Posts by tag: Slingshot

Suzuki March 12, 2019 posted by

Slingshot Superbike: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

When I got into bikes, it was easy for me to indulge my existing bias towards European machinery, since Japanese bikes were garishly colored and festooned with neon graphics, with silly names [Ninja? Katana? Really?], owned by posturing riders who thought t-shirts, sweat shorts, and high-top sneakers were appropriate riding attire. Welcome to New Jersey, circa 1990. I’ve since learned the error of my ways and, although I still prefer European bikes, the second generation of the Suzuki GSX-R750 is one of my favorite motorcycle designs of any era.

Sure, the double-cradle frame design was fairly primitive and had been superseded by modern aluminum beam units like Yamaha’s Deltabox, and Suzuki’s oil-cooled inline four experiment ultimately gave way to the liquid-cooling used by the other superbike manufacturers, but Suzuki made the somewhat outdated package work just fine on both road and track. The Gixxer always had a bit of a bad-boy image that makes them far more collectible today than Yamaha’s more technologically advanced machine.

The second-generation machine is often referred to as the “Slingshot” to differentiate it from the earlier “Slabbie” models, supposedly in reference to the quartet of semi-flat-slide carburetors, but I’ve never seen any part of the things that actually looks anything like a device used to fling small projectiles. It retained Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System that was meant to simplify and add lightness by eliminating a coolant-filled radiator and kept temperatures under control using a high-capacity oil system.

Bore was larger and stroke shorter than the earlier bike to increase the bike’s appetite for revs and make the powerplant more suitable for competition. Although that backfired a bit when racers complained of a lack of torque, and Suzuki’s homologation GSX-R750RK reverted to the earlier bike’s bore/stroke dimensions. Wheels went from 18″ to a more modern 17″ and the fairings were redesigned, but it kept the twin-headlamp endurance-racing style of the original bike. Dry weight for this version was a claimed 419lbs, and the bike made 112hp.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

“Excellent condition Classic Superbike”

1989 Suzuki GSXR750 with clear title in outstanding condition. 10k miles on new motor. Same year (89 short stroke) motor as original. All gauges and directionals work. Mild restoration including brand new NOS stock upper and seat cowl. Freshly painted rear wheel with new wheel bearings and brand new Battleax tire.

Some of the mods are as follows.

  • 38mm CV Carbs jetted perfectly with filters and Yoshimura carb cover
  • Freshly painted 1992 Rear wheel/cush drive/shock with 180 Bridgestone
  • Toby steering damper that really works. Also forks and Shock recently serviced 
  • Brand new NOS stick Suzuki upper
  • Brand new NOS Suzuki rear seat cowl
  • Full Yoshimura Duplex exhaust with header wrapped header

This bike is a great running bike I’ve had fun with. It’s not a perfect bike cosmetically bit very close. Some nicks here and there nothing bad, no dents in tank etc. Still represents VERY well for its age and can be put into a collection as is. I do have the lowers in very good condition and will post pic of them shortly. Also included is side mounted oil catch tank.

These bikes are near impossible to find in this condition so don’t miss out! Will ship but buyer to arrange all details. I can be here to meet the shipper but that’s about it.

The low miles on the motor are nice if you’re looking for a bike to ride, but may turn off numbers-matching purists. The change to an updated, wider 5.5″ rear wheel allows that 180-section tire to be fitted, since the original was a 160. Not too hard to find today, and should make for a more agile bike, but not as cool-looking. And note that the seller does have the fairing lowers, although they’re not pictured at this time. I believe removal facilitates cooling of the oil-boiler engine and improves ground-clearance, but I think the bike does look much better with them on. Overall, this could be a very nice, usable superbike for a buyer looking to relive their youth but not fussy about complete originality.

-tad

Slingshot Superbike: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale
Suzuki February 20, 2019 posted by

Slingshot, engage: Road-worn 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750

Slingshot Gixxers have gained value over the last couple years on the strength of their reputation as basically the earliest available fully modern street legal sportbike. Short of an astronomically expensive RC30, a late ’80s GSX-R is about as close as you’ll get to a vintage bike that rides like something from this century. Beyond that, they carry a mystique born of their world-beating pace when new. The awe they inspired when they debuted has evolved into full-on legend status.

1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for sale on eBay

With the help of redesigned fairings and suspension, 17-inch rubber and a new rack of flatslide Mikunis, the ’88 Gixxer burst on the scene with technology and pace that was unheard of at the time, especially for something so light. Back then, the lack of water cooling didn’t raise any eyebrows, though Suzuki did have to get creative with oil cooling to keep the things running properly. The 750cc inline four commanded 112 horses in street trim, and the bodywork had been slickened to reduce the mill’s effort.

This 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750 is in unrestored, original condition, except for some exhaust and airbox mods. Whereas many of these bikes are either hammered or babied, this one strikes a nice balance of looking like a bike that was well looked-after, but ridden as it should have been and stored without huge regard for the cosmetics. If you’re looking for a rider and you don’t care about looks too much, seek no more. If you’re looking for an easy restoration that doesn’t require a nut-and-bolt re-work, here’s your steed. The seller is quite proud that the bike rides on its original tires, but we’d have those suckers swapped out in a heartbeat.

From the eBay listing:

1988 GSX-R 750 Slingshot. This is a true Survivor, never been touched with the exception of the exhaust. Runs and performs perfectly. I do have the original air box also. Original tires that are in excellent condition for their age. The tires tell the story of this bike, it has been rode less than 500 miles a year. Some of the clear is peeling from decales (normal for the age of the bike). Right fairing has crack by lamp (see pic) and solo seat has small crack in rear, quick fix if you want but, I would leave it alone as bike is a survivor! Hate to see this bike go but, must make room and that is the only reason while it is going up for sale! I will listen to any reasonable offers!
Also bike comes with really nice matching Suzuki jacket cost was $550.00 when bought! Email any question you might have and also see another listing of mine on a 1989 Suzuki GSX-R 1100 that is also up for sale!

At $5,000, the asking price is right at what Hagerty says an excellent example should go for. With fairly low miles, great patina and rising interest in these machines, he might not be too far off.

Slingshot, engage: Road-worn 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750
Suzuki January 31, 2019 posted by

2FAST4U: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

The seller isn’t mincing words here in the listing for this Suzuki GSX-R1100: “This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback stay away… this is too much bike for you.”  So apparently if your eBay feedback is low or you like to grind someone for a good deal, a 30 year old motorcycle with 138hp is too much to handle? Good to know. Luckily, I’m not much of a haggler, so I’m sure I’ll be fine trying to wrestle this beast through a set of corners.

Of course, rumor is that the K-Model GSX-R1100 was too much for anyone to handle, but not because of the power: handling wasn’t the best and both Phil Mellor and Jamie Whitham crashed riding the GSX-R1100K at the Isle of Man TT in 1989, resulting in a ban of big bikes for years afterward. Some people blamed the bike’s geometry, some the suspension setup, and many different fixes and parts combinations have been tried to sort out the bike’s handling woes, but the bike maintained its reputation as a heavy, ill-handling brute, which ironically has probably helped the bike’s mystique, considering similar Yamaha FZR1000s go for much less at the moment.

At 462lbs dry, it wasn’t the heaviest GSX-R1100, but it’s pretty portly. Personally, I think it’s the best-looking version of the big Suzuki, and this iteration of the bike are sometimes known as “Slingshots” in reference to the semi-flat-slide Mikuni carburetors, although I’ve seen them off the bike and disassembled and I still can’t see anything that looks like a slingshot in there.

These days the GSX-R1100’s handling shouldn’t be a problem, considering the kind of riding the new owner is likely to do on it. The bike has plenty of straight-line speed and stability for weekend blasts, you just want to make sure you plan ahead and don’t try to change lines mid-corner. Certainly, it’s not lacking in power: the K-Model was powered by the 1127cc version of Suzuki’s inline four, still with oil-cooling. That beast of a motor, aside from the styling, is probably the primary reason for buying a “Slingshot” GSX-R1100.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

1989 GSXR 1100. Well kept killer bike. New tires ,brakes , clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom cond. 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes were bikes. Very rare to see in this cond. top seat pad has some delamination, Top tree is a little dull from keys (common). XL jacket inc, with stand, 1000.00 bonus. This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback please don’t bid. The pics say it all!

1989 GSXR 1100. Well kept killer bike. New  tires, brakes , clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom cond. 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes were bikes. Very rare to see in this cond. top seat pad has some delamination, top tree is a little dull from keys (common). XL jacket inc, with stand, 1000.00 bonus. This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback stay away… this is too much bike for you. The pics say it all

It’s a shame about the picture quality on this listing, since it looks like it’s in pretty good shape and, with 21,000 miles, is pretty much just broken in. Bidding is up to $3,250 with another six days left on the auction, so dive in and take a chance, or maybe request some betting images from the seller!

-tad

Suzuki December 22, 2018 posted by

Teenage Dream: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

The 90s sportbike market is booming right now. Folks that grew up riding or lusting after vintage 1960s and even 1970s bikes are steadily aging out of the hobby, and values for bikes of that era are already pretty high. Many people that lusted after 90s bikes, on the other hand, are right in that sweet spot, where they’re young enough to still enjoy bikes like today’s Suzuki GSX-R1100, but old enough to have some mid-career disposable income, now that the kids are headed off to college… And while the values of 1990s sportbikes have risen sharply, solid examples of some amazingly capable and entertaining machines are still available for much less than your average midlife crisis Corvette.

It also helps that the ergonomics of the big Gixxer, while considered pretty extreme at the time, are a far cry from the ass-up, head-down, seat-like-a-plank superbikes of today. In fact, the riding position could almost be considered “cushy” and far closer to a modern sport-touring machine. While still technically considered sportbikes, I don’t think that there were too many classes that would have allowed this later Gixxer to compete when it was new, but that wasn’t really the bike’s mission statement by the 90s. It was devastatingly effective at the kind of riding your average weekend warrior does, with relatively stable, predictable handling in spite of the near 500lb weight, good wind protection, and room for two-up blasts.

The majority of the package was pretty unremarkable, with an outdated but effective cradle frame, a full-fairing, a monoshock rear, and garish, neon-airbrush graphics. The biggest change from the earlier “Slabbie” and “Slingshot” GSX-Rs was the addition of updated bodywork with improved aerodynamics, including a fully-enclosed headlight unit. But the star of the show was definitely the engine, Suzuki’s hulking “oil-boiler” inline four that relied on engine oil, a high-capacity oil pump, and an oversized cooler to keep temperatures under control.

Displacement was up to 1127cc for this M-model version, and the factory claimed 145hp, although much more was available with careful tuning. These are famously tough bikes, and variations of the engine saw use in the later Bandit 1200 and GSX1400. But the writing was on the wall, and looming power and emissions requirements meant the addition of liquid cooling for 1993’s iteration of the big GSX-R to help it keep pace with bikes from the other Japanese manufacturers.

Of course, that meant even more weight, and while these things may disguise their weight on the move with a low center of gravity and good suspension, they’re incredibly heavy if you’re say, rolling one around your garage or a showroom… This example has obviously been cherished, and the seller appears to have been very meticulous when it comes to maintenance.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

I graduated high school in 1991 and this was my dream bike. At the time when I was 17, and was riding around a Riva 180 scooter as I couldn’t afford the GSX-R, and I recall them being about $8,500 new. So when I could buy one, I did and looked for the very best stock, impeccable bike I could find just like I saw on the showroom floor. This bike is insanely clean, all original stock parts including the rare factory OEM solo cowl. I went through just about every mechanical thing I could, not because I needed to but because I didn’t plan on selling the bike. See pics: I kept all the original replaced OEM parts like o-rings from cabs, needles, jets, o-ring seals, float bowl gaskets, etc. I wanted a bike that ran and looked like brand new and this one checks off both boxes. There was no expanse spared on this bike, period. The bike starts right up with choke, idles, and purrs along. I get told over and over not to sell, it’s just a really excellent example of a perfect bike. The bike is truly a time warp.

At 9,469 miles, I went through the bike entirely and correctly as follows:

  • Carburetors. First, all four of the head-to-intake pipe o-ring seals were replaced, head oil hose o-rings, all o-ring seals in the carbs, including the most important o-ring on the plastic slide with emulsion tubes, float bowl gaskets, needles, seat valves, pilot jets, air jets, seals from replaced original seals
  •  Brand new Bridgestone BT016R Pros with 40 miles on them, they still have the knobbies… I went with these because they looked to most original to the bike and have the correct profile. Some tread patterns do not look correct and the profile is off, these look similar to the originals
  • Brand new air filter
  • Brand new oil filter and Motul 5100 10W-40 oil, mineral based
  • All new OEM factory NGK plugs including one factory OEM spark plug cap that was loose
  • All new bearings in the wheels and sprocket carrier. All factory OEM with boxes and receipts [NSK, NTN, etc. No Chinese bearings.]
  • EBC sintered brake pads new front and rear. 40 miles on them
  • Full hydraulic flush of brakes and clutch with Motul 5.1 fluid also at 9,469 miles
  • Recharged the rear shock with nitrogen to 140 lbs
  • New YUASA battery with trickle charger connection
  • Factory toolkit included, along with the original rear passenger grab handle
  • Factory solo cowl included

Bidding is up to near $6,500 with plenty of time left on the auction. These aren’t quite as desirable as the earlier models, but all GSX-R1100s are pretty collectible at the moment. Clean, carefully-maintained, low-mileage examples like this are very hard to find, something that’s reflected in the shocking jumps in prices we’ve seen in a very short period of time. They’re big, fast, reliable, and relatively comfortable. What’s not to like?

-tad

Teenage Dream: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale
Suzuki October 20, 2018 posted by

Clean, Low-Mileage Slingshot: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Suzuki’s GSX-R750 revolutionized the sportbike game by bringing racebike handling and technology to the masses. There were obviously plenty of other sportbikes available at the time, like Honda’s VF1000F and Kawasaki’s GPz900R, but none seemed to capture the style of the era quite as well the Suzuki, with its endurance-racing bodywork and striking blue-and-white graphics. It didn’t hurt that it had the performance to back up the race-bred style.

Interestingly for a cutting-edge sportbike, the original “oil-boiler” GSX-R’s engine almost seems like it was a step backwards, as it was not water-cooled. Instead, the GSX-R’s designers took a page out of Colin Chapman’s book, and used an oil and air-cooling system to save both weight and complexity. Luckily, they left out Lotus’ factory-installed mechanical and electrical gremlins… Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or “SACS” used a high-capacity oil pump and a large oil-cooler to do the same job as a radiator, and the package made 112hp in the second-generation version seen here.

The second-generation of the GSX-R was introduced in 1988 and affectionately known as the “Slingshot,” owing to the unusual design of the semi-flat slide Mikuni BST36SS carburetors. The Slingshot actually had one less cc than the original bike, because of a more oversquare bore and stroke that resulted in 748cc. The updated engine could rev higher and made more power, but naturally less torque, and increased weight meant some customers weren’t especially happy about the change: the extremely rare homologation GSX-R750RK actually switched back to the original bore and stroke dimensions to restore some of the lost torque at the request of race teams.

The new version kept the oil-cooling though, and the perimeter aluminum frame, along with revised styling, suspension, and 17” wheels that make it look and perform more like a modern motorcycle. I’m not generally a huge fan of Japanese sportbikes, but the second-generation GSX-R750 and 1100 are on my short list of favorite motorcycles. Okay, it’s technically a pretty long list, but this is still a really cool bike.

I don’t especially like the heavy four-into-two exhaust system seen here, but it is original and should add to the value for collectors. “Showroom condition” is an overused term and  is often applied to bikes that are very nice, but far from the way they rolled off the dealer floor. It shouldn’t be subjective: aftermarket turn signals, exhausts, and even period-correct performance-upgrades technically disqualify a bike. But as a non-expert on Gixxers, this one looks like it might fit the description, or at least come pretty close.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Rare opportunity to obtain an original 89 GSX-R750 in mint condition with original exhausts and components. 

8880 miles from new, runs perfectly and needs nothing

Originally Purchased from local Suzuki Service Manager and collector, maintained in a climate-controlled garage. 

 One small scratch on the rear left tailpiece otherwise in excellent condition throughout.  

Recent tires and battery

No oil or gas leaks whatsoever, no stains, engine is smooth

Buyer responsible for shipping arrangements and costs. 

Please do not bid if you do not intend to purchase.

The curse of the “everyman sportbike” was the very reliability and affordability that made them so ubiquitous: most owners didn’t bother to cherish them as they would a more exotic, or maybe more fragile machine, and they were ridden, flogged mercilessly, and discarded when they were worn out or when a new generation was introduced, then “customized” horribly by their second or third owners as the obsolete version became more affordable. These days, clean examples of Suzuki’s oil-cooled GSX-Rs are quickly snapped up by collectors. Just a few years ago, you could get one of these for a few grand, but prices are shooting up quickly, especially for nice, low-mileage bikes like this one. Don’t scoff too loudly at the $9,500 Buy It Now price, since bidding is already up above $7,000 with plenty of time left on the auction.

-tad

Clean, Low-Mileage Slingshot: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale April 23, 2018 posted by

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale – April 21st!

Update 4.23.2018:  We’ve updated most of the listings below with their sale prices, and estimates from Bonhams were very close in most cases.  Their showcase pieces did very well also.  From Bonhams:

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale took place this weekend (21 and 22 April) at the International Classic MotorCycle Show and saw an incredible 92% of lots sold, achieving a total of £3,376,045 (US $4,708,029).

Several world records were broken, including the 1970 Clymer Münch 1,177cc TTS ‘Mammoth’ which achieved a staggering £154,940 and the 1973 MV Agusta 750S which realized £96,700, the highest prices ever achieved for these models at auction.

Congratulations to Bonhams on a great sale and to all the new owners!

-dc


For those lucky enough to be in attendance at the Staffordshire County Showgrounds in Stratford, UK, there will be an amazing collection of motorcycles passing over the auction block courtesy of Bonhams. But fear not: you need not be in attendance in order to participate in the auction. And just so you don’t miss out on any of the key lots going up for sale, RSBFS is here to help you navigate through the drool-worthy articles on hand. Register early, and bid with confidence!

For the rest of us, let us know what you think of the sale and estimates in the comments below.

– RSBFS Team

1998 Ducati 916 SPS – This 4,000 mile machine has a Bonhams estimate of $21,000 – $27,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 20,196 inc. premium

1990 Ducati 851 SP2 by NCR – Never been raced, but chock full of NCR parts. Bonhams estimate: US $39,000 – $49,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 27,631 inc. premium

1989 Honda VFR750R Type RC30 – this works Honda is an Isle of Man TT and Macau Grand Prix veteran. Bonhams estimate: US$ 35,000 – 49,000.  SOLD – US$ 40,393 inc. premium

1987 Ducati 851 – Alan Cathcart’s personal machine since new, this tri colore beauty has a Bonhams estimate of $49,000 – $63,000 USD

1998 Ducati 916 Senna III – This low mileage 916 is number 281 of 300. Bonhams estimate: $14,000 – $17,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 22,620 inc. premium

1998 Ducati 916 SPS – With a documented history (including complete engine rebuild) this SPS has a Bonhams estimate of $18,000 – $24,000 USD.

1999 Ducati 996 SPS2 – Only 150 examples of this Euro-spec model were built. Bonhams estimate: $13,000 – $17,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 13,733 inc. premium

1986 Ducati 400 F3 – With only 327 kilometers showing, this late Cagiva-era Ducati has a Bonhams estimate of $5,600 – $8,400.  SOLD – US$ 5,655 inc. premium

2000 MV Agusta 750cc F4 S – This ‘1+1’ Biposto example of the astounding F4 lineup has a Bonhams estimate of $9,800 – 13,000.  SOLD – US$ 10,987 inc. premium

1990 Suzuki GSX-R750L ‘Slingshot’ – Presented as virtually new after an extensive restoration, this bike will be sold at No Reserve. Bonhmas estimate: $4,900 – 6,300.  SOLD – US$ 6,947 inc. premium

1988 Honda VFR400R Type NC21 – A rare oddity in the US, this baby RC30 shows approximately 23,000 miles. Bonhams estimate: $3,100 – $3,900.  SOLD US$ 4,524 inc. premium

1978 BMW 980cc R100RS ‘Krauser’ – Though rather high mileage at 80k+, this looks well looked after. Bonhams estimate: US$ 7,100 – 11,000.  SOLD – US$ 7,755 inc. premium

1971 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport ‘Telaio Rosso’ – Recently restored, previous magazine tester. Bonhams estimate: US$ 34,000 – 42,000.  SOLD US$ 43,625 inc. premium

1976 Ducati 900SS – Used in the late 70’s in amateur racing, it was later returned to road duty but includes many spares. Bonhams estimate: US$ 35,000 – 45,000.  SOLD – US$ 37,162 inc. premium

1977 Benelli 750cc Sei – odometer shows 13k KMs, includes receipts. Bonhams estimate: US$ 11,000 – 17,000.  SOLD – US$ 22,620 inc. premium

1979 Honda CBX1000Z – Imported to the UK via Canada in 1982. Includes receipts and Delkevic exhaust system. Bonhams estimate: US$ 14,000 – 20,000.   SOLD – US$ 15,349 inc. premium

1983 Suzuki GSX1100 Katana – Shows nearly 25k miles and includes some receipts. Bonhams estimate: US$ 7,100 – 11,000.  SOLD – US$ 12,926 inc. premium

1979 Suzuki GS1000 – No mention of Wes Cooley, is it a clone? Bonhams estimate: US$ 6,400 – 9,200.  SOLD – US$ 11,310 inc. premium

1970 Clymer Münch 1,177cc TTS ‘Mammoth’ – One of the featured lots of the Stafford auction. Completely restored. Bonhams estimate: US$ 110,000 – 140,000.  SOLD – US$ 217,692 inc. premium

1973 MV Agusta 750S – Another featured lot at the Stafford sale and noted as one of the most desirable of post-war motorcycles. Bonhams estimate: US$ 99,000 – 130,000.  SOLD – US$ 135,864 inc. premium

1957 F.B. Mondial 250cc DOHC Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle – World Championship and Isle of Man TT-winning motorcycle of great historical and technical interest. Offered with assorted correspondence relating to its provenance. Bonhams estimate: US$ 110,000 – 170,000.  SOLD – US$ 129,569 inc. premium

Honda 250cc RC163 Grand Prix Replica – The 250cc inline four gem was a championship winner, this replica is suitable for parades or vintage racing.  Bonham’s estimate: $20,000 – $25,000

1974 AMF Harley-Davidson 250cc Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle – This Aermacchi-designed two-stroke is unrestored and was in the stable of the Cesena Motorcycle Club before being on display at the Rimini Motorcycle museum for the past 30 years.  Bonham’s estimate – $17,000 – $21,000.  SOLD – US$ 17,773 inc. premium

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale – April 21st!
Suzuki February 28, 2018 posted by

Very Rare Slingshot: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750RK for Sale

Update 3.2.2018: My apologies, the links to the first RK we wrote up below led to bike now linked in this post, which is a second RK available from “whiteknuckle”. Sorry for the confusion, I’ll watch the VINs closer in the future. Good catch, James! -dc

Update 2.28.2018 This GSX-R750RK was first listed last month for $27,500 and is relisted for $24,900 buy-it-now or offer. Links updated. -dc

From the same era as last weekend’s OW01 and a direct competitor on the race track, this Suzuki GSX-R750RR is maybe the least well known of the period’s homologation specials, and it’s my personal opinion that this is the best-looking GSX-R of all time. But it’s also hugely rare, another case where they were supposed to build 500 for homologation purposes, but it’s unclear if that many were actually made. Certainly, they’re extremely hard to find here in the USA, although some did make it to Canada.

Why is the bike so rare? Well the general idea with homologation specials is for the basic platform to win races, so the manufacturers really didn’t care all that much about marketing them, and they were priced accordingly: the GSX-R750RR or “RK” as it was also known was actually a good bit more expensive than Honda’s RC30 and looked far less exotic to anyone not in-the-know. The rules only specified that you had to build 500 examples, not that you actually needed to sell the things.

Why is the bike so special? Well the RK was chock-full of trick, track-ready goodness. First of all, Suzuki used race-spec internals, along with different bore and stroke for the RK. But, counter to usual racing thought, they went from the standard Slingshot’s 73 x 44.7mm back to the earlier bike’s 70 x 48.7mm and used sand-cast engine cases, along with a brace of 40mm Mikuni CV carbs. Why go to a longer stroke engine? To regain some of the older bike’s missing midrange torque, something the new bike was sorely lacking. The oil-cooler was updated [remember that these were oil-cooled], and a second unit was added to keep cylinder head temps under control. A close-ratio six-speed gearbox with an uprated clutch helped handle the abuse racers were likely to inflict. The swingarm was braced, the aluminum tank has a lower profile, the fairing has a revised shape and is made of lighter fiberglass compared to the stock plastic. The frame was revised as well, made thicker around the steering head, and there were updated suspension components at the front and back.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750RK for Sale

Up for sale is a beautiful 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750RK GR79C with only 22,801 kilometers (14,168 miles). This rare RK is a homogilation bike from the racing division at Suzuki. JDM model. Very limited build. Bike is 100% stock except for the RUN stickers. All fairings and components are 100% genuine OEM Suzuki factory. Bike only has a few tiny scratches and handling marks from shipping. Rear butt pad is worn, however not bad but needs to be re-upholstered to be perfect. Engine is very clean, no corrosion present. No blistering in the paint. Bike appears to have never been down or crashed. This bike has a ton of curb appeal and presents itself as a bike with 1,400 miles, not 14,000. Runs like the day it was new. New battery and new fluids. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use.

The Buy It Now price is set at $27,500 and there are still a few days left on the listing. Unlike many valuable homologation bikes, this one actually has a few miles on it. Certainly nothing to worry about and, if you plan to ride it on occasion, you at least know that it won’t need a complete overhaul before you take it out for a brisk weekend ride. It’s always tricky to judge from photos, but this looks to be as described and is in excellent shape for a nearly thirty year old bike… Resplendent in classic Suzuki blue-and-white with the signature red tail section, it’s a great-looking machine, although the afterthought-level brake light could have been better integrated…

-tad

Very Rare Slingshot: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750RK for Sale
Suzuki January 17, 2018 posted by

Literally Found in a Barn: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

The term “barn find” pretty much says it all: the collectible car or motorcycle in question was found sitting in an actual barn, where the previous owner stored it when it stopped running. Possibly hidden under a layer of dust, old blankets, back issues of Playboy, and mold. The implication is that it is in complete, original condition, but has been somewhat neglected cosmetically and mechanically. The term gets thrown around regularly as a sort of shorthand for “original, low-miles, and in need of restoration,” but seems to be exactly the case for this Suzuki GSX-R1100K “Slingshot.”

The second generation GSX-R1100’s nickname came from the quartet of 38mm semi-flatslide Mikuni “Slingshot” carburetors that fed the dual overhead cam, four-valve, inline four engine. It actually displaced 1127cc, up a bit from the original’s 1052cc, but still featured Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or “SACS” to keep things within optimal temperatures. SACS used a multi-chamber oil pump to effectively cool and circulate the oil, with circuits in the cylinder head and jets directed at the pistons. Later GSX-R1100s adopted a more conventional set up with a radiator and coolant, but here Suzuki stuck with the concept that simpler was better and lighter, although the Big K isn’t exactly a flyweight. Mass continued to creep up throughout the 1100’s successive generations and the new frame used here was both stiffer and heavier than the one found on the Slabbie. With a dry weight of 462lbs, the “K” version was never going to be particularly agile, so it was more of a GT than an actual sportbike, something that Suzuki tried to rectify the following year when they made changes to the suspension.

Unfortunately, the GSX-R1100K never really matched up with expectations: I have an old issue of SuperBike magazine that describes it as “… quite pretty. To look at, sure, but never to ride.” But it’s really the beefy engine that defines the GSX-R1100 experience anyway. It was a powerhouse, the Small Block Chevy of the time: endlessly tunable with a wealth of performance parts available. People set them up for drag racing, and even created road-race hybrids by squeezing the 1100 engine into the GSX-R750, which is pretty much the same idea Bimota had when they built their lightweight and extremely quick SB6, although it was a very tight fit in both cases…

Of course, a GSX-R1100 by its very nature isn’t necessarily all that uncommon, but ones in this kind of condition are very rare these days: the powerful engine, reasonable ergonomics, and good wind protection meant they got used as intended, racking up huge miles, battle scars, and less-than-tasteful aesthetic “upgrades” popular at the time. People looking to make them into the corner-carvers the looks advertised tried all manner of fixes that worked or didn’t in varying degrees, but the end result was very few remain as delivered by Suzuki, and even fewer have covered so few miles. With just 722 miles on the odometer, I doubt you’ll find a less used example anywhere outside a museum.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

1989 Suzuki GSXR 1100 perfect condition with 722 miles,  was a barn find been stored since 1991 but not climate control storage literally in a barn. The bike was redone but didn’t need much as the miles are so low. The body was completely done to perfect factory spec’s no cracks or any problems, the wheels are original but do have a bit of chips,  bike runs great and needs nothing. Full tune tires everything done including carbs. This one for collection beautiful bike and super rare. Also comes with passenger seat parts. Bike will sell no matter what

The seller’s opening bit is set at $7,000 which seems pretty fair considering the condition and low miles, but there are no takers yet with very little time left on the auction. It’s a shame the pictures aren’t better lit, since I think this is the very best-looking version of the long-running GSX-R series, especially in classic Suzuki blue-and-white. If you’re looking to actually ride it, I’d expect there are plenty of shops out there who can recommend suspension changes to make a Slingshot handle, probably using off-the-shelf Suzuki components, along with brake upgrades and weight saving measures. At the very least, you can probably swap the original 2-into-2 exhaust for a 4-into-1 and save 20 pounds. But honestly, the original bike offered plenty of stability, even if it lacked agility, and this one should probably be enjoyed for what it is: a freeway blaster par excellence or a great two-up weekend rider. Given the low mileage though, I’d bet it might end up stored away in a collection somewhere.

-tad

Suzuki December 7, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K

When Suzuki introduced the GSX-R750 (G model) to US buyers in 1986, the racing world was set on fire. With four-stroke, race-bred technology – devoid of the corny race-replica shortcomings – the original GSX-R was a privateer’s dream. This was as close to a race bike as one could buy in a showroom, and Suzuki capitalized on that fact with lucrative sponsorship opportunities in both professional and amateur racing series. This first generation of the GSX-R is often referred to as “slabbie” due to the flat, narrow bodywork along the sides and rear of the bike. Notable chassis features included an aluminum alloy frame, adjustable suspension and large, ventilated triple disk brakes. But the big story was the motor: to save weight the GSX-R was air-and-oil-cooled. This setup was pioneered on the XN85 Turbo project, and resulted in a much lighter package than the liquid cooled competitors. Bottom line: The GSX-R was a formidable track weapon.

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K for sale!

Fast forward only a few years, and already there were significant changes. While the unique air-oil cooling was retained, 1988 (J model) introduced a shorter stroke power plant that could rev higher than previous models. Gone were the flatslide carbs, replaced by new, larger Mikuni “slingshot” carbs with vacuum-actuated slides. The newer carbs worked better at lower RPMs and ultimately made more power than the first generation setup. The bodywork gained some fluidity through subtle curves, although the paint scheme remained familiar and relatively traditional. Chassis changes included a stronger frame, a bigger front fork and new wheels allowing for wider rubber. With the additional performance and handling capabilities came an increase in weight. The 1989 (K) model was the culmination of these changes, producing a meaner, faster GSX-R – and a neo collectable in its own right.

From the seller:
This gorgeous 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K “Slingshot” edition was brought to SUB moto service for a “make run” and ultimately a full restoration. Our service department took it apart, looked it over closely, any parts showing excessive wear and tear were repaired, refinished or replaced. This almost 30 year old GSX-R had held up well.

Its hard to believe that 31 years have passed since the US introduction of the original GSX-R. The model has held up well, and the J and K models have started to appreciate in value just like the slab-sided generations have done. The problem is finding a solid example of the breed. Three decades ago, these were mass-produced motorcycles of reasonable cost. Many found their way onto race tracks or (worse) into the hands of teenage squids who wanted to emulate Roberts, Lawson or Spencer. Today even a clean K model Gixxer is old and will likely need serious refurbishment. That is the appeal of this particular 1989 Suzuki GXR-R750 Slingshot – it presents well and has been thoroughly refurbished. This is a rider that you can collect. Or a collector that you can ride. Either way, you will be sitting pretty.

More from the seller:
It received a full service, new tires, all fluids were replaced and a complete carburetor rebuild including all rubber internal parts.. The original bodywork was sent out to be professionally inspected for any cracks or weak spots, Then repaired, gas tank cleaned out and everything repainted to exact factory specs even using an NOS Suzuki decal kit! All rubber pads and cushions mounting the tank and bodywork were also replaced. The original white wheels were sent out to be professionally powder coated, we cleaned and re-greased all the wheel bearings, reinstalled and then slipped on a fresh pair of Michelin Pilot Power 2CT’s.

This GSX-R750K is not a concourse level restoration and really should be ridden and enjoyed, these are great bikes and a wonderful model series.

More from the seller:
Over $6500 spent in restoration! It will stand out in the crowd, Blue/White combo is always Suzuki’s most popular and this one is a true classic. We just finished up some final details and it is ready to go!

If the beautiful pics are not enough to whet your appetite, check out the short video provided by the seller. Be sure and crank up the volume, as this Slingshot sounds fantastic! Take note of how clean everything looks. This is not just some used bike, but rather an example that really stands out from the crowd:

A few years from now (or a few years ago) you will be making comments like “I remember when the non-slabbie GSX-Rs were unloved and you could pick them up for nothing…” Those days are gone, as are many of the good examples of this breed. Good looks, great performance and a solid pedigree – what is there NOT to like of this generation GSX-R750? If there is a downside, I certainly can’t find one. The K model does not have the distinction of being first generation, but other than that it is a superior motorcycle in every way to the earlier series of the line. With values on the rise, the time to get in is now. Check out this beautiful example courtesy of Seattle Used Bikes (a reputable shop in the Pacific Northwest) and be sure and tell ’em you saw it on RSBFS.

MI

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K