Posts by tag: MotoGP

Featured Listing October 2, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: real-deal 2014 Akira Kawasaki Avintia MotoGP bike

Short of a racing license and incredible luck, there generally just isn’t a way to get your hands on world-championship-caliber racing machinery. Even if it wasn’t out of the price range of mere mortals, you’d have a hard time convincing the companies that sell this stuff to let any old squid loose on the world with a 250-odd horsepower race bike. Today, though, our sponsors at Grand Prix Motorbikes have the fix for some well-heeled reader.

This 2014 Akira/Kawasaki MotoGP bike competed in MotoGP’s Open Class for most of the 2014 season. Open Class bikes replaced the CRT machines on the grid, and were a step below the full-factory and satellite team bikes. Because they were envisioned as a way to make the cost of entry lower for the MotoGP World Championship, you ended up with teams pairing bespoke chassis with the best engines they could find within the rules. Kawasaki seemed like a decent bet for Avintia, as the company had full-factory MotoGP rides until just a few years earlier, and the team in 2013 was given access to the company’s pneumatic valve setup.

But to hear rider Hector Barbera tell it, Kawasaki just never showed up for the ’14 season, leaving tuner Akira to do all the maintenance, development and build work. They also were not given the World Championship-caliber suspension bits they had been promised, according to the Spanish racer. That truly must have sucked for Barbera, but for whoever gets their hands on his old mount, the difference will be impossible to discern.

Down to the carbon brakes and 16.5-inch slicks, this is Barbera’s 2014 race bike. Even the livery from his last race remains, with a resplendent lime-green number 8 prominent above the air intake. The next buyer will probably be best served using this bike as a display piece, but it could make an amazing track day mount if you can find tires. We’d be content just staring for hours at the beautiful welds all over this thing.

From the seller:

SUMMARY

Model: Kawasaki MotoGP
Origin: Japan
Engine: Kawasaki SBK Engine
Last Service: 1020 km
Colour: White
Suspension: Showa
Brakes: Brembo
Marchesini 16.5″ wheels
Availability: Inmediately in our store of Barcelona (Spain)

EXTRA PARTS AVAILABLE: 17 wheels, steel disks, fairings, exhaust and many other parts

MODEL INFORMATION
The Kawasaki MotoGP is a MotoGP four-stroke Grand Prix racing motorcycle manufactured by Akira Racing Corporation and Kawasaki for racing purposes only.

This bike race on the World Championship with Hector Barbera and DiMeglio in 2014.

Contact AMATUMOTO – GP Motorbikes in Spain or USA for pricing on this unique opportunity.

Sponsored Listing: real-deal 2014 Akira Kawasaki Avintia MotoGP bike
Featured Listing July 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2017 Suter MMX500 for Sale

Update 7.8.2019: We’d like to take this opportunity to thank Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes for being a sponsor of RSBFS! From Amatumoto, “This 2017 Suter MMX500 at reduced price will not last long, so if there is someone out there that has been pining for a reliable 2-stroke GP500, they should act soon.” Contact Amatumoto today! -dc

So, I’m going to have to try not to gush uncontrollably here, because this is one of the coolest bikes we’ve featured recently. A real, live Suter MMX500, a “what if” race-replica from a parallel universe where MotoGP racing never made the switch from two-stroke to four-stroke power. A labor of love built by Eskil Suter of Suter Racing and a bunch of guys who never got over their addition to premix fumes.

Forget all of your shed-built Grand Prix homages with RZ500 engines stuffed into R6 chassis and painted up in Marlboro racing colors. No disrespect intended, but this is what you’re looking for, the ultimate paean to the snarling, lethal machines that carried Rainey and Schwantz and Mamola to greatness.

The looks may be stealth-fighter modern, especially in this example’s matte carbon finish, but the spirit of those older machines is still there, married to absolutely state-of-the-art racing technology. It’s powered by a compact, fuel-injected two-stroke V4 with a pair of counter-rotating cranks based on the Swissauto/MuZ500 raced by Suter in 1998 and 1999. Apparently Suter “had a few crankcases kicking around from the 500cc V4 design,” and frames are, obviously, their specialty.

I’m always fascinated by how two-strokes can be mounted in the frame: a lack of cams, cam-drives, or valve gear means they’re ludicrously compact, and often oriented in ways not at all intuitive for someone weaned on four-strokes. In this case, the engine is laid over on its side, rotated 90 degrees from what you’d expect, facing forward. So more like a >4 really, at least if you’re looking at it from the left-hand side…

The bike may be tagged as a 500, but it actually displaces 576cc, with an undersquare 56 x 58.5mm bore and stroke in an effort to deliver a bit more midrange and help the bike avoid racebike service intervals. Suter acknowledges that most of its customers are skilled enthusiasts, not win-or-crash racers, and the changes to the formula make for a more manageable ride that still captures the feeling of a two-stroke MotoGP machine, but is less likely to spit a rider off in an evil highside when they get in a bit over their head…

Modern electronics and fuel injection help there as well, while offering improved rideability and a better spread of power. Of course, the delivery is still two-stroke abrupt and, with 195hp at 13,000rpm pushing just 280lbs, power-to-weight is still fairly astonishing, so the two-stroke GP character is intact, just slightly more refined.

Head on over to the original listing for the bike, as there are plenty of additional photos for you to drool over.

From the Seller: 2017 Suter MMX500 for Sale

SUMMARY

Model: Suter MMX 500

Origin: Switzerland

Engine: Suter

Last Service: 490 km

Colour: Carbon

Suspension: Ohlins

Brakes: Brembo

OZ 17″ wheels

Availability: Immediately in our store of USA

MODEL INFORMATION
Bike in good condition and ready to race. Extra parts included with the bike: rear stand, pistons, rings, reeds gaskets, fiber+steel clutch plates, plugs + caps, filters, front stand, windscreen, seat, engine stand, service manual, owner manual, cover.

Spares list:

Pistons, rings, carbon reeds, gaskets, and o-rings; enough for 2 complete rebuilds

fiber/steel clutch plates

plugs & caps

Spare seat #5 of 99

Engine stand, front & rear service stands

Parts, service & dash manuals

bike cover

This is the very first Suter MMX500 I’ve seen for sale. With just 99 made, I’m assuming they were all snapped up before they were even finished by well-heeled track day and racing fans. If you’ve got $115,000 $95,000 lying around and decide to buy this, please let me know what track days you’ll be attending, because I need to see an MMX500 in action. The craftsmanship and passion that went into its creation are impressive, as you can see from the images. Of course, the price is shocking, but this is a very rare opportunity to purchase one at any price, so refinance your home, sell that sailboat, or sell that kidney, and pounce before someone else does.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2017 Suter MMX500 for Sale
Featured Listing July 2, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Update 7.2.2019: We’d like to take this opportunity to thank Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes for being a sponsor of RSBFS! This NSF250RW is available now for purchase as is or as a custom build. Contact Amatumoto today! -dc

Why buy a race replica when you can pick up an actual race bike? Today’s Sponsored Listing from our friends over at Amatumoto GP Motorbikes is a Honda NSF250RW, and it’s no stripped-down streetbike in race plastics, it’s an evolution of the machine that won last year’s Moto3 Constructors Championship in a very competitive field. If you’ve never watched Moto3, the racing is very close, with bikes nose-to-tail at 145mph.

For years, the “lowest” of the three tiers of Grand Prix racing used to be the domain of tiny little two-stroke 125cc machines that weighed less than an average adult American male. This of course gave the class differentiation a nice symmetry, with 125cc, 250cc, and 500cc machines. But in 2012, the smallest class shifted to a formula using 250cc four-strokes to match MotoGP’s move away from two-strokes. Bikes are limited to singles with a bore of no more than 81mm, four valves, a rev ceiling of 13,500rpm, and a minimum weight for the combined bike and rider of 326lbs.

Unlike Moto2, where the entire field uses a single engine [formerly Honda, now Triumph] to keep costs down and ensure close racing, Moto3 allows a variety of engine builders to participate. While physically much larger than a two-stroke of similar displacement, the Honda single still needed to be as light and compact, while taking advantage of every opportunity to save weight, increase power, and centralize mass. To that end, the 249cc engine has its cylinder head reversed, with the ram-air intake to the front and the exhaust exiting to the rear. Other manufacturers have experimented with this configuration with varied success, but here, the main goal appears to be mass-centralization.

The engine is canted backwards in the frame 15°, allowing the engine to be placed further forward in the chassis and maximize airbox volume, with a bore and stroke of 78 x 52.2mm, below the class maximum bore size. The engine is backed, naturally, but a six-speed cassette gearbox for quick ratio changes to maximize the small engine’s potential, and the package weighs in at a claimed 185lbs dry.

From the Seller: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Do you want a Moto3 Honda NSF250RW? Our company can get the most exclusive bikes of the market. Only for VIP customers, museums or exclusive collectors! Contact with our team and inform yourself. Only 2 units available – RESERVE NOW

In our VIP club you will find the most exclusive race and road bikes, also you can offer your bike for manage the sale. We work with customers to worldwide and we want offer the best service and products.

At Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes Store, we take pride to have in our stock great exclusive bikes used on the races. That said, we understand that the collector of bikes hobby is enjoyed by some of the most passionate and diverse enthusiasts on the planet. Simply put: there are just too many awesome styles to fit in to one showroom. No need to worry though, as we’re happy to search for the bike of your dreams. Just give us a bit of pertinent information and we’ll keep an eye out. Amatumoto can build a READY to RACE bike… with engine, exhaust, wiring on demand with the specs that choose our customers.

Contact us via our website: http://www.gpmotorbikes.com/

If you’re a track day junkie or a racer, this is your opportunity to buy a very serious piece of hardware. Just add sponsor decals!

-tad

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!
Aprilia June 19, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2003 Aprilia RSV-R Nori Haga Edition

By all accounts, Japanese superstar Noriyuki Haga has had an interesting career. Starting out in home market racing – including Japanese Superbike – Haga made the jump into WSBK in the late 1990s, initially as a wildcard entry. One of his earliest opportunities was substituting for an injured Colin Edwards, who would later become his teammate. Throughout the years he jumped back and forth from WSBK and 500cc GP, with an impressive record of three second place championships and as a four-time third place championship finisher. And while securing a championship eluded him, winning and finishing consistently did not. His record of 11 seasons with at least one win was only broken this year by Jonathan Rea. And he managed this across a wide range of machinery, including a one-year spell with Aprilia racing the RSV 1000 in a one-bike team. No wins were to be had that year, but Haga’s consistency paid off to the tune of 4th in the 2002 WSBK championship. And that is what this Nori Haga Edition Aprilia is all about: celebrating the accomplishments of both Aprilia and Haga.

Featured Listing: 2003 Aprilia RSV-R Nori Haga Edition

Aprilia is a company focused on racing, and this Haga replica is quite the proof. Outwardly, the bike shares the livery of Haga’s PlayStation-sponsored WSBK racer, including number. Underneath the skin the Haga Edition is pretty much all RSV 1000R, which is a pretty stout piece of kit. Based around a 60 degree, 998cc V-twin, expect nearly 140 horsepower to be at your beck and call. Suspension pieces are Ohlins, and brakes are the requisite Brembo units. And while the changes are mostly graphical in nature when compared to a stock RSV 1000R, the build itself receives a color-coded top clamp complete with Haga’s dashing signature and a number plate. Only 300 units were released world wide, and only 60 of those were earmarked for the United States. Additionally, as a nod to the racing heritage of the livery, the Haga Edition also came with dedicated race parts (not for street use), which included a full Akrapovic titanium exhaust system and a corresponding injection unit programming chip. Installation of the race kit drops nearly 7 lbs from the bike, while adding approximately 10 horsepower. Win!

From the seller:
The look, sound, and ride of this bike are amazing! Low mileage, two mature collectors have owned this bike. It was imported to Canada in 2018 from Tennessee. Always stored temperature regulated space, it has never been in an accident and is in perfect running order. If you are looking for an amazing classic V-Twin Italian race bike, this is a rare find. #107 of a 300 bike production run. The tires are only a year old, recent oil change, and head bearings replaced. This bike is in 100% stock form, passed import safety inspection without any issues and is ready to ride. I have multiple bikes and I am looking to sell this to make room for another. (4250 mi / 6800 kms)

Noriyuki Haga followed Aprilia into their fledgling MotoGP foray, teaming with Colin Edwards on the ill-fated RS Cube machine. One year of that was enough, and he returned to WSBK, riding for a number of different manufacturers. But none provided the fruits of victory, nor the fruits of a race replica offering. That makes this Aprilia race replica something special. Not only is it undeniably rare, it celebrates one of the best Superbike riders to never win a championship, and looks awesome to boot. With only 4,250 miles on the clock, this bike is clean and looks near new. Interested parties should jump over here quickly, as this Canadian-based example has a nearly-free opening ask, and needs a new home. Check it out, read up on the specs, and then bid to win (just like Haga). Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2003 Aprilia RSV-R Nori Haga Edition
BMW January 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Honest-to-God 2012 Suter BMW MotoGP bike

You read the headline correctly. What you are looking at is an honest-to-God MotoGP racebike that won the CRT class at the 2012 Qatar Grand Prix under American roadracing hero and two-time World Superbike champion Colin Edwards. The overall win went to Jorge Lorenzo, who was on his way to his second MotoGP championship. Edwards crossed the line 12th overall, a testament to the difference between CRT and the factory machines.  

Based on a bespoke Suter chassis, the bike was powered by a warmed up WSBK-spec BMW S1000RR engine. Even with the better part of 240 horses, the BMW mill was handicapped compared to the factory rides by electronics and development time. Having almost 240 horses is one thing, putting it down is quite another. For a painfully detailed look at the season, click here.

The seller’s description of the bike is pretty basic, but there is a detailed fact sheet with more photos here.

Being a MotoGP machine, this bike does not have the battlescars and booboos that former racebikes generally wear. It’s got just enough dirt to look as if it just cooled down from taking the checkered flag at Valencia, but otherwise is in beautiful shape.

The bike wears all of its as-raced MotoGP parts, including the Bosch data acquisition electronics, and 16.5-inch magnesium wheels, with a fresh set of GP-spec Bridgestone slicks included.

CRT, short for claiming rule team, was a short-lived section of the MotoGP rules that allowed teams without factory money to compete at the big dance. Head over to the always wonderful Moto Matters to learn how the CRT bikes differed from the full-on factory mounts.

Though the bikes were always destined to be slower than their better-funded factory-backed competitors, they made for some truly innovative and interesting machines. This 2012 Suter BMW CRT machine was a work-in-progress for the season Edwards was aboard, and even on the night he won in the desert, the famously blunt Texan was only medium happy with its performance.

For anyone below The Texas Tornado’s talent level (which is everyone), the bike will be an absolute monster. At $99,000 not including transport, it represents something of a bargain, considering Forward Racing would have spent more than that on just the engine back in 2012. If you have the means and the skill, Speedbox can be contacted through their website.

Featured Listing: Honest-to-God 2012 Suter BMW MotoGP bike
Honda November 17, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 2018 Honda NSF250R Moto 3 Race Bike For Sale

For many years, Grand Prix motorcycle racing was dominated by two-strokes: 125s, 250s, and the hairy 500s that carried the likes of Schwantz, Rainey, and Doohan to victory. But as the popularity of two-strokes waned on the road, the formula was changed to allow four-strokes to compete, and ultimately all Grand Prix motorcycle racing machines transitioned to four-stroke power. The entry-level class was dubbed “Moto3” once the formula switched from 125cc two-stroke to 250cc four-stroke power, and today’s Honda NSF250R was designed to compete in this fiercely-contested category.

They might sound a bit agricultural, but two-strokes are perfect racing motors: light, extremely compact, and relatively simple. Four-strokes are generally larger and heavier for a given displacement or output, since they include things like “cams” and “valves” in the package. Honda had to work hard to approach the standards of lightness and elegant simplicity set by the outgoing RS125R, but the results speak for themselves.

Single-cylinder four-strokes are traditionally the format of dirt bikes and economical commuters, but Honda packed plenty of tech into the relatively tiny package for the NSF250R. The dual overhead cam engine features a reversed cylinder head with the intake at the front, and the unit is rotated backwards in the chassis to fit between the frame rails and maximize space for the airbox. A cassette-style gearbox helps for quick trackside gearing changes, and the bike’s dry weight is an impressively svelte 180lbs, so the 48 claimed hp offers serious performance for aspiring GP stars.

From the Seller: 2018 Honda NSF250R for Sale

Up for your consideration is this Honda NSF250R four-stroke race motorcycle from HRC (Honda Racing Corporation) I personally ordered it from HRC last November. Production was August 2018. Brand New, Never started, No fluids. Imported thru all legal channels. Located Cleveland Ohio. Included is the Option Parts Package (PGM-FI SETTING TOOL, MODE SELECT SWITCH, PIT ROAD SPEED LIMIT SWITCH) Seat pad included (not pictured) $18,000 USD OBO. Suitable trades will be considered. Contact: Greg 440.214.0954 deftonecycles@gmail.com

This one is being offered by our friends over at Deftone Cycles for $18,000. A brand-new NSF250R probably doesn’t present too much of an investment opportunity, at least short term. But it does offer an aspiring racer the perfect platform on which to hone their skills, a blank slate on which a rider can write the first chapter of their career.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2018 Honda NSF250R Moto 3 Race Bike For Sale
Suzuki March 28, 2018 posted by

Worth the Trip: 1983 Suzuki RGB500 for Sale

This time of year, really interesting sportbikes can be a little thin on the ground, so our online searches naturally take us farther afield. In this case, all the way to Japan for a 1983 Suzuki RGB500 that was the Grand Prix racing inspiration for the two-stroke RG500Γ. This Mk8 version was highly-developed, although the earliest iterations of the bike were notoriously brawn-over-brains machines, with plenty of power but sometimes terrifying high-speed handling…

Suzuki’s initial foray back into Grand Prix competition in the early 1970s was built around a production-based, water-cooled parallel twin borrowed from their T500 Titan, which saw limited success. Something different was needed if Suzuki wanted to win, and that meant the development of a brand-new four cylinder engine that featured a pair of cranks, disc valves, and the now famous square-four architecture. The new four-cylinder machine was first competed in 1974 and won its first Manufacturer’s Title in 1976, then went on to dominate Grand Prix racing for years, and actually drove the shift from four-stroke machines to smokers: if you wanted to compete, you made the switch. That change defined prototype motorcycle racing up until 2002, when rules changes specifically intended to allow four-strokes to compete on more equal footing were introduced.

The original design for Suzuki’s new square-four used front and rear cylinder banks that were the same height and made 110hp, although later versions used the more familiar “stepped” arrangement familiar to fans of the Gamma and made even more power. Suspension and tire technology took a while to catch up with the engine’s brutal performance: 120hp may not sound like much today, but two-strokes deliver that power in a famously abrupt manner, and the early machines ate tires and chains with startling regularity. By 1982, the bike weighed 238lbs and produced over 120hp, with top speeds of up to 170mph and the RGB500, helped along by talented riders like Barry Sheene and Randy Mamola, was a dominant force in top-level motorcycle racing throughout the 1980s.

From the original Yahoo! Japan listing: 1983 Suzuki RGB500 for Sale

Racer RGB 500 I-MK 8 Works specifications. (Marco Rukkinelli player in Japan has riding)

Frame engine · swing arm Other than Works parts · Exterior manufacturer original.

(Engine) Works Mechanic · Full Overhaul (Replacement of new parts such as expendable parts)

It is running for 2 hours including a mustard and test course.

Basically present car verification. On… examination can receive person hope, in any case present condition delivery no claim.

A bid please those who can understand old racers · those who can understand by image.

Since cancellation of a bid can not correspond, please bid carefully under self-responsibility.

Those who can withdraw to Saitasa city, or if you can arrange for land transportation by yourself as a guideline after about a week after a successful bid

If it is BAS, we will bring it to Kashiwa depot for 5000 yen.

BAS Please bear the shipping fee from Kashiwa Depot by the highest bidder

Please, no jokes about the listing: I ran this though Google Translate so the original seller isn’t responsible for any atrocious syntactical mistakes. Although I’m really interested in “a mustard and test course.” Obviously, potential buyers won’t be worried about the need to register their purchase, since this isn’t a street bike. You’d just need to figure out whether to to race or display this bit of history.

-tad

Worth the Trip: 1983 Suzuki RGB500 for Sale
Ducati March 3, 2018 posted by

Misplaced Priorities: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale

I realize that I’m spoiled. I’m spoiled because my current riding group includes five or six MV Agustas that actually run, a pair of RSV4s, a few Ducatis, a couple Bimotas, and a KTM. I’m spoiled because I live in Southern California, and car and motorcycle exotica are everywhere: I’ve recently come across a few Arch Motorcycles, nearly every variety of 90s two-stroke, Confederate Fighters actually being ridden on the road, a slew of Bimotas, pretty much every vintage and modern sportbike you can possibly imagine, even a Gurney Alligator. Which is possibly why I’m surprisingly blase about the Ducati Desmosedici RR, one of the most exotic machines of the past twenty years.

It’s not fair to the Desmo. I should be incredibly impressed by it, but it probably doesn’t help that I’ve never really thought the Desmo was all that beautiful. It’s no doubt a very aggressive machine, with a leering, hungry-catfish face and a wild exhaust that exits through the top of the tailpiece, at least in stock form: there’s also a Ducati Performance system that vents two of the cylinders through the bellypan on the right side and the others through a more traditional underseat pipe. But although it lacks the slim-waisted purpose of a 916 or the sculptural elegance of an MV Agusta F4, the D16RR, meant to closely ape the look of Ducati’s 990cc MotoGP racebike, has an air of ruthlessness about it and looks like nothing else on the road.

The original idea was to take Ducati’s V4-powered MotoGP racebike and detune it, then sell a few to well-heeled enthusiasts to use at trackdays or as living room ornamentation. While other “race replicas” of the period generally consisted of race bike colors, graphics, and even sponsors splashed across otherwise stock bikes, Ducati went and made a bike that had almost nothing in common with any of their production motorcycles. It even used an annoyingly-authentic 16″ rear wheel, something that must be pretty inconvenient when you’re trying to get street tires to shoe this thing.

Of course, the D16RR is obviously no “homologation special” since MotoGP is a prototype series and the bikes need share nothing except a badge with a company’s roadgoing offerings. Appearances and specifications to the contrary, the Desmo doesn’t actually use a detuned MotoGP powerplant: race engines in the premier class don’t factor longevity into the equation and, even detuned, don’t make useable or practical road bike powerplants, considering they lack things like a charging system or a starter…

Instead, Ducati basically whipped up an entirely new V4 engine for the bike that very, very closely mirrors the specifications and layout of the racebike while at the same time sharing almost no parts… So you still get a 989cc 90° V4 with gear-driven cams, Desmodromic valve actuation, and a “twin-pulse” firing order that gives it a bit of Ducati flavor compared to a “screamer” or “big-bang” configuration, along with a beefed-up cassette-style gearbox.

Considering the price tag, you could be forgiven for being unimpressed with the 170hp output and 425lb wet weight, but the numbers alone fail to capture the wild, track-bred character. And the Desmo is littered with top-shelf parts that help reign in the power, like the Öhlins FG353P gas-pressurized forks up front that are truly “race spec” and normally cost as much as a new GSX-R600…

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale

No compromise, Italian passion personified. The high water mark for street legal sportbikes.

#895 out of 1500.

1878 miles all street so far. May increase in the next few months I don’t think I can resist doing some track days on this bike as the weather improves.

Serviced by a Ducati Master Technician at 1814 miles.

Clean title in hand, all manuals, 2 keys, technical workshop DVD.

Here’s a good article detailing the specs and history of this bike: https://www.sportrider.com/sportbikes/ducati-desmosedici-rr-firebreather#page-4

The bike is in my living room right now, seems perfectly normal to me, but wife isn’t amused – please buy this so I can start sleeping in my bed again.

I’m willing to deliver or meet you within a 1000 mile radius of Salt Lake City for a small additional fee.  Please contact me for details.  Or haulbikes.com is a good option for shipping.

Bike is for sale locally also, I reserve the right to end this auction at any time.

This one appears to be nearly untouched, with under two thousand miles. Which makes sense because the seller claims it’s currently being used in lieu of a big-screen television or a painting of a ship being tossed on stormy seas to liven up their home. They may have chosen to get rid of the Desmo, but is that the real problem here? New, the bike retailed for $72,000 and the 1,500 built were quickly snapped up by collectors, although anyone looking to quickly flip their purchase for profit were severely disappointed: these can often be found for well under that, and certainly much less than today’s example with an $80,000 asking price. Have values jumped sharply, or is this seller simply ambitious?

-tad

Misplaced Priorities: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale