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Posts by tag: AMA

Featured Listing July 24, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale

The precursor to Yamaha’s extremely desirable OW01, this very clean FZR750R is actually even rarer, but a bit less exotic as well, both in terms of components and construction. Instead of rare materials and hand-welded parts, the RT was a bit more of a parts-bin special, but just 200 of the “T” were built in 1987 and another 200 in 1988 for the “U” model to satisfy homologation requirements for AMA Superbike racing.

The FZR750R formula should be familiar to Yamaha fans: an extremely light and stiff aluminum Deltabox frame that debuted in 1987 on the FZR1000 and was light-years ahead of cradle-style frames as seen on the GSX-R750, Yamaha’s signature five-valve “Genesis” head atop a 749cc block, and a six-speed gearbox in place of the bigger 1000’s five-speed. Front wheel was 17” and matched with a typical 18” rear often found on sportbikes of the period, and both were wrapped in radial rubber.

Suspension adjustable for preload and rebound at both ends was novel for the time, especially on a street-legal bike. Although Yamaha really didn’t intend for any of these to actually see the street, and actively discouraged dealers from selling them to anyone who was planning to use them on the road. Unfortunately, the 484lb [dry] package ended up significantly heavier than their road-racing rival over at Suzuki, and drag-strip performance was hampered by the ratios in the gearbox. But that was really beside the point, and the bike had some of the best brakes and handling available.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale

Up for NO RESERVE AUCTION is a very nice original 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT.

The precursor to the OW01, the FZR750R Genesis is a rare collectable. Homologated for AMA racing with only 200 examples made for the US market. This machine came out of a dealership in Oconomowoc Wisconsin and thankfully never seen the track.

I purchased this bike from its second owner in WI about 12 years ago. I have enjoyed owning this bike and took great care of it but its time to pass it on to a collector. I recently moved from WI to Denver Colorado where the bike is currently located. I've only had the bike here in Denver a few weeks,  it started right up but I haven't driven it because I anticipate it would need adjustments for the higher elevation. Have not registered the bike here in Denver either so it is currently titled and registered with collectors plates from WI. Title is clean and clear of any leans. Cycle has 26,403mi.

Bike recently had a $1500 overhaul including fuel pump rebuilding, fork seals, brake pads, carb cleaning, clutch, adjustments etc (see photo of receipt). Runs strong and as it should. Has 26... k miles. Has vintage Yoshi exhaust, vintage Storz steering stabilizer, is properly jetted for the exhaust, original race sprocket was changed out for a more street friendly ride. ALL ORIGINAL PARTS INCLUDED and many extras including vintage riding apparel, period Corbin seat, parts, all manuals, period feature magazines, bike stand, cover and more

Motorcycle is for sale locally so I reserve the right to cancel the auction early if sold. I work during the day so evenings are my best time to answer any questions.

I would really like to see the bike end up in someone's collection that will really appreciate it. I will be happy to help the new owner with loading the machine and any other arrangements to make it a smooth transaction.

The FZR750RT is a historically significant machine that was incredibly trick when it was new, and I expect we're seeing a low point for values right now. As the seller mentions, this is no garage queen but condition is way more important than mileage if you actually plan to use a car or motorcycle, and this example has been serviced and is ready to go. It's not a museum piece, it's a living, breathing bit of sportbike history.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale
Ducati May 17, 2018 posted by

Clean, Low-Mileage, and Nearly Stock: 2006 Ducati 999R for Sale

After languishing in infamy for a few years, Ducati's 999 is finally getting a bit of respect for being the impressive machine it has always been. If the 999 had been built by anyone other than Ducati, and it had been the follow up to pretty much any bike but the 916, its praises would have been sung from every rooftop. But although the regular and S model bikes are finally getting a bit of respect, collectors were always on to the 999R.

The 999 was an improvement over the 916 in terms of power, reliability, and ergonomics, but the 999R stood head and shoulders above the more common versions, even though they don't look very special to the casual observer: Ducati's R bikes are always pretty subtle. A bit of a red frame here, a flash of gold from shock or fork tubes, a logo unpainted to let the carbon weave show through the paint...

The main changes are under the skin, since the R was created to allow the 999 to compete in various racing classes, including AMA Superbike racing. And we're not talking about some cams and a different fuel map. The 999R featured an entirely new cylinder head design, along with high-compression pistons, titanium rods and valves, all hidden within sand-cast engine cases. The result was much more oversquare than the stock bike for exactly 999cc, along with 134hp at the wheel.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Ducati 999R for Sale

Immaculate 2 owner 2006 Ducati 999R. Only 1740 miles. I purchased from the original owner in 2010 and have accumulated a grand total of an additional 225 miles. Recently serviced and new battery. I added a slipper clutch but still have the original. Also added bar end mirrors. Never dropped, no dings, dents, no track. I am not comfortable riding the bike as can be seen by the mileage. Have the original owner's manual and service manual CD. Absolutely no disappointments with this bike. If you have read this far you know all about the 999R and that 2006 is most likely the best year. No trades.

Bidding is currently up to $12,300 and the Reserve is Not Yet Met. But since the Buy It Now price is set at $15,995 I expect that won't be a problem by the time the auction ends, since there's plenty of time left and there is lots of activity on this one already. That might be because the bike has very low miles and is mercifully unmolested: the awful original license plate holder even includes the stock reflectors! The bar-end mirrors look pretty silly and, depending on the position of the clip-ons, might be nearly useless, but should take all of five minutes to remove. The slipper clutch might not be original, but is a very practical addition in keeping with the bike's character, and can always be removed.

-tad

Clean, Low-Mileage, and Nearly Stock: 2006 Ducati 999R for Sale
Kawasaki January 10, 2018 posted by

Mean and Very Green: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale

Forgoing the elegance and class of the European sportbikes, Kawasaki's unabashedly garish ZX-7R, or ZXR-750 as it was known in other markets, is splashed with jagged graphics in vivid green, white, and blue. Not a modern, metallic, beetle-green, of course. Kawasaki's impossibly green green, with the un-self-consciously adolescent "Ninja" in fluorescent lettering splashed across the tank, along with a pair of HVAC air tubes that don't actually feed a pressurized airbox, just direct cooling air at the cylinder head... I hated these bikes when I was younger. But I'd buy one in a heartbeat now, since I could ride a Ninja with a sense of humor about the name, and not be worried that people might think I had a pair of tabi boots in my closet and some shuriken in my sock drawer next to a pair of nunchaku...

The ZX-7R was Kawasaki's entry into the hotly-contested 750cc superbike class in racing and on the street, their answer to the Suzuki GSX-R750, Yamaha's YZF-750R, and Honda's RC30. At the time, the 750cc inline four was the go-to configuration in World Superbike competition, unless you were Ducati. Of course, each manufacturer built limited-production homologation specials to help create the very best foundation for their World Superbike entries, except for Honda, whose RC30 was basically an homologation special to begin with.

The ZX-7R sold in 1991 is generally known as the "J1," so what's going on here with what the seller claims is a "K1"? Although they provided a wide range of tuning parts for their ZX-7/ZXR-750 that allowed them to compete successfully, Kawasaki didn't really create an homologation special until the 1991 model year's ZX-7R K1. The K1's solo seat and aluminum tank meant it was was lighter, while flat-slide carbs and higher compression meant the engine made a bit more power and could rev a bit higher. Different ratios with a taller first gear were better for the track, but made stoplight getaways a clutch-slipping pain. Price was nearly double the stock bike, but worth it if you wanted to be competitive.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale

Some of the most exotic motorcycles ever sold to the public were built during the 1990s, the golden era for homologation Superbikes.  For sale is a rare and wonderful example of such a motorcycle - a limited edition 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 production-based race bike.  

The Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R K1 was a special limited edition of Kawi’s ZX-7R used in AMA Superbike. Kawasaki enjoyed tremendous success in competitive racing with this bike, and plenty of that tech made it to the ‘civilian’ version. Required to produce 500 examples for homologation purposes, Kawi packed this bike full of features like 39mm Keihin flat-slide carbs, an aluminum gas tank, and a close ratio six speed transmission with an exceedingly tall first gear. All these goodies nearly doubled the MSRP compared to a base ZX-7R, but for the lucky 142 riders in the US who got to buy one, it was well worth it.  Weighing 10 pounds less than a base ZX-7R, the K1 had a tweaked engine with higher compression and a redline that was 500 rpm higher. This powerplant produced 120 horsepower at the crank, leading to a top speed of just under 160 miles per hour. (from the website bike-urious).
This particular model has only 3,100 miles and starts, runs and rides beautifully...and sounds great with Muzzy exhaust.  The upper fairing near the right side mirror has a couple small cracks (don't ask), but the bike is in remarkably nice shape overall and shows no sign of having been down.  A new lithium battery is included, as well.

