Posts by tag: oil boiler

Suzuki September 25, 2019 posted by

Going the Distance: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Race Replica for Sale

Well this is obviously not some perfectly-preserved replica, so if that’s a problem, just move along. Me, I’m always glad pristine originals exist in museums, so we can tell what those original, factory-supplied decals on the tank looked like before years of spilled gasoline caused them to flake and peel. But I don’t really want to own those bikes. Original carbon canisters that clutter up a Ducati’s clean lines? Massive exhaust cans that make a superbike sound like a sewing machine? Ugly plastic fenders and bulky signals and all that are optional, in my book. A bike is a blank slate. Sure, you can go too far and create something tacky and ill-advised. But this particular Suzuki GSX-R750 walks that line perfectly, with classic, if not original graphics, and great 80s endurance-racer style.

Flat-slide carbs now feed the air and oil-cooled inline four, but it otherwise retains the classic GSX-R oil-boiler powertrain. The inline four had twin cams and four valves per cylinder, but it saved weight by eschewing a radiator and water cooling system. Instead, Suzuki’s first couple generations of Gixxer used the Suzuki Advanced Cooling System or “SACS” that featured a double-chambered oil pump to circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the undersides of the pistons.

The colors here match the black-and-red Japanese-market Limited Edition version of the bike, decorated with tasteful period sponsor logos. I don’t know if this Yoshimura setup is period-correct, but it looks the part, and makes the bike look more lithe and nimble, more modern. There may be fans of the huge, perforated cylinder that passed for an exhaust can on the original bike, but I’m not one of them. Stainless-steel braided brake lines are obviously a later edition, but look good and should improve feel from the old-school four-piston calipers. The Fox shock out back should get handling closer to modern standards, and I love the single-lamp endurance-style fairing.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Race Replica for Sale

INTRODUCTION:

You are looking at a 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 endurance race bike replica. This GSX-R750 was custom built to race spec but was never raced, it was mostly a show bike, this race build was inspired by the 1986 endurance race bike. The motor was fully race built from the crank up and a lot of performance bolt on parts were added or custom fabricated to replicate the endurance race bike of 1986. This bike is extremely fast and truly feels like a real race bike with the motor modifications and bolt on performance parts. But please feel free to read more about the specifics of this bike and see the pictures for detail. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us. U.S. and International bidders are welcome to bid on this motorcycle but must arrange shipping themselves…

BODY:

The body work is all original and is in good condition. There are absolutely no cracks on any of the body panels, but there are some minor nicks and scrapes on a few of the panels.  We took pictures of the body work before all the decals so you can see the decals are not hiding any cracks or paint flaws. The wheels are perfect with no rock chips or scratches anywhere. The frame and engine have no corrosion and are nice and clean. Overall cosmetically this bike is in very nice condition.

MECHANICAL:

The bike runs and rides perfect, and shifts smoothly through all 6 gears. A full service tune-up was performed which included new spark plugs, chain, air filter, brake pads, oil change, new tires, and fluids flushed. All of the lighting, switches and electrical components work as they should.

RACE PARTS:

Professionally fully built motor from crank up, balanced crankshaft, over sized Wiseco pistons, race cams, adjustable camshafts sprockets, extended hardened rocker arms, performance valve springs, titanium valve retainers, and camshafts were degreed top performance race spec. 34mm Mikuni flat slide carbs, velocity stacks and pod filters included. Yoshimura race exhaust, fox fully adjustable rear shock, progressive front springs and emulators, larger 4.0 rear wheel, 520 chain conversion, pro flo clip-ons, larger diameter front brake rotors, braided steel brake lines, 4 piston large calipers. this bike also comes with a full JDM lighting kit for street, which includes JDM turn signals, and front headlight kill switch with city light options too.

CONCLUSION:

This is a great opportunity to buy a 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 endurance race replica. This race build was inspired by the original endurance race bikes of the time and was built to closely resemble and perform as the original Suzuki team endurance race bike. If you would like any additional pictures or have any questions please feel free to email us. Domestic & International buyers are welcome to bid but must arrange the shipping themselves. We will however be glad to assist with any loading of the motorcycle.  We have helped with the shipping of motorcycles across the country and overseas for other customers in the past. Please feel free to bid as long as you make the shipping arrangements.

This is a very sharp bike, although the gauges are pretty faded and some other details show the bike’s age. Overall, it seems like a very nice rider, a bike to be enjoyed and shared, not bubble-wrapped or displayed in a museum. Bidding is very active and up to just north of $5,000 with several days left on the listing.

-tad

Going the Distance: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Race Replica for Sale
Suzuki July 21, 2019 posted by

Special Suzuki: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 LTD for Sale

Suzuki’s original GSX-R is often thought of as being the first modern sportbike. Other bikes had similar specifications and were produced during the same era, but none have quite captured the riding public’s imagination in the same way, combining the ubiquitous Japanese inline four with a monoshock suspension, an endurance-racing full-fairing, and an affordable price point. This first-generation GSX-R750 LTD or Limited Edition incorporated a few extra bells and whistles Suzuki wanted to homologate for production-based racing and is very rare, with just 299 examples imported to the US.

The original GSX-R400 that was introduced a year earlier used a more traditional liquid-cooling system, but the 750 and later 1100 ditched the radiator and additional plumbing to save weight. To keep the big four-valve, twin-cam four cool, Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or “SACS” that featured a double-chambered oil pump to circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the undersides of the pistons. First and second generation GSX-Rs are often referred to as “oil boilers” as a result.

The Limited Edition was distinguished by a vented dry clutch, solo seat, and a longer swingarm, along with Suzuki’s electronic anti-dive forks from the GSX-R1100 and that very distinctive graphics scheme. Cost for the LTD was significantly higher than the standard model, but collectors didn’t care much then or now. Interestingly, the rare and valuable dry clutch made the bike a popular target for thieves when new but, luckily many survived to grace the pages of RSBFS!

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 LTD for Sale

1986 GSXR750 LTD
This is a running motorcycle that just had a complete service. Mostly original paint work here, there are a few scratches. (see pictures please). Period correct Yoshimura Duplex pipe in near mint condition, coupled with factory set of 1989 Slingshot carburetors jetted with a Factory pipe products jet kit. Carbs were just Ultrasonic tank cleaned and are ready to be synced. I did not want to add gas after the cleaning so the motorcycle has no fuel in the system whatsoever. Dry clutch works great and OH that sound.

The bike will need tires and a carb sync if you want to ride it. We can preform this service for you at an additional charge.

Also this bike can be delivered to the port of Long Beach for a flat fee of $100.00. Please have a look at the pictures and ask any questions before buying. Motorcycle sold as is.

There are a couple minor blemishes [note the deep scratch on the belly pan in the pic of the headers], but looks very clean and original, apart from the period-correct exhaust and the later-model carburetors. With 12,000 miles on the odometer, it’s pretty clear that “a complete service” at the very least included an extremely thorough cleaning, and this looks like it could be a great opportunity to pick up a sharp-looking homologation special, although the $17,900 asking price is a bit steep.

-tad

Special Suzuki: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 LTD for Sale
Suzuki June 23, 2019 posted by

Blunt Force Trauma: 1990 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

For a flagship superbike, the Suzuki GSX-R1100 looked relatively primitive on paper: oil/air cooled engine, twin cradle frame, five-speed gearbox… But the sledgehammer personality of the early GSX-R1100 makes it more collectible today, next to comparatively polished in-era competition from Honda and Yamaha. It may not have been the most sophisticated bike, but it did the job, and the engine is famed for being durable and responsive to tuning, with a wealth of go-fast expertise out there for anyone looking to build a big, bruising retro sportbike. It’s a handsome beast as well, with old-school looks and more tasteful graphics than the later Gixxers, combined with more modern running gear like those 17″ wheels that allow for riders to fit modern, grippy rubber.

The air and oil-cooled inline four was always the star of the show. It has dual overhead cams and sixteen valves, but stuck with what is basically air cooling, which does seem like a strange choice. But in the wild days of the 1980s, motorcycle designers were experimenting with all sorts of technology to maximize power and minimize weight. Japanese sportbikes were suffering from no deficiency in the former department, but weight was still a bit of an issue. So in developing the various GSX-Rs, Suzuki took a page out of Colin Chapman’s book and decided that keeping things simple meant fewer parts to fail, less of them to weigh the bike down, and a whole type of fluid the bike wouldn’t need. Namely: coolant.

To keep the bike operating within the appropriate temperature range, Suzuki employed a high-capacity oil pump, a dedicated oil circuit for the cylinder head, and oil jets for the bottom of the pistons. The system was dubbed “SACS” for Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System, and it featured on the Gixxer lineup from the bike’s introduction until 1993. The GSX-R1100K introduced in 1989 bumped displacement to 1127cc from the original bike’s 1052cc and featured a set of 38mm Mikuni “Slingshot” semi-flat slide carburetors for a claimed 143hp and 75lb-ft of torque. Compared to today’s cutting edge superbikes, the GSX-R1100’s 462lb dry weight is still pretty portly and this version of the bike wasn’t especially successful in international racing, but the bike’s fat powerband meant the bike was a highway blaster par excellence and it was a popular choice for drag racing and all-around hooliganism here in the US.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

11,225 ORIGINAL miles, bike is in exceptional condition for a 29 year old machine. Untouched, original and exceptionally clean, but not perfect. Bike has been garaged since new. I had not started it or ridden it in about a year. I installed a new battery and drained the fuel bowls and it runs like new. Title is in my name and there are no back fees on registration.  Please feel free to ask me any questions.

Bidding on this clean, original example is up to $7,100.00 with several days left on the auction. This is one of my favorite sportbikes of the period, and this one looks like the perfect candidate for someone who wants a collector they can actually ride: condition appears to be good, but not perfect, and miles are low, but high enough to encourage the new owner add a few more. Suzuki sold lots of these when they were new, but very few remain in anything approaching collectible condition.

-tad

Blunt Force Trauma: 1990 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale
Suzuki January 31, 2019 posted by

2FAST4U: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

The seller isn’t mincing words here in the listing for this Suzuki GSX-R1100: “This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback stay away… this is too much bike for you.”  So apparently if your eBay feedback is low or you like to grind someone for a good deal, a 30 year old motorcycle with 138hp is too much to handle? Good to know. Luckily, I’m not much of a haggler, so I’m sure I’ll be fine trying to wrestle this beast through a set of corners.

Of course, rumor is that the K-Model GSX-R1100 was too much for anyone to handle, but not because of the power: handling wasn’t the best and both Phil Mellor and Jamie Whitham crashed riding the GSX-R1100K at the Isle of Man TT in 1989, resulting in a ban of big bikes for years afterward. Some people blamed the bike’s geometry, some the suspension setup, and many different fixes and parts combinations have been tried to sort out the bike’s handling woes, but the bike maintained its reputation as a heavy, ill-handling brute, which ironically has probably helped the bike’s mystique, considering similar Yamaha FZR1000s go for much less at the moment.

At 462lbs dry, it wasn’t the heaviest GSX-R1100, but it’s pretty portly. Personally, I think it’s the best-looking version of the big Suzuki, and this iteration of the bike are sometimes known as “Slingshots” in reference to the semi-flat-slide Mikuni carburetors, although I’ve seen them off the bike and disassembled and I still can’t see anything that looks like a slingshot in there.

These days the GSX-R1100’s handling shouldn’t be a problem, considering the kind of riding the new owner is likely to do on it. The bike has plenty of straight-line speed and stability for weekend blasts, you just want to make sure you plan ahead and don’t try to change lines mid-corner. Certainly, it’s not lacking in power: the K-Model was powered by the 1127cc version of Suzuki’s inline four, still with oil-cooling. That beast of a motor, aside from the styling, is probably the primary reason for buying a “Slingshot” GSX-R1100.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

1989 GSXR 1100. Well kept killer bike. New tires ,brakes , clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom cond. 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes were bikes. Very rare to see in this cond. top seat pad has some delamination, Top tree is a little dull from keys (common). XL jacket inc, with stand, 1000.00 bonus. This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback please don’t bid. The pics say it all!

1989 GSXR 1100. Well kept killer bike. New  tires, brakes , clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom cond. 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes were bikes. Very rare to see in this cond. top seat pad has some delamination, top tree is a little dull from keys (common). XL jacket inc, with stand, 1000.00 bonus. This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback stay away… this is too much bike for you. The pics say it all

It’s a shame about the picture quality on this listing, since it looks like it’s in pretty good shape and, with 21,000 miles, is pretty much just broken in. Bidding is up to $3,250 with another six days left on the auction, so dive in and take a chance, or maybe request some betting images from the seller!

-tad

Suzuki December 22, 2018 posted by

Teenage Dream: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

The 90s sportbike market is booming right now. Folks that grew up riding or lusting after vintage 1960s and even 1970s bikes are steadily aging out of the hobby, and values for bikes of that era are already pretty high. Many people that lusted after 90s bikes, on the other hand, are right in that sweet spot, where they’re young enough to still enjoy bikes like today’s Suzuki GSX-R1100, but old enough to have some mid-career disposable income, now that the kids are headed off to college… And while the values of 1990s sportbikes have risen sharply, solid examples of some amazingly capable and entertaining machines are still available for much less than your average midlife crisis Corvette.

It also helps that the ergonomics of the big Gixxer, while considered pretty extreme at the time, are a far cry from the ass-up, head-down, seat-like-a-plank superbikes of today. In fact, the riding position could almost be considered “cushy” and far closer to a modern sport-touring machine. While still technically considered sportbikes, I don’t think that there were too many classes that would have allowed this later Gixxer to compete when it was new, but that wasn’t really the bike’s mission statement by the 90s. It was devastatingly effective at the kind of riding your average weekend warrior does, with relatively stable, predictable handling in spite of the near 500lb weight, good wind protection, and room for two-up blasts.

The majority of the package was pretty unremarkable, with an outdated but effective cradle frame, a full-fairing, a monoshock rear, and garish, neon-airbrush graphics. The biggest change from the earlier “Slabbie” and “Slingshot” GSX-Rs was the addition of updated bodywork with improved aerodynamics, including a fully-enclosed headlight unit. But the star of the show was definitely the engine, Suzuki’s hulking “oil-boiler” inline four that relied on engine oil, a high-capacity oil pump, and an oversized cooler to keep temperatures under control.

Displacement was up to 1127cc for this M-model version, and the factory claimed 145hp, although much more was available with careful tuning. These are famously tough bikes, and variations of the engine saw use in the later Bandit 1200 and GSX1400. But the writing was on the wall, and looming power and emissions requirements meant the addition of liquid cooling for 1993’s iteration of the big GSX-R to help it keep pace with bikes from the other Japanese manufacturers.

Of course, that meant even more weight, and while these things may disguise their weight on the move with a low center of gravity and good suspension, they’re incredibly heavy if you’re say, rolling one around your garage or a showroom… This example has obviously been cherished, and the seller appears to have been very meticulous when it comes to maintenance.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

I graduated high school in 1991 and this was my dream bike. At the time when I was 17, and was riding around a Riva 180 scooter as I couldn’t afford the GSX-R, and I recall them being about $8,500 new. So when I could buy one, I did and looked for the very best stock, impeccable bike I could find just like I saw on the showroom floor. This bike is insanely clean, all original stock parts including the rare factory OEM solo cowl. I went through just about every mechanical thing I could, not because I needed to but because I didn’t plan on selling the bike. See pics: I kept all the original replaced OEM parts like o-rings from cabs, needles, jets, o-ring seals, float bowl gaskets, etc. I wanted a bike that ran and looked like brand new and this one checks off both boxes. There was no expanse spared on this bike, period. The bike starts right up with choke, idles, and purrs along. I get told over and over not to sell, it’s just a really excellent example of a perfect bike. The bike is truly a time warp.

At 9,469 miles, I went through the bike entirely and correctly as follows:

  • Carburetors. First, all four of the head-to-intake pipe o-ring seals were replaced, head oil hose o-rings, all o-ring seals in the carbs, including the most important o-ring on the plastic slide with emulsion tubes, float bowl gaskets, needles, seat valves, pilot jets, air jets, seals from replaced original seals
  •  Brand new Bridgestone BT016R Pros with 40 miles on them, they still have the knobbies… I went with these because they looked to most original to the bike and have the correct profile. Some tread patterns do not look correct and the profile is off, these look similar to the originals
  • Brand new air filter
  • Brand new oil filter and Motul 5100 10W-40 oil, mineral based
  • All new OEM factory NGK plugs including one factory OEM spark plug cap that was loose
  • All new bearings in the wheels and sprocket carrier. All factory OEM with boxes and receipts [NSK, NTN, etc. No Chinese bearings.]
  • EBC sintered brake pads new front and rear. 40 miles on them
  • Full hydraulic flush of brakes and clutch with Motul 5.1 fluid also at 9,469 miles
  • Recharged the rear shock with nitrogen to 140 lbs
  • New YUASA battery with trickle charger connection
  • Factory toolkit included, along with the original rear passenger grab handle
  • Factory solo cowl included

Bidding is up to near $6,500 with plenty of time left on the auction. These aren’t quite as desirable as the earlier models, but all GSX-R1100s are pretty collectible at the moment. Clean, carefully-maintained, low-mileage examples like this are very hard to find, something that’s reflected in the shocking jumps in prices we’ve seen in a very short period of time. They’re big, fast, reliable, and relatively comfortable. What’s not to like?

-tad

Teenage Dream: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale
Suzuki October 20, 2018 posted by

Clean, Low-Mileage Slingshot: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Suzuki’s GSX-R750 revolutionized the sportbike game by bringing racebike handling and technology to the masses. There were obviously plenty of other sportbikes available at the time, like Honda’s VF1000F and Kawasaki’s GPz900R, but none seemed to capture the style of the era quite as well the Suzuki, with its endurance-racing bodywork and striking blue-and-white graphics. It didn’t hurt that it had the performance to back up the race-bred style.

Interestingly for a cutting-edge sportbike, the original “oil-boiler” GSX-R’s engine almost seems like it was a step backwards, as it was not water-cooled. Instead, the GSX-R’s designers took a page out of Colin Chapman’s book, and used an oil and air-cooling system to save both weight and complexity. Luckily, they left out Lotus’ factory-installed mechanical and electrical gremlins… Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or “SACS” used a high-capacity oil pump and a large oil-cooler to do the same job as a radiator, and the package made 112hp in the second-generation version seen here.

The second-generation of the GSX-R was introduced in 1988 and affectionately known as the “Slingshot,” owing to the unusual design of the semi-flat slide Mikuni BST36SS carburetors. The Slingshot actually had one less cc than the original bike, because of a more oversquare bore and stroke that resulted in 748cc. The updated engine could rev higher and made more power, but naturally less torque, and increased weight meant some customers weren’t especially happy about the change: the extremely rare homologation GSX-R750RK actually switched back to the original bore and stroke dimensions to restore some of the lost torque at the request of race teams.

The new version kept the oil-cooling though, and the perimeter aluminum frame, along with revised styling, suspension, and 17” wheels that make it look and perform more like a modern motorcycle. I’m not generally a huge fan of Japanese sportbikes, but the second-generation GSX-R750 and 1100 are on my short list of favorite motorcycles. Okay, it’s technically a pretty long list, but this is still a really cool bike.

I don’t especially like the heavy four-into-two exhaust system seen here, but it is original and should add to the value for collectors. “Showroom condition” is an overused term and  is often applied to bikes that are very nice, but far from the way they rolled off the dealer floor. It shouldn’t be subjective: aftermarket turn signals, exhausts, and even period-correct performance-upgrades technically disqualify a bike. But as a non-expert on Gixxers, this one looks like it might fit the description, or at least come pretty close.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Rare opportunity to obtain an original 89 GSX-R750 in mint condition with original exhausts and components. 

8880 miles from new, runs perfectly and needs nothing

Originally Purchased from local Suzuki Service Manager and collector, maintained in a climate-controlled garage. 

 One small scratch on the rear left tailpiece otherwise in excellent condition throughout.  

Recent tires and battery

No oil or gas leaks whatsoever, no stains, engine is smooth

Buyer responsible for shipping arrangements and costs. 

Please do not bid if you do not intend to purchase.

The curse of the “everyman sportbike” was the very reliability and affordability that made them so ubiquitous: most owners didn’t bother to cherish them as they would a more exotic, or maybe more fragile machine, and they were ridden, flogged mercilessly, and discarded when they were worn out or when a new generation was introduced, then “customized” horribly by their second or third owners as the obsolete version became more affordable. These days, clean examples of Suzuki’s oil-cooled GSX-Rs are quickly snapped up by collectors. Just a few years ago, you could get one of these for a few grand, but prices are shooting up quickly, especially for nice, low-mileage bikes like this one. Don’t scoff too loudly at the $9,500 Buy It Now price, since bidding is already up above $7,000 with plenty of time left on the auction.

-tad

Clean, Low-Mileage Slingshot: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale