Posts by tag: Final Edition

Ducati April 1, 2021 posted by

Wouldn’t Start – 2004 Ducati 998S FE with 2 miles !

Always dressed in red, Ducat’s 998S Final Edition celebrated the tenth anniversary of the iconic 916 generation.  This very special order waited in its shipping crate until a few years ago, and since its factory road test, hasn’t seen a battery, gas, or oil.

2004 Ducati 998S FE for sale on eBay

Some specs show the 998S power as 100Kw, a nice round number and 136hp.  The cases were different than a base model, and had a deep oil sump to ensure the pick-up didn’t run dry.  Adjustable Öhlins dampers are all around, with 43mm forks and a progressive rocker arm for the monoshock.  Dry clutch and single seat naturalemente, with 320mm Brembo brakes and 17-inch Marchesini forgings.  The FE’s aren’t numbered but have a Final Edition plaque on the triple tree, right below the temperature gauge, which required some attention since the cooling system hadn’t had a major update to cope with the increased power.

This FE showed the same two miles on RSBFS – back in 2018-, and has had one or two more owners since then, who also ( wisely ) declined to bring it from display to riding duty.  So far all the owners have been collectors, including racing driver Graham Rahal.  The seller’s comments comments from the eBay auction-

Limited production Final Edition model that has reportedly never been ridden. The bike was removed from the factory crate with 2 indicated miles in 2017, when Indy driver Graham Rahal acquired it for his private collection. It has not been started since, or had fuel or a battery put in. Factory equipment includes Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes, Marchesini wheels, and a graphics package specific to the FE. Power is supplied by a 998cc Testastretta L-twin paired with a 6-speed gearbox, and the original protective film remains on the engine covers and frame. The bike was acquired by a dealer in late 2018 from from Mr. Rahal’s collection.  I purchased the bike in January 2019.  Since I have owned the bike, it has been sitting in my garage as eye candy.

Both factory keys, the original tool pouch, and owner’s manuals are included with the sale.

The collector’s realm might be foreign to a weekly rider, not being able to hop on and enjoy.  Could be there are other diversions.  The 998S FE with its angular nose, air intakes, single-sided swingarm, and underseat exhaust might deserve to be saved for a future rider.  Or collector.  Looking forward to hearing from the new owner.

-donn

Wouldn’t Start – 2004 Ducati 998S FE with 2 miles !
Ducati November 20, 2020 posted by

All Sales Final: 1998 Ducati 900 Final Edition #104

Ducati has a long history of creating some very memorable motorcycles, many of which have been considered rolling artwork. They also have perfected the art of the limited edition, with exclusive models wearing limited and unique number plaques on the headstocks. The purpose of the special, super-exclusive badging is to drive demand via the perception of scarcity – thereby harnessing the law of supply and demand to turn a bigger profit. And in many, many cases the motorcycles wearing the “LE” badge are indeed special bikes (SP, SPS, LTD, Superlight, MH900e all come to mind). And what can be as special as the last model of the vaunted Tamburini-era 900 Supersport?

1998 Ducati 900 Final Edition #104 for sale on eBay

To be sure the 1998 model year was not the last Supersport – for these are still being built today. But the ’98 model was the final year for this particular design, which dates back to the 1980s and the introduction of the Pantah motor. With a big square headlight and both a half-faired as well as fully faired bodywork style available, the Supersport allowed customers who could not afford a 851/88/916 Superbike model a more wallet-friendly way to get into Ducati. And it worked. The air-cooled, two valve, desmo Ducati Supersports became a hot seller, overhauled only by the success of the Monster line. But the big deal here was not the past, but the future. For in 1998 the “new” Supersport design was launched – penned by Pierre Terblanche. Responsible for the polarizing design of the 999, Terblanche’s take on the classic 900 Supersport fell flat. That cliff dive of design continuity is what *really* makes the ’98 900 Final Edition special.

From the seller:
Final Edition – 1998 Ducati Supersport 900FE

To mark the end of its badass Supersport line, Ducati released a one-year run of 800 bikes around the world. They called it the Final Edition, painted it silver, and threw on a couple of goodies like 41mm FCR carbs and Ohlins rear shock. 300 of the 800 examples made it over the US – here’s number 104.

Ducati started with the Superlight variant of the SS, and then in addition to the silver paint, added a whole bunch of carbon: mudguard, chain guard, rear fender, countershaft drive cover, and dashboard cover. In addition, they raised the pipes for more cornering clearance, gave it new cast iron floating rotors, and some new parts (voltage regulator and alternator) were added, too.

Extremely rare Ducati, 14,895 miles in pristine condition. I am the second owner and it has been meticulously maintained.

From an ownership perspective, there is little not to love about the Supersport. Relatively simple, light, torquey and rock solid, the Ducati of this era gave up a little bit of creature comfort and polish to the Japanese competition, but offered the visceral sound and experience for which Ducati is known. Maintenance intervals are reasonable, and the 2v motors are much easier to work on than the desmoquattro Superbikes. All in all, these are reliable machines with a relatively low cost of ownership considering it is an Italian exotic.

From a collector perspective, the 900SS-SP (Sport Production) and 900SS-SL (Superlight) are the top dogs of the Supersport world. The Final Edition is essentially a specially-badged SP variant, which should certainly place it appropriately as unique. These are not necessarily valuable motorcycles as a whole (a basic 900 SS CR model remains a real bargain today), but values are certainly on the rise. Superlights are way up, and SP versions of the 900SS are climbing. This 900SS-FE has been slow on the auction side, and has a Buy It Now price of $9,000. That B.I.N. number is fair money for a clean and well-kept FE, so interested buyers should check out all of the details here. It’s hard to go wrong with a Ducati Supersport, be it bevel or Pantah, Tamburini or Terblanche. What’s your favorite Supersport model? Be sure and let us know in the comments. Stay safe, and good luck!!

MI

All Sales Final: 1998 Ducati 900 Final Edition #104
Ducati August 16, 2020 posted by

Red Hot Summer – 2004 Ducati 998S Final Edition

Our last few 998S reviews have focused on Bayliss and Bostrom livery replicas, but here is a classic Anniversary red example with just 7,000 miles.

2004 Ducati 998S Final Edition for sale on eBay

The 998 was an interesting transition for Ducati, since it was the last of the revered 916 lookers but had the more modern testastretta head design.  Its 136 ponies want to go faster than any speed limit, and though it’s a pre-nanny bike the factory Öhlins and 320mm Brembos will help you from making the wrong mistake.  About 1,000 Final Editions were made, with a little over half being single-seaters, which seems much more appropriate.  It’s not a numbered edition, but they did receive a nice plaque for the triple tree.

Offered by a specialty car dealer near Philadelphia, this 998S is in very special condition.  A set of carbon mufflers and accompanying tune have been added, evidently done at Fast by Ferracci.   Engraved FBF clip-ons are also pictured, though any change in the handlebar goemetry is hard to detect.  Notes from the eBay auction:

Shortly after purchasing the bike, in April of 2005, this Ducati was treated to a set of carbon fiber slip-ons, a power commander, and a performance air filter, all of which were installed by Fast By Ferraci. Given the low original mileage, service work is relegated to basic maintenance items such as oil changes and a 6,000-mile belt service completed in 2010. The current owner and consignor purchased the bike from the original owner about 5 years ago and it rode it sparingly.

When we received the bike on consignment, we immediately took the bike to local marque specialist, The Spare Parts LLC of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania who completed a belt service, clutch/brake fluid flush and refill, replaced the battery, as well as completing a once-over inspection of the bike to make sure it was in top running condition.

The 998 had one foot in the past design, maybe two since the cooling system still needed help in traffic, but the new engine had longer maintenance intervals and has proven to be a trusted agent.  Seems like a new chain would top off this LE, but maybe the new owner will take it out and ride.

-donn

Red Hot Summer – 2004 Ducati 998S Final Edition
Ducati June 25, 2020 posted by

Silver Bird – 1998 Ducati 900SS/FE #287 of 300

In the 1990’s, Ducati’s SuperSport could be all things to some people – before the Monster and ST2 arrived, it could be an ok commuter and passable sport tourer.  This Final Edition has had some choice upgrades and considering the mileage looks very good.

1998 Ducati 900SS/FE for sale on eBay

The FE used the 904cc L-twin that had inhabited the SuperSports throughout the 90’s, air-cooled with 84 hp but peak torque at just 6,400 rpm.  The inverted forks and alloy swingarm were suspended by Showa, with Brembo supplying their gold-line 320mm brakes and cast iron rotors.  FE’s had a re-designed body with scoops to help cool the rear cylinder, and all were monoposto’s with a seat fairing courtesy of the earlier Superlight.  A new charging system brought 520 watts via a three phase alternator, and exhausts were swept high.  Carbon mudguards complimented the black alloys, and the dash was carbon as well.

Sounds like this owner is a knowledgeable SuperSport fan, and this FE has some key updates and neat NOS parts.  The Keihin flat-slide set-up appears to pre-date the seller and is tuned for Santa Fe (6,500 ft.) so chances are the carbs will have to be re-jetted for the new owner.  A few marks over the 17,000 miles, which is hard to confirm since the dash is new.  From the eBay auction:

The fork seals have just been replaced. 
It has a new Oberon clutch slave as the original was leaking. Works great.
It has brand new (NOS) front brake discs. These are unobtainium and super expensive when found – around $900!
It has a new factory windshield. $$
 
The gauge needles were faded as many vintage 900SS do over time. While hunting for less faded gauges I found another bit of unobtainium in the form of a complete NOS dash complete with gauges specifically for the FE with the carbon surround. It’s beautiful. Unfortunately, I can’t find my original speedo – I was going to include it in the sale for mileage history. I’m worried it got sold last year when I was clearing house of old used parts. It was in the mid 17000 mile range.
 
The bike is original except for the Keihin FCR41 carb set-up. This is a very popular upgrade that transforms the performance of the bike.  It runs great! There is no choke on these carbs – so the choke lever has been disconnected but is still there. I live at 7000 feet and the carbs are jetted for our high altitude. It may run a bit lean if you are close to sea level. No way to tell until the bike reaches it’s final destination. It has an open top airbox meaning it has a aftermarket frame that holds the K&N filter in place. It really helps the bike at our altitude as well.
 
The high mount Termignonis are beautiful. Sound great and the best period correct option for these. These are pricey if you can even find a set.
 
The Battlax tires have plenty of tread left front and rear. The belts were replaced by the prior owner about a year before I bought the bike. They are now around two years old.
 
It has a new fuel level sender ($250!). I have not put fuel back in the tank since replacing it, figuring if I sell the bike as planned, some shippers prefer empty tanks.

The 904 SuperSports were made from 1991-98 so you have to pick your spots for rarity, but the later SuperLights and FE’s fit the bill.  Not sure that seat is an all-day affair, but the riding position got high marks from reviewers.  Unusual to see such limited production with so many special parts on a no reserve auction, and it’ll be interesting to see where this FE winds up.

-donn

Silver Bird – 1998 Ducati 900SS/FE #287 of 300
Ducati December 10, 2018 posted by

New In Box: Zero Mile 2004 Ducati 998S FE for Sale

Examples of the Ducati 998S with zero miles have been popping up recently. No surprise that a few folks mothballed them in their original shipping crates, since Ducati kind of telegraphed their intent to discontinue the Tamburini-designed superbike with the whole “Final Edition” thing… I sometimes wonder just how long they could have continued to sell the bike without significant stylistic updates: it had certainly become familiar by the time the 998 was replaced in 2003 by the Terblanche-styled 999, but it’s not like it’s ever really looked all that dated. It’s one of those few designs that skipped right from “cutting-edge” to “classic.”

Under the wild new skin and ergonomic changes that made it almost luxurious by Italian superbike standards, the 999 that followed was more evolutionary than revolutionary. Aside from being pretty uncomfortable, there really wasn’t anything inherently wrong with the 998, and most of the 999’s performance improvements could have been applied to the earlier bike. Powered by the updated narrow-head “Testastretta” v-twin, the 998S produced a claimed 136hp, which sounds pretty tame by today’s standards, but this was a very serious sportbike in the early 2000s. Keep in mind that traction-control on roadbikes wouldn’t arrive even in its crudest form until the 2009 1098R.

The seller [famed Southern California Ducati dealer ProItalia] refers to it “considered to be the best of the bike that started with the 916” and that’s an awkwardly-phrased, but accurate statement. The 916 was the original, but a gradual evolution meant that the 998 was the Ducati Superbike in its most powerful, most highly-developed form, and it’s generally considered to be the best of the bunch from a rider’s standpoint. Which makes this one’s zero miles kind of tragic, really.

From the original eBay listing: 2004 Ducati 998S FE for Sale

2004 Ducati 998S Final Edition. New. On MSO, never registered or prepped. Never has never had gasoline in the tank or a battery installed. Purchased originally by a collector in 2005 from Motobella in Coopersburg PA. It was left in the crate until last year when it was purchased by the Indy Car driver Graham Rahal as part of his changing collection. 

Factory Ohlins forks, steering damper, and rear shock. Considered the best of the bike that started with the 916 in 1994.

Comes with MSO, keys, tool kit, 2004 parts catalog. Unique. Came out of the crate only a year ago. We’ll assist with shipping to your door. Trades welcomed. If buyer wants the motorcycle prepped for road use, our certified Ducati tech will make it happen.

Pro Italia has been serving Italian motorcycle enthusiasts since 1987 and has a reputation of honesty and transparency with our customers.  

Okay, so I’ll admit my headline is a bit clickbait-y: this 998S is no longer New In Box, since it was recently removed from the shipping crate, but has never seen the road. Still, $25,000 is pretty huge money for any 916 variant, so anyone considering this had better either really want a box-fresh example of the breed or have a long-view of its investment potential. Sure, values will eventually get there, but it may be a while until the new owner can actually turn around and sell it for a profit…

-tad

New In Box: Zero Mile 2004 Ducati 998S FE for Sale
Ducati September 5, 2018 posted by

Keep it Simple: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

I appreciate simplicity. Simple HVAC knobs on a car’s center stack. Black coffee. Bikes like the Ducati 900SS FE. Modern technology is great, but if you’ve seen the new Ducati Panigale V4 with the bodywork removed, you realize that the cost is massive complexity and the knowledge that, if something goes wrong once the bike is out of warranty, things could get expensive really fast… And while TCS and cornering ABS are really great ways to keep even experienced motorcyclists safe, some of these bikes are so powerful that you need electronics just to rein in the wild performance. But bikes like the 900SS manage to be both entertaining and very simple, suggesting that maybe we’ve gotten lost somewhere along the way.

“FE” stands for “Final Edition” and was obviously a way to sell a few blinged-up examples of the stone-axe simple Supersport before an updated version arrived in 1999 that used bronze in place of chipped flint. The bike is almost painfully basic: it’s powered by Ducati’s 904cc air-cooled two-valve v-twin, fed by a pair of Mikuni CV carbs and backed by a six-speed gearbox, now with extra Dry Clutch Rattle™. There are no variable power modes. There is no traction control, no ABS. No electronically-actuated exhaust flappers or phased variable cam lobes, heated grips, GI Joe Kung-Fu Grips, or cellphone charging ports.

What you do get is Ducati’s charismatic 900SS with a solo tail, upswept exhaust pipes that increase cornering clearance, and a numbered plaque on the top triple clamp. Just to show that you’re one of 300 very special people. Obviously, the 84 claimed horses aren’t going to impress anyone these days, and honestly they didn’t even when the 900SS was brand new. But the bike is relatively light, the geometry race-bred, the brakes relatively strong, and the engine flexible and fun. A bike like this is never going to win in a spec-sheet bang-for-your-buck competition, and anyone who dismisses this bike as being “overhyped and slow” is probably missing the point.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

Ducati 900 SS FE, 1998. #193/300. 12,804 miles, bike is in excel cond. Serviced at Ducati Dallas, valves adjusted, timing belts, Motul oil and filter, fuel filter, K&N air filter, etc.

Bike has 3 spoke Marchesini magnesium wheels, braided stainless hydraulic lines, Termignoni carbon high mount mufflers, carbon tank protector.

These bikes are getting hard to find in this cond, this is a nice running and riding Supersport.

Crating service available.

This one appears basically stock, with the addition of magnesium wheels, stainless brake lines, and Termi pipes. All of which are things I’d want on my very own 900SS, and upgrades that are generally acceptable among collectors. Note that the pictures appear to show the stock FE wheels, which I don’t believe were magnesium, as the owner claims. Miles aren’t barn-find low, but very reasonable for a machine this old, and should give a new owner room to add some without decreasing the bike’s value significantly. Because the point of this bike is to ride it.

-tad

Keep it Simple: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale
Ducati August 8, 2018 posted by

Hey 19 – 1998 Ducati 900 SS/FE

The ( original ! ) owner of this 900 SS/FE must’ve been at the dealer in late 1997 to have cadged chassis number 016 of 300.  The end-of-model commemorative had mostly the best of the 900SS years, and where Ducati left off, this owner has updated to even better.

1998 Ducati 900 SS/FE for sale on ducati.ms

Ducati’s 2nd generation Super Sports had the first generation of 904cc air-cooled desmo, with single overhead belt-driven cams helping deliver 84 hp.  Though for most of the 90’s the SS had been a white frame and red or yellow fairing, the cosmopolitan FE had a dark gold trellis frame and silver monoposto bodywork.  Showa forks and monoshock were specified and of course Brembo’s finest 320mm hardware.  Carbon fiber dash and mudguards provide a technical accent to the black 17-inch wheels.

Offered on the fan site ducati.ms, it sounds like the then-new owner poured darn near the purchase price right back into his new FE in engine and suspension work.  And then rode it sensibly to its current 8,400 miles.  The coordinated look of the billet rear sets and muffler brackets is outstanding, and it’s rare to see a full Akropovich exhaust of this vintage.  The owner’s comments from the for sale -post- :

Bought the bike new in 98 , it is #16 of 300 final editions Ducati produced of that generation of the SS (91 to 98) a great series , I also had a 91 and 93 super light but this was/is the nicest I’ve had.  To make it the best for me, (I didn’t like the “fuel infection” and looks of the 99’s) I took it to my friend Jeff Nash ( owner of AMS Ducati Dallas) soon after I bought it to massage it and work his magic   As I recall, it was to the tune of about 9-10k dollars extra spent back 20 years ago – I’ll try to remember all what’s been done .

He went all through the engine, balancing /lightening/polishing/porting, and adding the higher comp/displacement 944 kit, and added Kiehin FCR’s 39’s (he advised the 39’s would be much smoother than 41’s for street , and he was right) I added a 50mm Spaghetti / Titanium exhaust made by Akrapovic ( very hard to get that or Termi’s back then) also have the K+N filter airbox mod.

Ohlins rear shock , and RaceTech mod to front forks, and then the really nice/light Marchesini magnesium 5 spoke wheels.  Custom billet pipe hangers footpegs and fully adjustable clip on bar assemblies, Corbin seat, recent Optima gel battery, rear stand ,tank bag ,tinted windscreen assorted extras carbon goodies etc ..

I believe I have all the original parts , and have new tires on bike.  And sitting on the shelf , new belts, fluids and filter I haven’t got around to doing this year.

The FE reviewed as a sharp all-rounder, in hindsight made all the sweeter by the next year’s emissions-driven re-design.  Just in time for the Final Edition ( and hopefully #016 wasn’t too early to get it ) was a three-phase charging system which ended battery life woes for the air-cooled desmos.  Ducati took flack at the time for charging a premium for already depreciated tech, and with the updates this owner made, it would be interesting to know how the sale goes.  Hopefully the new owner is an RSBFS reader and can give us an in-flight report…

–donn

 

Hey 19 – 1998 Ducati 900 SS/FE
Ducati June 7, 2018 posted by

Eight Mile: Nearly New 2004 Ducati 998S Final Edition for Sale

By the time Ducati’s 916 was retired, they’d wrung just about everything out of the bike there was to wring, and the sportbike world had moved on. From a stylistic perspective, the 998 was far too familiar after ten years and, while the design was still considered a classic, it was decidedly… classic. Of course Ducatisti felt the 999 that followed moved the style on a bit too far, but a significant mechanical overhaul was a good idea, and this 998S Final Edition represents the very end of the line for Tamburini’s masterpiece of form and function.

The 998 looked pretty much like the original 916 with some updated graphics and wheels, was significantly evolved. Sure, some parts are interchangeable between the 916, 996, 998, and even the 748, but both the engine and frame changed significantly between the bike’s introduction in 1994 and 2004, when the 998 was discontinued. The 998’s frame was actually the same as the 996R, which allowed the 998 to use that bike’s larger airbox and updated injectors for additional power: 123hp, up from the 996’s 112. The new frame also allowed use of the 998cc Testastretta engine that was first used in the 996R, and bodywork was revised to wrap around the new frame and engine as well.

So while the 916 may be the original, the 998 is a much more thoroughly-developed package, with increased power and improved reliability from both the mechanical and electrical components. If you want to collect a Tamburini bike, you’re probably looking at the original 916. If you’re looking to ride your Ducati, the 998 is likely a better choice. Of course this 998S FE might be better left as a display bike: it has covered just 7.4 miles in total since it was built.

From the original eBay listing: 2004 Ducati 998S Final Edition for Sale

This is a new, never ridden 2004 Ducati 998S Final Edition.
It has the Testastretta engine, Ohlins shocks, Termignoni exhaust, and carbon fiber underbody.
It has never been licensed. I bought it thinking I would ride it later, and now I have lost interest in riding it. It has always been kept indoors and covered.
It had 7 miles on it when I purchased it from the dealer, and I have not added any more.

If you missed buying the most refined version of Tamburini’s superbike new, this is just about the closest thing you’re going to find now. It isn’t one of the high-performance homologation models like the R or SPS, but that insane mileage makes it one of the rarest Ducatis around. Honestly, this is a collector and not a rider, and would probably need some work after basically sitting for the past 14 years if you wanted to actually use it, but if you want a museum piece, this is your bike. The seller is asking an eye-watering $25,000 for this one, which is stiff money for a 998. But how many are there in existence like it at this point?

-tad

Eight Mile: Nearly New 2004 Ducati 998S Final Edition for Sale