (ten) in recognition of the 10th collaboration between Bimota and Yamaha, the YB10 represents the evolution of the series YB6 and YB8 with a 4 cylinder 1000cc Bimota tuned Yamaha engine. Pierluigi Marconi used inverted Marzocchi forks, super strong lightweight aluminum beam frame, redesigned aero, larger high-flow carbureted intake and more comfortable riding position. Dieci is the perfect name for the final development of the YB line. Weighing in at 407lbs (65lbs down on the stock Yamaha FZR) with 145BHP on tap, gives the rider power with a comfortable and balanced ride. Great brakes were a must so Marconi used a pair of 320mm front discs plus a single rear 230, combined with Brembo calipers. Whilst this Dieci is 25 years old and shows just over 12000 miles it doesn’t appear tired or dated. It has been well preserved and restored where necessary. The bodywork is less rounded than current trends but the ‘stealth’ look still works well, especially with its silver over red combination. Overall the body panels are well preserved and in very good condition. Recent performance and service includes Ohlin rear shock, new Pirelli Corsa tires, Termignoni carbon muffler, new chain and sprocket, new braided lines and new battery. The Dieci was originally sold and serviced by Bob Steinbugler at Bimota Spirit. Needs nothing, ready to ride. $10,500. Contact Matt with your interest: mattshaw@comcast.net

The $10,500 the seller is asking is right in line with the asking prices we've seen for similar Bimotas recently, and is pretty much chump change for such a rare, exotic, and good looking machine that can still show many modern sportbikes a clean pair of heels. You might have to work a bit harder, and avoid pissing matches with modern literbikes, but your buddy on an R6 or GSX-R is going to be very shocked to see those two big, round, endurance-style headlamps in his rear-view mirrors on a brisk Sunday morning ride...

-tad

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Bimota April 16, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

Update 4.29.2018: Now on eBay as well for $12,500. -dc

Bimota's SB6R followed the earlier SB6, one of their best-selling models of all time, with approximately 1,200 made. The SB6R likely would have been produced in similar numbers, but for the debacle that was the radical, two-stroke VDue. That bike's failure pulled the whole company down into bankruptcy, and when the company was resurrected in 2003, the SB6R was not in the lineup, likely due to the discontinuation of the SB6R's GSX-R1100 powerplant with the demise of that model in 1998.

1998 Bimota SB6R for sale on eBay

That GSX-R engine was famously powerful and bulletproof, and was backed by a five-speed gearbox that reflects the bike's freight-train character: the Bimota's claimed 156hp might not seem all that impressive, but the liquid-cooled inline four had a storming midrange and the SB6R was very light for the era. Paioli forks up front and an Öhlins shock round out a package that can still embarrass modern motorcycles in skilled hands, but a complete lack of electronic aids means it remains an "experts only" motorcycle.

The SB6R used the SB6's massive, aluminum "Straight Connection Technology" beam frame, with more modern, conservative bodywork that lost the SB6's swoopy looks and the exhaust hidden within the tail section. The styling elements of the updated SB6R may be derivative: fairing "speed holes" from a CBR900, a pair of undertail exhausts like a 916, and a trapezoidal headlight like an FZR... Okay, it actually was the headlight from an FZR. But somehow, even though the elements are familiar, the overall look was very much a Bimota. It's almost the anti-916: bulbous and curving instead of wasp-waisted and slab-sided, built around a beam-frame instead of a trellis, powered by an inline four instead of a twin...

This Bimota certainly isn't one of the best bikes of the era, but it is one of my personal favorites. This particular example is a rarity, a machine ready for the road that appears to have had the bugs worked out and only some very minor blemishes. It's also a very low serial number: 000023.

From the Seller: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

I have come once again to your fine forum to move a jewel. I know you have featured a few of these, so I wont go through the Bimota propaganda and just get to the meat of what I have done. The usual Bimota story, well heeled individual purchased and rode very little, used more as a object d'art, rather than a mode of transportation for the majority of its life. She is now ready for riding. This thing rips, even with my 6'4", 220 pound, Yeti-like mass aboard.

  • Equipped  with the Bimota Corse Titanium exhaust
  • Kevlar brake lines
  • Michelins
  • Rebuilt carburetors, new needle valves
  • New NGK plugs
  • Oil and filter
  • New fuel pump from Bimota Classic Parts
  • New petcock from Bimota Classic Parts
  • All new Motion Pro fuel lines
  • New fuel filters
  • Cleaned fuel tank
  • The fuel system is now up to original Bimota factory spec.
  • This bike pulls like a freight train.
  • 2 small cracks in the gauge lens
  • Ridden and on the road
  • Every system functional
  • No issues
  • All paperwork in order.
  • 2 Original Bimota keys.

Price: $12,500
Contact Chris: gsxronly@aol.com or 407-492-5854

The seller is asking $12,500 for this SB6R, which is on the high-end, but the bike looks to be in highly functional condition, which is critical: Bimotas are often derided for their kit-bike quality when new, so set up is key. The fact that this one is claimed to be ready for the road is kind of a big deal, and mileage is pretty low as well. The Corse exhaust is a nice addition since it reduces weight from high up and at the tail end of the machine, and any Bimota with stock pipes is likely to stay that way at this point, unless you feel like having someone custom fabricate a set for you: just 600 were made so there isn't much demand for aftermarket parts.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale