Posts by tag: shaft drive

Moto Guzzi June 7, 2017 posted by

2002 Moto Guzzi V11 Le Mans Tenni with 1,204 miles !

Commemorating Omobono Tenni, a Guzzi racer who gave the factory many victories in the 1933-48 era ( and died in a crash during GP practice ), the Le Mans Tenni is a brilliant and subtle styling exercise using the recent V11 base.  This Tenni is badged number 114 of 170, and has been preserved with only first-oil-change miles.

2002 Moto Guzzi V11 Le Mans #114/170

Helped by Aprilia’s development lire, the V11 used the venerable air-cooled V-twin which reported 91 hp and nearly 70 ft.-lbs. torque.  Signature shaft drive is helped by a torque arm, and Marelli fuel injection makes starting and running easy.  Top components from Öhlins and Brembo, and improvements like the hydraulic clutch and oil cooler bring the big machine into the 21st century.

Owned by an Illinois collector, this Tenni is dead stock and almost unused.  The suede seat was a fair-weather option and a vinyl seat is also included.  Just a few dings on the seat fairing detract, but should correctable.  From the eBay auction:

Original owner of a rare, low mileage, unmolested Moto Guzzi LeMans Tenni, number 114 of 170 worldwide.  I purchased this motorcycle new in December 2003 from Motorsports Inc. in Wichita, KS.  I have kept the bike in a climate controlled space, and have not performed any alterations whatsoever to the engine or body.  Periodic cleaning, oil changes, and engine starting, with a occasional ride around the block!  Hence the very low miles.  Bike comes with an original Tenni sales brochure, owners manual, shop manual, parts manual, two keys, tool kit, MG bike cover, extra gasket set, and two seats (black vinyl and brown suede).

With weight approaching 550 lbs. wet, the V11 quickly becomes a lot of work to push quickly.  More suited to less twisty bits, the rock solid handling inspires confidence, and great torque makes for a fun ride.  The V11 has a mature powertrain, and the Tenni has premium appointments and an attractive take on racing green.  For a Guzzi fan, it’s a very low-mile example, 1 of 170 total of a single-year commemorative, with the late Le Mans half fairing, a modern and nice-riding machine to boot…

-donn

2002 Moto Guzzi V11 Le Mans Tenni with 1,204 miles !
BMW June 2, 2017 posted by

Capitalist Tool – 1982 BMW-Krauser MKM 1000 #130

In the 1980’s, Michael Krauser was a leading manufacturer of motorcycle luggage and accessories, and ventured out on the slippery slope of motorcycle manufacture. Replacing the big-tube backbone frame of an R100RS with a Ph.D.-designed trellis saved 6 kg. and subsequently adding four-valve heads to the classic boxer liberated 12 hp. The result rode like a BMW but performed and was priced more like a Ferrari.

1982 BMW-Krauser MKM1000 for sale on eBay

With the bomb-proof boxer, five-speed, and shaft drive, the MKM1000 can certainly cope with the engine’s 70 hp.  Dual front disks and forward riding position keep the rider in the game.  The generous fairing makes a nice hole in the 138 mph breeze, and the sleek tank-seat fairing hides a metal fuel tank underneath.  Bespoke production and pricing more than double an R100RS insured exclusivity.

Coming out of California, this Krauser is recently restored and not registered in well, a while.  From the eBay auction:

Rare 1982 Krauser BMW MKM1000

Only 237 Bikes build by Race team Owner Krauser with an incredible Trellis frame.

This Bike is # 130.

No body knows how many still exist, most of bikes got exported to Japan . Only few to US.

This bike was sold new by San Jose BMW in 1982.

Completely restored to original condition with only OEM parts including Fairing decals which were pretty expensive.

Newly rebuilt motor, carbs and tranny with new clutch.

Tank reconditioned and sealed, new pet cocks.

Comes with original toolkit and little supplement OEM instruction booklet and other collected Literature.

The bike hasn’t been registered since 2000 and has current Non- Op status.

Bike runs and handles fantastic. Showed at the Quail Motorcycle Gathering.

Not appearing to be a 4-valve model, the engine in this MKM1000 will last much longer than the envelope-pushing arrangement of two valves per rocker arm.  Though this machine will likely spend most of its time on the display stand, it’s good to know ( and some concours require ) it’s operational.  Most went to Japan, and – one – owned by a certain financial magnate even made it to RSBFS, but only a few over two hundred were ever made.  With shapes and colors pushing forty, the Krauser is a thrilling opportunity for a collector, but for more fans, a vingette into a previous era, a look at how exciting the early days could be…

-donn

Capitalist Tool – 1982 BMW-Krauser MKM 1000 #130
BMW April 5, 2017 posted by

The Ultimate Boxer: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for Sale

In the early days of motorcycle design, there were a variety of alternatives to the telescopic forks that have become the standard in an industry evolving towards efficiency but, unfortunately also towards homogeny. Even the S1000RR that followed today’s HP2 Sport as BMW’s flagship sportbike is evidence of this: that striking asymmetrical bodywork is wrapped around an inline four and conventional, if highly sophisticated suspension. Sure, it blew everything into the weeds upon its introduction and has more performance than any mortal can actually use on the road, but it’s kind of… same-y. You certainly can’t accuse the HP2 of that.

It may look like a pair of telescopic forks up front, but that’s actually BMW’s Telelever front end, and the HP2 features a pair of Öhlins shocks: one in the rear, and one controlling the movement of the front wheel. These days, the only real players in the alternative front end game are BMW and Bimota, although there are always a few weirdo independent builders lurking in the wings. Forkless front ends have distinct theoretical advantages, but generally seem to have two problems. One, they’re more complicated to design and manufacture, and multiple linkages in set ups like the one used by Bimota can lead to play and vagueness in the handling, something that should actually be a strong point of the design. But the bigger issue seems to be the fact that the rest of the industry revolves around telescopic forks. They aren’t ideal, but people know how to set them up and make them work, you can buy highly-developed components off the rack from specialists, and riders are familiar with how they feel: Bimotas and BMWs are actually engineered with a bit of dive tuned in, so they don’t feel completely alien to riders used to telescopic forks.

Like the front suspension, the engine of the HP2 is a bit more than it seems as well. Sure, it uses BMW’s iconic flat-twin engine with its longitudinal crank, shaft-drive, and cylinder heads sticking out where you might find the highway pegs on a Harley Fat Boy. But inside, you’re looking at titanium connecting rods, and the bike debuted new four-valve cylinder heads with radial valves that helped the bike produce a claimed 128hp. Those heads feature skid plates in case you deck them out on track: roadgoing cornering clearance is generous, but track riders are advised to add a bit of rear ride height, and might need to adjust their racing lines slightly if they’re used to dragging elbows in the corners. For the rest of us, this is a very capable mount for road or track.

Elsewhere, the bike was kitted out with the best of everything: monstrous radial Brembos, adjustable ergonomics, and even a quickshifter that was the very first fitted from the factory to a production motorcycle. Carbon fiber is everywhere and includes a self-supporting rear seat unit, and helped the bike weigh in at a relatively svelte 392lbs dry. Keep in mind that those exotic titanium rods will need replacement at the 30,000 mile mark, but that’s a long way off for a collectible like this, and at least you just need two of them…

From the original eBay listing: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for Sale

This is the ABS version.  One owner bike.  Own the coolest boxer ever. This is number #103.  Only 1987 miles.  Bike is nearly perfect.  There is a small blemish on tail section.  Tires are like new, bike has been maintained at local BMW dealer with full records. Currently has extended warranty until June of 2017.

So the original listing makes the lazy eBay poster move of copy/pasting the bike’s manufacturer’s specs in place of any detailed information about the bike being offered. Sellers take note: no one cares about the fact that the bike has a three-phase alternator. And just what in the hell is “inner leg curve, unladen weight”? If you’ve got some sort of wild racing cams in your bike, the people looking to buy it might want to know. Otherwise, it just smacks of “well, I know I should post something here in this section…” It’s basically non-information: no one is reading it, and most of it is pretty meaningless even if they did. I’m assuming with just a shade under 2,000 miles it probably hasn’t needed anything. And even if this isn’t the original owner, I’m sure the “full records” mean that the seller can confidently say “there are no issues” leave it at that.

HP2s are quirky, fast, rare, and actually usable, although they don’t seem to be particularly desirable yet. Maybe they’re confusing to collectors? Neither fish nor fowl, with decent, but not eyeball-flattening performance and sporty, but not particularly beautiful looks. High-quality, light-weight, race-bred parts attached to a platform ultimately limited by design in terms of absolute performance. But with a whole raft of perfectly fast, competent, and slightly vanilla inline fours out there that can be had by the bucket load, it’s hard to put a price on character and individuality. Or maybe you can: the Buy It Now price for this one is $16,999 which is pretty much right on the money for a nice HP2

-tad

The Ultimate Boxer: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for Sale
BMW March 28, 2017 posted by

For a Beemer – 2004 BMW R1100S

After a 20-year break since the R100/S, BMW’s re-entrance to the more sporting side was thoughtfully  considered, with lots of new engineering, and as they approach classic status, a great success.  This nicely-updated R1100S looks excellent and fans of the brand would say, just broken in with 22,000 miles.

2004 BMW R1100S for sale on eBay

The R1100S arrived with concepts new to sportbikes – the four-valve 1085cc boxer, Telelever  front and Paralever rear suspension with shaft drive, single-plate clutch, ABS, and some things newer to BMW – clip-on handlebars and underseat exhaust.  BMW kept their vaunted build quality and usual Bosch fuel injection, but tried to leave the weight behind.  The engine is a stressed member of the aluminum chassis, and the supersport fairing flows from the beak, over the tank to the pillion cover.   Great power at 98 hp with 72 ft.-lbs. torque, and with a dry weight of 505 lbs. it’s light for a BMW.

Offered by an Illinois dealer, this R1100S looks well taken care of and has the optional grey / orange checkerboard.  A more sporting build since the ABS, centerstand, and heated grips were left off.  The owner has upgraded to Ohlins dampers on both ends, and added conspicuity lights on the fork legs.  The bags look like they just came out of the closet where, handy as they are, they should be returned.  From the eBay auction:

This 2004 BMW R1100S has only 22,370 miles and has had all of its maintenance performed by Cycle Werks in Barrington, we are an authorized BMW dealer.  This bike comes with BMW Saddle Bags, Ohlins suspension, Aux. Driving Lights, and much more!

For a BMW it’s sporty, light, and this one with low miles, and though succeeded by the R1200S, the R1100S is regarded as the better track machine.  The bike was the source of many years of the Boxer Cup, a single marque support series, resulting in the special edition Boxer Cup Replica.  But you can find an R1100S at almost any track day or racing school, just look for the guy with no trailer, he’ll be riding it home…

-donn

 

For a Beemer – 2004 BMW R1100S
MV Agusta March 24, 2017 posted by

Flashback Friday: 1977 MV Agusta 800 Super America for Sale

Most factory racing efforts are intended to raise the company profile and sell more bikes, or are used to develop and test new technology that filters down to and improves road-bike performance. But the early road-legal efforts of Ferrari and MV Agusta were basically afterthoughts, and sales of these vehicles were simply intended to help fund the companies’ racing teams. In fact, MV Agusta didn’t even make a serious sporting multi-cylinder roadbike until 1967’s 600 4C, a notoriously half-arsed attempt at a production machine. Luckily, the follow up 750S and 800 Super America rectified that problem, although there were some pretty obvious indications that Count Agusta was uncomfortable putting his company’s hard-won knowledge into a bike that was available to the public…

First of all, there’s the literal elephant in the room: that 560lb wet weight. Sure, the MV Agusta carried that weight well once on the move, and plenty of other sport bikes of the late 1970s were heavy beasts, but considering the 750S cost an eye-popping $6,500 new, you’d think they could have put at least a modicum of effort into weight-reduction. The other component hamstringing the four-cylinder MV’s performance was that strange contraption stretching from the back of the gearbox to the rear wheel: a driveshaft. Supposedly, it was decided that the bike for sale to customers would swap the normal lightweight drive chain for a shaft in order to prevent customers from simply racing their roadbikes. It means maintenance is less messy, but I doubt many of these were ever going to cover the mileage for that to matter. The specialists at Magni made a chain-drive conversion for these bikes, so it might be possible to track one of those down if you have extra coin to spend.

The original 750S made 75hp which was respectable at the time, considering the output of bikes like the CB750 and Ducati SuperSport, but nothing to write home about, then or now. The later 750S America or, as it was known in some parts of Europe, the “800 Super America,” bumped displacement to 788cc and swapped the gearshift across to the left side to appeal to riders in the USA although, considering the low numbers produced for all markets, I’m not really sure why they bothered with that…

So if the 800 Super America is basically fat, slow, and expensive, then what’s the point? Well if you equate “inline four” with “sanitized and boring” then prepare to have your eardrums shattered. The beautiful sand-cast, dual gear-driven overhead cam engine with a four-into-four exhaust makes a sophisticated shriek likely unknown to motorcyclists familiar with modern machines. It’s narrower than a period Honda CB400 and it does handle, you just have to respect the weight and the monetary value. Which makes it pretty much ideal for the modern rider: a genuine race-replica would probably just be a pain to own, and you’d hate to crash something so valuable, so you’re likely to ride at a fairly reserved pace anyway. Perfect for enjoying the play of sunlight along the tank on a beautiful afternoon and the sound of the engine bouncing off the canyon walls.

There’s some good information from the seller in the listing, although describing the unloved 600 that preceded the 750 and 800 as “suffering from an identity crisis” is diplomatic in the extreme. Basically, the thing was so pug-ugly it was as if MV had extended their mechanical hobbling to include the style…

From the original eBay listing: 1977 MV Agusta 800 America for Sale

This is a very, very low mileage 4,629km/ 2,876 original miles bike! This example (VIN: 2210507) has 4,629 km was imported from Japan last year and previously was imported to Japan in 1990 and had one owner since then. It’s gorgeous and sounds amazing (refer to running video at link below) – what more could you want? Bike is an original and an un-restored example with great, great patina. This bike needs one thing to ride – GAS! Bike is fully commissioned and ready to ride.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/1us90cevf2xp765/mv%20america.mp4?dl=0

Comes with US Customs import docs so that it can be registered/titled easily in the US.

Feel free to contact me for more information, or for more pics. I can assist with worldwide shipping. I ride and collect and I am always happy to connect with new owners who have the same passion as I do. Oh, and I did put this little bike show on last year… https://petrolicious.com/art-of-the-italian-two-wheel

Frame# 221-0507 Engine# 221-0300

75 bhp, 789.3 cc DOHC four-stroke transverse inline four-cylinder engine with four Dell’Orto carburetors, five-speed mechanical transmission, oil-immersed multi-plate clutch, front hydraulic telescopic fork suspension, rear swing-arm telescopic shock suspension, and front double-disc and rear single-disc brakes. Wheelbase: 1,390 mm

Originally a helicopter manufacturer, MV began manufacturing motorcycles in 1948. The company eventually went racing in earnest, and its dual overhead-cam singles, triples, and four-cylinders dominated international racing from the 1950s through to the 1970s.

John Surtees won his first world championship in the premier 500 cc class in 1956, followed by three successive world titles in 1958, 1959, and 1960. Surtees then turned his attention to Ferrari sports and Grand Prix cars, and to this day, he remains the only world champion on both two and four wheels. The torch was passed to Gary Hocking in 1961, then to Mike Hailwood in 1962, 1963, 1964, and 1965. That indomitable championship run was followed by Giacomo Agostini, who racked up an incredible seven world championships for MV from 1966 to 1972.

Driven by its dominance on the track, the MV, designed by the engineer Remor, was a major success. The beautiful DOHC inline four-cylinder engine was a genuine wonder, and MV thought it best to produce a road-going version for the public. The 600 “Quattro Cilindri” was unveiled at the Milan Motorcycle Show in November 1965. Innovative as it was, however, the 600 was not a major success. Suffering from an identity crisis, it was too expensive and not sporty enough to remind buyers of the MV Agustas ridden by the legendary Surtees, Hailwood, and Agostini. In 1969, increased displacement of 750 cc paved the way for top-level road-going performance.

The ultimate version came in response to requests from American importers. The 750 S America was unveiled in 1975 and produced until 1980. Its displacement was further increased to 790-cubic centimeters. The company had finally produced an exceptional motorcycle worthy of both its name and its fabled history.

The styling is pure Italian and the MV exudes character that few bikes can match. The 750 Sport America is on every serious collector’s shortlist, of which this MV is one of the finest.

The fact that this is no show piece, but a ready-to-go motorcycle just adds to the appeal. Shaft drive or no, these are incredibly desirable motorcycles, and probably the most valuable road-going MVs of all time. Performance obviously won’t impress today and wasn’t even really top of the class when new, but it was and is a chance to own a genuine bit of the MV Agusta racing mystique from an era that saw them as a dominant force in racing. Bidding is up past $35,000 with the Reserve Not Met, no surprise since previous examples of the 750S and 750S America have been listed with starting bids in the $55,000 to $75,000 range, depending on year.

-tad

Flashback Friday: 1977 MV Agusta 800 Super America for Sale
Moto Guzzi March 12, 2017 posted by

Meaty Beauty, Big and Bouncy – 1996 Moto Guzzi Sport 1100

With apologies to the Who, this cheesecake of a sportbike is one of Guzzi’s greatest hits.  The design was based on the Daytona and shown in fall 1993 as a 1994 model.  One of the last carburetted Guzzis, the 1996 model had fully adjustable suspension front and rear, and the company’s torquey 2-valve L-twin.  This higher-mile example has been well-loved and presents well.

1996 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for sale on eBay

No denying the 1100 Sport tends toward the traditional, with the slightly oversquare air-cooled mill and 5-speed shaft drive.  But a new frame design began the updates, W-P provided the outstanding forks and monoshock, and un-linking the brake system was a nod toward sportier riding.  The riding position and fairing compare to other supersports of the day, and the company eagle soars over a nicely finished machine, this time in the deep red.

This owner’s mods show the sportier side, the factory’s catalyzer traded for a full Termignoni exhaust, and the airbox removed in favor of foam air filters, which also gives a good view of the rear shock.  Fork tube cozies and head guards are a nod to the realities of road riding.  15 years and 30,500 miles on, the owner has been in for the long term and provides a maintenance update in the eBay auction:

I’ve decided to part with this beauty after owning her for 15 years. I’ve owned 2 of these up until a few years ago. I bought this one at Meyers Ducati/Moto Guzzi in Asheville (since closed). I’ve always considered these to be one of the sexiest Italian V twins of the era. I’ve read there were 215 of this year produced. Not sure if that’s accurate. They are getting rare these days and are destined to become more valuable. This Sport 1100 is equipped with a few extremely hard to find after-market performance parts including Termignoni stainless exhaust full system and Marvic wheels, UNI Pod air filters (air box was removed before I got it). It runs strong and starts easily. It’s always had good maintenance, regular valve adjustments, and primarily full synthetic oil. I only run ethanol free premium fuel. Most recently serviced at HCV Motorsports in Asheville NC. 

A regular in supersports and thunder-twin race series, the race-developed frame was shared with the 1100 Sport.  The weight can’t be erased but the biked tested as good to hold a line once turned in, and strong torque numbers make the back roads unwind.  No worries about the longevity of the drivetrain, and with a fan’s updates and up-to-date care, this might be a good entrée into a classic sportbike…

-donn

Meaty Beauty, Big and Bouncy – 1996 Moto Guzzi Sport 1100
BMW January 8, 2017 posted by

Feeling Feint – 2007 BMW R1200S

Not feathering the throttle in the twilight of the flat twin engine’s development, BMW made a great re-design for their 4-valve boxer sport. The R1200S was more sport and less touring, and this mint example has done very little of either.

2007 BMW R1200S for sale on eBay

For 2007 BMW went more mainstream, shelving the cast aluminum backbone for a much lighter trellis frame, with the power unit providing support for the Telelever front and Paralever rear suspension.  The oil-cooled heads have four valves running off a single overhead cam with 122 hp being the result.  The usual outstanding brakes are available with a sport-oriented two channel ABS that also has a defeat switch.  Frame-mounted supersport fairing flows into the sculpted tank and seat fairing, above a couple of the nicest alloy wheels ever.

There’s a sad part to the story of every 10 year-old sportbike that hasn’t even made oil-change miles, but it’s good news for a fan of the model.  This R1200S was also well-spec’ed with ABS, heated grips, and jazzy option paint.  Original tires would need a serious reality check before any kind of spirited riding.  The Georgia-based second owner says this in the eBay auction:

Complete leather box and key fob, pressure gauge etc. the manuals and brochures are as new. I have the original invoice. Bike has been in heated garage. Candy Cane Paint ($800 option) with BMW suspension and 5.5″ rear wheel. ABS, heated grips, factory power plug, battery pigtail for charger. Leo Vince Carbon cylinder covers, Pitbull rear stand. Oil changed with factory oil. Brake purge and bleed. NO codes on my GS911. Original tires, appears as new, but stored out of the ultraviolet. This bike shows as new.

The R1200S with options went into the upper teens, and the auction has quite a few bids with the reserve still unknown.  Even though it reviewed as the sport tourer that didn’t forget about the sport, expectations still have to be tailored to the realities of the big twin, which will dance a half-step to the right when you open the throttle exiting a corner.  But if you missed out on the 1200S ten years ago, this would be a good way to rewind and try a so-new-the-headers-aren’t-blue, very luxurious, and rather rare super sport…

-donn

 

 

Feeling Feint – 2007 BMW R1200S
BMW December 7, 2016 posted by

Featured Listing: 2008 BMW HP2 for Sale

There’s a proud tradition of independent motorcycle builders “sportifying” some very unlikely machines: CBXs converted into monoshock cafe-racers, heavily modified Swallower Moto Guzzis with chain drive and Hossack front ends, even venerable RZ500 engines stuffed into R6 frames. In the case of the HP2, BMW built their very own factory eclectic performance motorcycle by taking the quirky, flat-twin R1100S powerplant and adding high-spec parts to create a bit of an odd-duck sportbike, but one with real-world ability.

Certainly, if you were designing a sportbike from scratch, you likely wouldn’t build it around an air-cooled 180° twin with shaft-drive. But throw in a set of DOHC heads with radial valves, titanium connecting rods, fully-adjustable ergonomics, and a self-supporting carbon-fiber seat/subframe, and the performance intentions of the bike start to look more convincing. A 9,500rpm redline and 128hp were Ducati superbike territory just a few years ago and that power, while not class-leading, comes with a big lump of torque for brisk, if not eyeball-flattening performance from the claimed 392lbs dry machine.

In theory, BMW’s Telelever front end should offer up improved performance under heavy braking, but reviewers of bikes so equipped generally felt they were a bit vague in terms of steering feedback. However, the HP2 reviews were very positive with regards to the handling and feel of the bike, and those Brembo monoblock brakes provide plenty of stopping power. Keep in mind, the HP2 might seem weird to ride at first if you’re used to inline fours: that shaft-drive means increased inertia and the bike lacks a slipper clutch as delivered, although one is available for the bike. And while cornering-clearance is generous for road-use, the standard suspension settings can have the heads touching down at extreme lean angles, so track-day junkies should plan accordingly and see about raising the rear ride-height.

Really, you get the feeling the whole thing was helping to set the stage for their S1000RR by establishing that BMW could create a sportbike that didn’t rely on generous helpings of nostalgia and a reliance on “character.” Obviously, this falls somewhere short of the bar set by the RR in terms of outright performance, but it’s surprisingly capable, given the limitations of the platform. Of course, high performance parts can mean expensive replacement costs, and BMW does recommend those titanium rods be replaced at the 30,000 mile mark… Luckily, that service is a long way off for today’s Featured Listing.

From the seller: 2008 BMW HP2 for Sale

Only 1125 miles. Added it to my collection in 2008. Looks and runs well. Bike always stored indoors, and run every couple of months to keep healthy. Have very large bike collection being thinned down to make more space. Overall, a pretty well preserved bike.

64 year old owner, former bike wrench and former shop owner. Every effort has been made to show condition of bike with pictures . Can e-mail better, larger pictures directly, on request. Bike in good cond, though no warranty expressed or implied. Sold AS – IS .

Payment by cashier check, must clear for bike to be released. Chase or Wells Fargo the quickest. Cash, in person, works, too. :o)

Today’s HP2 has obviously spent more time being admired than being ridden, with just 1,125 miles on the odometer, but that might make it ideal for someone who wants to admire it: it’s certainly a striking bike, with tons of cool details and the low miles means you’ll get plenty of time riding it before you start to eat into the value. Aside from some discoloration on the exhaust pipes, it looks to be in excellent condition, as it should be with such low miles. The seller also includes a video of his collection and a short clip of the bike going around a corner, so we know it will both start and turn. The asking price for this bike of kit is $15,000 which is steep, but the HP2 is most definitely a rare and collectible bike that can also get a wiggle on and a surprise a few people at a track day.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2008 BMW HP2 for Sale