Posts by tag: F1

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Ducati June 15, 2022 posted by

Classified: 1986 Ducati 750 F1

In the late 1980s, the Ducati F1 was – technologically speaking – a bit of a relic. The revolutionary Kawasaki Ninja had already been in market for two years, offering cutting-edge performance based on a 4-valve per cylinder, liquid cooled platform. The mighty Suzuki GSX-R750 had already made a huge splash, using innovation to add performance and reduce weight. And Ducati? Ducati rolled out an old school, 2-valve, air cooled twin that had both feet firmly mired in the 1970s. What the F1 was missing was zoot suit technology. But the 1970s taught Ducati a LOT about racing, about balance, and about what absolutely required to be on a bike. So Ducati did that – and added nothing else. The result was an extremely narrow, lightweight, stable platform that offered good real world torque and a booming note that makes everyone sit up and take notice.

From the seller:
First introduced in 1985, This Ducati 750 F1 Desmo is one of only 1801 examples produced. Between 1985-1988, Ducati created a street performance version of their race bread machine. Offering the air cooled 748cc Desmodromic engine with the iconic Tri-Color Italian graphics to the public, Ducati’s air cooled L-twin Desmodromic engine combined with the race proven dry clutch, harmonizes with the acoustics of the mechanical parts and exhaust note, creating a machine of function and form, equally.

More from the seller:
This iteration comes with many tasteful race-ready upgrades to improve upon the already impressive machine, these upgrades include: Arkront Magnesium 2-piece wheels (Spain), Lindeman Enterprises rear suspension (aka Lindemann Engineering). Verlicchi Swing arm, Carbon Tech exhaust.

Based on the 600TT racer, the 750 F1 started out life with an impressive pedigree. Much of the DNA was retained in the form of the trellis frame, and very lightweight bodywork, the Pantah motor used as a stressed member, and the Brembo brakes. The F1 – as special as it was – spawned several even more limited editions, including the Montjuich, Laguna Seca and Santamonica, which were all based on the same platform.

These are relatively rare collector machines, and this particular bike does sport some tasty upgrades. This is being listed as a Classified ad, with the seller looking for a cool $18,900 – or reasonable offer. There does appear to be something wonky with the right rear turn signal, but the extent of damage (if it is damaged) is not clear in the photos. We do not see these come up for sale all that often, and since they were produced in limited numbers they will always be scarce and coveted. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Classified: 1986 Ducati 750 F1
Honda May 28, 2022 posted by

A Sip a Cylinder – 1988 CBR250R

Image 1 - 1988 Honda CBR

1988 Honda CBR250R

In the modern era of sport bikes, it’s easy to visualize how much displacement is needed to propel you into the ditch of one of the two mildly curvy sections of blacktop in your sprawling suburb. Just think of all the times you got a 36oz Big Gulp. Our Harley brethren have the pleasure of visualizing the displacement of their engines right before they ride into a ditch via 60 oz of Miller Lite from the local watering hole. To visualize what the CBR250R needs, just think of when you’re cleaning up after a get together and you find that 2/3 full beer that someone told themselves they’d revisit at a later point. Divide that by 4 and now we’re talking a sip a cylinder.

In America, the reason we don’t like the 1/3 beer drinker is the same reason we didn’t like the CBR250R. You can’t get in trouble with them. Small displacement bikes are considered “beginner” bikes and have never scratched the itch for the US markets. Consequently, these bikes only end up in the states after collectors import them. Such is the case for this low-mile example today.

Image 4 - 1988 Honda CBR

The most intriguing things about a CBR250R are the looks and redline. Similar weight, suspension, and power are all easy to find today. The double headlights and classic Honda racing colors have aged so well. The seller hasn’t posted many pictures but the cosmetic condition is pretty good from what can be seen outside of some marks on the rims.

Image 2 - 1988 Honda CBR

The engine is other spectacle here. The picture of the cockpit teases the  18k redline which places the engine characteristics of this bike solidly in line with the engines found in premier class racing. High revs, gear-driven cams, light pistons, and an oversquare setup delivers minimal torque but 45 hp up top.

Image 5 - 1988 Honda CBR

From the seller:

For sale 1988 Honda CBR 4 cylinder  rare bike imported from Japan runs and rides amazing only 6447 original kilometers Clean title. If you have any question, please call or text me 843 9255097 thanks

Image 3 - 1988 Honda CBR

The seller seems to be a man of few words and pictures so there should be some more legwork done. However, we can assume he has good taste considering the MT-01 in the background.

Here’s an example that sold on BAT during COVID for $6,500 and can be used as a reference point if you choose to make an offer. Good luck and finish your beer.

-Norm

A Sip a Cylinder – 1988 CBR250R
Honda July 26, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 1989 Honda CBR600 Hurricane

Update 7.26.21: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

From the classics section of milestone motorcycles comes the wonderful Honda 600 Hurricane. Officially known as the CBR600F when introduced in 1987, the Hurricane was Honda’s wash and wear tuxedo for the ultra-competitive middleweight class; this was a bike that could do everything well. With a raspy liquid cooled inline four that was completely enclosed by bodywork, the Hurricane made a statement that set it apart from the rest of the crowd. During this time, full bodywork was an actual thing, with Bimota (DB1) and Ducati (Paso) leading the trend. Honda’s entry was vastly different than the other Japanese Big Four offerings and resulted in a runaway showroom success that spawned many variants. Up through 1990 these became known as the first series bikes (CBR-F1, if you will), and what followed were the F2, F3 and F4 models.

Featured Listing – 1989 Honda CBR600 Hurricane

As the magazine adverts at the time stated, even the Ninja fears the Hurricane. And that was not too far from the truth. The CBR pumped out 85 ponies at the crank – plenty of motive force to push what was described as the lightest and quickest middleweight of the time to the top of the timing sheets. With air-adjustable anti-dive forks and a rising rate rear linkage with preload settings, the Honda could handle with the best of them. Our seller Jim is an obvious fan of the model. He has provided a ton of detail on this bike, and I will let him pick up the story here:

From the seller:
Lordy, I hate selling my motorcycles. This 1989 Honda CBR 600 “Hurricane” caught my eye the minute I saw it on Ebay a few years back. All I’ve done in my ownership is to ride it, enjoy it, and maintain it (like my other bikes). I’m a collector but everything must be ridden! I’ve put a thousand miles on it (odo is now 26,517) and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it. As far as I’m concerned the custom red/white/blue seat puts it over the top. It’s been stored properly and tendered during the entire time I’ve owned it. The bikes starts and runs smoothly and everything works! It’s also been freshly serviced.

When the “jelly mould” styling came out in 1987 everyone was a fan of the styling but I just simply loved that full enclosure bodywork back then. That full enclosure bodywork hides a steel frame, an inline four cylinder engine of 598cc with twin cam, 16 valves and 85Bhp. Did I mention it runs great? In 1989 this bike was the quickest and most powerful middleweight ever built, but it was it’s the complete user-friendly nature of the bike that make the bike what it is—-super, all day comfortable yet still la great handler.

More from the seller:
CBR stands for “City Bike Racing” and Honda’s idea was to create a bike that could take you to work and back five days a week and then win races on at the weekend. I get it—-30+ years later it still performs its mission well.

For the 1989 model year the hugely successful CBR600 got upgraded with minor tweeks. It looked the same jelly mould bike but underneath it got higher compression (11.3:1, up from 11:1), the cam timing was revised, bigger carbs fitted, new ignition and a beefed up clutch. It also got adjustable rebound damping. Power was increased from 85Bhp to 93Bhp and, apparently was a noticeable difference.

Performance
0-60mph 3.5 secs
0-100mph 7.7 secs
Top Speed 137mph
Fuel consumption 45mpg

More from the seller:
The CBR600F1 had a nice set of clocks that I still think look great today with their red details and markers. These clocks always looked great at night with their orange/red glow. There is just something about a set of needles, gently illuminated from below as you ride into the twilight. OK, maybe that’s a bit too poetic but you get the picture. This is a great vintage bike in very good condition.

Nit-pick items? One of the mirrors is a little faded so it’s a slight creamy white. It looks like one of the red decals is peeling up just a hair on the tank. The bike is not perfect but it’s in damn good condition and is surrounded by admirers wherever I ride. You won’t be disappointed. Be prepared to ride all day!

Price: $3,600 $3,300 USD

While never particularly rare in the day (this was a very popular model for Honda dealers), we do not often see these wonderful machines in such fantastic condition. Quite simply, most have been abused, dropped, stunted, raced, crashed and resold for scrap. This bike looks great, comes from a RSBFS enthusiast who has taken care of the beast, and is now offering up this example of a legendary model for a mere $3,600 $3,300. With typical Honda engineering and build quality, this is a bike that will last a lifetime of use when properly maintained. You are not likely to find anything that will turn heads – or put a bigger smile on your face – for that small of an outlay. It even has period correct F1 slip ons!

MI

Featured Listing – 1989 Honda CBR600 Hurricane
Ducati March 1, 2021 posted by

New-ish Old School: 1986 Ducati 750 F1

The Ducati 750 F1 is about as old school cool as you can get. Devoid of any wizardry found on more modern motorcycles, the F1 is a basic bare-knuckle brawler with fancy footwork. To call this a race bike for the street would certainly be accurate, given the underlying DNA came directly from the factory TT1 and TT2 racers. Sporting a similar trellis frame and utilizing a Pantah-era engine punched out to 748cc that were both first utilized in the TT1 racer, the F1 offers a no-nonsense riding experience that is raw and pure.

1986 Ducati 750 F1 for sale on eBay

Both the TT1 and the TT2 racers were effective weapons at such iconic places as the Isle of Man. The F1 followed in those footsteps – such that there were three “special edition” models of the bike named after famous racing circuits such as Montjuich (Spain), Stanta Monica (Italy) and Laguna Seca (United States). With about 70 HP on tap, the F1 was not so much a rocket ship as an adequately fast – but extremely nimble – racing sled. With no anti-lock brakes, no anti-wheelie control, no anti-stall device, no traction control and no quick shifter, this relic is missing everything that helps make racing motorcycles fast today. But what remains is the essence of motorcycling, distilled down to only what needs to be there. Creature comforts? Sorry, not on this bike. If it doesn’t make you faster or the bike lighter, it simply isn’t there. THAT is the beauty of the F1 series, in a nutshell.

From the seller:
Selling one of my 750 F1’s, bike got a new paint job, new belts, overall in great shape. Comes with set of original turn signals and a few more parts. Was last on the street probably 20 years ago when I bought it, see manufacturing date from tires. I had the bike for 3 years and only rode it twice, restored it to what you see and now selling it. Needs new tires and the turn signals which I installed are not connected yet, everything else works and bike starts cold and warm very well. The last 4 pictures show the bike as it looked when I got it, from the original ad when I bought the bike: “Rare 1986 Ducati F1B. Super trap tail pipe, repaired gauge mount, last ridden Donner Pass Hwy 40 hill climb 2000. Fresh oil, new battery, petcock eliminated, runs good. Liquidating collection.”.
More information can also be found at raresportbikesforsale.com when you search for Ducati 750 F1B.
Happy to answer any additional question.

The seller is correct in that we at RSBFS have seen a lot of these F1 machines (and more specialized variants) posted on these pages. In fact, this exact bike graced our pages in its earlier tricolore guise back in 2017. Comments were not kind regarding the butchered paint job, and this seller has done a great job restoring the livery to former glory. Here is a link to find other F1s on RSBFS. Researching older posts offers a great way to learn more about the model, but can also help describe the rough historical value of these models over time. Those serious about a bike such as this F1 would be well advised to do their homework.

This particular example looks pretty good in the pictures. It shows a nicely painted F1 in the standard Italian tricolore scheme. Mileage is low (4,200 claimed), however given that this bike had been raced it is possible that the speedo drive has been disconnected at some point in its life. There appear to be other minor foibles that may need to be sorted here as well. Sharp eyes will also spot some non-stock additions, including modifications to the left-side lowers as well as the tail section. But such is the nature of a 35 year old racer that aspired to be a street bike. There is no claim of “all original, zero miles” here, and the seller has been open about the efforts undertaken to bring this classic back to the status it deserves. Bidders have agreed, with decent traffic and action up to $7,300 at the time of writing. Quite a few watchers are standing by, so expect a lot more bidding once the reserve has been met. Check out all of the details and pics on this auction here. Good Luck!!

MI

New-ish Old School: 1986 Ducati 750 F1
Ducati February 11, 2021 posted by

N’elefant – 1986 Ducati 750 F1A with 4,655 Miles !

Ducati readied their new sportbike just about the time the Castiglioni family presented their investment plan, and F1’s took a mid-model livery change.  Here’s a pre-Cagiva F1A which has been barely ridden and recently freshened up.

1986 Ducati 750 F1A for sale on eBay

The F1 harkens back to the 750 Imola Desmo, with a thin but full fairing, trellis frame, and 748cc’s of L-twin.  The desmodue delivered 63 hp, but had a nice torque band to push on the 5-speed.  Marzocchi provided the 38mm forks and the shock mounted to the cantilever monoshock.  Brakes were single-puck Brembo’s, and wheels were staggered with 16-inch front and 18-inch rear.  Embracing back-to-basics before it was trendy, bringing a friend or lunch would require a second bike and a backpack.

The Massachusetts owner states they are just the third custodian in under 7,500 km or 4,655 miles, and condition varies between good and excellent.  The frame evidently was re-painted, and it looks like the shop receipt show piston rings, so maybe the jugs got new gaskets along with the valve adjustment.  Wouldn’t be a huge leap to secure the darn battery and re-finish the seat console, to really make this F1A something special.  Comments from the eBay auction:

Pre-Cagiva lettering, Nippendenso Guages, alloy tank and other F1A features includes what I think is a competition Conti. Zero miles on recent major service including belts, valve check, fluid flush, tires, battery (removed), chassis and engine fairing paint refresh.  Seat section is original with what looks like loose battery dings on top.  There is a small dent in the aluminum tank on left side, see pictures, I tried to get it but it is small but there.  Dent-less paint remover should take care if it.  I am the 3rd owner and have owned since 2002.  I have ownership and service history from new.  Sold originally from Razee in Massachusetts.  While cared for I bought this bike to ride not to polish. Garaged its entire life.

The F1 came at a premium compared to their Japanese competition, but found fans and success in the “Battle of Twins” support races.  In the 1985 BoT at Daytona, GP Champion Marco Lucchinelli rode from the back of the pack ( he was a last-minute entry ) to challenge eventual winner Gene Church on an XR1000 Harley-Dave.  These days it might be best for an afternoon of twisties, allowing the torque and light weight to work their magic.

-donn

N’elefant – 1986 Ducati 750 F1A with 4,655 Miles !
Ducati December 27, 2020 posted by

Holiday Colors – 1986 Ducati 750 F1B

A touchstone to Supersport fans, the F1 was lightly built but had the innovative 750cc L-twin.  Offered by a classic specialist in Santa Monica, this F1B shows just over 8,000 miles in Km, but looks much better.

1986 Ducati 750 F1B for sale on eBay

The F1 packed a lot into its smallish envelope, chassis and swingarm were chromoly tubing, cradling the 75 hp engine from above.  Both cylinders exhaust toward the front, with a short intake tube allowing the forward Dell’Orto some cool air.  Forcella 40mm forks and a Marzocchi monoshock handled suspension duties, and 280mm disk brakes used just a single set of opposed pucks.  A 16-inch front wheel reduced gyroscopic mass, easing turn-in without an extreme geometric solution.  Aluminum fittings are billet-cut, but precede any Bimota-style brightwork.  The F1B was also available with a dual seat, but the monoposto offers a more authoritative spot to the rider.

At nearly 35 years of age, the longer history almost doesn’t matter, since this F1 was on display and recently tuned up for the next owner.  Blinkers are more modern but less obtrusive than the originals, otherwise its light preparation has an honest look.  From the eBay auction:

This F1B comes from a private collection of sport bikes and remains to its original specification apart from a change of indicators. From static display, the bike has had life breathed back in it with fantastic results. The recommissioning was minimal, and the bike now starts easily on the button and revs freely with a thunderous soundtrack. The bikes stops and goes around corners as well as the fabulous Tri-colore livery looks.

In very good condition, the bike shows minimal wear conducive with 8,000 miles and 33 years of enjoyment. A brilliant ‘80s ride and collectible piece of Ducati history.

The water cooled and four-valve 851 succeeded the F1 after a few years, arguably Ducati’s first superbike.  But bridging the air-cooled desmo through a change in ownership ( and thankfully not a name change ), gave the F1 an important place in the list of models.  The three circuit-named special editions gave testament to the TT heritage, and though they might be the most collectible, an unadorned F1B has its own, how do you say je ne sais quoi in Italian ?

-donn

Holiday Colors – 1986 Ducati 750 F1B
Ducati March 24, 2019 posted by

Small Batch: 1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Behold the mighty Ducati F1 special edition “Laguna Seca.” Essentially a factory hot rod based on the F1 (a 750cc version of the Tourist Trophy), the Laguna Seca shared a special tier with the two other limited edition models, the Santamonica and the Montjuich. All of the special models were named after race tracks where a Ducati rider pulled a first place rabbit out of a hat. In this case, it was Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli prevailing at the 1986 Battle of the Twins (BOTT) event at the famed California track. The Laguna Seca was closest to the Montjuich in spec, the differences being largely related to the intended target audience: North America. As such, changes were basically limited to emissions and noise controls. The rest is pure 1980s Ducati goodness; rough and ready, light and lean. The seller has written (or copied?) a good story of the Laguna Seca (and the F1 model in general), so I will let him pick up the tale:

1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Frame no. ZDM750LS*750059*
Engine no. ZDM750L1*750194

Less than 300 examples made

Only 6,500 miles from new

Considered by many enthusiasts to be the last of the ‘real’ Ducatis, the race-styled 750 F1 first appeared in 1985. Ducati had already enjoyed considerable success with its Pantah-derived F2 racers in FIM Formula 2 racing – Tony Rutter winning the championship four-times running between 1981 and 1984 – so a ‘750’ version was the logical next step.

First seen in prototype form in endurance races in 1983, the F1’s 748cc engine was the latest in a long line of stretches applied to the original 500c ‘belt drive’ Desmo unit that had first appeared in the Pantah in 1979 – a street-legal updated version of the mid-’80s TT1. A markedly over-square design of 88×61.5mm bore/stroke, the F1 engine produced around 60bhp and functioned as a stressed element within the frame, the swinging arm pivoting in the rear of the gearbox. Clearly visible above the deliberately cut away fairing sides, the aforementioned frame attracted almost as much attention as the engine: a trellis of short, straight tubes, it has formed the basis of every road-going Ducati since, as well as the first Desmosedici Moto GP racers. In the fashion of the day, the F1 came with a 16-inch front wheel, while braking power was provided by state-of-the-art triple Brembos. The stock F1 was complemented by a series of hand-built, limited edition, race replicas – Montjuich, Santamonica and Laguna Seca – the last inspired by Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli’s famous ‘Battle of the Twins’ race victory at Daytona in 1986. Today the evocatively named F1 and its derivatives are highly prized by Ducati collectors.

Much like the Montjuich, the Laguna Seca came with bigger Dell’Orto carburetors, higher compression ratio, bigger valves, and straight-cut primary drive gears. And talk of 95bhp at 10,000rpm! But unlike the Montjuich, it came with a larger, quieter muffler.

There were some small changes between the two bikes, namely in the Laguna’s parts from the new Paso. The delta-spoked one-piece 16-inch Oscam wheels and the brake discs, but not the four-piston ‘racing’ Brembo front calipers, came from the 750 Paso, as did the wider front fender. Other changes included a ‘Lucky’ signature steel gas tank, revised foot peg bracketry and a plastic rear sub-fender attached to the swing arm. Most Laguna Secas came with a solo seat and were built in limited numbers (perhaps as few as 296.)

Not a lot of history about this particular example, although the read is a good one (reminds me of Ian Faloon). The only point of note I see on this bike is the non-standard Ohlins external shock reservoir strapped to the left side of the iconic trestle frame chassis (original shock was a Marzocchi PVS 4). Any other changes are unknown with the facts given, and with only 3 pictures to work with there are many questions left unanswered. But with only 6,500 miles, this beauty is undoubtedly clean and very rare. I’m not sure if proper etiquette deems we refer to this as the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Laguna Seca Raceway, but the connection is very clear. Also clear is the asking price: a not insignificant $24,900. That is a bit higher than we usually see these bikes offered – although the seller appears open to a lesser figure – so if you’re in the market for one of these beautiful and rare model Pantahs you should act quickly. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on the F1 model Ducatis: are you a fan? Good Luck!!

MI

Ducati August 9, 2018 posted by

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca

The 1980s were a period of gestation for Ducati, hitting their sportbike stride with the move from the bevel drive motors to the now-ubiquitous rubber belt-driven desmo valve train. And while Japan focused on technology such as four valves per cylinder, liquid cooling and a constantly changing array of multi-cylinder configurations, Ducati stuck to what they knew: a robust L-twin with simple (and light) air cooling, desmodronic valve actuation, and a steel trellis frame. The F1 lacked the refinement and outright power of the Japanese competition, but the magic was in what wasn’t there; the F1 weighed less than the competition, and the narrow configuration of the twin made for a compact and very agile racer. Although time and technology left it behind, the F1 and its variants remain a significant era for the Cagiva-owned company.

1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

Sitting on the cusp of the next era (the legendary 851 was released this very same year), the F1 was becoming long in the tooth before its time. To bridge the gap to the next model and keep interest in the F1 alive, Ducati released three special editions: The Santamonica, the Montjuich and the Laguna Seca. These limited edition models consisted of unique paint schemes and minor changes (some cosmetic, some performance related). Power across the three remained identical, while some of the running gear changed based on markets and need. All of these special edition bikes run 16″ wheels front and rear, and all have special cosmetic touches to highlight the fact that they are unique. The Laguna Seca utilizes a steel gas tank (unlike the aluminum model on the Montjuich), and the wheels, brakes and fender are Paso items. Yet despite the archaic configuration and Cagiva parts bin raiding, any of the F1 specials remain collectible high-points in Ducati model history.

From the seller:
This bike is a 1987 Ducati Laguna Seca, one of 200 produced to commemorate Ducati’s victory at that California track. From ’86 to ’88 Ducati would release a trio of special edition F1’s in celebration of the machine’s various successes around the world – the Montjuich, Santa Monica, and Laguna Seca. The Laguna Seca spec commemorated Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli winning the 1986 “Battle of the Twins” at the iconic, technical Northern-California circuit . In addition to wearing a Lucky Lucchinelli livery, the F1 Laguna Seca also boasts a decal of Lucchinelli’s signature on the tank of the limited edition Ducati. I purchased this machine in 1999 from the original owner’s estate in Southampton, NY with 614 kilometers on the odometer.

Currently this bike is in excellent condition and has travelled a mere 848 kilometers since new. It has been made more streetable by the conversion to Mikuni carbs, but the original Dell’Ortos are included in the sale price. All other parts of the bike are original except for the tires. The original Pirelli MP7S tires are included as well. It has been started regularly and taken for occasional local rides. I believe this to be the 189th Laguna Seca produced as evidenced by the VIN ZDM3GA3M0HB750189. This is a classic, rare Ducati that is difficult to find in any condition and would make a great addition to any sophisticated collection of Italian motorcycles or a great weekend ride with sympathetic Ducatisti.

In the past these F1-based specials have generated strong interest and stronger prices. There has not been too much interest in this particular example, which is strange due to the low mileage and clean, excellent condition. The opening ask is $15k; and while not exactly pocket change it is far from the highest opening for one of these models. In fact, I would consider it right on the money based on history. The paintwork looks clean and where modifications have happened (i.e. carb replacement, new tires) the originals are included in the sale. That is important for a collector, but maybe less so for someone intending to ride this beast. And who wouldn’t want to? I can practically hear the bark of the exhaust through the Conti pipe, feel the rumble of the L-twin loping just off idle, and imagine what my neighbors might think. Raw and crude in many respect, this relative relic is a riot riding on 16″ rubber.

Unfortunately, this looks to be another low mile icon destined for a comfy parking space somewhere inside. One can always hope to see and hear it run in anger, but at this price that will likely be a rare occasion. Still, it is nice to see that this Laguna Seca example did rack up some mileage up to this point. It has also survived the ravages of time and corporate changes that befell Ducati. This is a wonderful and rare survivor that deserves a good home. And despite the fact that the historic track for which it was named has itself gone through some naming changes, the Ducati F1 Laguna Seca will remain a significant model for the brand and a major collectible for those with the means and taste. If you are among that group, be sure and check it out here. And then you can jump back to the comments and share your thoughts: which F1 model do you covet – if any? Good Luck!!

MI

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca