Posts by tag: OW01

Yamaha December 14, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Yamaha OW01 FZR750R Race Bike

Update 12.14.2018: Tom has renewed the Featured Listing for the OW01 and the updated price is 37,500 Euros or approx $43200 USD. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

This is not your ordinary RSBFS Featured Listing. This is a honest-to-god Yamaha OW01 WSBK racer. Competing successfully at the highest level of production-based motorsports, this exact bike won the Spanish Superbike championship in 1991 (and we all know how competitive the Spanish are when it comes to racing). In fantastic condition with a pile of spares, this proven racer is ready to hit the track again.

1991 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Racer in Spain

The FZR750R should need no introduction on these pages. Developed by Yamaha specifically to compete on the World Superbike stage, the road-going OW01 was built in just enough numbers to qualify under homologation rules. That makes the model extremely rare; the OW01 is one of the top collectable models to be found on RSBFS. This example takes this rarity and kicks it up a notch with professional race-prep including top-level Ohlins suspension, Brembo binders, lightweight components such as carbon fairings and lithium battery, and race-specific items such as the massive swing arm and the radiator (which doubles as a work of art).

From the seller:
Bike in good condition and ready to race. The bike will be delivery fully revised. Engine fully revised and ready to run. Swingarm KIT, Suspensions Ohlins, Brembo brakes, Radiator KIT, Carburettors Keihin FCR 39, Carbon fairings, Litium batt and many other high components.. is a really SBK.

Extra parts included with the bike: Rear stand, Sprockets set (6), Crash set (support + footrest + levers), brake hose (1), Spring Ohlins for rear shock (1), Spark plugs, Farings, Gaskets, Clutch set, Wheels set Dymag (F+R) with discs.

For more information please contact: info@gpmotorbikes.com

Check out all of the details on their website

More from the seller:
Ex (Louis ) Carlos Maurel ( 1990 250cc European Champion )

Season: 1991 WSBK
http://www.wsb-archives.co.uk/profiles/rider-profile.php?riderID=364

He and the bike were also the Spanish SBK champion in 1991

It would be very competitive for AHMRA NextGen SBK.

For more information please contact: info@gpmotorbikes.com

Check out all of the details on their website

Look very closely at the numerous, high-quality photographs. What you will find is not a tired, clapped out racer that is out of date, but rather a spotlessly clean and well-preserved icon that took the fight to Honda, Ducati, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Bimota. And while the OW01 was not dominant in WSBK thanks to the likes of Raymond Roche & Doug Polen on Ducatis, it remains a competitive, rare and lusted-after model. This particular specimen is far and away the cleanest competition example of the breed we have seen, and is definitely worth a closer look.

Located in Spain, this fabulous FZR750R OW01 is looking for a new home - and hopefully one that involves some track time. While this is a museum quality example of a very special breed (and would be great as the centerpiece of any collection), this is a machine built to run. I could imagine no better outcome than this bike returning to the tarmac and run in anger once again. The pedigree is there, the prep is there, the spares are there - all that is missing is you. Reach out to GP Motorbikes or check out all of the details on their website. And while you're there, don't forget to look at some of their other offerings!

MI

Featured Listing: 1991 Yamaha OW01 FZR750R Race Bike
Yamaha August 23, 2018 posted by

Great bike, bad timing: 1992 Yamaha YZF 750SP with 4,017 miles

Today's post is a bit of homolgation era goodness, a 1992 Yamaha YZF750R/SP.  The SP isn't currently as desired by collectors as other 750cc machines, such as a 1st/2nd generation Suzuki GSXR-750R or Kawasaki ZX7RR, nor is it as technologically important as the OW01 or R7.  Yet the YZF750SP was dominant for multiple years in Superbike racing and was recently rated as possibly the best 1990's 750cc homolgation machine by Practical Sportbikes (April 2017).  Combine this with it only being produced from 1993-1996 and with this one showing only 4,017 miles, it certainly seems worthy of a post here on RSBFS.

1992 Yamaha YZF750SP with 4017 miles

Ask a group of sportbike fans what the "best" 1990's 750cc machine was and you will no doubt get a variety of answers.  Some will say it was the GSX-R750, the bike that really launched the repli-racer craze and the last of the air cooled monsters.  Others might say it was the Yamaha OW01, R7 (Ow02) or perhaps the Kawasaki ZX7RR...you might even get a few votes for the landmark Honda VFR750, a progenitor of the V4 philosophy that now rules MotoGp.   Ask this same group about the Yamaha YZF750R SP and perhaps you get a few comments of "um..yeah..nice bike" or shrugs but very few would probably initially list it as the best 750cc of the 1990's.   But consider this...it won the Suzuka 8 hour in 1996 which made it the the only non-Honda to do that in over 10 years and it dominated in Superbike Racing in the UK from 1996-1998.  Think about that timeframe for a second..notice anything?   It means the SP was dominant on the track for 2 years after the company stopped making it, a truly amazing result.

In case you are wondering how Yamaha achieved this the answer is in typical Yamaha fashion the SP was developed as an evolution, not a revolution.   Like the preceding OW01, the SP came equipped with Yamaha's EXUP system which delivered both high rpm performance and good mid-range.  The 3/4 liter powerplant was wrapped up in a new deltabox frame designed by the same man who would lead Yamaha's R1 effort. And handling was done by adjustable forks and 6 piston calipers, a first on a production machine.  The SP also came with flatside carbs, a close ratio gearbox, adjustable swingarm pivot and lots of other trick goodies designed to help it dominate on the track.

Now let's turn out attention to this particular offering.  Listed as a 1992 model imported from Japan, this one looks to be in excellent condition.  The seller does provide some  recent maintenance history, the summary of which is as follows:

  • 4017 miles (6465 kilometers)
  • Imported from Japan and now has a legal Washington State clear title
  • Carburetor was recently ultrasonically cleaned and adjusted, and a full service tune-up was performed which included new, tires, spark plugs, chain, air filter, brake pads, an oil change, and fluids flushed. All of the lighting, switches and electrical components work as they should
  • No cracks on any of the body panels, but there are some minor nicks and scrapes on a few of the panels. The wheels are perfect with no rock chips or scratches anywhere. The frame and engine have no corrosion and are nice and clean

NOTE:  I did note a fairing scuff on the riders right side lower (zoom in on the pic below on the ebay auction, you can see it in the 'Yamaha' Blue lettering) and I am not sure if the exhaust is OEM or aftermarket but other than that this bikes looks completely OEM.  I do wish the pics were taken in more direct sunlight though.

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So this brings us to the question, is this bike worth the $13,000 USD asking price?  Well when it was new the YZF asking price was $15,000 so the asking price is actually not outrageous and finding one in this condition and mileage seems unlikely anytime soon so the price seems right on.  Still this is a 26 year old motorcycle so its not going to appeal to a lot of people/the chances of major price appreciation from this point seem small.   Personally I think this one will appeal most to a homologation-era collector. I can envision it parked between a OW01 and R7 or maybe gleaning in the sun next to a ZX7RR.

Marty/dallaslavowner

Great bike, bad timing:  1992 Yamaha YZF 750SP with 4,017 miles
Yamaha March 15, 2018 posted by

Racetrack Refugee: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale

Yamaha's R7 was among the last in a long line of machines from the Age of Homologation Specials, where the manufacturers competing in AMA and World Superbike racing created limited runs of insanely expensive bikes that looked like production models, but were chock full of trick bits like adjustable steering heads and exotic engine internals. For the most part, these were based on pretty common machines from each manufacturer's lineup. But in situations where nothing in the manufacturer's stable really matched their needs, companies sometimes whipped up a bike whose whole production run was designed to allow the bike to compete in a variety of racing classes. By the late 1990s, the 750cc class was pretty much on its way out as a viable category for streetbikes, but that didn't stop Yamaha from introducing their very trick and hideously expensive YZF-R7. How trick? Well the frame was claimed to have been based on Yamaha's 500 Grand Prix machine. Just 50 were imported to the US out of 500 built in total. And how expensive? Well, the R7 was $32,000 late-nineties dollars, and that was before you included the race kit that actually made it fast.

Just one problem: from the factory, the R7 made just 106hp, which didn't really provide the performance the looks or pricetag promised. The solution? Just pony up for the race kit that activated a second, dormant test of injectors and replaced the airbox for a revised part that unleashed a more appropriate 162hp but also gave racebike-like reliability. The biggest limitation of the R7 was that engine, and unleashing the full potential could be tricky and expensive, so owners that wanted to use their bikes on the road sometimes switched out the 749cc engine for the 998cc unit from the R1, which seems to have been done in this particular case. I'm under the impression that this was a relatively simple swap and, although it could be considered sacrilege, actually had several benefits: it gave very similar maximum power to the original engine, but with far more midrange, and it also meant the original engine could be saved to preserve the bike's value for future collectors. That appears to have been done here, although the seller's description does leave me with some questions.

This R7/R1 hybrid appears to have been built to a high standard by Graves Yamaha, so I'm sure they knew what they were doing and I've no doubt the bike is very special. But it would really help if the owner was clearer about what he has: he calls the powerplant a "OWO1 1000 superbike motor" but the OW01 was 749cc, although the five-valve inline four was related to both the R7 and the 998cc R1 units. The OW02 engine was supposedly based on that earlier engine and has the same displacement to conform to class limitations, but I'm not sure it can simply be punched out to a full 1000cc.

More likely, it has a later R1 engine, which was, as stated above, the simpler, much more reliable way to get the fully-unleashed R7's 162hp without all the explode-y engine drama. Maybe it's a full-factory superbike R1 unit? The seller also mentions the "half R7 and half R1 frame" which would require some very serious surgery if true. And which halves were used? Front and back? Left and right? Maybe it's the R7 Deltabox with the R1 subframe? It's also listed as a 1998 model, but I was under the impression that the bike was sold in 1999 and 2000.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale

This bike was built in house built by factory Graves race team and was one of Chuck Graves personal bikes. It might be one of only two left, this bike has every goodie you could imagine on it: Brembo brakes, Ohlins forks and rear shock, superbike radiator and tank, swing arm, custom half R7 frame and half R1 frame, Yamaha OWO1 1000 superbike motor, rear Brembo brakes, thumb brake, brake lines, rearsets, Akro pipe, after market wheels, chain sprocket kit, offset triple clamps. This bike new with the race kit harness was $43,000 and only 32 came to the US that year, it is a very limited production bike, to rebuild this bike in today's time would cost over $100k plus the 1000 donor bike for parts, this bike looks like it just rolled off the race truck.

All-in-all, this modified R7 is a very cool machine, with plenty of very trick bits plainly visible, but I'd definitely want some answers to my questions before bidding on this one. Many, many questions, but worth asking, considering it is a Yamaha R7, after all. I'd especially want to know if the original motor is included, as a good chunk of the bike's value is wrapped up in its originality, and while this might be an amazing machine and a true track-day weapon, all those modifications likely hurt the collector value. As always, if you have any insight into the bike, please feel free to fire away in the comments!

-tad

Racetrack Refugee: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale
Yamaha January 27, 2018 posted by

Race-Kitted: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 for Sale

 

"Homologation" refers to the process by which a manufacturer makes a particular machine eligible for production-based racing classes. In most cases, mass-produced motorcycles include significant compromises in terms of their materials, construction, components, and even geometry that seriously hinder their racetrack performance. You can't sell every machine with radically oversquare bore and stroke, titanium engine internals, magnesium engine cases, and adjustable steering-heads, or the average GSX-R1000 would cost as much as a decent car, and Suzuki wouldn't sell too many. So to get production bikes into a form more suitable for racing, manufacturers build a small run of tricked-out, "improved" versions that often include very exotic features or parts, and those "homologation specials" are produced in limited quantities and often sold at outrageous prices. The number required varies by racing series and year, but at the end of it all, you end up with something like this, the Yamaha FZR750R OW01.

Unlike Honda, who basically just created a whole new machine to meet the requirements with their trick RC30, the OW01 could easily be mistaken for a regular production FZR750 at a glance: the most important modifications are under the skin. The five-valve, 749cc engine included magnesium castings, titanium rods, twin-ring pistons, and flat-slide carburetors. The revised Genesis engine used much more radically oversquare dimensions, compared to the stock bike, and it's naturally more rev-happy as a result, although the expected EXUP valve does keep things reasonably streetable.

The OW01 also used an aluminum fuel tank with an endurance filler cap and a removable aluminum subframe to reduce weight carried up high, quick-release axle clamps, Öhlins suspension, and a set of 17" hoops at both ends, although the pièce de résistance was probably the hand-welded aluminum Deltabox frame, a bit of gorgeous industrial artistry. This example has been further sweetened with a raft of kit Yamaha Engineering Co racing parts, as listed in the seller's description.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 for Sale

For sale is a gorgeous, race kitted 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW-01.  Potential buyers will already understand and appreciate the scarcity of homologation race bikes, so I'll spare you a long description of their rich history.

The story behind this particular OW-01 is that prior to taking delivery, the original owner instructed his dealership to order and install any additional factory race components that were available, which included:

  • Marchesini Wheels
  • Brembo Rotors
  • Brembo P34 Calipers
  • Ohlin Forks
  • YEC Racing Triple Clamp
  • YEC Racing Clipons
  • YEC Racing Rear Sprocket
  • YEC Racing Swingarm Kit
  • YEC Racing Caliper / Dogbone
  • YEC Racing Ram Air Tubes
  • Early YEC Racing Lower Radiator
  • Dry Clutch and Gearbox
  • Rare Magnesium Kit Alternator

This bike was ridden, but reportedly never raced.  Note: The Marchesini wheels do not drive the odometer, which currently reads 4/10ths.  The bike has a few minor scratches and nicks here and there, but is in wonderful condition overall.  It has been on display for a couple years, so a service will be in order if it is to be ridden.  Also, the original components that were replaced when the bike was kitted were not passed along.

While not as successful overall, compared to Honda's RC30, or as well-known these days, the OW01 is certainly one of the most desirable sportbikes of the era. This example was up previously on eBay but failed to sell, although bidding got as high as $26,500. The current starting bid is set at $31,000 with no takers as yet, so the seller may be aiming just a little too high on this, in spite of the exotic racing components: the YEC parts are valuable for sure, but the bike's lack of pure originality may keep the price lower than they're expecting

-tad

Race-Kitted: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 for Sale
Bimota December 13, 2017 posted by

Classic Superbike: 1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike for Sale

It's fitting that the last couple of Bimota YB4s we've featured have been race bikes, since the YB4 was a competition machine first, and a road bike second. In fact, only a racing version was built at first, until World Superbike homologation rules required 200 roadgoing examples be built. The YB4 competed head-to-head with the best Japan could build, first in Formula 1, and later on in the new World Superbike series, an amazing feat for such a tiny manufacturer.

First produced in 1987, the YB4 was powered by Yamaha's 749cc five-valve "Genesis" motor and six-speed gearbox, which it ironically used to compete against Yamaha's OW01. Weight for the roadbike was 396lbs dry, and both versions used Bimota's stiff, lightweight aluminum beam frame and swingarm, so handling was predictably sublime.

Before their untimely demise, Bimota had become a manufacturer of expensive toys for well-heeled collectors or the occasional race team maybe looking for something to differentiate themselves from all of those very competitive Kawasakis and BMWs. There's nothing inherently wrong with recent Bimotas, but the Japanese Big Four and the Germans have caught up, and they didn't provide the kind of competitive advantage that bikes like the YB4 offered to racers and road riders of the 1980s.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Bimota YB4R for Sale

1988 Bimota YB4 Racing, ex-Steve Williams Team Fowlers Yamaha UK VIN: YB4*000027

4th overall in the 1988 World TT F1 (Superbike) Championship  - that year Fogarty won it, second Joey Dunlop, both on Honda RC30. This bike was also in the top ten results of TT IOM 1988 and 1989.

Rare opportunity to acquire a piece of the early Superbike era and of Bimota history. Bike is genuine, complete and working with the right patina, fitted with the correct carbs engine with magnesium sump.

Letter of verification by Dennis Trollope with the bike.

Parade, race and collect!

Bike is currently located in 33080 Roveredo in Piano, Italy but i can get them delivered all around the World at cost, no problem. I can supply US contacts for reference.

This example comes to us via a seller that should be familiar to RSBFS and CSBFS readers. I've never met him, but he obviously has great taste in motorcycles. There is very little time left on the auction, and bidding is up to just north of $5,600. Bimota values in general and pretty low right now, but this particular machine I'd hope would buck that trend: it's got racing history and plenty of patina. It's obviously a bit scruffy around the edges, but that's pretty much par for the course with well-used racebikes.

-tad

Classic Superbike: 1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike for Sale
Yamaha November 23, 2017 posted by

Ready to Rip: 1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW01

Yet another spotless machine from Gary's Utah collection, this 1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW01 is the second of its kind from the collection that we have written about this year. Like the one before it, it is spotless, though it has a few more miles and is ready to ride, shod with a brand-new set of Michelin Pilots.

1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW01 for sale on eBay

The bike is a Japanese-market example, and still shows the original home language stickers on its windshield. This example has been de-restricted, meaning it packs its full complement of 120-odd horses. The polished frame, red-white-blue bodywork and EXUP branded exhaust all show flawlessly, and the bike has traveled just north of 3,000 miles in its 28 years.

The fairings are the original pieces, though they have been resprayed in the stock colors along with the bike's wheels. The seller says it runs beautifully and contains all new fluids.

From the eBay listing:

Up for sale is a 1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 with only 5047 kilometers (3136 miles). Bike is in mint condition with no issues. Wheels and fairings have been professionally resprayed with factory correct color codes. Bike is completely stock condition but has been de-restricted for full power. Fairings and components are 100% genuine factory Yamaha. New Michelin pilots have been installed front and rear. Not a scratch on the exhaust muffler or fuel tank. Bike looks showroom new condition. Bike runs fantastic. New battery and fluids throughout. This bike will not disappoint.

Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use. 801-358-6537 for more pictures or questions. $200 deposit thru PayPal immeadiatly after sale. Balance due by check, bank wire or cash in person within 5 business days.

The bike is not the time capsule that Gary's last OW01 was, but it is in slightly better condition, and is priced at $26,500, about $3,000 over the last bike, commensurate with its shape.

Ready to Rip: 1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW01