Posts by tag: shaft drive

Honda September 27, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo!

Update 11.28.2019: This bike is SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

In 1982 Honda fired a technological missile, the implications which were heard and felt around the world. Overnight Honda had changed the game (again), offering the promise of liter power in a mid-sized package with the first full factory Turbo motorcycle. With futuristic styling, wild colors and TURBO emblems screaming mystical propulsion methods, the CX500 Turbo made a bold statement before the key was even turned. Once the bike fired up, there became an interesting dichotomy between the low boost tractability and comfort of the Dr. Jekyll side around town, and the wild Mr. Hyde nature of the bike on boost. In 1982 this was the most technically advanced motorcycle you could purchase, and despite the performance it was built with typical Honda quality and reliability.

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo!

Starting with the rather pedestrian CX500 standard/cruiser power plant, Honda introduce forged pistons into the the Moto-Guzzi like transverse vee. Unlike most vee configurations, this one splayed 80 degrees rather than the usual 90. This engine already had liquid cooling and four valve heads (operated by pushrods), and was already at that time known for being overbuilt. The chassis was sturdy and equipped with shaft drive and monoshock rear suspension. It was an easy – if not overly inspired – choice to be the foundation for something much, much greater. The basic engine package was beefed up, Honda bumped the compression slightly, and then bolted on an IHI turbocharger built to Honda specifications. At it’s peak, the turbocharger pumps out 19 psi before the wastegate opens to slow the party down.

Simply bolting on a Turbo is not enough to engineer a working, reliable motorcycle. So Honda introduced digital (programmed) fuel injection – a world’s first for motorcycles. This system contained redundancy to protect the engine; fail safe circuits ensured fuel delivery while a separate ignition system protected the more highly stressed engine from potential meltdown. Rarely utilized or needed, these fail safe measures show the level of planning that Honda put into the CX500 Turbo. Management of these redundant systems was completely automatic, the rider being made aware of any potential failures via a comprehensive and well-laid out instrument panel. “Cockpit” might be a better description for the gauge cluster, as in addition to the usual tach, speedo, fuel and temp gauges there also exist a number of warning lights, a fuel system failure warning light, and of course a centrally located TURBO BOOST indicator.

From the seller:
In 1977 Honda began their Turbo powered motorcycle project…which would become the world’s 1st ever, from the ground up…purposeful built, turbocharged motorcycle and Honda’s 1st fuel injected bike. When finally released in 1982 it was described as “a technological tour de force”…”a milestone in motorcycle history”…”one of the most futuristic motorcycles of it’s time”…”one of the most influential motorcycles of the decade”. Now some 37 years later all that still rings true!

The project was a combined effort of Honda’s R&D folks, IHI Turbo America and Italian automotive stylist, Giovanni Michelotti, one of the most prolific & influential designers of the 20th century. Michelotti created the innovative and curvaceous fairing and body work.

Two years pre-production, in 1980… Honda in a bold and unprecedented move…put their CX500TC/Turbo on display at the Cologne International Motorcycle Show. This was probably no more than a “finger wag” at Yamaha…as the 2 giants, from the Land of the Rising Sun, were in a fierce battle for market supremacy. “Turbo Wars” soon followed.

Honda’s platform would be their tried and true…bullet-proof V-Twin / 4-Valve / CX500 motor. Every aspect of the bike was considered. Not only designing a motor that would be capable of handling the rigors of turbocharging but a frame to work with the stresses and a suspension to complement it all. Block castings were made thicker. A stronger crankshaft, connecting rods and clutch were employed. Honda’s first specific forged pistons were used. Larger end & main bearings installed. Over 200 new patents were created to build this motorcycle.

An improved futuristic liquid-cooled / digitally fuel injected motor…pushing those (up to) 82 ponies through a modern shaft drive to the rear wheel…with TRAC Anti-Dive forks up front and a Pro-Link rear suspension handling duties at the rear…twin piston brake calipers in place to haul it down…beautiful redesigned gold Comstar wheels fore & aft…a comprehensive dashboard…all that wrapped in a wind tunnel designed Michelotti fairing & body panels. A motorcycle with superb ergonomics & smoothness. A rolling piece of art!

More from the seller:
This example has been well cared for with only 16,904 miles. A fine example of this rare, 1 year only production, motorcycle at this price point. Three known owners…with the last 2 being in their late 60’s. Private collection offering. All pictures are recent and more are available as needed. I do have quite a number of pictures showing the cleanliness of the undercarriage.

A new stator & stator connector had been installed along with cam seals & water pump seals and all associated O-rings, seals & gaskets (previous owner). All this is called a “Triple Bypass”. An excellent factory spec re-spray of the body and motor was done also at that time. This bike shows quite well! Runs and shifts as it should. Turnkey bike w/no known issues.

> Matching Dunlop D404T tires are in excellent condition
> Battery was replaced and is excellent
> Seat was recovered to factory spec
> A “Visual Instruments Inc” voltmeter has been added
> Brakes are excellent
> Coolant flushed & replaced
> Castrol 4T/Full synthetic oil & WIX filter done @ 16,830 miles
> Rear shaft spline & ring gear correctly lubricated
> Stock tool kit & owner’s manual with bike
> Factory Shop Manual with bike
> Extra set of keys

Your chance to own a rare example of “Motorcycle History”! These rarely come up for sale. Be the only person w/one of these at your local cycle rally or cruise-in! Located near Binghamton NY


Asking Price: $6,350

Nestled between some truly interesting hardware in the Honda showroom – including the CB1100R, the GL1100 GoldWing, the CBX, the VF750 and the simple FT500 Ascot – the CX500T was competing for attention and customer wallet share. And it required a bigger share of the customer’s wallet than most of the bikes on the floor (MSRP $4,898). As a result, not many of these one year only models were sold. With sportish-touring bodywork, a wide seat and higher bars, the CX500T is a comfortable place to rack up the miles. Roll on torque – the real strong suit of the Honda Turbos – fits nicely into the highway cruiser persona. At 550+ pounds these were never destined to be racers, however they are fabulous riders and far more reliable than a 37 year old technological wonder has a right to be.

This bike looks to be absolutely gorgeous. With 16,000+ miles on the clock it has been ridden, but we all know that nothing deteriorates faster than a hangar queen. Regular use is positive for the mechanicals, the seals, the electrics and the turbo system. This one has the right number of miles to be carefully used, without being beaten up or at the end of its service life. History has proven that these Honda Turbo bikes have very few weaknesses – the key being the stator. The fact that this one has been changed is a real plus, as there are another estimated 20k-25k miles to be enjoyed before this should become a concern. Otherwise all of the pieces are here, and the general handling shows the care that went into the stewardship of this rare factory Turbo; it is not often that we see such a clean first-year example. Located in New York, this one is going for a very reasonable asking price. It only takes one experience on boost to know that Turbo ownership is worth everything that was promised. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo!
BMW September 6, 2019 posted by

Silk Purse: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale

Before the introduction of the class-breaking BMW S1000RR, the company wasn’t really associated with cutting-edge sportbikes, unless you go back a few decades to the R90S. After all, an air-cooled, 180° ” flat” twin with shaft drive is a pretty inauspicious foundation for a true performance machine. A flat-twin is obviously very wide, which presents aerodynamic issues and limits cornering clearance unless the suspension is jacked way up. Air-cooling is simple and reliable, but the high compression needed for competitive horsepower generates heat that usually requires a radiator to control, and shaft drive is inherently heavier than a chain, making the BMW HP2 Sport a very unlikely sportbike, looking at the spec sheet anyway.

But German companies seem to have a knack for working around this kind of thing, as if they view it as an entertaining challenge. “Oh ja? Heir, halte mein Bier…” It’s been said that the Porsche 911 is “a triumph of development over engineering,” as it has a similar problem: sticking the entire powertrain out behind the rear axle is only marginally better than putting it all up front. But we know Porsche managed to make their ass-heavy car work brilliantly and, even though the HP2 Sport didn’t achieve quite that level of success, it did the job for which it seems to have been intended: it showed the world that BMW was serious about updating their image and competing head-to-head with rivals in Italy and Japan.

The engine may not have been blessed with a radiator, but temperatures were kept under control using a hybrid arrangement, with the heads cooled by oil, and the barrels cooled by air. It has radial valves, and four of them per cylinder, operated by dual overhead cams, while lightweight titanium connecting rods let the 1170cc engine spin up to 9,500rpm and produce a claimed 128hp. Liberal use of carbon fiber reduced the weight to a claimed 392lbs dry, so weight was on par with class competitors, even if power wasn’t. Adjustable ergonomics and the self-supporting tail section are very trick, quality touches in keeping with the bike’s very exclusive nature: just 500 were built.

It’s interesting that the biggest complaints about BMW’s alternative Telelever front suspension is a lack of feel, but that seems to have been eliminated here with higher-spec Öhlins shock and a matching unit out back. Forkless front ends are naturally very stable under braking, an asset for a bike with a pair of stout Brembo Monoblock brakes on the front wheel.

From the original eBay listing: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale

I am the original owner of this rare 2009 BMW HP 2 Sport. I bought it brand new in spring 2010. The bike has always been stored in climate control garage, never ridden in rain, and meticulously maintained. All maintenance records from new. Last fluid service approx. 1000 mi ago. Tires replaced in 2015, due to age at 4700 mi. All factory recalls performed. Runs perfect. Showroom perfect condition. Part of multi-bike collection, selling collection because I can’t ride them anymore.

listed for sale locally, I reserve right to end auction early if sold.

reserve price set below market value of recent sales

one of approximately 118 in US, 500 worldwide

sure to be a collectors item

clear/clean MD title

The BMW HP2 Sport is quirky and at the original list price of over $25,000 couldn’t really compete directly against natural rivals like the Ducati 1098, but it handled well and was quick enough in isolation. These days, prices are much lower and it’s a very rare and exclusive machine, with plenty of exotic materials inside and out and the high quality you’d expect from BMW. Bidding is very active, but up to just $10,000 with several days left on the listing.

-tad

Silk Purse: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale
BMW August 31, 2019 posted by

About Time: 1982 Krauser-BMW MKM1000

I must admit, I’ve been sitting on the sidelines on this one. After the 3rd or 4th time around on eBay, I figured it was about time I wrote it up here (it was already on our Facebook site). After all, it is a freaking Krauser frame with seemingly pristine bodywork. That makes this a rare bird. A pretty bird. A pretty rare bird. The pinnacle of the early 1980s frame game (spearheaded by Bimota, but with Harris, Spondon, Elgi and others close behind), Krauser was one of the few tuners that offered performance products for BMW; the other was Luftmeister. And while the latter focused primarily on turbocharging for relatively cheap grunt, Krauser was an all around performance shop. They offered bolt-on bits, bodywork, engine upgrades (including custom 4-valve heads), and the crown jewel of them all, the MKM1000 kit. Meant to transform the staid “Gentleman’s Express” into a true sports bike, the Krauser kit accepted BMW running gear into a bespoke (and very trick) frame. Custom bodywork completed the transformation from sheep to wolf.

1982 Krauser-BMW MKM1000 for sale on eBay

Under the skin is where the Krauser MKM1000 really shines. Following the Bimota route of utilizing straight tubes to properly channel loads, the MKM (Michael Krause Motorcycles) frame is often referred to as a “birdcage” type. Painstakingly time-consuming and expensive to create, this complex arrangement of straight tubes results in a stiffer frame that is also lighter than conventional frame arrangements. The 1000cc BMW boxer motor appears to hang in mid-air in an unusually high manner. This is because Krauser lifted the engine to provide more cornering clearance for the vulnerable cylinder heads. Shaft drive, along with the rest of the tranny and running gear of the donor R100 was maintained.

From the seller:
Here we have a Krauser MKM1000 in stunning condition.

Ultra rare super low production numbers. An opportunity to own one of perhaps 200 built. This is number 42. The quintessential collectible Airhead, it doesn’t get any better than this. Mileage is 29,573 kms (18483 miles).

The bird cage frame, which there are 52 straight tubes and four curved chromium molybdenum tubes welded together at 150 points, weighed in just 11.6 kilograms. A series of other changes were made when integrating the R100RS parts. Engine sat slightly higher, front forks were 38mm lower, rake and trail were increased, wheelbase made longer by 43mm, custom rear sets, 21 litre aluminium fuel tank hidden under the elegant one piece tank cover, seat and rear cowling. A matching aerodynamic fairing was developed for the autobahn and a wider swingarm allowed for a wider rear wheel and rubber. Weighing just 496 pounds wet, the MKM was lighter than all of its competition, including the Ducati Super Sport and the Moto Guzzi Le Mans.

Recently complied for road use in New Zealand and has a current warrant of fitness. This can be exported to any port in the world. Please ask for shipping details.

On paper – and in person – the MKM1000 really looks like a competitive threat to similar sporting hardware of the era. Light in weight, aerodynamic in form and purposeful in stance, the Krauser offering could have been a contender. But while the airhead BMW unit is revered for longevity and it’s bulletproof ability to eat up mile after mile, it is far from a powerhouse. With heavy crank and rods it doesn’t rev particularly quickly, and even BWM gave up on it when they entered WSBK racing with a more conventional inline four. The jacking effect of the shaft drive can get in the way of spirited cornering, and while its effects can be minimized with some suspension tuning it is always present. So while the paper tells a tale, the proof was not exactly the same. All in all, the Krauser MKM1000 was well reviewed and an iconic and rare unicorn for the Beemer faithful.

As mentioned above, this particular bike has been around the auction block for a few tries. It is located in beautiful Auckland, New Zealand, which is currently in the winter season. The seller appears willing to ship to all ports of call, which makes this a particularly good find. Better yet, hop over to the northern of the NZ islands and enjoy the fabulous Kiwi hospitality, take in the sights and sounds, check out the bike in person, and then bring it back home. Now that sounds like a great vacation souvenir. We have seen one or two of these amazing machines on these pages in years past, but they remain rare and pretty elusive. Check this one out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

About Time: 1982 Krauser-BMW  MKM1000
MV Agusta August 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America

Update 8.8.2019: This seller has decided to upgrade to a Featured Listing and is also available on eBay. Thanks for supporting the site, Jamie, and good luck to buyers! -dc

The mid-seventies saw MV Agusta floundering after the founder’s death, and about to accept an offer they couldn’t refuse from the Italian government.  U.S. importers persuaded the company to try and revive their fortunes with a special 750, a monoposto bristling with premium parts.  This rare example returned to Italy for a mid-stream model upgrade before sale.

1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America for sale on eBay

Before almost every big bike was an inline four, MV Agusta had a history of air-cooled DOHC Grand Prix machines.  For the 750S, displacement was increased to 788cc’s, heads re-designed and 26mm Dell’Orto carburetors were specified.  Though the cams are driven by a gear train between cylinders two and three, the alternator is behind, resulting in a trim crankcase.  Shaft drive indicating its more GT purpose, most MV 750’s came with front discs and a drum rear brake.

Not enough to be one of 500 or so, this MV was upgraded by the factory to an 850SS, which the factory did to just a few dozen leftover machines to make them more enticing.  A little history from the eBay auction:

“The Ferrari of Motorcycles”

Up for sale is a stunning 1977 MV Agusta 850SS. This is pretty much the quintessential late-70s Italian sport bike and the last, highest spec iteration of MV’s factory-built four cylinder sport bikes. Less than 500 Americas were made from 1975-77, and this 750S-to-850SS factory conversion is one of just 19 (or 27, or 35, or 42, depending on your source) total 850SSs made. Just to be clear, all MV Agusta 850SSs were conversions from 750S machines; some were done by the factory, some were done by dealers based on instructions from the factory.

The bike in question is a 2800-mile example in excellent overall condition. It features factory-optional cast wheels, Lafranconi exhaust, and its original suede covered seat. Frame and engine numbers match; not all do. There are a few nicks here and there, as you would expect from any 40+ year old machine, and the finish on the front edge of the instrument binnacle is separating (see photos), but the bike is whole and has obviously never seen any hard use. It has a wonderful, honest overall appearance. It starts, run, shifts, and stops, but with such low mileage and limited use in the last few years, it could probably benefit from a more fulsome recommissioning, including carb tuning/cleaning, before any serious road riding. A video of the bike in action can be sent upon request.

750S to 850SS conversion: Factory records during this period in MV history can be inconsistent, if they are available at all. 1977 was the final year of factory-produced MV Agusta motorcycles, and the factory was fast and loose with some things, including specifications from bike to bike. They were also having a hard time selling new 750S Americas in a crowded field of ever larger and more powerful Japanese machines, which could be had for a fraction of the MV’s $6500 sticker price. So, an uprated variant of the 750S, the 850SS, was cooked up as a way to move leftover or unsold 750S machines. In late 1976, MV recalled 19 unsold new 750S machines from distributor stock (including this bike) back to the factory in Italy for conversion to 850-spec. They also instructed dealers/distributors in how to convert other 750S machines to 850SS spec. Fortunately, this bike’s journey is well-described in both factory and distributor documents. The bike is first described in factory documents from 1975 and early 1976, as a “1976 model 750cc ‘S’ America”. Later documents from 1977 list it (by serial number) among 19 bikes that were recalled in late-1976 to the MV factory in Italy for conversion to “850S” specification. Additional documents from 1977 pertain to the re-importation of the bike by the US distributor, Garville, now as an “850S” with “86hp” (vs 75hp in standard 750S trim), and allocation to Champion Motorcycles in Costa Mesa, California. The bike has 750S sidecover emblems; these may have been left on the bike at the factory or re-installed later during a refinish (easily remedied by removal of the emblem and replacement with an “MV” decal, which is what the factory did on some 850SS machines). It has the factory optional and 850SS-correct EPM cast alloy wheels with triple disks and Brembo calipers. 850SSs typically used 27mm carbs unless bound for the US, like this one, which then used the standard 26mm Dellorto carbs of the 750S America.

All original documents relating to this bike are included in the sale, both when it was a “1976 750S” and after conversion to 1977 850SS (see pix), with the exception of the document listing this bike among the 19 recalled to the factory for 850SS conversion. That particular document belongs to the records of another of my MVs, but I will provide a copy/scan of that original document to the new owner as well. The sale also includes a commissioned hardcover photo-book of this particular machine, by Ian Falloon.

Values on these bikes are hard to pin down…but at much less than the price of a 1974 Ducati 750SS “Green Frame”, which was produced in significantly greater numbers than the MV 850SS and by a manufacturer of less racing pedigree than MV Agusta, values of the late-spec MV classics seem destined to close the gap to their Italian brethren. Imagine this red stunner in your garage/mancave/lair next to your 275GTB or 365 GTB/4 Daytona or 365BB! These bikes rarely come up for sale, outside of major auctions, where buyer and seller can be expected to pay as much as 12-20% in combined fees on top of the hammer price. Consider this bike instead.

42 years on, the 850SS shows no particular wear, but chips and aging paint and plating of a real classic.  Despite the outstanding components from Ceriani, Tomaselli, and Brembo, the factory thought having the LaFranconi mufflers black would be sporty.

Already playing catch-up to the new Japanese imports, Agusta didn’t have the time or resources to engineer a new lightweight model.  At over 500 lbs. dry, the 750 and 850S reviewed as a better ride for moderate speeds but did so in style.  The factory wound down shortly and was offline for ten years before being revived by Cagiva.  Seeming more appropriate for a white glove auction than online, this 850S is a history lesson in 1970’s design and manufacturing.

-donn

Featured Listing: 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America
BMW June 9, 2019 posted by

Unretouched – 2005 BMW R1100S BoxerCup Replika

The BMW BoxerCup had just a couple of appearances at Daytona but sparked a lot of interest in the Replika, an R1100S with a nice factory option package.  This is number 504 of a around 550 made, and looks excellent with under 13,000 miles.

2005 BMW R1100S BoxerCup Replika for sale on eBay

BMW developed the R1100S for the 1998 model year and equipped it with their 1085cc four valve boxer, good for 98 hp.  The 2004-5 iteration has a second spark plug which makes for a smoother running engine at Euro 3 leanness, though torque and power numbers haven’t changed.  The BCR sports longer fork tubes allowing greater lean angles, and Öhlins dampers on the Telelever front and Paralever rear.  House brand 320mm front brakes have 4-piston calipers.  A Laser underseat exhaust is part of the Replika package, as are the carbon head covers and engine fairing.  A special factory ECU chip was generally installed by the servicing dealer.

The one owner was evidently unimpressed by BMW’s list of optional goodies, looking very stock with excellent cosmetics.  The limited pictures are at least a conversation starter.  From the eBay auction:

2005 Ultra Rare BMW r1100s Boxer Cup Race Replica. There were only 550 of these motorcycles produced in the world, and only 300 of them were shipped to the United States. This motorcycle is number #504. The motorcycle is a single swing arm, drive shaft driven motorcycle. The odometer reads 12,849 original miles. I am the original owner, since I bought the motorcycle new. This listing will also include the owners manual, a leather riding jacket, two sets of gloves both cold weather and summer, and two helmets. One needs a new visor cause a clip that holds it in broke from the visor. It has relatively new tires, the original seat has been recovered by Sargent Seats, and it has a fresh oil change. This bike is crazy fast and so much fun to ride. It handles like a dream.

A pretty nice run for the R1100S, though the BCR came toward the end and the R1200S was introduced in 2006.  Replikas are most often well maintained and lightly ridden, and demand a premium.  Here again the ask draws attention to the “Make Offer” button.  If a detailed inspection and maintenance records pan out, it could be a nice value.

-donn

Unretouched – 2005 BMW R1100S BoxerCup Replika
BMW May 28, 2019 posted by

Portion Control – 2004 BMW R1100S

Showing less than 1,000 miles per year, this rather stock R1100S looks excellent in the option paint, and appears to have ABS and new tires.  Might be a sensible entreé to the sporting side.

2004 BMW R1100S for sale on eBay

BMW’s R1100S was their re-introduction of the -S model, not seen since the R100S.  Ever the flat twin, the R1100S used oil-cooled heads and four valves to percolate 98 hp and 71 ft.-lbs. torque.  Suspension is of course BMW-centric, with the anti-dive Telelever front and Paralever shaft drive rear.  320mm front disks do their best with the 505 lb. dry weight.  The painted cover hides a generous pillion, and bag racks are not installed but of course available.

BMW’s are born for farkling with great aftermarket support, but this owner has hardly been tempted.  The overall factory look shows off the carbon mudguards and pebble-grain seat, and a stray bracket and smudge on the handlebar betrays a gadget or two.  From the eBay auction:

Pristine bike. Less than 12k miles. Brand new Michelin (2ct Two Compound Tech) Aftermarket Seat, Ceramic coated exhaust, performance chip.

 

Try as BMW might, the R1100S didn’t fall very far from the sport-touring tree.  Often seen with a jillion miles, this one looks fresh and the condition reflects the Beemer demographic of multiple bike ownership and shall we say, an experienced rider.  The option paint and late year makes this one interesting, and unless your looking for something very sporty, the robust mechanicals and top craftsmanship should make it a nice value.

-donn

Portion Control – 2004 BMW R1100S
Yamaha May 11, 2019 posted by

Never Say Never – 1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo

Someone bought-it-now Friday afternoon – a reader ?   -donn

It was a short bandwagon but early 1980’s was the time for early turbo systems, and Yamaha developed the XJ-650 Turbo but resisted the urge to break the bank.  This Phoenix example is quite clean with just a couple of foibles and barely 10,000 miles.

1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo for sale on eBay

Using a relatively low-tech two valve four as a base, the blown 650 used carburetors instead of injection and was rated for 90 hp and 60 ft-lbs. torque.  The YICS intake control system capitalized on the speed of the charge air to improve combustion.  Air cooling limited boost to 7.7 lbs., adding a gentler push than some of the competition.  Exhaust is simplified with one muffler dedicated to the wastegate, emissions kept quieter in the other single muffler.  Despite the higher speeds and weight of the turbo bike, brakes weren’t upgraded from the normally aspirated model.  Styling was one area where the Seca Turbo excelled, with and integrated fairing with a sport touring windscreen and locking glove boxes.

Averaging nearly 20 years for each of its two owners, this XJ650 Turbo has been only occasionally ridden, and looks very good.  The undamaged fairings, pipes, and cases far outweigh the worn stitching and tired trim shown in the owner’s video – here –.  Comments from the eBay auction:

I’m selling my 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo.  Low Miles, 10,100  Miles.  Excellent Condition.  2nd owner.  This is the same type used in the James Bond Movie never say never.  Recently serviced.  Runs great!  I also created a video of it running and  a walk around.

James Bond’s stunt double shredded a Turbo in a chase scene early in 1983’s – Never Say Never Again – but the real Seca had a less sporty rep.  The turbo era fizzled shortly afterward, along with a drop in fuel prices.  But each solution had their good points – Yamaha’s showed how 25% more power could be achieved with relative simplicity.  As presented, it’s a lot of bike for the fan, and for the buy-it-now.

-donn

Never Say Never – 1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo
Moto Guzzi May 3, 2019 posted by

Talk to me Goose: 1986 Moto Guzzi Lemans IV

The LeMans series is a legendary model in the Moto Guzzi lineup. Originally designed as a sportier V7 model way back in 1976, the LeMans went through a series of updates and changes throughout its life span. From a small-fairing enhanced V7 of the Gen I to the larger sport-touring (and half-faired) look of the Gen II, to a back-to-basics look with small fairing of the Gen III, and then finally the decade-long run of the De Tomaso influenced Gen IV machine, the LeMans has had a number of facelifts. Today’s example is a Gen IV bike. Let’s explore some of the key differences.

1986 Moto Guzzi Lemans IV for sale on eBay

At the heart of the LeMans IV is a full liter of v-twin torque. Upgraded from the 850cc power plants that preceded it, the Mark IV version of the LeMans was bigger in nearly every dimension – except the front tire. Utilizing a 16″ front wheel which was in vogue at the time on GP racers and hyper sport bikes, De Tomaso sought to re-image the LeMans as a sportier machine than it was. Unfortunately without chassis geometry changes, the LeMans IV simply became a bigger, more angular machine with a smaller front end. Handling remained stable – as is the Guzzi tradition – but there was some edginess lost as the LeMans grew older, and performance was nearly on par with the previous generation 850s.

From the seller:
1986 Lemans, totally sorted out. Runs and rides perfectly, very well looked after. New tires, new clutch, ceramic coated Bub exhaust sounds amazing. Very strong running bike. Everything works as it should. Not a show bike, but a very, very nice rider. Needs nothing. I have sold several bikes here and my feedback tells the story. Thanks for looking.

While it is easy to deride the later generation LeMans offerings as being uglier than their predecessors, the LeMans of any configuration is still a good looking motorcycle. Purists may discount the De Tomaso years, but the resultant machines were modern, reliable and long lasting. This particular 1986 example has 58,000 miles on the clock…but certainly does not look like it. These are classic motorcycles to ride for the joy of riding. You are not likely to beat many peers in your riding group on a LeMans, but if you are looking at this that probably isn’t your goal. Pictures are relatively few and there have been some noted modifications, but the auction is currently at a paltry $2,550 at the time of this writing with reserve in place. This could be a sweet bargain Guzzi in the making depending upon where the reserve is set. Check it out here, and then jump back to the Comments and share some LeMans stories. Which generation is your favorite, and why? Good Luck!

MI

Talk to me Goose: 1986 Moto Guzzi Lemans IV