Posts by tag: Super Sport

Ducati September 1, 2018 posted by

Wham-O ! – 1990 Ducati 750 Sport

The 1990’s were a heady time for Ducati, with the 851, Paso, 888, Supermono, and 916 all realizing their potential.  Meanwhile, the sporty-on-a-budget 750 Sport that helped keep the company afloat in the late ’80s is all but ignored.  This eastern Duc has been ridden extensively but probably not much lately.  It has the early bold graphics livery and looks substantially original and complete, just in need of a little TLC.

1990 Ducati 750 Sport for sale on eBay

A foot in each decade, the 750 Sport used an F1-style frame and a Paso-style Weber carb for the belt-timed desmodue.  Great power at 72 hp for a two-valve 750, though tractability of the single carburetor was wanting.  Single-adjustable Marzocchi dampers and 16-inch wheels kept the bottom line in sight.  Single puck Brembo brakes are front and rear.  The size is more Paso than 851, making the Sport more of an all-rounder, a little more comfortable on a long ride.

 

The seller might not have had time to form an emotional attachment to this 750, and it looks like the previous owner parked her a while back.  Still it’s complete and mostly stock, ready for a week at the spa.  From the eBay auction:

Up for sale is a Ducati 750 Sport, aka the “Poor Man’s F1”. I have been told that they imported less than 400 of these to the US, they are not common.  I have only ever seen one other one for sale. 

This bike is mechanically sound, it runs/drives perfectly. 19,030 miles. 
Good condition for it’s age, but with it’s age there are some little scuffs and scratches around the bike.  Took photos of what I found. 

 

Never exactly the top of the dance card, the 750 Sport was a worthy partner for weekend tours or rallies.  As ever a compromise, this one is a rarity not needing deep pockets.  For a mid-size, an eager performer with enough room for an un-tucked adult.  Even more unusual than the later sun beam paint scheme, the bright blue and white graphics on red fairings recall an era when Ducati wasn’t hanging back waiting for your attention.  Once this 750 Sport is detailed up, some time spent in the stainless hardware aisle, and with fresh expendables, it’ll be an eyeball grabber too…

-donn

Wham-O ! – 1990 Ducati 750 Sport
MV Agusta June 15, 2018 posted by

Naked Super Sport – 2005 MV Agusta Brutale 750S

MV’s 749cc Brutale was their first dabble in the naked sector after Cagiva’s investment, and the F4 sportbike without fairings has stood the test of time and a few engine updates.  Compared to more specialized Agustas, the 750S or Strada used little carbon or magnesium but imprinted a very sporty feel and sound on the rider.  This example has just under 11,000 miles and should prove to be a nice introduction to the MV world.

2005 MV Agusta Brutale 750S

Coming over from the F4 750 in a slightly less peaky tune, the Brutale’s engine still makes 127 hp at a lofty 12,500 rpm.  The chrom-moly trellis suspends the engine from above and is hung with 49mm Showa forks.  The 4-1-2 exhaust isn’t constrained under the seat and makes its exit across from the single sided swingarm.  The aluminum frame connectors, and plastic fender and covers were a small step down from the Serie Oro, but adjustable suspension and 6-piston Nissin brakes reflect the overall quality.

This Brutale has just a few modifications, includes a rear stand, and its original catalyst for a prospective Cali buyer.  Replacing the patina-ed ignition switch cover would be a quick way to improve things.  The Pennsylvania owner keeps it short in the eBay auction:

Garage kept, 3rd adult owner, never raced, never dropped.
Everything in pictures goes with bike, plus correct oil and filters.
Mid pipe installed, but CAT comes with bike
Non OEM mirrors installed, OEM mirrors also along with sale.
Rear tire has less than 100 miles.

Reviewed as sweet handling and smooth, it doesn’t have much of the cruel and ruthless the name implies.  It tackles the difficulties of hiding the plumbing and bracketry with a lot of style, and comes off a lot sportier in person.  This example seems about the middle of the pack, substantially stock but not fawned over, and unless the reserve is out of line, on target for a reasonable price…

-donn

Naked Super Sport – 2005 MV Agusta Brutale 750S
Ducati May 7, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale

It’s obvious that we’ll continue to see Ducati’s iconic “L-twin” for the foreseeable future, but the recent introduction of their V4 Panigale represents the end of the v-twin superbike era that really began with today’s Featured Listing Ducati 750GT. If you ask anyone to name the earliest Ducati v-twin, one of the Supersports is the one most likely to spring to mind. But this GT was actually the first, and possibly most significant machine to be powered by the elegant and desirable “Round Case” twin.

It’s difficult to overstate how important the v-twin was to Ducati’s present fortunes. Prior to the introduction of the 750GT in 1971, Ducati built single-cylinder road and race motorcycles, the most sophisticated of which used their now widespread Desmo heads that eschewed springs for a more precise and positive system of cams to both open and close the valves. But, singles, while profitable and popular in much of the world for their simplicity, economy, and light weight, would never have allowed Ducati to develop a real fan base in that largest and most lucrative of markets: North America.

The original incarnation of the roadgoing v-twin did not include Desmodromic valve actuation: until the Pantah, that was reserved for the Supersport models exclusively. However, it did use a system of tower shafts and bevel gears to operate the cams for very precise timing, and that clockwork masterpiece is a far cry from modern motorcycle engines that are often mercifully hidden behind fairings or a tangle of wires and hoses.

Performance for the 748cc engine was relatively modest by today’s standards, but this was a considered a serious machine and a 750GT can definitely keep up with modern traffic. Braking won’t be up to current standards, but the 60 claimed horses and 407lb dry weight meant a top speed of 125mph, so you can easily out accelerate most cars leaving a stoplight and handling was excellent.

Although only 4,000 or so 750GTs were actually built, they paved the way for Ducati’s big-bike ambitions and their current status as the premier European bike brand, with a balance of sales volume and exotic cachet that extends well beyond the enthusiast market and into the general population. This example is being offered by Moto Borgotaro, a Brooklyn-based shop that specializes in quality classic bikes, maintenance, and restorations.

From the Seller: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale

Bike is presented by Moto Borgotaro Inc. located in Brooklyn , N.Y. 

This is a fantastic 3rd production stage 750GT that has a lot touches from the earlier series 750GT’s — I would call this the ultimate rider as that how it was set up… Why? well lets start with the good… complete motor rebuild in 2009 by Mike Duzick of Mikmar Motors, Paxinos, PA. earlier 72′ tank and tins, completely rebuilt wheels (high lip Borrani style), frame re-done, chrome redone, new Conti pipes, updated electrical, low bars, newer Avon’s.. the works.

Close up, flaws etc… The bike is excellent in person, minor flaws as follows — dash is cracked (common) and it is the earlier style 3 light, scratch on underside of rt. hand pipe, you only see it if your looking for it, brake lever bent out a bit on the end. No it is not 100% original but frankly the bike is fantastic and Mr. Duzick’s motor and restoration is excellent… ride this bike.. this is the one. 

— There are more than 50 additional photos from restoration. 

DETAILS

  • Third production stage 750GT with earlier body work 
  • Engine # 756389
  • Engine crank on up rebuild in 2009 by Mike Duzick of Mikmar Motors, Paxinos, PA
  • 72′ GT tank and tins all re-done in black 
  • Restored seat 
  • New Contis 
  • New Chrome all around 
  • Complete rebuilt wheels 
  • Original shocks
  • Sold with a clean New Jersey title
  • Only 513 miles since restoration in 2009 
  • New Sealed battery 
  • New electrical, and electronic ignition 
  • Newer Avon Roadriders 

The 750GT was probably the most practical of the original v-twins, and this one looks like the perfect collectible, round-case Ducati to actually ride on weekends. I’m a fan of Moto Borgotaro’s recent offerings and this bike seems pretty representative of the kind of bikes they’ve had available in the past: not over-restored, cosmetically “perfect” museum pieces, but extremely clean, well-maintained bikes for collectors who also want to regularly use their acquisitions. Head on over to the eBay listing for some more info, or just to keep an eye on the auction: there are just a couple days left, and bidding is up north of $18,000.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale
Ducati April 12, 2018 posted by

More Than the Sum – 1993 Ducati 900SS Custom

Ducati’s iconic 900 SuperSport has everything you need and nothing you don’t.  The early 90’s edition inspired this retro-faired monoposto, where even more of everything is out in the open.  The custom frame, tank and fairing hang together very well, looking like a Friday afternoon ride into the hills waiting to happen.

1993 Ducati 900SS Custom for sale on eBay

The 900SS goes way back to 1975, but belt drive unburdened the engine in 1988 and the conversion to Mikuni carburetors in 1993 freed up 84 hp.  Big brakes from the 851 provided ample stoppage, and fully adjustable Showa suspension were a nice improvement.  Dry weight was under 400 lbs.

As built by Union Motorcycle Classics, this SuperSport might be under 400 lbs. with half a tank, though the trip odometer might want to be used as a gas gauge.  Perhaps the wafer-thin seat atop the revised subframe would remind the rider to take a break, though the aluminized Ferracci exhaust and Fox rear shock say go.  From the eBay auction:

Introducing a one-of-a-kind professionally built 900SS. Everything on this beautiful motorcycle shows attention to detail and mechanical craftsmanship. (search “custom 900SS” on google and this will be one of the top 5 motorcycles that appears in images.)

The one-off hand crafted tank is a merging of a 900SS tank and a late 80’s 750 Sport. Beautifully done. You will see throughout the build are custom manufactured brackets and period race parts, with all work performed by Union Cycles.

Likely the builder didn’t change the frame geometry, not messing with one of the best handling SuperSports of the day.  Union has beautifully reduced the 900SS to its cafe’ racing denominator, as Hunter S. Thompson described in his original Cycle World review of the bike.  With the limited seating position, rider endurance might be even lower.  But cafe’s aren’t that far apart these days, and the new owner will likely be having extended Q&A at coffee stops, with spirited blasts in between…

-donn

More Than the Sum – 1993 Ducati 900SS Custom
Ducati March 21, 2018 posted by

Distant Rumble – 2004 Ducati 1000DS SuperSport

Long and lean, Ducati’s 1000 Dual Spark SuperSport impressed reviewers with stable handling and sensible seat height.  Its 85 air-cooled hp don’t snap the bike upright but do just fine making the cars and bikes behind get smaller.  This 2004 model has miles but recent maintenance and a very factory appearance.

2004 Ducati 1000DS SuperSport for sale on eBay

Ducati used two sparks plugs ( and valves ) per cylinder to help increase power.  Similar 90-degree L-twins powered the Monster and Multi Strada, trading the stable temperatures of liquid cooling for the simplicity and lighter weight of air cooling.  Many updates were made to the heads to improve valve angles and gas flow.  The classic trellis frame provides a solid platform for the 43mm Showa forks and alloy swingarm with Öhlins shock.  The dry clutch is also all aluminum to save weight.  Gold line Brembo calipers are found over dual 320mm front disks and 245mm rear.

Despite 24,000 and 14 years, this 1000DS looks very good.  As a 2004 it has alloy swingarm, Marchesini wheels, and Öhlins rear shock that were later value-engineered into cheaper components.  It also has the rarely seen aluminum mufflers and factory turn signals.  I had thought that Ducati only offered the 1000DS SuperSport with full fairing, but maybe this example snuck in under that wire as well.  Maintenance history from the eBay auction :

Work at 17,000 Miles :

  • Valves Checked (No adjustment needed)
  • New Timing Belts Installed

Recent Work at 21,000 Miles :

  • New Brakes

Just Installed at 24,000 Miles :

  • Oil Changed – 100% Synthetic, with new mounts on the oil cooler
  • Ducati Air Filter
  • New Front and Rear Tires
  • New chain
  • Both sprockets (front and rear) are new, geared for the highway
  • New Battery
  • New Rubber Oil Cooler Mounts

 

Fans might differ on the complex Terblanche design, but the basic facts of a nicely faired 1000cc sportbike remain, with the fanfare of the big L-twin on approach.  Some afficionados recommend buying the very latest of whatever model you choose, but the 1000DS SuperSport is an exception, this 2004 being better equipped than later years.  Since the last year of the model was 2007, all major improvements are on board the ’04.  The simplicity of the desmodue also lends itself much better to hobbyist maintenance than a new bike, and this well cared-for example is worth a look-see…

-donn

Distant Rumble – 2004 Ducati 1000DS SuperSport
Honda February 19, 2018 posted by

Silver Streak: 1980 Honda CB750F Super Sport for Sale

Although the term “sportbike” evokes images of sleek, fully-faired two-wheeled plastic darts, the term has been steadily evolving and originally would have been used to describe bikes like this, the Honda CB750F Super Sport.  Strangely practical-looking for a sportbike, the CB750F was the logical evolution of Honda’s revolutionary, but long-in-the-tooth CB750. That bike set the motorcycling world on its ear in 1969, but ten years is a long time, and the bike was in serious need of an update.

 

Introduced in 1979, the CB750F took the earlier machine and moved the game on a bit: SOHC became DOHC, and two valves per cylinder became four. It was still air-cooled, but the changes led to a claimed 72hp from the 748cc engine. Bore and stroke were perfectly square: 62mm x 62mm. Why not more oversquare per typical, high-revving motorcycle convention? Well Honda felt that the narrower bore meant a narrower, more aerodynamic engine and less surface area meant better combustion. It wasn’t particularly light, although the 503lb dry weight was pretty standard for the period, as were the 19″ front 18″ rear wheels, now cast instead of spoked.

The bike was updated slightly for the 1980 model year seen here with improved rear Showa shocks, a reinforced swingarm, a frame revised to increase rigidity, and heavier, but stronger wheels that replaced the 1979’s Comstar hoops. Overall, weight was increased, but so was handling. The package might seem underwhelming for riders used to modern hardware, but period reviews were very positive, praising the bike’s agility, stability, and the powerful engine.

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Honda CB750F Super Sport for Sale

Amazing pristine collector Super Sport bike in rare “seldom seen” condition

  • 750cc inline DOHC engine
  • 78HP 5 speed
  • 12 Second 1/4 mile sport bike
  • Timeless design
  • Super Sport racing handle bars
  • New tires 
  • Two owner bike

Silver Metallic paint that appears brand new. Bike has had recent service. Meticulous detail work done and looks and runs like brand new motorcycle. Garaged kept by collector and still looks new 38 years later – She’s ready to ride! Beautiful bike with a style that will keep on pleasing. I get compliments on this bike every time it goes out. Rare condition and there will be absolutely no disappointments. I’ll be here to assist your shippers any way I can. 

To me it appears to have been completely restored, but I’m not certain. This just my opinion. I’ve restored a lot of cars in my time but not a bike. This bike is absolutely gorgeous and looks freshly done. I purchased it from a fellow car collector. Again, it looks like a complete restoration had been performed but I can’t be certain. Bike has never been dropped or laid down. You can’t restore a bike for what I’m asking. Please look closely at the photos as they are a true representation of the immaculate condition of this Super Sport bike.

Here’s a beautiful sport bike being offered here in exceptional condition!  You will not find another motorcycle like this one in this condition for this price! It’s cheaper than a dirt bike! I’ve put a very reasonable price of only $5,800 on the bike. For the money that has been spent on this bike, it can’t be duplicated for anywhere close to what I’m asking. Jump on this deal… she needs a new home, admirer and a rider that wants to show her off! Again… you will not be disappointed! You’re buying the “BEST”

Thank you for your consideration. Drew – Arizona

Wow. Well this CB750F is very nice, but $5,800 is a pretty big jump over the last time I eyeballed values. Of course, in a couple years’ time, that might start to look like a bargain… Certainly, these aren’t modern sportbikes in any sense of the word, with an air-cooled engine, dual shock rear suspension, spindly forks, and huge wheels. And the weight is pretty shocking as well. But unlike the potentially crippling ergonomics of something like an MV Agusta F4, this old school superbike offers a pretty relaxed riding position and a wide, flat seat that probably works well for two, so you can share your vintage sportbike with your vintage back, and maybe a vintage companion.

-tad

Silver Streak: 1980 Honda CB750F Super Sport for Sale
Ducati January 5, 2018 posted by

Pristine Entry-Level Italian: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport with Just 936 Miles!

Made for just two years between 2002 and 2003, the Ducati 620 Sport was intended as an affordable way into Ducati ownership for riders more interested in the Ducati brand than in actual speed. But Ducati being Ducati, they were unable to build a sporty bike that actually handled badly, and they managed to create an entry-level machine that encapsulated the best and worst of the brand. Of course, that means that it may not be ideal for the newer riders it was obviously targeting: the riding position is extremely aggressive for a bike with such modest ability, typical Ducati steering lock means an inconveniently large turning circle, and the suspension is harsh.

The silver and black on the 620 recalls the style of the original 1980s Pantah, which is closely related to the 620 Sport in more ways than one. The Pantah was the very first Ducati to be powered by their then-new 500cc L-twin that had the single overhead-cams driven by toothed rubber belts, instead of a complex arrangement of tower shafts and bevel gears. This change to belts meant the engines were simpler to produce, but at the cost of maintenance, since the rubber belts require regular replacement, a service that’s ignored at the owner’s peril: second-hand two-valve Ducatis are currently very cheap, but a wrecked engine can quickly turn your affordable exotic into a pricey proposition…

The 620 uses the crank from the 750 for a slight increase in displacement to 618cc and a bump in torque, compared to the earlier 583cc 600SS, while the addition of Marelli fuel-injection means a broader spread of power with fewer hiccups, compared to the original’s carburetors. Like the Pantah, the 620 uses a five-speed gearbox and a wet clutch, instead of the 900’s six-speed and dry clutch arrangement. A gearbox with fewer cogs in a smaller-engined bike might sound like a retrograde step, but the torquey, flexible v-twin works well with the wider ratios of the five-speed and the wet clutch means it will take more abuse, which is ideal for the newer riders and commuters dealing with traffic.

Although the bike is down on power compared to its bigger siblings and pretty much anything in the 600cc class, the 60 claimed horses and 29 lb-ft of torque mean the bike is responsive, if not particularly fast when you’re hustling the 400lb machine through a set of curves, which is really where the Ducati shows its breeding. The fork and shock are relatively primitive and non-adjustable, but the bike shares its frame and basic geometry with the 900SS so handling is very good, even if the ride quality is a bit harsh, while a pair of Brembo calipers and discs up front mean stopping power on par with much more powerful machines.

Interestingly, these rare bikes seemed to get snapped up by racers looking for an affordable v-twin platform to modify into a production race bike when they come up for sale. You may be thinking, “Why the hell would you do that when there are loads of liquid-cooled, four-valve Suzuki SV650s lying around?” Apparently, the Ducati’s sporty frame geometry makes for a better-handling foundation, and I’m sure there are also some weight penalties imposed on the more sophisticated SV to keep racing close.The air and oil-cooled, two-valve twin responds very well to tuning and is supposedly much more reliable than the Suzuki unit as well, especially when used in racing applications.

From the original eBay listing: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport for Sale

Collectors dream! 2003 Ducati 620 SuperSport with 936 original miles!

I purchased the bike from the original owner with 580 miles on it who had it stored in a climate controlled garage.

No wreck or “tip over” damage, stock original except for some tasteful decals the original owner added on, I just left them on.

Clear NC title in my name.

Owned by mature 55 year old, I’m needing to change to a different riding position so selling my sporting motorcycles.

No wheelies, no gearbox abuse, no track use, just country roads near my house.

No smoking or weird engine noises. Starts, idles, shifts gears and runs as new.

No leaks of any kind, oil, fuel, forks, brakes.

Stock motorcycle, no intake, fuel, exhaust or electrical modifications, no aftermarket computers, no headers, none of that stuff

Recent maintenance performed:

Oil and filter change
Timing Belts
Spark plugs
Brake fluid change (with new Ducati caps and seals on reservoirs)
Internal rubber fuel lines (OEM Ducati)
Fuel filter (Mahle)
Tires (Shinko 009 Radials)
Yuasa MF battery
Kaoka cruise control

Chain and sprockets still as new, no rips or tears on seat, windshield nice and clear.

Mufflers have no dings or scratches.

Inside fuel tank perfectly clean, no rust, no sealant. Some very small scratches on top of tank near filler, hard to see but if you look closely at the photo of right side of tank you can make them out.

Still has a full set of original keys, owners manuals,tool kit, owners card,etc. as shown in photo. Also still have the original key fobs from the factory with ID numbers.

Sale also includes Factory Service manual and a Haynes manual.

It is ready to ride, collect or display, a beautiful time capsule Ducati.

Runs great, just had it out last week for a ride in nice weather. The motorcycle rides great, nice and smooth, gears change effortlessly. It is ready to ride and needs nothing… No disappointments here!

Motorcycle is located near the coast of NC, if you would like to see in person let me know.

This thing is pretty immaculate, as you’d expect from a bike with just 936 miles on the odometer. I’m not sure the matte silver really flatters the lines of the Terblanche-styled SuperSport, but it’s certainly more subtle than the usual red or yellow. Bidding hasn’t even reached $2,500 yet with the reserve met and time left on the auction. So whether you plan to buy this nearly museum-quality Super Sport as a rider, an odd footnote to complete your air-cooled Ducati collection, or as the raw material for forging a class-dominating v-twin race bike, this looks like a pretty good place to start. Although it would be a shame to chop it up… Power will never really be much to write home about, but a quick stop on eBay will turn up some nice, used suspension bits from a 900 or 1000 SuperSport that should bolt up easily and improve the bike’s handling further.

-tad

Pristine Entry-Level Italian: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport with Just 936 Miles!
Ducati December 19, 2017 posted by

Almost New: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE with 867 Miles for Sale

Hmmmmm, the text from the listing for this Ducati 900SS FE looks strangely familiar… One of the surprising things about having been writing these posts for the past few years is how often my words show up in sellers’ listings. I probably shouldn’t be encouraging folks to use my writing for free but, to be completely honest, I’m still more flattered than offended at this point. The main problem is that it means I have to come up with some other theme for my post…

Up until Ducati’s most recent iteration, things were always pretty dicey for them financially and, on more than one occasion, they were reduced to trading on nostalgia to make ends meet. By 1978, Ducati’s bevel-drive twin was massively outdated, but a lucky win at the Isle of Man TT by Mike “The Bike” Hailwood meant they could flog some fully-faired and gloriously red and green Hailwood-replicas  and keep the lights on. It’s a very cool machine in retrospect, but on the eve of the GSX-R750’s introduction, it looks like a dinosaur. A very cool dinosaur, but a dinosaur nonetheless. Similarly, by the late 1990s, Ducati’s air and oil-cooled Super Sport bikes still had plenty of charm and charisma, but offered little to appeal to modern sportbike fans.

Even when new, the 900SS offered minimal handing advantages compared to a Japanese sportbike that would leave it for dead in a straight line. But Ducati obviously couldn’t sell enough of their expensive, exotic liquid-cooled models to make ends meet, and the design soldiered on for riders who wanted to pretend they preferred the “mechanical honesty of a classic, air-cooled engine” [it does sound better than the liquid-cooled version] or those who were more honest about the fact that they were terrified of the four-valve Ducatis’ expensive service requirements, but still wanted a genuine Italian motorcycle.

It’s a bit disingenuous to try and capitalize on nostalgia for a bike that would obviously continue in a newer, better form. But right before the 1999 release of heavily-revised, fuel-injected version styled by Pierre Terblanche Super Sport, Ducati released the “Final Edition” of the earlier, chunky, rubber-cambelt v-twin sportbike to cash in on the looming demise of the well-loved but obsolete model before it was replaced. Although when you consider the critical reaction to the updated model, it makes a bit more sense. The FE featured a solo tail to save weight and allow the fitment of upswept exhausts for better cornering clearance. Adjustable suspension front and rear was decent, and the standard two-valve engine in standard tune was good for the standard 80hp. Ergonomics are very humane for anyone weaned on late model sportbikes, and the seemingly limited power is plenty to have fun with on canyon roads.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

Time Capsule! Mint Condition, Torque For Days, Beautiful Ducati! Only 867 miles… yes you read that right. #288 of only 300 made

The 90s iteration of Ducati’s famous SuperSport wasn’t exactly a fast bike, even by standards of the day. And by the time the Ducati 900SS “Final Edition” rolled around, it likely appealed mostly to die-hard Ducati fans and collectors. Which is a shame because, although the 900SS didn’t offer cutting-edge performance, it did offer plenty of charisma, great handling, and accessible real-world performance.

The chase for abstract performance numbers has always obsessed the world of motorcycles and cars. But the truth is that peak horsepower numbers are often pointless. Since these machines are only fully exploited by .01% of riders, and what works in ad copy isn’t always all that useful on the road, it’s not always the most powerful bikes that make the most rewarding bikes to ride, especially on the road. Look at the endless praise heaped on the K5 GSX-R1000 by modern reviewers and see how this year’s Brutale 800 actually produces less horsepower than the previous version to make it a better roadbike, and it becomes easier to see why this Ducati might win your heart, even if it won’t win any bench-racing sessions…

Powered by Ducati’s long-lived two-valve Pantah engine, the FE featured a solo-seat tail that allowed upswept pipes for increased cornering clearance and some carbon-fiber parts ostensibly because of their light weight, although the savings on a front fender are probably negligible… With a claimed 80hp on tap and a big fat midrange these are very rewarding to ride stock and a huge range of aftermarket support means you can modify the bike to suit if that’s more your thing.

