Monthly Archives: January 2019

Kawasaki January 31, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

Update 3.8.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

There is obviously no practical reason to own a 300hp, track-only motorcycle that isn’t eligible for any racing series of which I’m aware. Maybe something involving quarter miles and ETs? Reviewers of the Kawasaki H2R generally don’t even seem to regard the bike as a particularly good track-day weapon: it’s just too heavy, and that fat rear tire needed to keep the power on tap from going up in smoke slows steering significantly. So you can’t race it, it’s almost too fast for track-day antics, likely eats tires like they’re free donuts at a sales meeting, and you can’t ride it on the street… or can you? Apparently, you can, with a bit of DMV chicanery, since this Featured Listing Kawasaki H2R comes with a street title!

The original H2 from the 1970s seemingly has nothing in common with this iteration, other than the name: it was an unfaired, upright machine with handlebars and a long, Schwinn-style “banana” seat that was powered by a two-stroke triple, while the new bike has room for just one and is powered by a supercharged 998cc inline four. But the spirit is there in spades, since both bikes were about speed, speed, and more speed, and all other considerations be damned.

People often forget that there were two different versions of the H2 when the name was resurrected by Kawasaki: the regular road bike and the H2R seen here. The regular bike is a… regular bike: it has the usual turn signals, mirrors, and a really cool projector-beam headlamp in the center of the fairing that looks like it shoots some sort of death-ray. It also made a claimed 200hp, which is impressive, until you consider that Ducati’s V4 Panigale makes well north of that, and even several of the v-twin Panigales got shockingly close. BMW’s S1000RR, Aprilia’s RSV4, and most of the other liter bikes hover around 200hp as well.

And all that power is dulled a bit by the bike’s 475lb wet weight, which is significantly higher than those bikes. Of course, the Kawasaki still has a massive midrange hit of supercharged torque, but on paper, the literbike brigade makes the regular H2 look… a bit regular, although I’m reliably informed it’s anything but in practice. But it doesn’t matter anyway, because this isn’t the regular H2.

The H2R upped the game by saving weight by deleting the lighting and mirrors, replacing them with some extremely expensive carbon-fiber winglets to increase downforce, a set of slicks, and 35psi of boost. The increased positive pressure results in 300 claimed horses that announce their arrival through a stunningly gorgeous and deafeningly loud titanium exhaust that will require earplugs for your unborn descendants: the H2R is so loud that Performance Bikes Magazine wasn’t even able to test one in the UK, as it wouldn’t meet the dB limits at any track in the country.

It’s also worth noting this H2R benefits from the most recent electronic revisions from Kawasaki in 2017 including an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and autoblipper. Cosmetically it has updated upper wings and the “matte mirror” paint.

From the Seller: 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

For sale is a 2018 Kawasaki Ninja H2R, complete with a clean street title in hand. The H2R only has 60 miles on the clock, and hasn’t been rode enough to register even one hour on the service interval tracker (it tracks based on time spent above 8000 rpm). Bike was broken in per Kawasaki’s specs on a dyno, at which point it was immediately serviced at the dealer. I took it out for a few minutes on the track and otherwise it has sat on front and rear stands plugged into a battery tender.

Includes all original accessories: front and rear OEM stands, Chicken Hawk tire warmers, and Dr. Beasley’s wax kit. Also includes one unused front tire and three rears (OEM-spec Bridgestone slicks), complete with spare rear wheel (you’ll need it for a track weekend!). The bodywork has been completely ceramic coated and the edges of the lower wings have a clear film on them for protection.

This is a tremendous bike and is virtually new, with the added benefit of a street title so you can easily turn around and take it on the street rather than wait for the next track day.

Regarding pricing, because H2Rs are so fantastically rare and streetable H2Rs even moreso, I find it difficult to put a price on it. I am not desperate to sell, but I’ve had a few opportunities come up, so I’d like to see if anyone is interested in one of the most incredible bikes out there that is only some tires and a mirror away from being street-legal.

For perspective on rarity, the VIN number on this bike ends in 10. I was told by a Kawasaki rep that Kawasaki skips VIN number 1, and this was the last 2018 H2R built worldwide. Unfortunately this is purely anecdotal but if you look for photos of H2Rs, there are so few images of them with the 2017+ revised wing design that it is not hard to believe.

Located in Indiana, USA but am happy to cooperate to find shipping within the US.

This isn’t the first H2R we’ve seen with a street title, so it can’t be all that difficult to manage, assuming you don’t live in California or New York. I’m assuming it has a normal VIN to help things along, and this has been done in the past with the Ducati SPS, which apparently wasn’t road-legal either, but came with lights and signals and a VIN, making it more of a, “Of course you’re not going to ride this very fast, very loud exotic racing motorcycle on the road, even though it has headlights and turn signals and treaded tires…” [wink, wink] Obviously, do your homework if you intend to buy it and actually use it on the street, as your local DMV may have some problems with this one, depending on where you live. But other than that, I love the idea of an over-the-top track-day weapon you can use to commute to work on Fridays.

-tad

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale
Suzuki January 31, 2019 posted by

2FAST4U: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

The seller isn’t mincing words here in the listing for this Suzuki GSX-R1100: “This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback stay away… this is too much bike for you.”  So apparently if your eBay feedback is low or you like to grind someone for a good deal, a 30 year old motorcycle with 138hp is too much to handle? Good to know. Luckily, I’m not much of a haggler, so I’m sure I’ll be fine trying to wrestle this beast through a set of corners.

Of course, rumor is that the K-Model GSX-R1100 was too much for anyone to handle, but not because of the power: handling wasn’t the best and both Phil Mellor and Jamie Whitham crashed riding the GSX-R1100K at the Isle of Man TT in 1989, resulting in a ban of big bikes for years afterward. Some people blamed the bike’s geometry, some the suspension setup, and many different fixes and parts combinations have been tried to sort out the bike’s handling woes, but the bike maintained its reputation as a heavy, ill-handling brute, which ironically has probably helped the bike’s mystique, considering similar Yamaha FZR1000s go for much less at the moment.

At 462lbs dry, it wasn’t the heaviest GSX-R1100, but it’s pretty portly. Personally, I think it’s the best-looking version of the big Suzuki, and this iteration of the bike are sometimes known as “Slingshots” in reference to the semi-flat-slide Mikuni carburetors, although I’ve seen them off the bike and disassembled and I still can’t see anything that looks like a slingshot in there.

These days the GSX-R1100’s handling shouldn’t be a problem, considering the kind of riding the new owner is likely to do on it. The bike has plenty of straight-line speed and stability for weekend blasts, you just want to make sure you plan ahead and don’t try to change lines mid-corner. Certainly, it’s not lacking in power: the K-Model was powered by the 1127cc version of Suzuki’s inline four, still with oil-cooling. That beast of a motor, aside from the styling, is probably the primary reason for buying a “Slingshot” GSX-R1100.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

1989 GSXR 1100. Well kept killer bike. New tires ,brakes , clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom cond. 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes were bikes. Very rare to see in this cond. top seat pad has some delamination, Top tree is a little dull from keys (common). XL jacket inc, with stand, 1000.00 bonus. This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback please don’t bid. The pics say it all!

1989 GSXR 1100. Well kept killer bike. New  tires, brakes , clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom cond. 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes were bikes. Very rare to see in this cond. top seat pad has some delamination, top tree is a little dull from keys (common). XL jacket inc, with stand, 1000.00 bonus. This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback stay away… this is too much bike for you. The pics say it all

It’s a shame about the picture quality on this listing, since it looks like it’s in pretty good shape and, with 21,000 miles, is pretty much just broken in. Bidding is up to $3,250 with another six days left on the auction, so dive in and take a chance, or maybe request some betting images from the seller!

-tad

Sport Bikes For Sale January 30, 2019 posted by

Recap and Comparison – Las Vegas Auctions 2019

Going from Bonhams to Mecum is a little like taking the transatlantic Queen Mary II from Southampton and getting off in downtown Brooklyn. The distinguished English gentleman guides you through 128 auctions on Thursday, but Mecum has a squad of rapid-fire auctioneers who literally run through double that number each day Tuesday through Saturday.

The 1993 Ducati Supermono was a sportbike high at $115,000

  

The stadium atmosphere at Mecum where this 1925 BMW R37 fetched $220,000

If a lot doesn’t meet the reserve, Bonhams encourages further negotiation.

Neither the 2012 EBR 1190S nor Metrakit GP125 racebikes hit the reserve.

 

The 1987 Bimota DB1 SR went for $11,500, but no sale for the 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo.  Mecum’s CX with no reserve brought $6,600

 

The 1990 Magni-Guzzi Arturo sold for $10,925 at Bonhams, no Magnis at Mecum

The 1974 Laverda 750 SFC brought $30,000 at Bonhams, and a ’75 fetched $88,000 at Mecum.

Pretty hard to compare apples to apples when considering the two auctioneers.  Special models, choice years, condition, and provenance all have their say.  Bonhams had a few ex-Steve McQueen bikes, and a 1938 Triumph 5T Speed Twin went for many multiples of the very comparable non-McQueen example.  A mysterious lady bidder was intent on winning several of the choice sportbikes at Mecum, leading to a 1992 Honda NR750 which brought $181,500, and a never-started 1988 Honda RC30 which went to $121,000.  At both venues, the bona fide antiques did the really heavy lifting, showing that sportbikes are downright affordable, and most of the time you can actually ride them…

-donn

 

RC30 0 miles never started!

Posted by Rare SportBikes For Sale on Friday, January 25, 2019

 

Wow NR750!

Posted by Rare SportBikes For Sale on Friday, January 25, 2019

Friday

Posted by Rare SportBikes For Sale on Friday, January 25, 2019

Recap and Comparison – Las Vegas Auctions 2019
Honda January 30, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Pristine 1979 Honda CBX

Update: eBay shows sold at $15,500. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The 1979 Honda CBX, a six-cylinder behemoth dressed up as a buttoned-down commuter, was an exercise in weird, but impressive, flex from Honda. As the long run of the original CB750 was at its peak, Big Red decided it was time to show off the ultimate evolution of the CB line, but elected to bare its engineering fangs instead of building a taught, sinewed race bike on the CB platform. Honda brass at the time even admitted that, if they had been going for track records, they could have made it with a much lighter, more focused and faster four cylinder.

1979 Honda CBX for sale on eBay

But that wasn’t what the CBX was for, so they took the lessons from their tiny 250cc grand prix six cylinders of the 1960s and made a mill four times that size that put out 105 horses at 9,000 rpm. Honda stuck the accessory drives in the middle of the crank, as opposed to at the ends, to keep the crank short for cornering clearance. That also helped balance the big engine, which otherwise would have vibrated mercilessly. Though the technology and thought meant the CBX was a true feat of manufacturing and engineering, it was also heavy, flexy and intimidating. Reports from the time said the handling was more impressive than it had any right to be, but few people were buying it.

This 1979 Honda CBX has been mothballed since 1988, when it was placed on display in a family dealership. The carbs were drained as it was put in storage and the engine was turned over regularly to keep it free. It had a new tank at some point in the 1990s after the original was dented. The tires were last changed in 2001. The seller says he plans to leave it as-is and let the purchaser decide what to do with the bike. Between 1979 and 1988, it covered just 8,400 miles.

From the eBay listing:

This is an original 1979 Honda CBX. It has not been registered or on the road since 1988. It has been stored in a climate controlled garage in Northern Nevada until I purchased it from a friend a few years ago…it had been in their family and on in display in their dealership since the 80’s.

I received the original California small pink slip with 1988 registration ( I have photos of this when I took it to DMV ) I have since registered and titled this in Arizona, it has a clean and clear title in my name.

I bought the bike as it sits today. Carbs were drained and the bike has been in stored conditioned for over 15 years. The engine was turned over occasionally. The tires are from 2001 I believe which I think is when it was last freshened up a bit. I also was told that the original tank suffered a dent while on display in the early to mid 90s and the original tank was replaced with one of the last new oem ones available from Honda. The tank is perfect and like new inside and out as seen.

I am selling the bike as is, I am going to leave it up to the new owner to display as is or make it a runner. I added a new battery and fresh avgas last week and the bike runs and the carbs do not leak, however it only ran on 5 cylinders and did not want to idle. So carbs will need a proper going over if you plan to bring it back to life.

Two other flaws on the bike. The tach was lazy when I started the bike, this might sort it self out with some run time. There is also some scratches on the gauges as shown in the photos.

I have not spent much time trying to detail the bike so it will clean up much better than what is shown in the photos if you dedicate a day or two, but as it sits it is very nice…it has basically been inside the last 30 years!!!

Original owners manual and tool kit in place and perfect. The original keys were lost, I had new ones made. I took photos with the tank, side covers and seat off so you can get an idea of the condition.

I will add a few more photos over the next few days, please email me with any questions or if you need specific photos, have questions etc.

I CAN SHIP ANYWHERE IN THE U.S. and help ASSIST with WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!!!

The asking price for this time capsule is $15,500, for which you are getting a pristine, absolutely unmolested example of a piece of Honda’s corporate history. They do not make them like this any more.

Featured Listing:  Pristine 1979 Honda CBX
Sport Bikes For Sale January 29, 2019 posted by

Details, Details – Notes from the Las Vegas Auctions

Being able to give some special bikes a close-up inspection was one of the benefits of last week’s Bonhams and Mecum auctions.  Engineering and fabrication marvels are in every row.

Arcs of chrome on the 1950 Vincent Black Shadow.

 

Using clip-ons left the factory handlebar mount available to mount a gauge on this 1972 Norton Commando race replica.

 

High-tech fuel gauge on the 1972 Ducati 750S racebike.

 

Careful, this 1974 Laverda SFC pre-dates brake/shifter standardization.

 

Bespoke suede appointments on a 1977 Bimota SB2.

 

Lightweight rear mudguard on the 1978 Ducati NCR race replica.

 

The oil filter is mounted right to the oil cooler on this replica of a ’70s Ducati NCR 750SS.

 

A little space in the 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 seat console for the battery.

 

On a 1985 Yamaha RD500LC, the airbox is built right to the inside of the fairing and each feeds two side-draft carburetors.

 

For all its carbon fiber, cast aluminum was used on the 1992 Honda NR750 grills, and a tank-top reminder in case you forgot.

 

Fretwork and exhaust details on a 2008 Ducati D16RR Desmosedici.

As anyone who’s bought a motorcycle at auction will tell you, it’s important to know what you’re buying and get some eyeballs on it.  At Bonhams there is a preview the day before, and Mecum lines the week’s offerings up in a hall next to the auction.  The variety of interesting bikes makes it one of the highlights, whether you’re a bidder on not…

-donn

Honda January 27, 2019 posted by

Legend: 1994 Honda NSR 250R SP MC28 Rothmans

A perennial mainstay on the pages of RSBFS, the Honda NSR250R should require no major introduction. Often considered the darling of the quarter liter smoking set, the 90 degree vee twin is named similarly to – and looks quite a bit like – Honda’s race-only NSR250. However the similarities are only imagined, as the two bikes share no parts in common. That being said, the NSR250R road going machine is a typically Honda-engineering wonder, sought after by riders and collectors, and a blast to ride. Today’s example, a 1994 MC28 model wearing original Rothmans livery, is a prime specimen.

1994 Honda NSR 250R SP MC28 Rothmans for sale on eBay

The original NSR was released as the MC16 back in 1987. Over the next (nearly) ten years, the model evolved in form and function. From a variety of swing arms and different suspensions to various states of tune, dry clutches and the PGM-I through PGM-IV ignition systems, the NSR changed with the times and what Honda believed the needs of the riding community to be. Not all changes were popular, although offering the bike in a variety of race-worthy livery was always a favorite. The Rothmans colors, emulating the tobacco-sponsored racers, remains among the most striking of the options. Often copied by way of knock-off body panels or re-spraying existing plastic, it is not easy to come by an original bike in these colors in this condition. Here is more from the seller:

From the seller:
1994 Honda NSR 250R SP MC28 Rothmans !
Original stock 1994 MC 28 SP U.S.title, plate, reg. very low original Km’s.

This is a original un-molested all stock 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 SP. This is an *original* low Km Rothmans SP, NOT one that has been put together from parts.

The bike has the correct VIN, it has the correct R3R subframe sticker and even has the original rear fender decal with R3R code and matching VIN to the frame.

1,500 were made and not many survive in low Km’s original condition. Prices for 28 SP’s in Japan are already over a million yen for less than perfect examples. Not much is left.

More from the seller:
This bike has 6695 km or about 4100 miles. This bike has both original key cards and the code sticker. It also has the original tool kit.

Bike has all the original and correct SP parts including Magtek’s, forks, dry clutch engine. All original OEM Honda bodywork. The bike had a small dent on the tank, various scratches and scuffs and I had everything touched up, saving the original decals and clearing over some of them. You can still see some rash on right clip on, exhaust can etc from a light tip over. I still have all the original pictures of how the bike looked when it was in Japan.

As you can see there is some corrosion on the fork legs as is common with most of the bikes from Japan, but otherwise it is very corrosion free. Still has a small sticker from Red Baron on lower right frame (easily removed). The inner small white plastic piece in the right side tail cowl is in poor shape, but that is easy to remedy. I am leaving the bike as near original as possible and will leave it to a new owner to restore/clean it up as they see fit.

The original rear fender is cracked, but repaired, you need to look under it or remove the tail cowl to see it. The right lower fairing stay that mounts inside the bodywork is cracked (where they all break) and could use a repair, but its all there and a minor nuisance.

The bikes starts, runs and rides as it should.

More from the seller:
100% stock, restricted, not modded in anyway. All electrical works, no error codes. Has a new battery installed and had a recent service, brake fluid, coolant, etc. Tires are quite older and should be changed if you plan to ride it.

Honda Fun Fact: The name “NSR” is based on the fact that these bikes utilized a then-new process known as nikasil-sulfur lining in the cylinder bores. This process provided a hardened cylinder for better longevity, without the weight of iron or steel liners. The technology was effective, but nikasil-sulfur makes for a terrible motorcycle name. Hence the “NS” part of the NSR was born.

This NSR is available now on eBay. It is a Buy It Now listing rather than an auction, and the seller is asking $17,500. That is big money for a NSR, although the low miles and original condition helps it along nicely. Check it out here for the details, including the opportunity to purchase a livery matching Honda Cub EZ90 to ride alongside! Good Luck!!

MI

Legend:  1994 Honda NSR 250R SP MC28 Rothmans
Moto Guzzi January 26, 2019 posted by

Italian Oddity: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

Even if you’re an Italian bike fan, this one might have flown under your radar. But that’s what we do here at RareSportbikesforSale.com: let you know that interesting bikes like the Moto Guzzi V65 Lario exist. I especially love 80s Moto Guzzis because they’re generally pretty durable and very affordable. They won’t set the world on fire with their performance, but they’re quirky, stylish, and pretty good handlers, if you allow for the fact that it’s a 32 year old motorcycle on 16″ wheels.

The bike could work up a decent turn of speed, with 60hp and a five-speed gearbox that meant the bike could do an honest 110+ with good handling for the time. Oddly, Moto Guzzi’s 643cc “middleweight” was a more mechanically sophisticated machine than their big Le Mans. It was still air-cooled, but had four-valve Heron-style heads, with the four valves operated by pushrods and rockers, similar to the setup used in the later four-valve Daytona. Heron heads, if you’re not familiar, have flat surfaces instead of domed or hemispheric combustion chambers, with recesses cut for valves and spark plugs. Instead, Heron-head engines generally use dished-top pistons to allow room for the fuel/air charge. This means the heads are easier to produce, and Heron heads have been used in a number of automotive applications, including Jaguar’s V12.

Unfortunately, the 4-valve “small block” Guzzis have a reputation for catastrophic failures. Digging around the Guzzi forums, the problem likely stemmed [ahem] from the two-piece valves that tended to fracture, although the cam and valve springs have also been blamed. Who knows? You might get lucky and the bike will be fine, or a combination of softer valve springs, a set of Suzuki 250N valves, and careful use might see you through, but… caveat emptor.

Hopefully by now that’s either been an issue and rectified, or never will be a problem, but I do get a bit nervous when I see a low-mileage example come up for sale. Easy to check though, with those cylinder heads sticking out proud of the bodywork like that, and the owner may be aware of them being checked recently or repaired. Bottom line: if you buy one, try out the updated valves and springs recommended by the Guzzi message boards and ride it with your fingers crossed until it breaks, then see about finding a two-valve engine from a different model. I believe the 750cc Nevada engine is a popular choice for this, if you can find one.

I love the huge, white-faced Veglia tachometer on a bike that probably doesn’t even need a tach, the padded “safety” dash, and the button key. If you’ve never seen an original Guzzi key from the era, the fob basically folds over once the key is in place, forming a sort of knob you turn to switch on the ignition [see above]. Bodywork is swoopy and very 80s, but will provoke questions wherever you go. First and most common: “Moto Guzzi? Who makes that?”

This isn’t pristine, but is in very nice condition and should make a great, quirky weekend ride if you want something interesting and don’t have a ton of cash to splash. If you’re looking for a budget classic, the V35 and V50 are obviously not as fast, but sweet-handling and much more reliable. All-in-all, it’s a funky little bike, but there are reasons they don’t go for very much and have low miles. If you like to tinker, it might be worth a shot.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

I bought this bike in 1993 and I am the second owner. Very low miles always starts up no problem, idle is a little rough when cold but fine when warmed up, carb balance is difficult to maintain on these even with the right tools. Previous owner had megaphones on it and said he had changed jets to suit, I put the original exhausts back on and messed with jets but couldn’t find any better set up than what it has now, it runs great accelerates very well  and it is pretty fast for an old 650.

The only issues I have had are leaking fuel lines and carb/intake connections, all of which have been replaced.

There are a few cosmetic issues that I tried to show in the photos, mainly with cheap plastic and paint. The fairing has a crack across it which has been repaired with a fiberglass patch across the back leaving a small step, this could be buffed and painted but the crack is only visible from the underside. The belly fairing also has a stress crack down the front; nothing has been done to it. Some of the engine paint is peeling under the carbs due to the fuel leaks and on the bevel gear housing; the front forks have a few scratches due to tag stickers and their removal. Some of the red wheel paint is flaking but this is an easy fix.

The air cleaner box has been removed and K&N filters installed and the seat replaced with a Corbin single. The only other mod was to replace the remote choke lever assembly with individual carb mounted levers. I have the remote assembly.

It has the original tool kit, a few spares, including the megaphones, at least two keys and a clear title.

I can deliver to a shipping point within 50 miles of Columbia SC.

The price is right, the bike is funky, and it makes Italian v-twin noises, although there’s more sound than fury. The biggest limiting factor could be the 16″ wheels: rear tires are particularly hard to find in the correct sizes, and some of the bigger Guzzis suffered handling issues when fitted with the smaller hoop. They look a little strange too. 18″ wheels supposedly fixed the bigger Gooses, so maybe that’s an option here, if you don’t like the way the Lario goes around corners. Parts may also be hard to come by, although these days you can probably get used bits from Europe via eBay.

-tad

Italian Oddity: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale
Suzuki January 25, 2019 posted by

High-powered Slingshot: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100

By the late 1990s, the Suzuki GSX-R1100 was seen as a bloated sport-tourer that had lost its way as a serious sportbike. It had been eclipsed by the power and lithe chassis of a new breed of 1000s, which looked more like 600s than liter bikes. But in 1989, the Gixxer 1100 was still very much the king of the streets, and enjoyed a fearsome reputation as a focused hot rod, with a massive air-oil cooled four pot stuffed into a modified 750 frame. With Suzuki’s signature “Slingshot” carb setup getting gas and air where they needed to be, the GSX-R1100 had quite a muscle to flex.

1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for sale on eBay

The bikes’ hairy reputation was solidified in ’89, when Isle of Man racer Phil Mellor lost his life aboard a Gixxer at Doran’s Bend. A second crash by Jamie Whitham, also on a Gixxer, led the organizers to ban the 1100cc machines’ use for a few years.

But in spite of their reputation, they remain the finest example of the 1980s superbike arms race. They carry all the tech you could hang wheels off of 30 years ago, and are still great every day mounts now. This 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 has been taken to the next level, both cosmetically and functionally. The seller has been fastidious to the point of being anal about making sure the bike is without blemishes, and the few it does have have been addressed. Added to that, he went to the trouble to fit a 180-section rear wheel, to improve handling and open up modern tire selections. He also collected nearly another bike’s worth of spares, should anything befall this beautiful beast.

From the eBay listing:

Selling because I have a 3 year old and I don’t ride much anymore.

You’re bidding on a hard to find, low mileage (14K) collectors bike, the 1989 GSXR 1100 in black and grey. Meanest looking of them all.

Looked for some time for this model in this color, found one locally but it needed a few updates. Overall, the condition of the bike is considered “mint” by some, but after 40 years it did need some upgrades.

