Monthly Archives: January 2019

Kawasaki January 19, 2019 posted by

Warm Leatherette – 2001 Kawasaki Ninja ZX7R

This ZX7R has popped up from the middle of the 1996-2003 run, mostly stock and showing no particular damage.  The owner lists a recent major service, battery and new tires.  Not a ground-breaking design or super lightweight, the mid-size Ninja did nail down a few AMA Superbike titles, and is still a great looking ride.

2001 Kawasaki Ninja ZX7R for sale on eBay

Kawasaki evolved the 748cc in-line four from the ZXR-750, and it puts out a very usable 112 hp.  The alloy twin-spar chassis was also a refinement from the previous model and offers a great-steering platform.  House adjustable USD forks and monoshock reviewed at the sporty end of the spectrum, rather stiff for road duty.  Six-piston Tokico brakes over 320mm rotors were up to the task.  Scoops next to the cat’s eye headlights send fresh air to the engine, and the biposto seat console offers a nice backstop for a solo rider.

With rather low mileage at 13K, this example looks great – but of course some close-ups would be nice, and we’ll have to look under that tank bra.  The color-matched pillion looks good, and the green Micron muffler will either delight or incite.  Surprising to see un-altered turn signals and tail feathers.  From the eBay auction:

Mint condition Kawasaki Ninja ZX7R. The only thing that is not original is the Micron can. I have the original black back seat for it. The bike only has 13,000 miles. It has never been laid down. There are a few minute scratches. It’ll be difficult to find one that’s this clean. The bike has new tires , battery and the front calipers rebuilt and all the fluids changed. The bike had a hung up float from sitting however that problem has been taken care of. Own a piece of history! The bike really needs someone that’s going to ride it. All it does is sit with me. It is maintained and started regularly. The bike runs and rides like a brand new machine.

Collectors will want a second -R, wanting an homologation special to keep up with their RC30 / OW01 buddies.  Not exactly plain vanilla but a perfect sport rider, carefully used, just a little young to be termed a classic…

-donn

Warm Leatherette – 2001 Kawasaki Ninja ZX7R
BMW January 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Honest-to-God 2012 Suter BMW MotoGP bike

You read the headline correctly. What you are looking at is an honest-to-God MotoGP racebike that won the CRT class at the 2012 Qatar Grand Prix under American roadracing hero and two-time World Superbike champion Colin Edwards. The overall win went to Jorge Lorenzo, who was on his way to his second MotoGP championship. Edwards crossed the line 12th overall, a testament to the difference between CRT and the factory machines.  

Based on a bespoke Suter chassis, the bike was powered by a warmed up WSBK-spec BMW S1000RR engine. Even with the better part of 240 horses, the BMW mill was handicapped compared to the factory rides by electronics and development time. Having almost 240 horses is one thing, putting it down is quite another. For a painfully detailed look at the season, click here.

The seller’s description of the bike is pretty basic, but there is a detailed fact sheet with more photos here.

Being a MotoGP machine, this bike does not have the battlescars and booboos that former racebikes generally wear. It’s got just enough dirt to look as if it just cooled down from taking the checkered flag at Valencia, but otherwise is in beautiful shape.

The bike wears all of its as-raced MotoGP parts, including the Bosch data acquisition electronics, and 16.5-inch magnesium wheels, with a fresh set of GP-spec Bridgestone slicks included.

CRT, short for claiming rule team, was a short-lived section of the MotoGP rules that allowed teams without factory money to compete at the big dance. Head over to the always wonderful Moto Matters to learn how the CRT bikes differed from the full-on factory mounts.

Though the bikes were always destined to be slower than their better-funded factory-backed competitors, they made for some truly innovative and interesting machines. This 2012 Suter BMW CRT machine was a work-in-progress for the season Edwards was aboard, and even on the night he won in the desert, the famously blunt Texan was only medium happy with its performance.

For anyone below The Texas Tornado’s talent level (which is everyone), the bike will be an absolute monster. At $99,000 not including transport, it represents something of a bargain, considering Forward Racing would have spent more than that on just the engine back in 2012. If you have the means and the skill, Speedbox can be contacted through their website.

Featured Listing: Honest-to-God 2012 Suter BMW MotoGP bike
Moto Guzzi January 18, 2019 posted by

The Manly Ride: 1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans

My knowledge of French comes courtesy of car manufacturer Renault (pronounced Run-Not) who marketed Le Car in the 1970s. It came with Le Tires, Le Hubcaps, and Le tiny little motor. But it was, according to Renault, a car. Popular Mechanics dubbed it a French VW Rabbit, low on style but practical and useful. Thankfully the Italians speak foreign languages better than we Yanks. And in Italian, Le Mans is not merely The Men, but rather a reference to a popular French vacation locale along the Sarthe river. Oh, and also the name of a pretty famous racetrack known for endurance competition. And unlike Le Car, the Le Mans is high on style, while still offering practicality and performance. Today’s find is a first generation 850cc example in Le Euro trim.

1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans for sale on eBay

The Moto Guzzi Le Mans was introduced in 1976. Today we think of these as Gen I machines, however there was no such official nomenclature for the original release; that came with the introduction of the Gen II design. There were two different builds of this model, referred to as Series One and Series Two. The Series One bikes were the first (approximately) 2,000 examples, and the most rare. The Series Two bikes had some minor cosmetic changes (different seat, rectangular tail light, black fork sliders, etc), and numbered approximately 4,000. Either way you look at it, the first generation of the Le Mans is relatively rare today – especially one wearing original patina and remaining relatively stock.

From the seller:
1978 Moto Guzzi Lemans euro. I’ve owned and cared for this bike since early 2001.

It started it’s life in London,England, was moved to Los Angeles, where i purchased it, and now lives in Ohio where i now work. I have a bit of paperwork on the provenance of the bike. This Moto Guzzi is a very low mileage bike that is all original except for raask period rearsets and side covers. I have the original foam seat, front turn signals, and one of the original sidecovers. The right side cover was lost 20 years ago on a freeway. All of these items are included and in excellent condition.

The aftermarket seat was an item I purchased from Italy 15 years ago. It has proved to be a good looking, functional piece for this bike. This Guzzi runs like a freight train, like original, unmolested lemans should. Only Guzzi and Ducati savvy mechanics have touched this bike it’s whole life.

The euro models have non matching frame and engine numbers, all can be traced, and a short headlight frame, and no bright orange fairing paint job. This bike has an excellent original patina, no crashes, dents, etc. Engine is very tight, with only some minor weep dusting at the back. Makes you wonder why people ever had to restore these bikes. All gauges, electrical work as expected.

These early Moto Guzzis can be thought of as very similar to air-head era BMWs. The hardware layout of air-cooled twin with longitudinal crank, pushrod two-valve heads, inline transmission and shaft drive is the same – if you bent the Beemer’s cylinders upwards 45 degrees per side. Brakes on both are Brembos. Swap the Bing carbs for Dellortos and you have Le Guzzi! Blip the throttle and the torque roll is the same between the Italian and German machine. So too is the driveshaft reaction that causes the rear of the bike to raise under throttle, and drop when the throttle is cut. But resemblances end there. Unlike the Teutonic autobhan stormer, the Le Mans is just so, well, Italian. The Le Mans looks faster, offers a reasonably stout 80 HP thanks to high compression pistons, and offers the immutable “cafe racer” look before that look was a collector thing.

This particular bike started life across the pond, but now lives in the US. As a result it wears some cosmetic differences compared to officially imported examples. The owner(s) have also made some mods, all which look to be non destructive. The black side covers look period correct, but the originals were color coded to the bike (fun fact: not all Le Mans models were red/black). So this is not perfectly original as if it were parked in a museum since Day 1 – but you should age this well. At 41 years new, this bike is just hitting its mechanical stride, and is perfect for a rider. Prices are always hot for pre-80s Guzzis, and this one is starting right at the five figure territory (with no takers as of yet). Check it out here, and then hit the Comments for a compare and contrast: How do you take your vintage Guzzi? Would you prefer a plain V7, or the Le Mans? Let us know, and Le Good Luck!!

MI

The Manly Ride:  1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans
Sport Bikes For Sale January 18, 2019 posted by

Some Assembly Required: 1994 Britten V1000 SCALE MODEL for Sale

Look, I know it sucks: you’re never going to own a Britten. You’re never going to ride one. Honestly, most people will never actually see one in person. Maybe someday, someone will build a run of nearly perfect replicas built to the original specifications. But even if they do, you probably won’t see one of those, either. But you can buy this scale model of the Britten V1000, and that’s not a bad thing.

The V1000 is the ne plus ultra of scrappy underdog stories, and reminds me of the first Iron Man film, “Tony Stark was able to build this in a cave! With a box of scraps!” John Britten had use of a shed and a bit of help, but lacked Stark’s resources and his V1000 certainly looks as impossible as a suit of flying armor, with an even more unlikely color scheme.

Just ten bikes made, with the lurid metallic blue and pink version being perhaps the most iconic. Looking absolutely alien, even to this day, the Britten V1000 took conventional thinking and pretty much threw it out the window. Nearly every single component was radical and innovative.

Suspension consisted of a carbon-fiber Hossack front end dampened by an Öhlins shock, with the rear Öhlins unit mounted in front of the engine and connected to the carbon-fiber swingarm via pushrods. The bike is basically frameless, and uses the engine as a fully-stressed structural member. A minimalist carbon-fiber structure links the heads and provides a mounting point for the front suspension. The swooping, minimalist bodywork is also carbon-fiber, and was designed to provide significant downforce, while vents in the nose ducted air to an underseat radiator. The wheels were made of carbon-composite.

The powerplant itself was perhaps the most conventional component of the bike, although it did feature programmable engine mapping and data-logging that can be accessed via laptop, something unheard of at the time. It was a narrow-angle 60° v-twin designed entirely by Britten, displacing an on-the-limit 999cc that produced a claimed 166hp and included the usual raft of race-spec internals, but interestingly lacked balance-shafts. The five-speed gearbox from Yamaha was one of few significant components not produced in-house by Britten, although I’ve read there was an optional six-speed box available as well.

The result weighed just 304lb and recorded a top speed of 188mph at Daytona. The V1000 was successful in competition, winning various events between 1991 and 1994, mostly in twins-only series, since it was obviously never going to qualify for production-based racing. A shame, since one can only imagine it would have stacked up well against Ducati in WSBK.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Britten V1000 MODEL for Sale

This Kit is 1:12 Scale of possibly the greatest Motorcycle ever raced.

This is number 115 of the first 200 ever produced to fund the development of the Britten.

Check out the kit’s influence on YouTube

These kits are an investment: there will never be any more produced since the factory was destroyed in the devastating earthquake at Christchurch NZ southern Island.

This kit is complete and unassembled.

Early kits included a supporters product pamphlet. It is included.

The metal is silver pewter of the best quality with brass screws.

The only plastic is the screen and control lines it has rubber tires.

Check with the seller for Postage cost.

THIS ITEM IS LOCATED IN AUSTRALIA

200 kits were produced to “fund the development of the Britten”?! Just how much did these kits cost originally? The seller is asking $1,200, and I’ve no idea what this might really be worth now, but it’s a pretty cool piece of history. Speaking from experience, this combination of metal, plastic, and rubber isn’t something you’d want to try and throw together unless you’ve got some skill. Unfortunately, part of its collectible value is that it hasn’t been assembled, presenting the potential buyer with a conundrum: keep it in the original box, or commission a build of the thing. Or hey, if you’re an experienced modeller, go right ahead and build it yourself for the ultimate desktop fantasy.

-tad

Some Assembly Required: 1994 Britten V1000 SCALE MODEL for Sale
Ducati January 17, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1997 Ducati 900SS CR in rare yellow!

Update 1.28.2019: This bike has sold to an RSBFS reader. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The Ducati 900 SuperSport line can trace its lineage a long way back. If you overlook the change from bevel-driven valve actuation to rubber belt drive, you can trace the DNA well into the 1970s. If you are looking for bleeding edge technology and the latest fads, you are missing the point. This is a motorcycle that is more than a collection of parts, even though the parts are very, very good. The Ducati SuperSport is a raw, basic sport bike that talks to the rider and gives willingly. With tons of great noise, torque, stability and panache, the SuperSport offers up a unique experience that is very Ducati.

Featured Listing: 1997 Ducati 900SS CR!

The SuperSport of the 90s came in 3 models: The SS CR (cafe racer) you see here, the SS SP (sports production) with upgraded suspension & brakes, and the SS SL (SuperLight). Originally only the SuperLight was available in yellow, while the SSCR and SSSP shipped in red livery with either gold or white accents depending upon the year. All had the same engine and chassis. The yellow CR is definitely an anomaly in the SuperSport world, and in many ways is the best looking of the bunch. The lighter color shows off the curves of the “just enough but not too much” bodywork. Thumb the starter and the 2-valve, air cooled desmo twin barks to life, idling with a pleasing lump. There is not a lot of RPM to play with by Japanese specs, but with torque available from 2,500 on up to redline, all is extremely usable. The twin arrangement creates a narrow profile and a comfortable cockpit.

From the seller:
1997 Ducati 900SS CR in the rare yellow

34,915 miles. High compression pistons. Termignoni carbon fiber slip-ons in exceptional condition. Open airbox with K&N filter. Brembo full floating cast iron rotors (as found on the SP). STM clutch slave cylinder. Stock forks were rebuilt/resprung several years ago. There’s a very small ding in the tank but overall the bike is in outstanding condition.

Best of all…

The bike has been freshly serviced by TJ at MotoUnion in WI–ZERO miles since the valve adjustment and belts (OEM) were replaced (except what I may put on between now and when it sells). Carbs were just professionally cleaned and tuned—new jets and adjustable needles.

More from the seller:
Also replaced, with zero miles since:

· New Shorai battery

· New 520 sprockets (aluminum rear)

· New DID ERV3 520 chain

· New Dunlop Q3 tires

· New spark plugs

· New grips

· New EBC HH brake pads

· Fresh Motul RBF600 brake and clutch fluid

· Filter and full synthetic oil change

The modifications have been carefully selected and things like the windscreen and fenders are still OEM. The maintenance has thoroughly been done, so you’ll have nothing to do but ride for thousands of miles.

I may be able to help with delivery between Chicago and Deal’s Gap in early September.

The hot rod bible for the SS lineup is pretty standard. This owner has made some tasteful, effective mods without thrashing the basic concept or idea. Weight is reduced, performance increased, yet reliability is not affected. The Termis are de rigueur, and add to the already fantastic soundtrack. Ditto for the airbox mods. The brake upgrade is not often seen on a CR, and takes braking to a whole new level. And the proof here is in the pudding; 34k miles and going strong. These motors are amazingly reliable and resilient; keep up with basic maintenance, belt changes and valve adjustments and you have a bike worth keeping long after the current fad has passed. Sure, at lower speeds the steering can be a bit heavy, but the platform is so stable across the sporting speed regime that it is hard to find much to fault. Maybe it isn’t the fastest bike out there, but as a rock solid performer you would be hard pressed to find a bike that delivers the goods so consistently.


1997 Ducati SS CR

Asking price: $3950

The best part of these iconic Ducatis: they are downright affordable to own. This bike has more cost in hi-po parts than the asking price for the whole package. Maintenance is not the nightmare that some make it out to be (easily handled by a backyard mechanic, or by a local shop), and reliability is astounding for a bike that sounds so good. Performance is more than adequate for aggressive street riding, and longevity of the basic bits has been proved time and again by high mileage bikes. Heck, these things even get great gas mileage (stock: 50+ mpg, modified: in the 40 mpg range) – if that sort of thing appeals to you. And this is not a sell job; several RSBFS staffers swear by these things with their own cash as long-term owners. Adam – who is no stranger to sport bike collections, is looking to thin his herd a bit and this beautiful 900 SSCR needs a new home. Drool over the pictures and then ask yourself how you could afford NOT to add one to your stable. You’ll be glad you did!

MI

Featured Listing: 1997 Ducati 900SS CR in rare yellow!
Sport Bikes For Sale January 17, 2019 posted by

Classic smoker: 1979 Yamaha RD400F

The 1979 Yamaha RD400F Daytona Special made its name by tangling with a breaking wave of magnificent four strokes and excelling in the face of the bigger machines. By ’79, two strokes were supposed to be effectively dead, with emissions and the popularity of the new superbikes rendering them relics of a bygone era. But Yamaha had a profit center with the little RD, as well as a string of wins at Daytona to celebrate. So, they threw a bunch of money at the RD400F, refining the engine to be torquier and meet emissions and re-doing the chassis to sharpen the handling.

1979 Yamaha RD400F for sale on eBay

What resulted was a more refined, nimbler version of an already famed hooligan bike, and the press went nuts. Not only that, Yamaha’s line of two strokes survived in the U.S. for another five model years.

This 1979 Yamaha RD400F looks to be in great, mostly original shape, and the seller says frame and engine numbers match. There isn’t much in the way of a description, but the cold start video shows positive signs. In the video, the seller says it has recently had the carbs cleaned, new tires and a brake service. Pod filters and DG exhaust pipes are non-original, but the stock airbox and jets will come with the bike.

From the eBay listing:

1979 Yamaha Daytona Specila rd400f ,frame and engine matching numbers .oil injection comes with complete stock air box and extra jets Call if needed 772-321-1437 cold start video link https://youtu.be/t_FswFr_Qqc Please only bid what you can afford and have funds readily available .

Please read the terms and conditions for payment . non refundable deposit with in 24 hrs ,Terms pay pal is for deposit only (no exceptions ) full payment CASH is king !! person to person , wire transfer bank to bank !! Other payments must be discussed PRIOR to auctions end ! not after . possible cashiers / bank check on a nationally known local branch bank !! full payment due within 7 working days !! can store for 30 days will work with shippers

Buy-It-Now for this beast is set at $6,500 or best offer, which seems to be right in line with prices for nicely presented RDs.

Classic smoker: 1979 Yamaha RD400F
Triumph January 16, 2019 posted by

Goldilocks: 1999 Triumph Daytona T595 for Sale

After the John Bloor resurrection of the Triumph brand and some experimentation with both three and four-cylinder engines, it became clear the triple supplied the right blend of weight, power, and perhaps most importantly, character that provided an alternative to the run-of-the-mill fours then dominating the sportbike scene. The original Daytona used a spine frame common to all Triumph models of the period that compromised weight distribution and handling, but the newly revised Daytona T595 introduced in 1997 used an all-new tubular cast-aluminum frame that lowered the center-of-gravity and improved handling.

The new Daytona was still a bit heavier than the Japanese 750s and less powerful than the 1000s and 1100s, but that was exactly what Triumph intended. It filled a similar niche as the earlier bike, with a bit of a Goldilocks mission statement: not to hot, not too cold, it was just right. Build quality and finish were, as before, higher than the competition, with ergonomics  that were still very sporty but more relaxed as suited the roadgoing mission statement.

Handling was good but the racy swingarm was clearly a stylistic decision, as the bike had no racing pretensions and single-sided swingarm is generally heavier than a conventional unit. Power was a claimed 128hp that gave a top speed of over 160mph. The original Triumph performance exhaust adds value here, as aftermaket parts can often exacerbate the 3,500rpm flat spot and the early Sagem fuel-injection apparently works best with this pipe.

The graphics proclaim this a T595, although 1999 saw the introduction of the 955i that displaced the exact same 955cc as the earlier version and was mainly intended to clear up the misconception that the Daytona was a 600cc machine. Assuming the year is correct, it’s likely from before the changeover to the new name. Black is always a classic choice, but the bike looks especially sharp in silver, or the retina-searing “scorched yellow” that somehow suits the otherwise elegant machine.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Triumph Daytona T595 for Sale

99 Triumph Daytona for sale. Has been sitting in the back of garage for years. All fluids need to be changed and bike needs to be serviced. Bike needed a rectifier when put away. Deployments and life got in the way of enjoying this beauty. Any questions about the bike feel free to ask. GRD Cycle in White Plains MD swapped the frame for me due to a hairline crack. I have the paperwork of original purchase and frame replacement. Triumph carbon fiber accessories and trim included. Original Triumph pipe and high mount Triumph pipe included. (High mount pipe adds some hp & shows off single side swingarm wheel) Racing belly fairing, bike stand & passenger seat included also. Clear title in hand.

The Buy It Now price is set at a very low $2,499 with a starting bid of $1,499 and no takers yet, which might be a result of the bike’s current non-operational status, although a rectifier shouldn’t be too difficult to source. The title is claimed to be clear and the paperwork documenting the replacement frame should hopefully ease the fears of buyers, considering that this was a well-documented issue and a factory recall on the earlier bikes. It’s hard to get a good bead on the bike’s condition from the photos: black can be tricky to photograph effectively, but it appears to have suffered a bit in storage or had a minor tip over, with a couple scratches and damaged signals. The bike is also missing its belly pan in the photos, but is claimed to be included in the sale. It needs a bit of love, but the important parts are there and the miles are extremely low.

-tad

Goldilocks: 1999 Triumph Daytona T595 for Sale
KTM January 15, 2019 posted by

Double Fun – 2008-10 KTM RC8 1190’s

Today we have a double order of RC8 V-twin goodness, an orange ’08 intro-year with just 1,055 miles, and a black 2010 RC8R with just over 19K.  Banking on the year and low mileage, the ask on the ’08 is more than double the -R.  Tricky decision !

2008 KTM RC8 and 2010 KTM RC8R for sale on eBay

 

KTM developed their superbike for the 2008 model year and it’s become a noteworthy alternative to some other V or L-twins.  Initially the Rotax-based engine was 1148cc’s and good for 152 hp, and the later -R’s 1195cc’s checked in with 168 hp – serious stuff  ! – and the -R rates a factory slipper clutch.  The 6-speed transmission reviewed relatively clunky, but honing a smooth trans takes millions of units.  Both years have WP forks and monoshock, fully adjustable of course.  320mm Brembo monoblocks are overkill on the street, but a literal life saver on the track.  Like their 1198S inspiration, the KTM have a beautiful chro-moly trellis frame, in orange on the 2010.  The angular fairing design and clean rear fender design have become a KTM hallmark.

* * * * *

Seems like both these sellers stuck to the extremes, with the 2010 RC8R asking somewhat below the going rate, and the 2008 RC8’s buy-it-now is similarly above the peak.  Both appear undamaged, but the 2008 is a 1K-mile cherry, and the 2010 having logged 19,109.  The 2008’s owner believes it is the 5th machine from that year’s production, and the 2010 comes with following statement, ” AFTERMARKET EXHAUST, ADJUSTABLE LEVERS, FENDER ELIMINATOR, LED FRONT SIGNALS, MARCHESINI WHEELS, CARBON FIBER FENDER, COOL BIKE! “.

* * * * *

KTM abandoned the superbike market in 2015 saying the machines didn’t fit their corporate responsibility ( but somehow the 1290 Duke does ).  Now their sole supersport is a 390 cc single and the LC8 is a poignant moment in the 21st century.  The big twin is a durable 4-cam beast, if not destined for WSBK fame then a champ on the road.  The rest of the package is nothing if not a phenomenal first effort, a nice testament to computer-aided design and manufacturing.  Just try and pick one !

-donn

Double Fun – 2008-10 KTM RC8 1190’s

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