This thing appears to be bone-stock, with under 1,000 miles on the clock, and bidding is up just north of $6,000 with very little time on the auction. It might have been laughable just a few years ago to consider the FE particularly collectible or desirable, but these have definitely increased in value in recent years, and this very low-mileage example should get the attention of collectors. It’s sad that such a usable sportbike has been basically accumulating dust, but I’m glad examples like this exist for folks more interested in displaying their bikes than riding them.

-tad

Almost New: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE with 867 Miles for Sale
Honda October 13, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1979 Honda CBX with Matching Helmet!

Update 10.27.2017: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

In 1978 Honda stunned the motorcycling world with a technological tour de force. The six cylinder, 24 valve CBX was the most ambitious – and the most visceral – Honda project to date. Dominated by an air-cooled inline format mounted transversely, this Honda made a statement like no other. And while Benelli introduced the world’s first production six cylinder motorcycle, Honda completely owned it and made it their own. Seemingly an engineering exercise that got out of hand, the Honda CBX remains a remarkable piece of machinery. It is coveted by collectors as well, with prices following suit.

A bit portly at 600+ pounds wet, the CBX was considered a superbike at it’s 1978 introduction. Part of that reason is that the world had never seen anything like it. With more than 105 HP on tap, the big bike was as strong in performance as it was stunning to look at. While you might not know it by looking, the big six was actually an evolution of the 50cc and 125cc GP race bikes of the 1960s and early 1970s. Honda claimed this lineage not only aided in meeting the performance targets of the 1047cc, 24-valve DOHC inline six cylinder, but also dramatically shortened the gestation period since this was a route already well traveled by Honda engineers. As a promotional stunt Honda provided bikes to the Isle of Man TT, which were utilized by course marshals and made a statement as to the sporting intent of the flagship Honda. Capable at the dragstrip, decent on the road course (especially endurance events), and at home at any boulevard in the nation, the CBX delivered on Honda’s promise of engineering excellence.

From the seller:
1979 Honda CBX

This CBX bike comes from BAC, the famous automotive and motorcycle collection. In the early 2000s the owner of a famous automobile collection decided that post war 1970s and 1980s motorcycles were some of the most unappreciated classic bikes and set out to buy the best of the best of all the iconic bikes. The owner is nearing 80 years old and has decided to sell off his collection of Italian and Japanese classic bikes of the 1970s and 1980s.

More from the seller:

The CBX in this ad took him three years of traveling across the country to find the best CBX he could find. While the bike has just under 10,000 miles on it, the current owner is the second owner. The previous owner who purchased the bike new only drove it on sunny days and it has never seen a drop of rain or any major dust or dirt. Everything is original bike except for the bearings in the rear swing axle. The bike even has a matching color Honda period correct helmet. The owner says without a question; this has to be one of the finest CBXs in the nation. It runs perfectly and has never been taken apart and nothing sounds like a Honda CBX when it is winding up through the gears.

More from the seller:
The owner said in his opinion the most important part of any collector bike is the mufflers as they are almost in all cases impossible to reproduce. The mufflers on this CBX are immaculate.

This bike also comes with a matching helmet!

This 1979 Honda CBX is located in Chicago land: $14,500

From the pictures of the enormous engine, you might think you need to be a bow-legged cowboy to ride one. But thanks to intelligent design, that is not the case. Not only did Honda cant the cylinder bank forward some 30 degrees, the intake setup is arranged in a vee format to further narrow the bike’s midsection; despite engine dimensions, there is plenty of room for the rider. And with a jack-shaft arrangement that moves ancillary components from the ends of the crank to behind the motor, the CBX is not nearly as wide as you might otherwise imagine.

Built from 1978 through 1982, the CBX was but one of the incredible models that Honda created during this wild time; other examples include CX500 Turbo, CX650 Turbo and later the V45 Interceptor. Yet the more conventional CB900F was the real showroom performer, outselling the engineering oddities by a large margin. As a result, the CBX remains a relatively rare model. Yet it still presents an amazing sight, and continues to stun today. The 1979 Honda CBX shown here is a low mile example. More importantly, this is a a completely original example that was recently liberated from a larger collection. If you are in the market for a 1970s collectable Honda, you want to source the cleanest, best example you can find. This particular machine meets those specs easily. The asking price is $14,500.

MI

Featured Listing: 1979 Honda CBX with Matching Helmet!