I went ahead and started with replacing the rear shock with a new 2007 Suzuki model, with almost no miles on it to replace the worn out old one. I then replaced the skinny rear wheel with the appropriate 5.5″ wheel (front and rear painted to match) and 180 tire size (requires mounting brake arm to rear caliper on outside). The bike has upgraded kevlar brake lines and new SBS pads, and new cross drilled rotors (not the smooth original style). Front fork tubes are not leaking but could use oil and spring upgrade, just too soft for my liking.

I then upgraded the ignition with a VH ignition advancer, Dyna Coil pack, and racing plugs/plug wires. Bike got new oil filter/oil and I keep tabs on oil condition/levels. I also replaced the air filter with a drop in UNI. Carbs were removed, and totally disassemble and cleaned, new orings and float levels set to spec (does start every time without much hesitation on choke) I will probably upload a video of it starting/running.

Battery was replaced with 6lb Ballistic Battery Lithium $$
Chain was replaced when rear wheel conversion was done.

I then changed out the stock front brake unit with a brembo radial NISSAN sand ASV adjustable lever. Also changed out the clutch unit with a radial Brembo with ASV lever (adjustable) and stainless line. Just this week i noticed the stock steering dampner was weeping, so I ordered a brand new NJK adjustable damper ($200) to make sure that was ok (in 4th pic).

Tires are newer with low miles and again are larger size rear. Bike corners very well.
Rear seat cowl is hard to find with the rubber butt pad in good shape (mine is excellent). Also have rear seat. Seats are like new condition as is the tank bra (NOS). One mirror has loose play in it, might be adjusted.

Exhaust is stock and rust free, chrome is very shiny with no rust. I prefered to keep the bike stockish looking and quieter for personal reasons, and I enjoy the stock exhaust on the road.

Gas tank was removed, new petcock and filters, and it was sealed against rust. I’ve seen way too many of these bikes look good on the outside but rusting inside, and that makes big problems.

Other little things: Bar ends replaced with custom logo, and it has rear chock stand spools added.

Paint is a 9/10

No chips in front fairing.
Paint has a small touch up on the right lower where they always get scrapes (about penny size). Paint as you see in pictures is gorgeous, no sun faded graphics or paint, the black blue pearl is deep, lots of deep gloss and microfiber towels used only to polish. Just a small bit of clear coat on the tank under the tank bra has shown a bit of wear, otherwise the tank shows like new. Graphics are in amazing condition, tank graphics “R” has a bit of patina (discoloration in the letter under the clear) that doesn’t take away from its value. Rear plastic cowls are near mint and have a rare “Slingshot” logo on the right side. Rear seat cowl has a sticker on top (don’t know if its cleared over or not, i would just leave on). Insides of the fairings are clean, no grime, no gunk…kept up with the rest of the nooks and crannies on the bike. Aluminum parts are not pitted at all.

Lenses on the lights are free of damage, clear, and working, as well as horn.

Pictures speak for themselves. The engine is spotless, with no leaks or paint coming off. The frame is all original and never polished or damaged etc. Her owners took good care of this bike.

This auction will include an assortment of replacement fairings I bought JIC.

I have a complete upper cowl (super hard to find) with minor work can be used as a perfect replacement.
I have a mint condition left mid, and right rear cowl.
I have a pair of original mirrors which need paint matching (super hard to get)
I have a spare (near mint) gas tank
I have full tank decal set (OEM) with the “Hyper Sport” R logo
I have spare wheels and some original parts taken off the bike.
Stock tool set and manual in rear seat area.
Factory repair manual

Basically, I wanted to future proof the bike.

I don’t get to ride it as much as I want, so it has to go to fund other child related things now. Will be sad to see her leave, hope someone mature appreciates and will take care of it and not mod it out into just another chrome 1100. Overall a solid bike, stunning in person, and fun to ride with the newer parts added.

Keep in mind reserve price includes all the extra’s package and the scarcity of this models color/condition.

**I will post a Youtube video of bike on a January day, cold start** I may add pics or info at any time here as well.

I will accept full payment USPS money order only, and only after cashed will bike ship. Check my seller feedback, i’ve sold other vehicles and stuff with excellent feedback. No liens, or salvage on this bike, clear CA title.

Please have funds IMMEDIATELY available and ready to send within 3 days of your winning bid.

The reserve hasn’t been met yet, but we don’t expect this one to go cheap, especially given its condition and the care the most recent owner has taken with it.

High-powered Slingshot: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100

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