Posts by tag: Race Replica

Featured Listing March 31, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC

In case you thought race replicas were a recent innovation, Laverda set the world on it’s ear some 50 years ago, with its 750 Super Freni Competizione, first in endurance racing, and then on the road.  Presented by a Seattle area restorer, this 750 SFC has been restored to museum quality and is ready for its next display.

1974 Laverda 750 SFC for sale

A development of Laverda’s 650cc parallel twin ( itself a template of Honda’s 305 ), the 750 SFC immediately did well in competition, and was made in rather small lots from 1971-75.  For 1974, the factory blue-printed engine with two 36mm Dell’Orto carbs and 9.9-to-1 compression made a reliable 75 hp with Bosch electronic ignition.  The classic nickel plated chassis held the engine from above as a stressed member, stabilizing the 38mm forks with their Super Freni ( Super Brakes ) 280mm disks.  Orange was adopted as Laverda’s competition color at some point in the early 1970’s, and the small seat and long range tank on the SFC appear to have been the inspiration more than one generation of café racers.

Evidently a previous owner started the restoration using all factory Laverda parts, and Duncan has these notes about the SFC and this example in particular :

A Production Racer For Sale

Laverda 750 SFs achieved notable endurance racing success in 1970, including a win of the 500km of Monza, a 1-2-3 podium sweep at the 24 Hours of Oss in Holland, and a third and sixth in the Bol d’Or in France. These bikes improved incrementally, but so did the competition. By the end of the year, Massimo asked Luciano Zen to think about a production racer version of the Laverda 750 SF.

In May 1971, the Laverda 750 SFC, for (Super Freni Competizion) was launched. Compared to the 750 SF, the engine was extensively modified. The reworked cylinder head had bigger valves and a new cam profile (designated 2/C), rockers were polished and 36mm Amal concentric carbs replaced the 30mm Dell’Ortos. A close-ratio five-speed was fitted, and the crankshaft and rods were carefully balanced and polished. Power output was rated at 70hp, and each engine was dyno tested to ensure output. The frame was strengthened with gussets and the front brake was either standard Laverda item or an optional Ceriani four-leading-shoe unit. The bikes ran on Dunlop K81 TT100 tires.

Bodywork was also new, with a 23-liter (6.1 gallon) handmade aluminum gas tank, a single seat with fiberglass tail section and a half fairing, all painted in the now-famous bright orange, a color selected to make the bikes easy to spot on the track, especially at night. It was also chosen to please the Dutch importer, Jan Raymakers, orange being the national color of the Netherlands.

Laverda 750 SFC models were produced in small batches between 1971 and 1975. The first batch, built in May 1971, numbered about 20 bikes, all intended for factory competition. SFCs were hand built by a small team and with little regard to cost. They were built to meet exceptional standards of performance, and in particular were intended to excel in endurance races, where bulk and a relative lack of nimbleness would not be so much of a handicap and where their great strength and robustness would give them a competitive advantage.

In their first official race in 1971, the Six Hours of Zeltweg, SFCs finished first and second. That year, SFCs also placed first, third and fourth in the 24 Hours of Montjuic in Barcelona, first and third in the 24 Hours of Oss, and first in Vallelunga (Italy). They also placed second at the Bol d’Or in Le Mans, first and second at Imola, and finished first and second in the 500km of Modena. Not bad for the first year.

In November 1971, 80 more SFCs were produced, and some were sold to the public. The aluminum gas tank was now fiberglass (the alloy ones had a tendency to crack), and the bikes had revised gearbox ratios and exhaust systems. They also had a new Laverda drum brake, with the more effective Ceriani a popular option. Another batch of SFCs were produced in early 1972, with slight changes to the shape of the fairing and seat and a new exhaust with a crossover pipe.

By this time, the Japanese had made significant progress in the development of their machines, and while there were SFC victories in 1972, they did not match the stellar performance of 1971. Only three 750 SFCs were made in 1973, and these served as test beds for radical changes like magnesium crankcases, new cylinder head designs and even lighter crankshafts. The results were not impressive, the bikes becoming more fragile and difficult to ride.

1974 would see the largest single-year run of SFCs. For the first time, the Laverda 750 SFC was considered part of the normal product range offered to the public and was no longer reserved solely for racing. The SFC was promoted as a “Production Racer,” similar to Ducati’s 750SS or Norton’s Commando-based production racers, and the changes were numerous. The bodywork was improved, and the zinc-plated frame was lowered and modified with revised steering geometry, larger front forks, and triple 280mm Brembo disc brakes. A new, strengthened close-ratio gearbox was fitted and the engine was enhanced by a lightened crankshaft, slim, polished connecting rods, a new camshaft (5/C), a higher capacity oil pump, new 36mm Dell’Orto carbs (without accelerator pumps), modified valves and valve springs, a new exhaust system and higher, 9.9:1 compression ratio. Power was now rated at 75hp at 7,500rpm.

A total of 222 SFCs were built in 1974, with slightly less than half of them going to the U.S. To comply with federal regulations, U.S. models had turn signals, bigger taillights, side reflectors, adjustable handlebars and Nippon-Denso speedometers and tachometers. Even though the bike was being sold to privateers in 1974, factory-prepared racers were performing well in the national production class races.

During the 5 year production run, a total of 549 were made. The SFC being offered is one of only 100 SFCs made for the North American market in 1974. According to well-known SFC expert Marnix van der Schalk (in correspondence with the previous owner), the factory records state it was shipped to the USA on July 8, 1974.

The last version of the SFC was the 1975 Laverda SFC Elettronica, its name reflecting its Bosch electronic ignition. It had a new cylinder head, revised valve angles, re-shaped combustion chambers and a new, optional high-lift cam with 10.5:1 compression ratio. A contemporary magazine test produced a 12.5 second quarter mile at 180kph (top speed over 220kph). A final batch of 33 SFC Elettronicas featuring five-spoke cast-alloy wheels were built in 1976.

The following is a list of much of the work commissioned by the previous owner and performed by Ron Small in 2002-2003, with the invoices totaling nearly $6,000.  Previous owner noted that all replacement parts used on the bike were authentic Laverda SFC parts purchased from Wolfgang Haerter at Columbia Car and Cycle in British Columbia, Canada (receipts totaling $1,000).

Motor:

Re-sleeved cylinders

bore and size cylinders

valve job

new valve springs

new valve guides

new cam chain

new cam tensioner

new guide wheel

new rings

blast and clean heads

Cam and timing set correct.

 

Other items:

new gas tank

sealed new tank 

paint new tank

new fork seals

new swing arm bushings

paint swing arm

rebuild brake master cylinders

new clutch cable

new throttle cables

new tires

new brakes

Subsequent to the work being completed at Maximum Effort, the previous owner only rode the bike 900 miles. The current owner has ridden it less than 100 miles. It has spent the past 13 years on display in a climate-controlled garage. 

There is no knowing if the 6753 miles showing on the odometer is the actual mileage, but the condition of the bike, combined with the minimal miles ridden by the current and previous owner in the past 20 years would lend credibility to that number. 

There is a small amount of surface rust on center stand.

Recently recommissioned for the road, it has a new battery, new fluids, top end adjust and inspection. Carburation adjustments and tune. Bike has had complete nut and bolt, safety inspection and test ridden. 

Tires are 15-20 years old.  They are not dry rotted, but if the bike is going to be ridden, changing them would be a good idea. 

For at least the past 20 years, this SFC has been adult owned, never down, always maintained by marquee knowledgeable technicians. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.

Being offered at $49,950 in US Funds. Will assist on Worldwide Shipping.

 Email sennaducati79@gmail.com your contact numbers for an immediate return call. 

Duncan asks $49,950 and reminds readers – This bike is absolutely correct, adult owned, never down, never abused, maintained by the best techs, riders in the business. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.  He can be reached via email – here –.

Early in the 1970’s the orange bikes sometimes captured multiple podium spots at championship events like Bol d’Or and Suzuka 8 Hours, but increasing competition from the east made it more of an occasion as the decade wore on.  Mostly made a handful at a time, production peaked at 222 in 1974, and total production is said to be 549.  As happens to race bikes, few survive to be restored, and just 100 of the federalized SFC’s were said to be imported in 1974.  But the SFC put Laverda in the exclusive company of a leading motorcycle manufacturer.  Duncan requests offers via email – here –.

-donn

Featured Listing:  1974 Laverda 750 SFC
Featured Listing February 21, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS

The 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS is probably the pinnacle of MG’s powers, and it’s a true emblem of the storied marque’s steadfast dedication to doing its own thing, consequence and technology be damned. The Daytona line was released in 1993 to celebrate Goose’s racing success with a privateer in the 1980s. If you can find one from any production year, they are magnificent machines, but the ’97 RS model adds some handling finesse and power the older bikes lack.

For ’97, the v-twin got a 12-horsepower bump to just under 110 horsepower, thanks to better breathing heads, Carillo rods and forged pistons, a lightened crankshaft and upgraded EFI. Braking was now handled by Brembo, and adjustable WP suspension front and rear kept the 500-ish-pound brute headed the right direction. Other trick bits included Marchesini wheels and an Bitubo steering damper.

Complaints at the time included notchy fueling from the big twin, but this bike has had its issued smoothed out with a chip tune from Creedon. The mod should bump power slightly as well as cure the throttle response woes.

From the seller:

Asking price for this beautiful, rare beast is $14,500 and it shows 13,360 miles. It’s not Ducati quick, or as precise and capable as a Japanese bike, but neither of those machines carries the same panache. Unless you’re a member of a well-heeled Guzzi club, the chances you’ll ever see another at the local cruise night are nil. Contact Tim with your interest: guzzirider06@hotmail.com

Featured Listing: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS
Ducati November 22, 2020 posted by

Red Friday – 2008 Ducati 16RR Desmosedici

Seasonal shopping officially kicks off this week, and here’s a suggestion for your wish list – the 409th Desmosedici, built in 2008 with just 93 original miles !

2008 Ducati 16RR Desmosedici for sale on eBay

It’s a bit of a stretch to call the 16RR a street machine, though you could ride it to the racetrack to exercise it.  The V4 uses desmosdromic valve actuators, and has a near-diesel compression ratio of 13.5-to-1.  Car-like power ( and sound ) of 200 hp peaks at 13,800 rpm.  Components are naturally the best that Öhlins, Brembo, and Marchesini could dream up, and the data analyzing dash can download your track day for later review.  The silhouette echoes the GP6 of the day, with lights at the corners and quick-release rearview mirrors.

No history to speak of, with 93 miles it looks surprisingly fresh.  Reporting from a suburb north of Buffalo, so close to the Can-Am border it might actually be from across the Niagara.   Not sure what exhaust part is pictured, maybe the un-muffled race kit exhaust is installed.  The limited comments from the eBay auction:

93 Miles!!!!  The Ducati Demosedici RR is a limited production road-legal version of the Desmosedici MotoGP racebike.  In 2004, Ducati announced at the Misano circuit at the World Ducati Week that a low volume road replica of the Desmosedici would be available for Reservations beginning in June 2006. With Ducati only making 1,500 models for public purchase.   This bike will go down in history as the first ever true road replica of a MotoGP racing bike!!!!
Though a few earlier Moto GP replicas come to mind, this might be the first one from the liter era.  Given how much of the GP6 Ducati had to re-engineer for the 16RR ( such as the engine which had to go from a dry sump to a wet sump design ), it’s surprising they persevered and how well it turned out.  Way above most realities, serious watchers and collectors will note the starting bid well below recent prices, and already wrapped in a festive cover !
-donn
 
Red Friday – 2008 Ducati 16RR Desmosedici
Suzuki November 19, 2020 posted by

Loose Cannon – 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma

Almost ten years after developing their RG Γ 500 Moto GP bike, Suzuki introduced the road-going version, and even with required street equipment the performance was beyond the norms.  Like this one, many were imported on the left coast, but not all have had such careful stewardship over the years.

1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma for sale on eBay

The Gamma shared engine dimensions with the race machine, but had a shock damper between the twin crankshafts and the clutch, and claimed “just” 95 hp ( racers were estimated at 120 hp ).  A factory cassette gearbox is fitted, allowing at least a theoretical quick change of ratios.  Two strokes of the time used moving exhaust ports to stretch the power band down to 5,000 rpm, and the RG’s are controlled by the Suzuki Automatic Exhaust Control system, in concert with the ignition.  Anti-dive forks and Full Floater monoshock took care of the staggered 16-inch front and 17-inch rear wheels.

With just enough photos to wet a buyer’s whistle, the owner can expect a message and visit from any really interested party.  Still this RG looks very stock and undamaged, with mostly nice finishes left on the alloys and paint.  Hyperbolic comments and specs ( reviewed top speed 147 mph, wet weight 386 lbs. ) from the eBay auction:

Street legal MOTO GP bike from the 2 stroke good old days!!  Legally registered in the state of Washington (now with collector plate) and was registered in Oregon.  BONE STOCK with just less than 19,667 kilometers on the speed-o (12,220 miles).  This is a 200 MPH insane 250 lbs. Rocket!!  that I just can’t seem to open up in my area of WA (too many cops).  So my baby just sits in a heated garage/shop.  Bike has ALWAYS been in a garage, and never used in bad weather!!  My loss your gain – first $37,500 gets it!!  Also comes with some extra parts to update it, if you so desire. Katana wheels, modern swing-arm, passenger seat, extra forks, NEW euro front turn signals, shop manual, and some other bits and bobs.

The RG500 had a limited market, was expensive to put together, and up against the new GSX-R’s – so in hindsight its green/white/checker run was no surprise.  In contrast, the racing RG and subsequent RGV-500 had a ten year run on the circuit.  Total production was under 10,000 units, but its only North American import was north of the border, so it’s a rare sighting here.  More study is required at this sort of ante, but the owner seems open to offers.

-donn

Loose Cannon – 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma
Aprilia October 16, 2020 posted by

Collector Alert – 1998 Aprilia RS250 with Zero Miles!

Twenty-plus years down the line, an unused RS250 has surfaced courtesy of EuroCycles Las Vegas.  What some collector or racer might give for a “new” RS250 might be challenged by this time machine.

1998 Aprilia RS250 for sale on eBay

Aprilia introduced their road-going 250 a year after Max Biaggi won his first championship on their racer, though the street bike used a Suzuki V-twin engine.  For 1998 73 ponies were on tap, though a big twist of the wrist and active left foot were required to keep the engine at peak power.  Twin 34mm Mikuni carbs contribute smooth running and Aprilia’s own exhaust releases pent-up power.  The twin-spar chassis and swingarm are made of aluminum/magnesium alloy stampings, with cast connectors and a fairly conventional seat sub-frame.  The livery echoes Rossi’s rides from the era, though the similarity isn’t much thicker than the decal set.

Not much history in a never-ridden example sold on a bill of sale.  Plate and key fob are from a Parisian moto boutique.  Equipped for the road, some paperwork would await a new owner intending to ride.  EuroCycle’s comments from the eBay auction:

This is the grey-market RS250 that was street-legal, never sold in the US. Showroom Condition, sold on bill-of-sale. Serious Collectors only please.

The fairing decal states “Racing Department Technology” – which is true, though it might be a year or so before the Departo Corse’s ideas make it through production engineering.  Though this one doesn’t have livery commemorative of a championship or rider, it’s hard to stop looking at what the factory intended, especially a factory so close to the race circuit.

-donn

Collector Alert – 1998 Aprilia RS250 with Zero Miles!
Honda September 2, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Honda NSR400R

Two stroke engine, sticky tires, loud pipes in the raw and a classic Honda paint scheme. What more are you looking for in a back road tiny terror? This 1986 Honda NSR400R was treated to a very under the radar restomod a couple years back, with the goal of making an already awesome bike more modern-day user friendly. It has period aftermarket capacitors and an awesome, raw finish JollyMoto exhaust to wake the engine up a touch.

1986 Honda NSR400R for sale on eBay

The chassis has been treated to a Fox shock and custom, 17-inch Comstar wheels, which means it will accept all manner of modern track day-friendly tires. The forks got custom emulators at the same time. Its age and DNA dictate that it won’t run or ride like a modern machine, but if you’re looking for that, go bark up another tree. This bike will instead give you the best possible experience a mid-80s sportbike can.

From the eBay listing:

Selling my 1986 Honda NS400R that I imported from Canada ~7 years ago. ~2.5 years ago it completed a full restoration/subtle restomod done by the excellent team at RestoCycle in Tucson, AZ (I can send a link to all the details of the build to anyone interested – just send me a message). The entire bike was gone over from stem to stern to ensure that it was in tip top running shape. The subtle restomod that I had done were all aimed at a better riding experience – custom 17″ Comstar wheels so that you can use more modern rubber, an adjustable Fox shock (freshly rebuilt) for the rear, and custom emulators for the front forks by Cogent Dynamics. The bike runs, ride, handles, and looks great. I did not have it done to a concours level restoration, it was meant to be ridden and enjoyed, so there are a few small nicks and dings here and there, but, overall, the bike looks fantastic. And the sound from the Jolly Moto pipes that the second owner put on are awesome (and, iirc, the bike even visited the Jolly Moto factory when it spent a few years riding around Europe). The only current niggle on the bike is that the low oil light sometimes comes on erroneously (there is plenty of oil in the premix tank) – other than that it is in great shape and ready to go. Currently showing 52654 KM (~32.7k miles) on the odometer – mileage might go up a little as I might take it out for a short spin or two. Lots of spare parts that I will be listing separately once the bike is sold (spare gas tanks, carbs, bodywork, original comstar wheels, gaskets, spare oil pump, some spare bodywork parts, swingarm, seat pan, stock rear stand, etc, etc), but would be willing to sell as a package deal to the buyer of the motorcycle.

This is one of the best, IMO, 2 stroke motorcycles ever made.

Please send me any questions you might have.

Pulling back from a closeup of the mods, the bike is near flawless cosmetically, which is increasingly rare in any bike this age, but especially one of this ilk. The original pieces and spare parts, including the stock Comstars, spare carbs, bodywork and a spare gas tank, can be had as a package deal with the bike, but otherwise will be sold separately. Reserve is set at $10k.

Featured Listing: 1986 Honda NSR400R
Honda August 22, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: Immaculate 2002 Honda RC51 SP2

Update 8.22.2020: This bike has SOLD to an RSBFS reader! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The 2002 Honda RC51 SP2 was the first year of the ultimate evolution of Honda’s gorgeous World Superbike conqueror. Built to play on Ducati’s v-twin field and engineered to within a millimeter of its life thanks to Big Red’s engineering might and racing experience, the SP2 gained four horsepower and dropped 11 pounds over the SP1 version. In 2002, Nicky Hayden won the AMA Superbike title aboard the SP2. That coincided with Colin Edwards’ second World Superbike championship aboard a Castrol-liveried RC51 SP2.

The racing success and Honda’s beautiful, 999cc v-twin made the RC51 a cult icon in its day. With the benefit of years, the bike has become a no-concession classic, as Honda has moved firmly toward a safer, more stolid lineup. Coincidentally, the World Superbike wins have dried up.

This 2002 RC51 SP2 shows a shade over 20,000 miles, but you wouldn’t know it to look at it. It’s hard to claim anything this old is flawless, but this machine comes close. It is also loaded with a stable of tasteful, reversible aftermarket parts. The list includes Stomp Grips, CRG levers, Yoshimura exhaust and flapper valve mod. The rest of the list is in the seller’s description below.

From the seller:

Here is an excellent example of a 2002 Honda RC51 with 20,813 original miles. The bike is in nearly flawless condition, mechanically sound, never dropped or crashed. Simple modifications include CRG RC2 levers, Carbon Fiber gauge cover, Zero Gravity dark smoked windscreen, HRC tank protector, Stomp Grip traction pads, Lamin-x headlight lens covers, Proton LED turn signals, HotBodies Superbike under-tail, Pyramid hugger, 520 chain and sprocket conversion (15/41) gearing and Yoshimura slip-on exhaust. Flapper valve mod has been done. There is no fuel injection module on the bike such as Power Commander etc. Battery is two years old. Starts first crank and runs like the true Champion that She is. Clean title in hand, California registration paid until 8/2021.

Asking price is $8,000 $7,500

It’s not too hard to find a nice RC51 even today, but it’s a Herculean task to find one this nice. It’s priced according to its condition, but if your next bike must be an RC51, this is the one you want.

Featured Listing: Immaculate 2002 Honda RC51 SP2
Aprilia July 16, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Aprilia RS250 Rossi Edition

Update 7.17.2020: This bike has SOLD in just 24 hours! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Just in time for the start of the COVID-19-shortened MotoGP season, we bring you this 1998 Aprilia RS250 MKII Rossi Edition. This gorgeous, close to original little ripper celebrates the beginning of Rossi’s career, back when he was making it known that he was the next big thing. The bike dropped between The Doctor’s first two championships. He snagged the 125cc crown in 1997 aboard an Aprilia RS125R, before moving up to the 250s in 1998 with the RS250. The next year, his last in the middle class, he secured his second of nine world titles.

The 1998 Aprilia RS250 Mk II differentiated itself from the Mk I machines with a new look, and had upgraded suspension and a wider front tire. The forks were now Showa units and rear ride height was made adjustable for ’98. Engine particulars stayed the same, which means about 55 horsepower in stock trim, delivered all at once above 8,000 rpm. Though the stock horsepower figure can’t hold a candle to a 600cc four stroke, the little Ape weighed just over 300 pounds dry, and stuck to the road like a gecko on a window. The result is sublime when you get it right, rewarding courage and momentum over a more ham-fisted stop-and-go approach.

Much like Rossi, this bike wears its age like a tailored suit. The paint and bodywork are certainly of their time, but are not gaudy, eschewing Rossi’s traditional fluorescent yellow motif. The seller says the bike is stock with the exception of a set of wave rotors on the front brakes, though the originals come with the bike. Past that, it wears a set of 2020 date code Pirellis in S01 compound, and has had the carbs ultrasonically cleaned before being rebuilt and synced. With a clear California title ready to transfer, this special little Aprilia is ready for the canyons and the cruise nights.

From the seller:

Coming out of my private collection of rare 2-stroke sport bikes is this 1998 Aprilia RS250 Mark II Rossi Edition. This bike is in mint condition. It runs and rides as new. It has just over 5000 original miles (8200km ) and it is 100% stock aside from brand new Pirelli tires and front wave rotors (stock rotors come with bike).
We just performed the following service:

-oil change
-2-stroke oil tank filled
-new Pirelli tires (latest 2020 SO1 compound)
-ultrasonically cleaned the carburetors, synced and balanced as well.
-new spark plugs
-adjusted and cleaned chain
-full detail job

This bike is ready to ride and enjoy or put in a collection. It has been kept in my climate controlled showroom, and is ridden at least every 8 weeks. It only has had ethanol-free fuel. There are no known issues mechanically. The only issues cosmetically are 2 very small scratches, 1 on each side of the belly pan. Please see images. Unless you look close on your hands and knees you cannot see them. Otherwise, this bike is as close to perfect as any bike can be. I included several pictures and also a video of it running. All lights, dash, signals, horn, etc function properly.

This RS250 has current California registration, license plate, and is insured. It has a 17 digit VIN which matches the clear California title, and the year, make and model is correct on the California title as well. The registration was just paid for, it is good through July, 2021

I am going to thin out my collection, as I have reached a pinnacle of owning rare 2-stroke sport bikes, and it is time for others to enjoy them. As these rare 2-strokes continue to rise in value, I truly believe this bike is a solid investment for many years to come. They just dont make these anymore!

This bike I consider a Unicorn. Mint condition, low miles, Rossi edition and California plated. You would be hard pressed to find another with all these features. Price is: $13,900 and bike is located in San Jose, CA.

Featured Listing: 1998 Aprilia RS250 Rossi Edition