Posts by tag: I4

Honda March 5, 2011 posted by

1994 Honda CBR900RR One Owner Bike With 5,985 Original Miles In Fantastic Condition

A one owner, less than 6k mile, iconic CBR900RR in California–sounds pretty good to me!

Bike: 1994 Honda CBR900RR

Miles: 5,985mi

Price: $4,000USD

Location: Concord, California

The seller uses all the good words to describe this bike:

THE BIKE ONE OWNER ALL ORIGINAL WITH LESS THAN 6,000 MILES ON IT. NEVER DOWN COSMETICALLY AND MECHANICALLY IS SUPERB. FOR ALL YOU HONDA LOVERS THIS IS A RARE FIND. THIS IS NOT YOUR AVERAGE BIKE, THIS IS LIKE KEPT IN A TIME CAPSULE BIKE…

What are the negatives about this bike? Well, if you’re going to nit-pick, it’s not a ’93 and it’s not Red/White/Blue–that’s about it. Other than that, it looks pretty good, notice in the gauge cluster photo that the brake fluid looks pretty fresh, that’s a nice touch. Some fresh tires look to be in the bike’s future though.

Mostly anyone who is aware of sportbikes from the last twenty-years would describe the early CBR900RR’s as desirable, and this bike isn’t an exception in all of it’s purple and yellow glory. Lastly, the asking price of $4,000 isn’t outrageous for this bike at all (See the other CBR900RR’s we’ve posted here), make sure to take a trailer with you when you go to look at it. See the bike on Craigslist here.

AG

Kawasaki March 2, 2011 posted by

1996 Kawasaki Ninja ZX7RR With Very Low VIN (#025) On eBay–Again

The is a great looking ZX7RR N1 that we haven’t seen since September!

Bike:  1996 Kawasaki ZX7RR N1

Miles:  6,998mi

Price:  $6,000 Starting bid with no reserve

Location:  Colorado Springs, Colorado

This ‘RR is on consignment from the third owner, was fully serviced prior to being listed, and the bike is stated to be all original.  Some defects include light scratching to the ram air covers, front fender, some of the left fuel tank decal has been removed by a fuel spill (new one is included with the sale), the battery is dead and the forks have started to leak.  Not exactly what I expect when a bike has supposedly had “…detailed service work” and “…several different services including thorough carb work.”  Regardless, this bike appears to be a very collectible piece with some light love–and front turn signals.

Doug had some very good observations when this bike was first spotted in September:

Downs:
1. Missing the front turn signals
2. Missing the side fairing reflectors
3. Doesn’t have the Muzzy 7rr Special sticker on the tank
4. Butt pad is a little beat up
5. Seat has a gas cap stain – can see if you look closely at pictures
6. Needs a new front tire, but it’s the original D204 Sportmax
7. Has a pencil sized dent in the gas tank.
8. Rims may have been painted at some point.

Ups:
1. It’s a N1!
2. Better than average condition
3. Low miles
4. Has one original tire :)
5. It’s priced right.
6. I like it a whole lot for the money

I’m going to have to agree with Doug, this is a very good–great–bike for the money compared to what we’ve seen other N1’s going for.  If you wanted an occasional weekend bike with collector credibility this is a fantastic choice.  With a little work, I don’t think anyone would be ashamed to have this in their garage.  See Doug’s very thorough write up here.  See some of the other ZX7RR’s we’ve posted .

AG

Sport Bikes For Sale February 25, 2011 posted by

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 In The United Kingdom

A gorgeous looking OW01 with less than 3k miles!

Bike:  1989 Yamaha FZR750R

Miles:  2,950

Price:  £15,000 (GBP)

Location:  Somewhere in the UK.

This seller has a few bikes for sale, and this one is the best looking!  The seller states that this OW01 is an original UK bike and has been stored in a climate controlled environment since new.  Other than mentioning that this bike is in fantastic condition, the seller also states that this bike comes with:

…ALL THE ORIGINAL PAPERWORK FOR THE BIKE, OWNERS MANUAL, SALES BROCHURE, SERVICE BOOK,  TOOL KIT, ORIGINAL TYRES AND ORIGINAL SPARE KEYS.

The seller is very correct in stating that the FZRR’s seem to be the rarest of the WSB homologation bikes and I fully agree, this bike is a finely tweaked racing machine that sill looks very similar to the FZR1000 that was available at the same time.  However, I believe the saying is everything that is rare isn’t valuable and, unfortunately, the FZR750R isn’t up to RC30 levels yet.  That being said, you’re going to have to be pretty keen on the OW01 to justify the asking price of £15,000.00  ($24,229.30 USD as of this writing).  The seller is feeling no guilt in the last thrashes of the recession–hopefully–as he is asking OW02 money for an OW01.  But, if you’re so inclined, I invite you to see if you can talk the seller, down, down to a reasonable level via the eBay link .

AG

Honda February 25, 2011 posted by

1996 Honda CBR600F3 With 2,579 Miles, As Seen On Our Facebook Page

A gorgeous, low mileage, CBR600F3 now on eBay!

Bike:  1996 Honda CBR600F3

Miles:  2,579

Price:  $3,850 BIN with bidding at $2,550 with reserve not met.

Location:  New Jersey

This bike was originally seen on Craigslist and posted on our Facebook feed; and I know, many of you may not follow us on Facebook because you don’t have a Facebook account, well, that’s usually where the nice deals of the day from Craigslist have been getting posted!  Anyway, this gorgeous example has made it to the shark infested waters of eBay.  This is a 1996 Honda CBR600F3 with 2,579 original miles!  The seller states that everything on this bike is completely original as if it just left the factory.  The pictures agree, this is a fantastic paint scheme–one of my favorites for the F3–and it isn’t too outrageously priced either.  You’ll find the majority of F3’s beaten to within an inch of their lives and having an asking price of $2,200 on Craigslist during the nicer months, making this one look quite attractive if the reserve is several hundred under the BIN price.  If nothing else, buying this bike would be a much better experience than finding out if you’re good at day trading–probably cheaper too.  See this nice looking F3 on eBay .  See Dan’s original post featuring this bike here.

AG

Quick Spot February 10, 2011 posted by

2004 Suzuki GSX-600F Katana With Less Than 200 Miles

This seven year old Katana has seen less than 200 miles!

Bike:  2004 Suzuki GSX-600F Katana

Miles:  <200mi

Price:  $5,000 USD

Location:  Vancouver, Washington

Now, this isn’t a very collectible bike (To mainstream collectors…) but it has been hardly used in the last seven years.  The seller states that this bike has been in storage for years, features some after-market parts such as a Yoshimura exhaust system, and that offers will be considered.  The last bit of that sentence is the most important, the asking price of $5,000 makes this Katana the most likely candidate for the “Most expensive 2004 Katana in the U.S.” competition.  KBB retail (For what it’s worth) for this bike is $3,015.  Granted, KBB doesn’t really apply to the majority–any–of the bike featured on this site, including this one, but a $2k premium is all the money for a bike with less than 200 miles.  This bike probably isn’t the only forgotten Katana with low miles, so keep that in mind if you’re interested.  The bike does have some after-market parts and stickers–for some reason–which doesn’t inflate the value at all, but if your significant other wants a bike and you know that they probably won’t ride it anyway, this bike might be perfect for you if you can get it for a good price.  See the bike on Craigslist here.

AG

Honda January 21, 2011 posted by

A Few, Very Rare, Race Bikes For Sale; Ex Roberts & Aoki

These three authentic race bikes are very special in their historical value, for winning and for not!

First Up:

Bike:  1999 Honda CBR900RR Erion Racing; Ex Kurtis Roberts

Location:  California

Price:  POR

The seller, RMD Motors, is sparse on the details, but it should be obvious what you’re looking at being that this bike is said to be authentic.  They do state that the bike produces 200hp at the rear wheel, comes with nothing other than what is in the photos (Read: No spares)–but that does include Kurtis’ actual leathers.

The AMA Formula Xtreme series is intended for production bikes, with some, but not many, rules on what parts of the bike you can exchange for aftermarket parts.  The intent of Formula Xtreme is to allow as many types of motorcycles to compete, anything from inline-fours to air-cooled V-twins.  Formula Xtreme racing is usually one of the more competitive and entertaining races of an AMA weekend; Many veterans such as Eric Bostrom, Jake Zemke, Josh Hayes, Nicky Hayden and Kurtis Roberts among others have cut their teeth in Formula Xtreme.

Erion Racing has continued to be a prominent name in Honda AMA racing with even a special Erion Racing edition CBR929RR released for the U.S. market by the manufacturer.  For 1999, Erion Racing was the winner of the Formula Xtreme championship with another title in 2000.  I’m not adept on the Formula Xtreme rules for 1999, but it’s obvious looking at the bike what some of it’s features are:  Race bodywork with mounts, analog tach’,  race fuel tank, larger radiator, Erion SS/Carbon full exhaust system, aftermarket triple clamps, Ohlins forks & rear shock, Brembo calipers, Marchesini wheels and I’m sure much more that I didn’t notice!  This is a chance to own a fantastic looking, legitimate, race bike with a championship under it’s belt.  I’m unaware how many races this particular bike won, I’m not sure about the 900 designation as this should be a 919 or 929 based on the year, but you still have a serious piece of AMA history regardless and I’m sure RMD would be happy to answer your questions.

See this Erion CBR900RR on RMD’s website here.

Next Up:

Bike:  2002 Kenny Roberts Proton KR3; Ex Nobuatsu Aoki

Location:  California

Price:  POR

As you may know, 2002 was the last year for two-strokes in MotoGP.  Two-strokes had their last hurrah in 2001, but couldn’t overcome the 490cc deficit they had to the four-strokes in 2002 and were finally obsolete–How you may feel about this is up for debate.  Regardless, Proton KR racing had a respectable finish in the 2001 championship with Nobuatsu Aoki & Jeremy Mcwilliams finishing 12th & 14th in the championship, respectively.  The disadvantages for the privateer team of Proton KR were immense and they didn’t receive much help from their V-3 format.  The four cylinder bikes of 500gp had the most tractable power delivery–If it’s possible to say that for a GP two-stroke–while also having the most power.  As an example, the NSR500v was a V-Twin example of Honda’s factory NSR500 designed for privateers and had nowhere near the power of the factory bike.  The theory was that the two and three cylinder machines had a lower weight and could out corner the larger bikes, in practice the two and three cylinder bikes hadn’t a chance but on a wet course or a very tight one.  The Proton KR3 debuted in 1997 and was a joint venture between legendary racer Kenny Roberts and Malaysian giant Proton.  While they may not have won any championships, or come close–and as frustrating as I imagine it was for KR–I’m sure “King” Roberts enjoyed it, I know I would have!

This example looks to be in fantastic condition.  The seller states that this bike will run and comes with a small selection of spares.  As I’m sure you can imagine, it would be no small feat to run this bike anywhere, especially when consumables are accounted for.  However, if you have the funds, ask yourself:  How many times does a 2001 500GP bike come up for sale?

See this bike on RMD’s website here.

Lastly:

Bike:  2004 Kenny Roberts Proton KRV5 XM2; Ex Kurtis Roberts

Location:  California

Price:  POR (Rumor has it $300,000)

The Proton KR KRV5 debuted in 2002 with the adoption of four-strokes.  The V5 in KRv5 denotes that this bike has a 60deg V5 arrangement and a displacement of 990cc, putting out 200hp @ 15,000rpm.  The bodywork appears to be the latter iteration of the KRV5, which is consistent with the Valencia technical inspection sticker.  For 2004, Kurtis Roberts was only able to finish twice in France and Brazil with 15th and 19th, respectively.  The bike for sale here shows a technical inspection sticker for Valencia in 2004, however Roberts never started the GP at Valencia in 2004.

So, what are you getting for your money?  As things stand right now, you’ll get a fully functioning seven year old, privateer, MotoGP bike with a minimal spares package.  This bike currently doesn’t hold the value that any of the factory bikes would and shouldn’t for a long, long time.  However, none of those factory bikes are currently available–that I’m aware of–and you’ll probably be waiting a very long time for one to pop up if you don’t already know someone who has one.

See the bike on RMD’s website here.

So, all of these bikes look to be from the same seller/collection, but which one is the one to have if you can only choose one?  Obviously, the most expensive will always be one of the Proton KR bikes, with a large gap back to the CBR.  My money says that the 2002 Proton KR3 will always be the most valuable bike of the three; The most important influence being that it is one of the last two-stroke 500GP/MotoGP bikes to ever be produced–privateer or otherwise.  The 2004 KRV5 will always be a interim MotoGP bike and if the rules are again revised to allow 1000cc bikes, it won’t even have a displacement draw.  The CBR is a National Championship bike, even if it’s only in Formula Xtreme, and that kind of provenance doesn’t come everyday.

There are two kinds of collectors these bikes are for:  One who has a decent amount of money to spend on a collector bike, and someone who has obscene amounts of money for a collector bike.  The Proton’s are obviously the expensive bikes with the Erion CBR checking the affordable box.  Both of the MotoGP bikes have parts that you’re never going to be able to purchase from any retailer, and I’m sure the CBR has some good HRC bits on it too.  I wouldn’t be ashamed to have any of these three bikes, but I’d absolutely love to have a final year Grand Prix two-stroke.  If nothing else, spend a little time to enjoy the photos!

AG

Classic Sport Bikes For Sale January 9, 2011 posted by

1969 Honda CB750K Sandcast With Hardly Any Time Left On eBay

1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast

Location:  Appleton, Wisconsin

Mileage:  13,642 Miles

Price:  Currently $12,500USD with reserve not met.

“Just because something is rare, doesn’t make it valuable.”  This slogan is used by many to low-ball sellers, or to just tell sellers that what they have is actually pyrite, not the gold they believe it to be.  However, as the collectibility of Japanese motorcycles becomes more prevalent and focused, some bikes will become the most desirable and therefore the most valuable.  As far as the direction vintage, Japanese, street bikes appear to going in, the ’69 CB750 Sandcast appears to be one of the top performers.

The Honda CB750 was absolutely revolutionary when released in 1969.  As played out as it has become, the CB750 was a four-stroke race bike for the road, something the world had never seen, and also single-handedly ballooned the sales of cider in the West Midlands.  The CB750 of 1969 was revolutionary in it’s electric start, front disc, transverse mounted inline-four, and single overhead cam among other things.  Some of the most surprising attributes of the CB750 were it’s affordable price ($1469 USD in 1969) and the fact that it was actually dependable!  The last real CB750 was released in 1978, as that was the end of the SOHC, dry-sump, bikes that were what made it so special when released.  The bikes were relatively the same from ’69-78, but what makes the sandcast so special?

Speaking of Ferrari’s on a bike website isn’t the most popular move, but it’s going to be the easiest way to explain why the sandcast is the most expensive CB750.  In 1975, at the Paris Motor Show, Ferrari released the iconic 308; the 308GTB wasn’t released to the buying public until 1977 however and the first 712 cars feature fiberglass bodywork.  These ‘glass cars can easily be identified by the horizontal line at the top of the A-Pillar, which isn’t present on the steel bodied cars.  The fiberglass bodied 308GTB is the lightest of the 308 line, features a dry-sump oil system, least amount of government regulation items (bumpers, emissions), and is carbureted as opposed to fuel-injected.  Some of these features were carried on through the post ’77 cars but the most important feature of the first 712 is the fiberglass body.  It has been widely speculated why these early cars feature fiberglass bodywork as opposed to the steel of the cars only a year later.  The most widely accepted reason is that Scaglietti/Ferrari didn’t have the resources to immediately start production with the steel body tooling.  These fiberglass 308’s are generally valued in the $40-55k range, or more, dependent on condition while other carbureted 308s tend to lie within the $25-35k range.

What does this all mean for the CB750 shown here?  The sandcast CB750s were produced up to serial number 1007414, these bikes featured some identifiable features such as front fender, gas tank, chain guard, master cylinder, etc., and most importantly the sandcast engine.  The sandcast engine has no performance benefits over the later die-cast blocks.  Honda went with the sandcast motors early on simply because a cope & drag system is considerably cheaper and faster than fronting the money for a die-cast production line.  The sandcast CB’s routinely sell for $10-20k more than a later (pre-’79) CB750 of the same condition.  You don’t want to ask about RSC parts for a CB750…

I know, you’ve probably skipped the last few paragraphs and I’m fine with that; Here is the review of this particular CB for sale:  This bike is in very good condition for being forty-two years old.  This bike is supposedly original except for a missing side cover and having the top clap replaced at a Honda dealer in the 1980.  The SN of the engine does not match the SN of the frame.  I’m not versed well enough on sandcast CB750s to know if this is possibly the original engine or not.  If it is not however, whomever found the engine did a lot of leg work as the engine is only thirty-three numbers from the frame.  This bike is in very good, driver, condition and should be more than acceptable for a restorer or someone who wants to simply be the eccentric guy at bike nights who rides the “…sandcast ‘750!”.  This CB750 appears to be early production based on it’s left mounted horn which is in line with the early SN.  The mileage also appears to be consistent with the condition of the bike shown.

This bike is right for you if you have the money for a brand new CBR1000RR, but not the interest in one.  Or, if you prefer appreciation to depreciation…See the bike on eBay .  Learn more than you’ve ever wanted to at the Sandcast Only Owner’s Club here.  Find NOS parts or get your sandcast bike restored here.

AG

Classic Sport Bikes For Sale September 29, 2010 posted by

1976 Yamaha TZ750C Project on eBay

A genuine TZ750 on eBay!

Bike:  1976 Yamaha TZ750C

Location:  Franklin, Michigan

Mileage:  TMU, engine is a later S/N replacement.

I’ll let the seller state the description so I don’t get anything wrong:

1976 Yamaha TZ750C Road Racer: Frame No. 409 – 100101, Engine No. 409 – 200224.HISTORY: I purchased the Yamaha in 1990. No other known history.

ORIGINALITY: The frame number is the first of the 1976 TZ750C production run. It is estimated that 40 machines were built. The engine number indicates that it is dated 1979. The left and right side cylinder barrels each have “347cc 40900” embossed at the rear. The fairing and screen are new Mead Speed parts. The swing arm has been reinforced, but has a very similar appearance to original. The wheel rims are stamped “Daido Japan”. The tires are Continental 3.25 H 18 RB2 (front) & Goodyear Eagle Drag Racer 25 x 7.0 x 18 (rear). The kill switch is missing, but the kill switch pigtail is original and attached to the CDI Controller Box. (2) tiny black tie wraps are used to mount the water temp gauge in place of the original clips. Some of the metric fasteners are not original Yamaha parts. All other parts are original Yamaha. Restoration has been carried out using the pages from the parts manual for reference.

CONDITION: The fairing and all black parts have been professionally painted. The screen to fairing attachment is adequate, but not excellent. The fuel tank, seat and front fender have the original paint. The tank has a tiny surface scratch on the left side and a ding and scratch mark on the right side, as shown in the pictures. These parts have been intentionally left unrestored to retain their originality. All other parts are excellent, but not all have a museum quality finish.

COMMENTS:
1) The mileage is unknown and the listed mileage is an approximation.
2) I have never had the engine running.
3) Engine compression, gear selection and clutch operation are normal. During storage, the cylinder bores were oiled and the transmission fluid was installed.
4) The transmission and brake fluids have recently been drained.
5) Many of the fasteners have not been correctly torqued and the machine is not suitable for immediate use.
6) The Yamaha does not have a title.

If you like sportbikes, and I assume you do, the TZ750 is pretty much a to-die-for bike and probably even more so than a Black Shadow depending on your generation.  The TZ750 debuted in 1975, following the TZ700, with cantilever rear suspension and put out near 140hp giving it a top speed of over 185mph.

If a TZ750 doesn’t get your blood flowing, this probably isn’t a hobby for you.  Read a fantastic write up of a, California, street titled TZ750 from 1979 here.

This example for sale has obviously been a display piece and would hold it’s value nicely if you decided to continue letting it sit in your living room.  However, this bike has enough influence to possibly make you make, perceived, rash decisions and cash out retirement funds just to be able to head out to the garage and listen to it.  Drool over it on eBay .

AG

Consider these other Yamaha’s:

[AffomaticEbay]yamaha rz[/AffomaticEbay]