Posts by tag: Monoposto

Ducati April 28, 2021 posted by

Lights and Mirrors – 2005 Ducati 999R

With everything that wasn’t cast or welded made of carbon fiber, Ducati’s 999R was almost ready to race right out of the crate. Here’s a Sacramento example that has 6,000 miles and a fresh major service.

2005 Ducati 999R for sale on eBay

Introduced in 2003, the 999 was a new design which has taken its share of lumps, but is more appreciated as time goes on.  The EVO testastretta aboard the 2005 R has incremental improvements with more titanium parts and revised Marelli fuel injection, and calls out 150 horses at 9,750 rpm.  The trellis chassis is visibly more robust at the transmission mounts, which hold the massive double-sided swingarm.  Headstock angle and Öhlins dampers are adjustable though a race tech and trackside data system might be part of the equation.  Even with the high compression twin, a slipper clutch isn’t factory installed, since they were “free” ( unrestricted ) under WSBK rules, it was assumed any race team would just install their favorite.  A slightly taller windscreen above the full carbon fairing and Termignoni canister muffler occupy the ends, above forged Marchesini alloys shod in Pirelli Diablo Rosso gumballs.

The close-ups show just how many carbon parts Ducati made for the -R, and how built everything is.  Not seeing much to quibble over.  Just wish the photos were as high resolution as the comments from the eBay auction:

Only 200 of these bike were built in 2005. The R bike is almost identical to the factory prepped race bikes, save for the lights.  The motor is identical to the factory race bikes.  I’m assuming if you’re looking at this ad, you know what an R bike is and how rare they are. This is very much a collector / track enthusiast bike. I’ve never tracked this bike, and to my knowledge it has not been tracked.

Designed by Pierre Terblanche, this bike was absolutely the cutting edge Super Bike from 2003-2006. The 2005-2006 bikes had many engine improvements, making them the ultimate of the 999R run.

The R bikes have a larger bore and shorter stoke than the 999 or 999S. Therefore they rev much quicker than the standard 999 engine. Rated at 150 hp in stock trim, but add the Termi exhaust and race ECM that come in the crate with the bike, and it’s rated at 165 hp. All in a bike that officially weighs in at 399 lbs! 0-60 in less than 3 seconds.

The R bike is absolutely dripping with carbon fiber.  All the body work, belt covers, clutch cover, exhaust shroud, heel guards…. almost everything.  The motor has titanium valves, titanium connecting rods, and sand cast cases, magnesium valve covers and headlight bucket.  All these super lightweight and technical parts are what add up to its amazing sub-400 lbs weight.

I bought this bike in January 2013, and it’s lived in my home with my collection of bikes since then.  I just completed the extensive 6,500 mile maintenance on the bike when re-commissioning it. The bike is 100% and in amazing, like new condition. 

We did all the standard maintenance and a more extensive tear down for the 6,500.  Obviously as part of the maintenance it got new belts, fuel pump, spark plugs, tires, battery, brake fluid, etc.  All engine internals looked great and are completely within specification. All Ducati parts purchased at a Ducati dealer.  All the work completed by a 30 year Ducati master tech. I’ve ridden this bike a few times since we completed the work, and it’s absolutely amazing.

I’ve got the books and manuals that came with the bike as well as two keys, a cover and stand.  If you can arrange pickup I’ll be happy to include the stand.  I’ll help with shipping / pickup on my end, and can deliver to a forward air terminal within reason.

Not part of Ducati’s plan, but the short run of the 999 design makes it almost a guaranteed rarity, particularly in -R form.  However in the four years of production, the 999 won three WSBK mantles.  Really wanting for track time and a knowledgeable team manager, a 999R adjusted mid-range would still be a blast on a good back road.  Carefully.

-donn

Lights and Mirrors – 2005 Ducati 999R
Ducati April 1, 2021 posted by

Wouldn’t Start – 2004 Ducati 998S FE with 2 miles !

Always dressed in red, Ducat’s 998S Final Edition celebrated the tenth anniversary of the iconic 916 generation.  This very special order waited in its shipping crate until a few years ago, and since its factory road test, hasn’t seen a battery, gas, or oil.

2004 Ducati 998S FE for sale on eBay

Some specs show the 998S power as 100Kw, a nice round number and 136hp.  The cases were different than a base model, and had a deep oil sump to ensure the pick-up didn’t run dry.  Adjustable Öhlins dampers are all around, with 43mm forks and a progressive rocker arm for the monoshock.  Dry clutch and single seat naturalemente, with 320mm Brembo brakes and 17-inch Marchesini forgings.  The FE’s aren’t numbered but have a Final Edition plaque on the triple tree, right below the temperature gauge, which required some attention since the cooling system hadn’t had a major update to cope with the increased power.

This FE showed the same two miles on RSBFS – back in 2018-, and has had one or two more owners since then, who also ( wisely ) declined to bring it from display to riding duty.  So far all the owners have been collectors, including racing driver Graham Rahal.  The seller’s comments comments from the eBay auction-

Limited production Final Edition model that has reportedly never been ridden. The bike was removed from the factory crate with 2 indicated miles in 2017, when Indy driver Graham Rahal acquired it for his private collection. It has not been started since, or had fuel or a battery put in. Factory equipment includes Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes, Marchesini wheels, and a graphics package specific to the FE. Power is supplied by a 998cc Testastretta L-twin paired with a 6-speed gearbox, and the original protective film remains on the engine covers and frame. The bike was acquired by a dealer in late 2018 from from Mr. Rahal’s collection.  I purchased the bike in January 2019.  Since I have owned the bike, it has been sitting in my garage as eye candy.

Both factory keys, the original tool pouch, and owner’s manuals are included with the sale.

The collector’s realm might be foreign to a weekly rider, not being able to hop on and enjoy.  Could be there are other diversions.  The 998S FE with its angular nose, air intakes, single-sided swingarm, and underseat exhaust might deserve to be saved for a future rider.  Or collector.  Looking forward to hearing from the new owner.

-donn

Wouldn’t Start – 2004 Ducati 998S FE with 2 miles !
Featured Listing March 31, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC

In case you thought race replicas were a recent innovation, Laverda set the world on it’s ear some 50 years ago, with its 750 Super Freni Competizione, first in endurance racing, and then on the road.  Presented by a Seattle area restorer, this 750 SFC has been restored to museum quality and is ready for its next display.

1974 Laverda 750 SFC for sale

A development of Laverda’s 650cc parallel twin ( itself a template of Honda’s 305 ), the 750 SFC immediately did well in competition, and was made in rather small lots from 1971-75.  For 1974, the factory blue-printed engine with two 36mm Dell’Orto carbs and 9.9-to-1 compression made a reliable 75 hp with Bosch electronic ignition.  The classic nickel plated chassis held the engine from above as a stressed member, stabilizing the 38mm forks with their Super Freni ( Super Brakes ) 280mm disks.  Orange was adopted as Laverda’s competition color at some point in the early 1970’s, and the small seat and long range tank on the SFC appear to have been the inspiration more than one generation of café racers.

Evidently a previous owner started the restoration using all factory Laverda parts, and Duncan has these notes about the SFC and this example in particular :

A Production Racer For Sale

Laverda 750 SFs achieved notable endurance racing success in 1970, including a win of the 500km of Monza, a 1-2-3 podium sweep at the 24 Hours of Oss in Holland, and a third and sixth in the Bol d’Or in France. These bikes improved incrementally, but so did the competition. By the end of the year, Massimo asked Luciano Zen to think about a production racer version of the Laverda 750 SF.

In May 1971, the Laverda 750 SFC, for (Super Freni Competizion) was launched. Compared to the 750 SF, the engine was extensively modified. The reworked cylinder head had bigger valves and a new cam profile (designated 2/C), rockers were polished and 36mm Amal concentric carbs replaced the 30mm Dell’Ortos. A close-ratio five-speed was fitted, and the crankshaft and rods were carefully balanced and polished. Power output was rated at 70hp, and each engine was dyno tested to ensure output. The frame was strengthened with gussets and the front brake was either standard Laverda item or an optional Ceriani four-leading-shoe unit. The bikes ran on Dunlop K81 TT100 tires.

Bodywork was also new, with a 23-liter (6.1 gallon) handmade aluminum gas tank, a single seat with fiberglass tail section and a half fairing, all painted in the now-famous bright orange, a color selected to make the bikes easy to spot on the track, especially at night. It was also chosen to please the Dutch importer, Jan Raymakers, orange being the national color of the Netherlands.

Laverda 750 SFC models were produced in small batches between 1971 and 1975. The first batch, built in May 1971, numbered about 20 bikes, all intended for factory competition. SFCs were hand built by a small team and with little regard to cost. They were built to meet exceptional standards of performance, and in particular were intended to excel in endurance races, where bulk and a relative lack of nimbleness would not be so much of a handicap and where their great strength and robustness would give them a competitive advantage.

In their first official race in 1971, the Six Hours of Zeltweg, SFCs finished first and second. That year, SFCs also placed first, third and fourth in the 24 Hours of Montjuic in Barcelona, first and third in the 24 Hours of Oss, and first in Vallelunga (Italy). They also placed second at the Bol d’Or in Le Mans, first and second at Imola, and finished first and second in the 500km of Modena. Not bad for the first year.

In November 1971, 80 more SFCs were produced, and some were sold to the public. The aluminum gas tank was now fiberglass (the alloy ones had a tendency to crack), and the bikes had revised gearbox ratios and exhaust systems. They also had a new Laverda drum brake, with the more effective Ceriani a popular option. Another batch of SFCs were produced in early 1972, with slight changes to the shape of the fairing and seat and a new exhaust with a crossover pipe.

By this time, the Japanese had made significant progress in the development of their machines, and while there were SFC victories in 1972, they did not match the stellar performance of 1971. Only three 750 SFCs were made in 1973, and these served as test beds for radical changes like magnesium crankcases, new cylinder head designs and even lighter crankshafts. The results were not impressive, the bikes becoming more fragile and difficult to ride.

1974 would see the largest single-year run of SFCs. For the first time, the Laverda 750 SFC was considered part of the normal product range offered to the public and was no longer reserved solely for racing. The SFC was promoted as a “Production Racer,” similar to Ducati’s 750SS or Norton’s Commando-based production racers, and the changes were numerous. The bodywork was improved, and the zinc-plated frame was lowered and modified with revised steering geometry, larger front forks, and triple 280mm Brembo disc brakes. A new, strengthened close-ratio gearbox was fitted and the engine was enhanced by a lightened crankshaft, slim, polished connecting rods, a new camshaft (5/C), a higher capacity oil pump, new 36mm Dell’Orto carbs (without accelerator pumps), modified valves and valve springs, a new exhaust system and higher, 9.9:1 compression ratio. Power was now rated at 75hp at 7,500rpm.

A total of 222 SFCs were built in 1974, with slightly less than half of them going to the U.S. To comply with federal regulations, U.S. models had turn signals, bigger taillights, side reflectors, adjustable handlebars and Nippon-Denso speedometers and tachometers. Even though the bike was being sold to privateers in 1974, factory-prepared racers were performing well in the national production class races.

During the 5 year production run, a total of 549 were made. The SFC being offered is one of only 100 SFCs made for the North American market in 1974. According to well-known SFC expert Marnix van der Schalk (in correspondence with the previous owner), the factory records state it was shipped to the USA on July 8, 1974.

The last version of the SFC was the 1975 Laverda SFC Elettronica, its name reflecting its Bosch electronic ignition. It had a new cylinder head, revised valve angles, re-shaped combustion chambers and a new, optional high-lift cam with 10.5:1 compression ratio. A contemporary magazine test produced a 12.5 second quarter mile at 180kph (top speed over 220kph). A final batch of 33 SFC Elettronicas featuring five-spoke cast-alloy wheels were built in 1976.

The following is a list of much of the work commissioned by the previous owner and performed by Ron Small in 2002-2003, with the invoices totaling nearly $6,000.  Previous owner noted that all replacement parts used on the bike were authentic Laverda SFC parts purchased from Wolfgang Haerter at Columbia Car and Cycle in British Columbia, Canada (receipts totaling $1,000).

Motor:

Re-sleeved cylinders

bore and size cylinders

valve job

new valve springs

new valve guides

new cam chain

new cam tensioner

new guide wheel

new rings

blast and clean heads

Cam and timing set correct.

 

Other items:

new gas tank

sealed new tank 

paint new tank

new fork seals

new swing arm bushings

paint swing arm

rebuild brake master cylinders

new clutch cable

new throttle cables

new tires

new brakes

Subsequent to the work being completed at Maximum Effort, the previous owner only rode the bike 900 miles. The current owner has ridden it less than 100 miles. It has spent the past 13 years on display in a climate-controlled garage. 

There is no knowing if the 6753 miles showing on the odometer is the actual mileage, but the condition of the bike, combined with the minimal miles ridden by the current and previous owner in the past 20 years would lend credibility to that number. 

There is a small amount of surface rust on center stand.

Recently recommissioned for the road, it has a new battery, new fluids, top end adjust and inspection. Carburation adjustments and tune. Bike has had complete nut and bolt, safety inspection and test ridden. 

Tires are 15-20 years old.  They are not dry rotted, but if the bike is going to be ridden, changing them would be a good idea. 

For at least the past 20 years, this SFC has been adult owned, never down, always maintained by marquee knowledgeable technicians. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.

Being offered at $49,950 in US Funds. Will assist on Worldwide Shipping.

 Email sennaducati79@gmail.com your contact numbers for an immediate return call. 

Duncan asks $49,950 and reminds readers – This bike is absolutely correct, adult owned, never down, never abused, maintained by the best techs, riders in the business. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.  He can be reached via email – here –.

Early in the 1970’s the orange bikes sometimes captured multiple podium spots at championship events like Bol d’Or and Suzuka 8 Hours, but increasing competition from the east made it more of an occasion as the decade wore on.  Mostly made a handful at a time, production peaked at 222 in 1974, and total production is said to be 549.  As happens to race bikes, few survive to be restored, and just 100 of the federalized SFC’s were said to be imported in 1974.  But the SFC put Laverda in the exclusive company of a leading motorcycle manufacturer.  Duncan requests offers via email – here –.

-donn

Featured Listing:  1974 Laverda 750 SFC
Ducati February 13, 2021 posted by

Triplo Otto – 1993 Ducati 888 SPO

Sporting a big number one for Doug Polen’s World Superbike Championships, the 888 came to us in rosso intenso.  This example is at a Florida dealer and shows very well.

1993 Ducati 888 SPO for sale on eBay

A natural progression of the 851, the 888 also was a fuel injected, water cooled desmoquatro with a nice round 100 hp on tap.  Go for the non-ethanol premium gas with 11.0-to-1 compression, and the 6-speed will have you challenging 160 mph before you can get comfortable.  Thanks to EPA, the stateside SPO engine had a single fuel injector for each cylinder, but USD Showa forks and Öhlins monoshock were the same as the European SP5.  Big Brembo brakes and wide 17-inch rims were shared between the continents as well.

Sitting in the lucky Fort Lauderdale sun, this 888 looks great with seemingly undamaged fairings, recent tires and carbon Termis.  The triple tree has been enhanced with a carbon beauty cover, but an SPO numbered badge should be available.  Mileage is a low 7,822, and the comments say it hasn’t been ridden since a major service late 2019 and a little paint work last April –

-888 SPO 1993 with low miles 7,822 to be exact.
-Nice upgrades that you can see on the pictures, pretty much new Dunlop tires, Termignoni Carbon exhaust.
-Left handle switch is missing the button cover (cosmetic only) but as a USA model lights are on all the time.
-Major service done Dec. 2019 and April 2020, bike has not been ridden since then.

Asking major money without the make offer button, spring may have come early to south Fla.  But after receiving a few more pictures and maybe the SPO dash plaque, a bidder may result.  The 888 has a tough kind of beauty – which segue-ed right into the ’94-98 Supersports – but sure looks good in red.

-donn

Triplo Otto – 1993 Ducati 888 SPO
Ducati February 11, 2021 posted by

N’elefant – 1986 Ducati 750 F1A with 4,655 Miles !

Ducati readied their new sportbike just about the time the Castiglioni family presented their investment plan, and F1’s took a mid-model livery change.  Here’s a pre-Cagiva F1A which has been barely ridden and recently freshened up.

1986 Ducati 750 F1A for sale on eBay

The F1 harkens back to the 750 Imola Desmo, with a thin but full fairing, trellis frame, and 748cc’s of L-twin.  The desmodue delivered 63 hp, but had a nice torque band to push on the 5-speed.  Marzocchi provided the 38mm forks and the shock mounted to the cantilever monoshock.  Brakes were single-puck Brembo’s, and wheels were staggered with 16-inch front and 18-inch rear.  Embracing back-to-basics before it was trendy, bringing a friend or lunch would require a second bike and a backpack.

The Massachusetts owner states they are just the third custodian in under 7,500 km or 4,655 miles, and condition varies between good and excellent.  The frame evidently was re-painted, and it looks like the shop receipt show piston rings, so maybe the jugs got new gaskets along with the valve adjustment.  Wouldn’t be a huge leap to secure the darn battery and re-finish the seat console, to really make this F1A something special.  Comments from the eBay auction:

Pre-Cagiva lettering, Nippendenso Guages, alloy tank and other F1A features includes what I think is a competition Conti. Zero miles on recent major service including belts, valve check, fluid flush, tires, battery (removed), chassis and engine fairing paint refresh.  Seat section is original with what looks like loose battery dings on top.  There is a small dent in the aluminum tank on left side, see pictures, I tried to get it but it is small but there.  Dent-less paint remover should take care if it.  I am the 3rd owner and have owned since 2002.  I have ownership and service history from new.  Sold originally from Razee in Massachusetts.  While cared for I bought this bike to ride not to polish. Garaged its entire life.

The F1 came at a premium compared to their Japanese competition, but found fans and success in the “Battle of Twins” support races.  In the 1985 BoT at Daytona, GP Champion Marco Lucchinelli rode from the back of the pack ( he was a last-minute entry ) to challenge eventual winner Gene Church on an XR1000 Harley-Dave.  These days it might be best for an afternoon of twisties, allowing the torque and light weight to work their magic.

-donn

N’elefant – 1986 Ducati 750 F1A with 4,655 Miles !
Bimota January 25, 2021 posted by

Maybe Be My Always – 2000 Bimota V-due 500C

Seeming to have made a silk purse from a nasty old two-stroke 500, Bimota had just about set the moto world on its ear when reality intervened.  This V-due has carburetors set up by a Bimota cognoscenti and proves that there really are unicorns among us.

2000 Bimota V-Due 500C for sale on eBay

With its two stroke v-twin, the V-due was able to match 105 hp with a dry weight of just under 400 lbs.   Electronic fuel injection ensured low emissions and 50-state compliance.  Sergio Robbiano designed a signature chassis, with alloy extrusions connected by Rimini’s exquisite billet machinings.  A large diameter Paoli fork set is fully adjustable, as is the horizontal Öhlins monoshock.  Swoopy and angular bodywork is executed in carbon fiber, with a single seat and dual expansion chambers.

This V-due looks immaculate and shows just 212 miles on its almost bespoke dash.  Due to poor running and more major issues, the first examples were recalled by the factory and many were converted to carburetors by a factory engineer.  Even then they required careful tuning, this time done by a North Carolina Bimota shop / museum.  Spare NOS fairings are seriously unobtanium.  Very little history to tell, but comments from the eBay auction:

Bimota V-due 500C. This was One of Bob Steinbugler’s bike from his collection Bob from Bimota Spirit I purchased this bike from him about 3 -4 years ago. Bike runs great this is the carburetor model which he serviced and tuned for me . The bike will come with a NOS set of spare fairings still in the wrapper. Upper fairing and left and right side fairing.

The conversion to carburetors indicated that more was amiss than just the fuel injection system, and the inconsistent power delivery was traced to under-engineered crankshaft seals ( each bay of a multi-cylinder two stroke has to be independently sealed to make induction vacuum ).  Unfortunately, at that point Bimota had run through their funding and had to shut the doors until new investors revived the company.  As individual as any Bimota is, the V-due might be their rarest and most exotic model.  And right here in our own back yard.

-donn

Maybe Be My Always – 2000 Bimota V-due 500C
Moto Guzzi January 9, 2021 posted by

Mile High Goose – 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000

Just east of some of the best snow sports in the world, there’s a classic and very sporty Moto Guzzi waiting for spring.  This Denver example looks quite original and very good for its 13,048 miles.

1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 for sale on eBay

Midway through the DeTomaso administration, Guzzi was looking to generate some attention, and the leap to four valves did just that.  The liter V-twin pushed 95 hp, and used a single belt driven cam in the north side of each head.  The chassis didn’t contain the engine so much as help it locate the steering head and swingarm.  17-inch wheels with conventional forks from Marzocchi and WP monoshock are sporty running gear, as is 320mm stopping gear from Brembo.  The upper-only fairing flows from nose to monoposto seat fairing.

Offered by the enthusiast owner, this Daytona is sharp and up to date maintenance-wise.  Looks like a regularly ridden superbike with the Supertrapp.  Comments from the eBay auction:

This Italian-made machine was largely the work of an American dentist-turned-engineer, Dr. John Wittner.  In the late 1980’s, Dr. John produced special Moto Guzzi race bikes that were very successful.  The Daytona is a production version in honor of those race bikes, with a four valve per cylinder engine.  Note that like the Vincent, the Daytona does not have a frame. Instead,it uses a box section “spine”.  The original exhaust system has been replaced with a SuperTrapp system. 13,048 miles, fresh service, new belts, very clean.

The eight valve engines must’ve been a budget buster, and though the engine was retired after 1999, BMW may have analyzed the almost-overhead cam’s geometry while their R1100S was in development.  Dr. Wittner and his interns did well in thunder twins racing, and the Daytona remains an aptly named flagship.  This one is having its own endurance challenge, racing toward a third decade’s finish line and new rider.

-donn

Mile High Goose – 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000
Ducati December 31, 2020 posted by

Starting Off with a Bang – 2008 Ducati 1098R #117 of 450

If you’re ready, the first ride of the new year could be on a rather special Ducati.  Many 1098R’s have more accessories than miles, but someone enjoyed this one enough to farkle sensibly and keep maintenance is up to date.

2008 Ducati 1098R for sale on eBay

Ducati returned to the side-by-side headlights in 2007, with a perceptible cat-eye composition.  The -R was meant for the racetrack, with many advanced components which had to be on board to allow them on the factory’s racers.  A high-horsepower testastretta engine, trellis frame, single-sided swingarm, and underseat exhaust are found on every 2008 Ducati superbike.  But the -R homologates the sand-cast 1198cc engine of 180 hp, with twin fuel injectors pointing down each 64mm elliptical throttle body.  The Öhlins twin-tube monoshock allows ride height to be set independent of pre-load, and the fork ends are cast to receive Brembo’s monoblock 330mm brakes.  Marchesini Y wheels speak lightness as does the generous use of carbon on the bodywork.

Offered by an enthusiast in eastern Pennsylvania, who states it has 4,356 miles, but doesn’t show the dash lit up.  Rizoma levers, clutch cover and rear sets are sharp, and no damage is apparent.  Photos are good but not exhaustive, and either way a pre-purchase inspection is in order.  Just a couple of comments in the eBay auction:

1098R #117 of 450. Clean, well maintained. Never raced, never abused. Never wrecked. Pristine example. Choice Rizoma controls and bits. Serviced for belts and valves last year. No issues, ready to go collector’s piece.

With its modernized electrical and cooling systems, the 1098 was almost a practical superbike.  Traction management and a data-analysis dash pushed it well into the 21st century.  The semi-trellis frame lends an accessibility to the 1098R, that riders of previous superbike generations can appreciate.

-donn

Starting Off with a Bang – 2008 Ducati 1098R #117 of 450