Posts by tag: SOHC

Benelli September 16, 2018 posted by

Oh Sei – 1983 Benelli 900 Sei

New CEO DeTomaso ( yes that one ) led the historic Benelli company to higher performance machines and the 750 Sei ( Six ) in 1973.  Benelli increased bore and stroke on the Sei to displace 906cc for the 1979 model year.  Simultaneously outrageous, exotic, handcrafted, and occasionally disappointing, the Sei was Benelli's flagship until they merged with Moto-Guzzi in 1988.

1983 Benelli 900 Sei for sale on eBay

Looking for all the world like a SOHC Honda engine from the era, the Sei had some innovations, like placing the alternator behind the cylinders ( which were wide enough already ).  80 hp were routed through a 5-speed and double-row final drive chain, speaking to the torque that was available at just above tickover speed.  Good as they are, the Brembo brakes are hopelessly outgunned by the power and mid-500 lbs. weight.  In spite, the Sei got high marks for handling, steady in a corner when the competition was wallowing.

Looking excellent in its late -70's flowing bodywork and controls, this Sei has just over 11,000 miles.  A machine of this age will have an afternoon's worth of tales, but the owner stays on message in the eBay auction:

A meticulously maintained 1983 Benelli 900 SEI with extremely low miles at 11300.
This bike is almost perfect, serviced and runs and drives perfectly.
They don’t come up often so here is an opportunity to get one.
Bid with absolute confidence.
Don’t waste my time with silly questions, low offers and if you don’t have money.
Viewing is welcomed before you buy.

Already in boutique territory, the Benelli pricing and complication of three carburetors made the Sei a rarity.  Performance was a few bullets down on the mission statement, under pleasing the crowd, honoring the Benelli name, and showing off the factory's skills.  Further down was a reliable ride, and the Sei got gigged repeatedly on electrical issues.  But the sound !  More 911 than motorbike, especially with the six-into-six.  For a collector with a European interest, this is just the bike for the end of the row...

-donn

 

Oh Sei – 1983 Benelli 900 Sei
magni August 17, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 1998 Magni Australia

Named in honor of their importer-turned-racer down under, the Australia was Magni's signature homologation special.  Using Moto Guzzi's quattrovalvole 992cc twin, the Australia is off the sporty and rarity charts.  This example is just out of a long restoration and looks like a new machine.

1998 Magni Australia for sale on eBay

In road trim with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, Guzzi's liter makes 104 well-mannered hp, and a healthy 65 ft.-lbs. torque.  Magni's own downtube frame has oil tankage in the backbone and massive Paioli forks.  Shaft drive is accomodated by the company's Parallelogrammo monoshock, which reduces extension under power.  Sporting intentions are confirmed by the thin foam seat and full fairing.  Weight is an acceptable 450 lbs. dry helped by carbon fiber mudguards.

Located in Illinois, this example has undergone a comprehensive rebuild, and is still awaiting its first fluids since completion.  Great to start with a special machine when embarking on a journey like this, and the Australia qualifies.  The single overhead cam V-twin hasn't been opened but should be far from needing anything.  Warren has this to say in the eBay auction:

On offer is a 1998 Magni Australia, 1000cc Moto Guzzi Daytona RS powerplant in Magni Parallelogrammo frame. I have recently completed a four year recommission/rebuild of the machine with many new parts including recent tires and battery, coils, all cables (fast idle, throttle, clutch, speedometer), NOS injectors and bodies, new Bosch fuel pump, injectors, and rubber boots, throttle potentiometer, main fuel valve, vacuum tank sender, all oil and breather lines, fuel lines, temperature sensors, cam position sensor. New rear brake carrier and rotor, new brake pads and HEL stainless lines, calipers rebuilt with Brembo kits, new buttons in front discs. All fluids fresh, bike has run on bench test, tank is flushed and dry, brakes have not been filled and bled since rebuild. All stainless steel pipes, muffler and crossover, fairing brackets are freshly polished, all fasteners have been replaced with European made stainless fasteners, unpolished.

Recommissioning used all Wurth supplies, torque specifications to manufacturer standards. All paint on bodywork and frame is original, lower belly pan professionally repainted due to stone chips, there have been no modifications to the machine that I can verify since it was constructed. VIN number is shown, engine number is KL011565. All takeoff parts and fasteners will be furnished with the machine if the purchaser desires. Odometer has been replaced with white faced metric instrument showing 1 kilometer. Original shows 10,183 miles, appears to be original.

Arturo Magni prepared Count Agusta's racing motorcycles ( for the likes of Surtees, Hailwood, and Agostini ) until the company quit racing in the mid-seventies, then he and his sons formed their own company.  Magni sampled different powerplants until 1985 when a lasting relationship with Moto Guzzi was formed.  The Australia reviewed as having a foot in two worlds - sharp handling but stable with the V-twin's low CG, the maintenance-free shaft drive hardly noticeable with the parallelogram swingarm, the Daytona RS engine powerful and torquey.  A "new" '98 by many measures, it should give the new owner many hours of enjoyment, even if the gas, oil, and brake fluid never go in.  Bidding is active but hasn't met the reserve yet.  Questions can be sent to Warren via the eBay auction.

-donn

 

Featured Listing – 1998 Magni Australia
Classic Sport Bikes For Sale January 9, 2011 posted by

1969 Honda CB750K Sandcast With Hardly Any Time Left On eBay

1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast

Location:  Appleton, Wisconsin

Mileage:  13,642 Miles

Price:  Currently $12,500USD with reserve not met.

"Just because something is rare, doesn't make it valuable."  This slogan is used by many to low-ball sellers, or to just tell sellers that what they have is actually pyrite, not the gold they believe it to be.  However, as the collectibility of Japanese motorcycles becomes more prevalent and focused, some bikes will become the most desirable and therefore the most valuable.  As far as the direction vintage, Japanese, street bikes appear to going in, the '69 CB750 Sandcast appears to be one of the top performers.

The Honda CB750 was absolutely revolutionary when released in 1969.  As played out as it has become, the CB750 was a four-stroke race bike for the road, something the world had never seen, and also single-handedly ballooned the sales of cider in the West Midlands.  The CB750 of 1969 was revolutionary in it's electric start, front disc, transverse mounted inline-four, and single overhead cam among other things.  Some of the most surprising attributes of the CB750 were it's affordable price ($1469 USD in 1969) and the fact that it was actually dependable!  The last real CB750 was released in 1978, as that was the end of the SOHC, dry-sump, bikes that were what made it so special when released.  The bikes were relatively the same from '69-78, but what makes the sandcast so special?

Speaking of Ferrari's on a bike website isn't the most popular move, but it's going to be the easiest way to explain why the sandcast is the most expensive CB750.  In 1975, at the Paris Motor Show, Ferrari released the iconic 308; the 308GTB wasn't released to the buying public until 1977 however and the first 712 cars feature fiberglass bodywork.  These 'glass cars can easily be identified by the horizontal line at the top of the A-Pillar, which isn't present on the steel bodied cars.  The fiberglass bodied 308GTB is the lightest of the 308 line, features a dry-sump oil system, least amount of government regulation items (bumpers, emissions), and is carbureted as opposed to fuel-injected.  Some of these features were carried on through the post '77 cars but the most important feature of the first 712 is the fiberglass body.  It has been widely speculated why these early cars feature fiberglass bodywork as opposed to the steel of the cars only a year later.  The most widely accepted reason is that Scaglietti/Ferrari didn't have the resources to immediately start production with the steel body tooling.  These fiberglass 308's are generally valued in the $40-55k range, or more, dependent on condition while other carbureted 308s tend to lie within the $25-35k range.

What does this all mean for the CB750 shown here?  The sandcast CB750s were produced up to serial number 1007414, these bikes featured some identifiable features such as front fender, gas tank, chain guard, master cylinder, etc., and most importantly the sandcast engine.  The sandcast engine has no performance benefits over the later die-cast blocks.  Honda went with the sandcast motors early on simply because a cope & drag system is considerably cheaper and faster than fronting the money for a die-cast production line.  The sandcast CB's routinely sell for $10-20k more than a later (pre-'79) CB750 of the same condition.  You don't want to ask about RSC parts for a CB750...

I know, you've probably skipped the last few paragraphs and I'm fine with that; Here is the review of this particular CB for sale:  This bike is in very good condition for being forty-two years old.  This bike is supposedly original except for a missing side cover and having the top clap replaced at a Honda dealer in the 1980.  The SN of the engine does not match the SN of the frame.  I'm not versed well enough on sandcast CB750s to know if this is possibly the original engine or not.  If it is not however, whomever found the engine did a lot of leg work as the engine is only thirty-three numbers from the frame.  This bike is in very good, driver, condition and should be more than acceptable for a restorer or someone who wants to simply be the eccentric guy at bike nights who rides the "...sandcast '750!".  This CB750 appears to be early production based on it's left mounted horn which is in line with the early SN.  The mileage also appears to be consistent with the condition of the bike shown.

This bike is right for you if you have the money for a brand new CBR1000RR, but not the interest in one.  Or, if you prefer appreciation to depreciation...See the bike on eBay .  Learn more than you've ever wanted to at the Sandcast Only Owner's Club here.  Find NOS parts or get your sandcast bike restored here.

AG