Posts by tag: Super Sport

Ducati November 30, 2020 posted by

Elemental: 1993 Ducati Superlight #838 for Sale

Until pretty recently, Japanese sportbikes were subjected to a pretty ruthless program of focused evolution, with significant updates to styling and mechanical components every two years. European sportbikes, on the other hand, often hung around well past their sell-by date, and special editions like the Ducati Superlight were often used drum up a bit of interest in a moribund model.

Put simply, the Superlight was a lightly modified 900SS. The engine was bone-stock, but weight was saved through the use of carbon fiber sprinkled here and there and a solo tail section. The biggest performance increase can probably be attributed to a set of Marvic composite wheels that contributed the lion’s share of the 15lbs saved, compared to the stock bike. It wasn’t especially fast then or now, but the 900SS is a simple, charismatic bike with excellent handling.

This particular example looks to be complete, with the lightweight wheels, open clutch, upswept exhaust, and numbered plaque, although the carbon has faded noticeably and the mufflers don’t appear to be original. The bigger issue is the nearly 40,000 on the odometer. That’s no problem for a 900SS, but I can imagine collectors might balk, considering the $9,000 asking price…

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Superlight #838 for Sale

Limited Edition Number 838. Outstanding condition, and just a bit of weathering, but overall very presentable and nice with 39,767 original miles. In 1992, Ducati took their 900 Supersport and added several choice extras to create a limited edition called the Ducati Superlight – 953 examples were built over 2 years. Unfortunately, for reasons unknown, in 1993 they removed almost all the extras, leaving just a fully floating rear brake to differentiate the limited edition from its less exclusive brother. We are proud to have a beautiful example of one of those ’93 models.

It’s easy to see why cynics scoffed at the Superlight a bit at the time it was introduced, since it was basically a just a 900SS with some bolt-on parts that saved a bit of weight. There wasn’t much of the package that was really all that special, other than the numbered plaque and the Ducati DNA already present in the Supersport. Personally, I think these look great, but I’d probably just find a nice yellow 900SS/CR and fit improved suspension so I wouldn’t have to worry about riding a depreciating asset every weekend.

-tad

Elemental: 1993 Ducati Superlight #838 for Sale
Ducati November 25, 2020 posted by

Stopped to Rest – 1995 Ducati 900 SS/CR

Across from the 916 in the showroom, the -90’s Supersports had a price advantage and could just about do it all.  This Florida rider took a break but appears ready to resume the road.

1995 Ducati 900 SS/CR for sale on eBay

When the “new” generation of Supersports was unveiled in 1991, Ducati had the formula down, with the air-cooled desmodue delivering a smart 84 hp.  The front-mounted oil cooler can deal with most engine conditions, helped by the un-faired powerplant.  The Cafe Racer moniker could have meant cost reduction, with pre-load suspension adjustments only, steel swingarm, and smaller rear wheel size.  Still, the upper-only fairing had rugged good looks and kept the dry weight to 414 lbs.  A painted cover on the pillion gave you all the options.

The owner of this SS has returned his CR to the living after some down time, and it looks to have had inside storage at least.  Original right down to the aluminum mufflers, you’d expect more than its 9,860 miles.  The pictures aren’t great but don’t indicate any ugh-knowns.  New tires and brake fluid are all that call attention.  From the eBay auction:

CR with 9,860 miles. It’s unmolested and all stock/original with the exception of the Zero Gravity windscreen. I had let it sit for a while and I just went through the carbs, changed the oil and filter, air filter, and plugs and installed a new battery. I bought new timing belts and when I took the covers off to change them, the belts looked like new. I adjusted the tension and reinstalled the covers. The spare belts will be included.

The bike runs, rides, and stops beautifully. All the lights and dash lights work, even the low fuel light. This is a 20 year old machine and has the patina of a bike that’s been well cared for but ridden. There are a few small scratches and chips in the paint as would be expected but it still presents very well. I believe the tires are original and will need to be replaced.

Cycle World and others reviewed this era’s Supersports as great used bikes – very versatile, quick and exotic enough, and often a bargain – even a nice one at Bonhams couldn’t even muster $4K recently.  This one requires in-person inspection, but the opening bid is a reasonable starting point.  Keep an eye on it, and have a great safe holiday !

-donn

Stopped to Rest – 1995 Ducati 900 SS/CR
Ducati March 31, 2020 posted by

Turnkey Racebike: 1993 Ducati 750SS for Sale

Ducati’s air-cooled 750SS might seem like an unlikely candidate for a racebike build. By 1993, a two-valve Desmo twin was antiquated technology, a quirky, charming curio by the sportbike standards of the day. But although competition duties had been handed off to the liquid-cooled, four-valve superbikes by the early 90s, it’s important to remember that versions of the lighter, simpler Desmodue were powering Ducati’s racebikes all the way back in 1981.

The first Ducati to use the then-new engine was the 500SL Pantah, first sold in 1980. The Pantah engine was developed by Fabio Taglioni as a follow up to the beautifully-engineered, but expensive to build and service bevel-drive v-twins. It had single overhead cams driven by toothed rubber belts, and two Desmo-actuated valves per air-cooled cylinder. Race bikes built from this platform were light and nimble, but were eventually outclassed in terms of outright power and were typically competitive in smaller classes.

Ultimately, larger variations of the Pantah engine found their way into Ducati’s second-tier sportbikes like the 900SS and the 750SS seen here. They were sold alongside the painfully expensive 851/888 and 916 that followed as a more affordable, easier-to-maintain alternative to those much more exotic machines. Power may not have been overwhelming, but the bones are good, and those Supersports machines provide excellent handling to go with their thumping Ducati charm.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati 750SS Race Bike for Sale

1993 Ducati 750 Supersport vintage racing bike:

  • Kehin FCR 39 Carburetor Kit
  • Sparker TCI-p4 inductive programmable ignition unit
  • Carrillo rod set
  • Keihin FCR carburetor kit
  • GP Shift
  • Woodcraft stands and hand guard
  • Replaced “Marion Fairing Stay” with Stock Fairing Stay
  • Installed Monster Cowl
  • Replaced clutch reservoir and mount
  • Installed Race Tech Gold Valve Kit
  • Replaced shock and Fork Springs
  • Full Motor Service
  • Rebuilt front rear brake calipers
  • Replaced brake pads brake fluid
  • Installed 1/2” seat pad
  • Replaced stock muffler
  • Oury grips
  • Repaired fiberglass side panel, upper fairing and tail section
  • Powder-coated Frame, swing-arm and wheels
  • Prepped and painted bodywork
  • Installed smoke windscreen
  • Installed Vortex V2 fuel cap
  • Ohlins rear shock

Ducati 750SS Spare Engine Complete 750F1 Cafe Race CCS AHRMA ($3,400)
This motor was built by Chris Boy of Motor course Performance, Fort Lauderdale FL. It was designed as a low stress motor, built with high compression pistons, Carrillo rods, lightened crank and internal gears, straight cut gears, wet clutch. Heads have custom manifolds as shown set up for FCR 4`mm carbs modest porting, standard valves and Vee Two “Daytona” gind racing cams from Brook Henry ($1500) and fresh clutch pack. Currently set up as constant loss ignition and starter plate is blocked off for cart starting. It made 79.5 RWHP at the MCP Dyno. Motor has approximately 40 miles on the most recent tune up, including valve adjustment, new clutch pack. It is in excellent condition and is plug and play. 

The seller does include a long list of included parts, and this bike appears to have been properly put together. Developing a competitive package can be time-consuming and expensive, and this appears to be a legitimate race bike built to AHRMA specifications, but $12,000 is still a hefty chunk of change for an early 90s air-cooled Ducati. Now if the seller planned to include that spare engine [sold separately!], this might start to look like a better deal. I love the air-cooled Ducatis and have long thought a Supersport would make a great trackday ride, especially considering their values until recently, but the price here seems ambitious.

-tad

Turnkey Racebike: 1993 Ducati 750SS for Sale
Ducati February 21, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1979 Ducati 900SS

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

The next offering from the amazing Edinger Ducati Collection is here, and it is a stunner: a 1979 Ducati 900 SS bevel in iconic gold and black. These long, sleek machines tell an important story in history, and are responsible for Ducati’s rise to power and popularity. This all began with the 1972 Imola win by Paul Smart (fun fact: Paul’s wife was Barry Sheene’s sister). Smart was riding a green-framed Ducati 750 Super Sport for that Imola race – as close an ancestor to this 900 Super Sport as can be found in history. You see, while displacement climbed over the next 15-ish years, little else seemed to outwardly change on these models. The similarities between the earlier bikes and later models is remarkable, highlighting what a fantastic platform the original Super Sport represented in the first place. The last of the big bevel twins had more in common with the earliest bikes of the same model than could be imagined. These are bikes with serious bones.

Featured Listing: 1979 Ducati 900SS

The Super Sport series began with what was essentially the mating of two Ducati single cylinder top ends to a common crankcase. The instantly recognizable L-twin arrangement came about due to the need to ensure adequate air flow to the rear cylinder; laying the front barrel down kept it from blanking the wind. Later this arrangement showed promise for weight distribution (low down and as far forward as possible), but it was the need for cooling and reliability that lead the way. And one key element really shows the history of this design; although this is a “modern” motorcycle with electric start, the kick starter carries over as a vestige of earlier days. And speaking of electrics, that is the one area where the Super Sport series made significant strides over the years, building in better reliability and efficiency.

From the seller:
This is a 1979 Ducati Classic with less than a 100 miles on it following the complete ground up restoration. The bike was purchased in Texas and was restored by Revival Cycles in Austin and has been serviced by Ducati Austin. There is only one flaw shown on the cosmetic ring on one gauge, the speedometer, new tires, this bike is in art. Vin# 089083 and has a clean title which says it’s a 1980 but the Vin # tells me it’s a 1979. Current mileage is 18,004 and the bike is in Texas

Asking Price: $30,000
Contact: Edinger.david@gmail.com 317-908-2573

Classic bevel Ducatis continue to drive to new heights in the marketplace. They are simply a standout design that bridges the gap between old and new; they are modern enough to ride today (in anger), yet retain the classic good looks and arcane technical elements that make them unique. By the early 1980s the bevel cam drive arrangement was being phased out in favor of the Pantah “rubber band” engines, the valve timing setup being tremendously less resource intensive on the production line. But today these older bevels simply look, sound and run fantastic. Today’s example has been restored, appears to be in wonderful shape for a 40+ year old sport bike and is ready for a new home. Interested parties should reach out to David quickly, as this black beauty is unlikely to be available very long!

MI

Featured Listing: 1979 Ducati 900SS
Ducati September 1, 2018 posted by

Wham-O ! – 1990 Ducati 750 Sport

The 1990’s were a heady time for Ducati, with the 851, Paso, 888, Supermono, and 916 all realizing their potential.  Meanwhile, the sporty-on-a-budget 750 Sport that helped keep the company afloat in the late ’80s is all but ignored.  This eastern Duc has been ridden extensively but probably not much lately.  It has the early bold graphics livery and looks substantially original and complete, just in need of a little TLC.

1990 Ducati 750 Sport for sale on eBay

A foot in each decade, the 750 Sport used an F1-style frame and a Paso-style Weber carb for the belt-timed desmodue.  Great power at 72 hp for a two-valve 750, though tractability of the single carburetor was wanting.  Single-adjustable Marzocchi dampers and 16-inch wheels kept the bottom line in sight.  Single puck Brembo brakes are front and rear.  The size is more Paso than 851, making the Sport more of an all-rounder, a little more comfortable on a long ride.

 

The seller might not have had time to form an emotional attachment to this 750, and it looks like the previous owner parked her a while back.  Still it’s complete and mostly stock, ready for a week at the spa.  From the eBay auction:

Up for sale is a Ducati 750 Sport, aka the “Poor Man’s F1”. I have been told that they imported less than 400 of these to the US, they are not common.  I have only ever seen one other one for sale. 

This bike is mechanically sound, it runs/drives perfectly. 19,030 miles. 
Good condition for it’s age, but with it’s age there are some little scuffs and scratches around the bike.  Took photos of what I found. 

 

Never exactly the top of the dance card, the 750 Sport was a worthy partner for weekend tours or rallies.  As ever a compromise, this one is a rarity not needing deep pockets.  For a mid-size, an eager performer with enough room for an un-tucked adult.  Even more unusual than the later sun beam paint scheme, the bright blue and white graphics on red fairings recall an era when Ducati wasn’t hanging back waiting for your attention.  Once this 750 Sport is detailed up, some time spent in the stainless hardware aisle, and with fresh expendables, it’ll be an eyeball grabber too…

-donn

Wham-O ! – 1990 Ducati 750 Sport
MV Agusta June 15, 2018 posted by

Naked Super Sport – 2005 MV Agusta Brutale 750S

MV’s 749cc Brutale was their first dabble in the naked sector after Cagiva’s investment, and the F4 sportbike without fairings has stood the test of time and a few engine updates.  Compared to more specialized Agustas, the 750S or Strada used little carbon or magnesium but imprinted a very sporty feel and sound on the rider.  This example has just under 11,000 miles and should prove to be a nice introduction to the MV world.

2005 MV Agusta Brutale 750S

Coming over from the F4 750 in a slightly less peaky tune, the Brutale’s engine still makes 127 hp at a lofty 12,500 rpm.  The chrom-moly trellis suspends the engine from above and is hung with 49mm Showa forks.  The 4-1-2 exhaust isn’t constrained under the seat and makes its exit across from the single sided swingarm.  The aluminum frame connectors, and plastic fender and covers were a small step down from the Serie Oro, but adjustable suspension and 6-piston Nissin brakes reflect the overall quality.

This Brutale has just a few modifications, includes a rear stand, and its original catalyst for a prospective Cali buyer.  Replacing the patina-ed ignition switch cover would be a quick way to improve things.  The Pennsylvania owner keeps it short in the eBay auction:

Garage kept, 3rd adult owner, never raced, never dropped.
Everything in pictures goes with bike, plus correct oil and filters.
Mid pipe installed, but CAT comes with bike
Non OEM mirrors installed, OEM mirrors also along with sale.
Rear tire has less than 100 miles.

Reviewed as sweet handling and smooth, it doesn’t have much of the cruel and ruthless the name implies.  It tackles the difficulties of hiding the plumbing and bracketry with a lot of style, and comes off a lot sportier in person.  This example seems about the middle of the pack, substantially stock but not fawned over, and unless the reserve is out of line, on target for a reasonable price…

-donn

Naked Super Sport – 2005 MV Agusta Brutale 750S
Ducati May 7, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale

It’s obvious that we’ll continue to see Ducati’s iconic “L-twin” for the foreseeable future, but the recent introduction of their V4 Panigale represents the end of the v-twin superbike era that really began with today’s Featured Listing Ducati 750GT. If you ask anyone to name the earliest Ducati v-twin, one of the Supersports is the one most likely to spring to mind. But this GT was actually the first, and possibly most significant machine to be powered by the elegant and desirable “Round Case” twin.

It’s difficult to overstate how important the v-twin was to Ducati’s present fortunes. Prior to the introduction of the 750GT in 1971, Ducati built single-cylinder road and race motorcycles, the most sophisticated of which used their now widespread Desmo heads that eschewed springs for a more precise and positive system of cams to both open and close the valves. But, singles, while profitable and popular in much of the world for their simplicity, economy, and light weight, would never have allowed Ducati to develop a real fan base in that largest and most lucrative of markets: North America.

The original incarnation of the roadgoing v-twin did not include Desmodromic valve actuation: until the Pantah, that was reserved for the Supersport models exclusively. However, it did use a system of tower shafts and bevel gears to operate the cams for very precise timing, and that clockwork masterpiece is a far cry from modern motorcycle engines that are often mercifully hidden behind fairings or a tangle of wires and hoses.

Performance for the 748cc engine was relatively modest by today’s standards, but this was a considered a serious machine and a 750GT can definitely keep up with modern traffic. Braking won’t be up to current standards, but the 60 claimed horses and 407lb dry weight meant a top speed of 125mph, so you can easily out accelerate most cars leaving a stoplight and handling was excellent.

Although only 4,000 or so 750GTs were actually built, they paved the way for Ducati’s big-bike ambitions and their current status as the premier European bike brand, with a balance of sales volume and exotic cachet that extends well beyond the enthusiast market and into the general population. This example is being offered by Moto Borgotaro, a Brooklyn-based shop that specializes in quality classic bikes, maintenance, and restorations.

From the Seller: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale

Bike is presented by Moto Borgotaro Inc. located in Brooklyn , N.Y. 

This is a fantastic 3rd production stage 750GT that has a lot touches from the earlier series 750GT’s — I would call this the ultimate rider as that how it was set up… Why? well lets start with the good… complete motor rebuild in 2009 by Mike Duzick of Mikmar Motors, Paxinos, PA. earlier 72′ tank and tins, completely rebuilt wheels (high lip Borrani style), frame re-done, chrome redone, new Conti pipes, updated electrical, low bars, newer Avon’s.. the works.

Close up, flaws etc… The bike is excellent in person, minor flaws as follows — dash is cracked (common) and it is the earlier style 3 light, scratch on underside of rt. hand pipe, you only see it if your looking for it, brake lever bent out a bit on the end. No it is not 100% original but frankly the bike is fantastic and Mr. Duzick’s motor and restoration is excellent… ride this bike.. this is the one. 

— There are more than 50 additional photos from restoration. 

DETAILS

  • Third production stage 750GT with earlier body work 
  • Engine # 756389
  • Engine crank on up rebuild in 2009 by Mike Duzick of Mikmar Motors, Paxinos, PA
  • 72′ GT tank and tins all re-done in black 
  • Restored seat 
  • New Contis 
  • New Chrome all around 
  • Complete rebuilt wheels 
  • Original shocks
  • Sold with a clean New Jersey title
  • Only 513 miles since restoration in 2009 
  • New Sealed battery 
  • New electrical, and electronic ignition 
  • Newer Avon Roadriders 

The 750GT was probably the most practical of the original v-twins, and this one looks like the perfect collectible, round-case Ducati to actually ride on weekends. I’m a fan of Moto Borgotaro’s recent offerings and this bike seems pretty representative of the kind of bikes they’ve had available in the past: not over-restored, cosmetically “perfect” museum pieces, but extremely clean, well-maintained bikes for collectors who also want to regularly use their acquisitions. Head on over to the eBay listing for some more info, or just to keep an eye on the auction: there are just a couple days left, and bidding is up north of $18,000.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale
Ducati April 12, 2018 posted by

More Than the Sum – 1993 Ducati 900SS Custom

Ducati’s iconic 900 SuperSport has everything you need and nothing you don’t.  The early 90’s edition inspired this retro-faired monoposto, where even more of everything is out in the open.  The custom frame, tank and fairing hang together very well, looking like a Friday afternoon ride into the hills waiting to happen.

1993 Ducati 900SS Custom for sale on eBay

The 900SS goes way back to 1975, but belt drive unburdened the engine in 1988 and the conversion to Mikuni carburetors in 1993 freed up 84 hp.  Big brakes from the 851 provided ample stoppage, and fully adjustable Showa suspension were a nice improvement.  Dry weight was under 400 lbs.

As built by Union Motorcycle Classics, this SuperSport might be under 400 lbs. with half a tank, though the trip odometer might want to be used as a gas gauge.  Perhaps the wafer-thin seat atop the revised subframe would remind the rider to take a break, though the aluminized Ferracci exhaust and Fox rear shock say go.  From the eBay auction:

Introducing a one-of-a-kind professionally built 900SS. Everything on this beautiful motorcycle shows attention to detail and mechanical craftsmanship. (search “custom 900SS” on google and this will be one of the top 5 motorcycles that appears in images.)

The one-off hand crafted tank is a merging of a 900SS tank and a late 80’s 750 Sport. Beautifully done. You will see throughout the build are custom manufactured brackets and period race parts, with all work performed by Union Cycles.

Likely the builder didn’t change the frame geometry, not messing with one of the best handling SuperSports of the day.  Union has beautifully reduced the 900SS to its cafe’ racing denominator, as Hunter S. Thompson described in his original Cycle World review of the bike.  With the limited seating position, rider endurance might be even lower.  But cafe’s aren’t that far apart these days, and the new owner will likely be having extended Q&A at coffee stops, with spirited blasts in between…

-donn

More Than the Sum – 1993 Ducati 900SS Custom