Please Note:  I’m listing this bike for a friend who has an exceptionally nice collection of motorcycles for sale, including other homologation bikes (Honda VFR750R RC30, Yamaha FZR750R OW01, numerous rare Ducati’s), a Vincent Black Shadow, an Ariel Square Four, two BSA Gold Stars, a 1937 UL Flathead Harley Davidson, etc. (additional photos included above).

These are very rare and were extremely expensive when new, and there's been plenty of interest in sportbikes of the late 1980s and early 1990s recently. The starting bid for this ZX-7R K1 is $18,000 with no takers yet and several days left on the auction. The last one we featured sold for $14,500 back in 2015, so $18,000 seems like a fair price for this very clean, low-mileage example but maybe a bit high for a starting bid?

-tad

Mean and Very Green: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale
Ducati November 10, 2017 posted by

Unlikely Racebike: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

One school of thinking about fast bike riding posits that the goal is speed, and that the motorcycle itself is a mere tool for achieving that end. But although a track-day GSX-R makes plenty of sense from a purely practical point of view, practical can be a little boring, so why not go fast with a bit more style? A buddy of mine is a fan of the MV Agusta F4 and found an example hiding in the Pacific Northwest with a shockingly low price a while back. Apparently, the rear wheel bearing failed ["Oh, don't worry, they all do that..."], leaving the bike an unrideable, but repairable albatross around the owner's neck, and he was selling it at a shockingly low price. It might seem like sacrilege to turn Tamburini's masterpiece into a track hack, but let's face it: that's where it belongs, since it sucks out loud as a road bike. And it just seems much cooler to go racing or track day riding on something like an F4, or a Bimota YB9, or today's Ducati SportClassic Paul Smart 1000LE.

Powered by the twin-plug "Dual Spark" version of Ducati's air and oil-cooled two-valve v-twin that was good for a claimed 92hp, the SportClassic line wasn't especially fast in a straight line, and you'd think that, racing cues aside, the Paul Smart is more of a bike for posing during weekend espresso runs to the local cafe than the foundation of a race-winning machine. In stock form, you'd basically be right: obviously, wire wheels aren't ideal for a real performance machine, and that air-cooled engine isn't exactly a powerhouse. But Ducati really don't seem to know how to build something purely for posing, and the basic platform is very sound. Throw in some top-shelf suspension bits like the Öhlins TTX rear shock and FGRT819 forks on this bike, replace those heavy wire wheels with some magnesium hoops, fit some lightweight bodywork, build a big-bore engine with the very best parts, and the result is something pretty special.

Obviously, if you plan to actually race your collectible Ducati, you've got to carefully build the machine to meet specific class requirements. Luckily, that's already been done in this case. According to rider "Fast Frank's" web bio, it looks like this Paul Smart was prepped for the AMA's PRO Moto-GT2 or maybe the Lightweight Superbike class. Racers can feel free to chime in in the comments.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE Race Bike for Sale

2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000 Limited Edition Road Racer

This bike has an Excellent history of winning races and Championships at the hands of Fast Frank

Chassis Specifications:
AIM Dash
Ohlins FGRT819 forks with DLC coated for tubes, forks built by Fast Bike Industries
NCR adjustable offset triple clamps
NCR Fairing Bracket
Custom built Ohlins TTX rear shock (built by Ohlins USA)
Brand new Marchesini Magnesium Wheels
ETI Carbon/Kevlar Fuel Tank, underside of tank covered in Gold heat resistance tape
New Brembo HP Front brake Rotors
Brembo RCS19 Brake and Clutch master cylinders
Brembo Mono Block front brake calipers
Lightened rear brake rotor
Spiegler brake lines
Vortex Clip-ons
Air Tech Fairing and seat
Custom Paint by Asher Finishing (the flags on the tank are hand painted)
Hand made Aluminum belly Pan
Carbon fiber vented front fender
Carbon fiber rear fender
Fast Frank Front and rear wheel quick change kits
Under mount rear brake caliper
Shorai Lightweight battery
75% of hardware is Titanium
DID ERV3 520 Chain
Motion Pro Rev 2 Throttle
Rizoma Brake Lever Guard
Quick Shifter

Engine Specs:
2009 Ducati M1100 Engine (cases are lighter, stronger and have top mount ign pickup and oil sprayers under piston)
Lightened, balanced and knife edged crank
Carrillo Rods
1098 Crank Main bearings
Pistal 100mm 1123cc Pistons
Millenium tech bored and plated cylinders
JPrecision CNC ported heads with 47mm intake and 41mm exhaust valves
MBP Valve collets
Low resistance closing rocker springs
NCR Race Cams
NCR Large Oil Cooler
Micro Tech ECU
Magnesium Valve Covers
NCR Magnesium Side engine cases
Ducati Slipper Clutch
SC Projects Racing carbon muffler with Termignoni Headers
Tip Over Sensor
Ducati Superbike Stator/rotor (lighter weight)
Lightened primary and cam gears
Billet aluminum cam belt pulleys
Custom 8mm Spark plug wires
MotoCorse over sized throttle bodies and velocity stacks with K&N filters
Billet engine breather

I normally try to edit parts lists down a bit, but this one is pretty exhaustive and the inclusion of some choice NCR parts suggests very deep pockets: this obviously not some quick-and-dirty conversion from a salvage-titled roadbike into an affordable trackday ride, it's a fully-developed, race-winning machine. The starting bid is set at $44,995 which is probably far less than it cost to build. Obviously, the owner will never recoup their investment, and their loss is your gain, assuming you have a air-cooled Ducati racebike-sized space in your garage and enough skill to take advantage of this example's well-developed handling.

-tad

Unlikely Racebike: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale
Suzuki October 12, 2017 posted by

Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale

It's hard to imagine that, just a couple years before the introduction of the GSX-R750, Suzuki's top-performing repli-racer was the stylish, but very last-generation GS1000S, a bike with twin shocks, handlebars, a center-stand, and a bar-mounted bikini fairing. The original "Slabbie" GSX-R750 that came along in 1985 brought modern endurance-racing style to the masses and codified the formula laid out by much rarer and more exotic machines like the Bimota SB2. This particular GSX-R750 Limited Edition claws back some exotic cachet from the Italian brand, and is one of just 299 imported to the USA to meet AMA homologation requirements.

The heart of the GSX-R was an oil and air-cooled inline four with dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder. It lacked liquid-cooling in a bid to save weight, reduce complexity, and improve reliability, but still had a few high-tech tricks up its sleeve: Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" featured a double-chambered oil pump was designed to more efficiently circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the bottom of the pistons. The aluminum frame used a mono-shock rear and four-piston brake calipers clamped triple discs. The Limited version added a very trick dry clutch, lightweight solo seat tail section, and the GSX-R1100's electronic anti-dive forks.

The Limited was differentiated by the striking red, white, and blue paint seen here on the distinctive, slab-sided bodywork, compared to the standard white-and-blue or red-and-black available on the regular GSX-R. When new, the bike was the most expensive Japanese sportbike, and was priced at $6,500, a shocking $2,000 more than the standard model. Performance advantages were very minimal but that wasn't really the point and this is, to my mind, the best-looking version of the early GSX-R.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

Race homologation special. It has 4545 miles. This bike is in as near perfect collectors condition for a 31 year old bike. Motorcycle was just fully serviced (ie carbs were serviced; all fluids changed; new tires added, as originals showed signs of cracking.)

These bikes have surged in price, exceeding $20K in most cases.

If you are looking at this bike, you know what it is, so NO LOW BALL OFFERS!!!!

The seller is correct that prices have surged, and his bike appears to be in excellent, very original condition that includes a stock exhaust that could be either "cool and retro" or "shockingly ugly" depending on your predilection for slotted heat shields. Certainly it's of value to collectors. Unfortunately, while his $20,000 asking price is fair, it actually seems just a bit on the high-side, at least looking at Limited Editions we've featured here on RSBFS in the past. I'm not sure just how far off his asking price an offer would have to be before it qualifies as "a low ball offer," but I have a feeling he may be disappointed. Will at least one buyer meet his asking price? It's very possible: those same recent bikes I mentioned didn't quite get to $20,000 but were very close.

-tad

Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale
Suzuki August 28, 2017 posted by

Classic Racer in a Box: Ex-Doug Polen Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Looking for a fun weekend project to keep you busy for a while? Well look no further than this ex-Doug Polen Suzuki GSX-R750 racebike. It's not exactly finished, but all of the really important parts appear to be there to get you started... Strangely enough, it seems like the AMA racebikes used many of the stock Suzuki components, even switching from the more exotic dry clutch to the standard wet unit, according to the seller. So that should help, right?

The introduction of the Suzuki GSX-R750 in 1985 was a seminal event in the history of motorcycling. It may not have been the first or only bike to use fully-enclosed, endurance-racer styling wrapped around a bulletproof, large-displacement inline four and monoshock aluminum frame, but it made that formula affordable and available to the masses, and led directly to the sportbikes we know and love. Later sportbikes would add liquid-cooling to the equation to help generate maximum power, but the Gixxer eschewed such frippery as too heavy for their pure speed machine: in spite of the visible cooling fins, it's oil that does most of the work. The oil-cooled powerplant utilized their SACS or "Suzuki Advanced Cooling System" that used a double-chambered pump and oil jets directed at the underside of the pistons to keep temperatures under control. Other than oil cooling, it followed modern designs and used dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder.

Obviously, as a race-spec machine for the street, the GSX-R750 spent plenty of time competing in various classes both abroad and here in the US. This particular bike was used in AMA racing and was ridden by Doug Polen. Polen was a world-class rider who got his start in AMA racing but left to compete in the World Superbike Championship, where he won the title on the trot in 1991 and 1992. He continued to compete in both international and American roadracing with success, netted a win at the Suzuka 8 Hour endurance race, and even dabbled in MotoGP.

There's additional information about the bike, its history, and the included photos over on eBay, so head over and take a look.

From the original eBay listing: Ex-Doug Polen Suzuki GSX-R750 AMA Superbike for Sale

I have researched the photo archives of Cycle World and Cycle magazines and obtained a number of unpublished photos from their records.  I've also bought photographs from freelance photographers that covered AMA racing in that year.  Special thanks to Larry Lawrence, of The Rider Files website.  I will provide these photos to the buyer with the proviso that they remain unpublished.

Each rider had two chassis.  The chassis and motors evolved constantly through the season and Doug probably got the good parts first, as he did better than Otter in the results, starting with the first race.  Their A bikes had all of the good parts at each race and the B bikes had more stock components.  You can clearly see in the photographs the progression of modifications during the season for all of the bikes and the lower spec of the B bikes.

The chassis is un-braced, with modified stock forks, Kosman Triple clamps, Kosman brake discs, AP calipers, a Fox shock and Marvic magnesium wheels.  The swingarm has been slotted, to allow for more variation in wheelbase.  Jim Lindemann worked with them on the shock valving, although he passed away a few years ago.  I have spoken to an ex-Fox engineer and he'd be happy to restore the shock but the records they had of those years were destroyed a few years ago.  Sandy Kosman now lives in Portland Oregon and the last time I talked to him, he was willing to get the discs reground on a Blanchard grinder, if desired.   One of the previous owners began the restoration years ago and the chassis, as pictured, is where he was when he sold the bike to the next owner.

The bodywork used was stock Suzuki plastic.  Early in the season it was raced in 1986 blue/white Suzuki colors; later in the season some of it was sporting the 1987 blue/white Suzuki stock colors.  A perforated metal filler panel was incorporated into the lower fairing V and the lower fairing panels had holes cut in them to allow for more ground clearance.

The motors were modified during the season and varied quite a bit.  They had Yoshimura (either kit Suzuki or Cosworth) pistons, different crank bearings, heads ported by Ron Scrima, Megacycle cams with Yosh retainers, a Tsubaki cam chain tensioner, and various carbs and exhausts.  At one point they obtained dry clutches and close ratio transmission gears but went back to running wet clutches and stock transmission ratios.  They may have run an ECU with a higher rev limit.  Ron Scrima passed away in 2011 but his company (Racing Engine Service) is still in business in Texas and the current owner was with Ron for about 25 years, so they might be my first choice for an engine refresh.  Another option would be Kelly Roberts, also in Texas.  I have never disassembled the motor, so I do not know what internal components are present.

I am interested in selling this project to someone that has the necessary resources and desire to restore it to an as-raced condition and to preserve it for the future.  It is a significant bike, as it was one of the highest placed privateer AMA superbike efforts of that era and was ridden by the rider that probably had more success in the USA racing the first generation Suzuki GSX-R than any other rider.  I would be willing to discuss this bike in more detail, via telephone, with any serious prospective buyers.  I am also willing to provide additional photos, a more complete listing of what components will come with the bike, and an approximate idea of what additional components will be needed to complete the restoration.

I have listed the mileage as 99999, as eBay requires that the mileage be listed for any vehicle sale.  The true mileage is unknown, as it was never recorded, which is not unusual for a race bike.

It also looks like the bike went through several iterations, giving you a bit of flexibility in terms of the color scheme you choose. If it were complete and in as-raced condition, this would probably be a very valuable motorcycle. As it stands, it's a valuable... basket case. How valuable? Well the But It Now price for this bit of American roadracing history is $4,950. This is going to need a lot of love, time, and money to finish, but I think this GSX-R deserves to be restored to its former functional glory.

-tad