Posts by tag: Honda

Honda May 7, 2021 posted by

Turbo City Madman: 1984 Honda CX650 Turbo

This is a bike that really shouldn’t need any introduction to the pages of RSBFS. After all, being the self-proclaimed RSBFS turbo nerd I *know* that I’ve posted more than a few. Why? Because they are awesome in a mega-flawed sort of way that drives you to either love or hate them. And despite their totally unloved status when new, they have recently encountered a bit of a resurgence in interest – and price. Today’s 27 mile example is the poster child for the movement, although it also represents an interesting counter-point to the whole factory Turbo saga.

1984 Honda CX650 Turbo for sale on eBay

Honda was the fist to bring a turbocharged motorcycle to market as a full factory supported effort with the 1982 CX500TC (technically the Kawasaki Z1-R TC was first atmospherically enhanced motorbike, but that was not factory). That particular bike bristled with new technology that only Honda engineering could bring to the fore, including a sophisticated computerized fuel injection system to manage the complicated intake situation and ensure engine longevity. The CX650 Turbo built on that foundation by increasing displacement and compression ratio to help improve the off-boost rideability. This also greatly improved the transition from off-boost to boost (although you’ll never miss that event) and help minimize the dreaded turbo lag. In all, the CX650 was the most polished of the factory turbo entries, being the only boosted bike to benefit from a second generation of development. Sadly, that was not enough to overcome the price, the stigma, the weight and the stigma. By 1985 the turbo era was well and truly over, save for oddball collectors and enthusiasts (ahem).

From the seller:
Up for sale is a 1983 Honda CX650T motorcycle – Only 27 miles.
This was a school motorcycle – sticker shown in pictures. Because it was a school motorcycle there was never a title issued. Registration and a Bill of Sale will be the only documents provided.

We picked it up years ago – always garaged. A nice clean motorcycle. Please note some cosmetic damage to the fairing, fender, etc. I tried to take several pictures to show any imperfections. Also, I did replace the rear cowl, which is a repaint. The original cowl has a broken tab that is unseen. I am willing to include this with the sale of the motorcycle.

More from the seller:
The following has been done on the motorcycle…
The brake system has been cleaned/flushed
The master cylinder and the rear master cylinder have been cleaned and rebuilt
The fuel injection has been cleaned and checked
New plugs
New pump propeller
Oil Change
New after market fuel pump (original is still available if desired)
New windscreen

The motorcycle starts and runs. Here is a link to the youtube video – https://youtu.be/MTjRL9s4bkk

I am not a videographer…lol so I apologize in advance and hope no one gets dizzy. My intention was to show how nice the motorcycle sounds.

Not to mince words, the turbo motorcycle era was an utter commercial failure. Each of the Big Four played with the devil of boost, and every one of them was an atrocious and abysmal return on the considerable investment required. Suzuki used their experience to develop the original air/oil cooled GSX-R, Kawasaki used the opportunity to elevate the GPz to the top of the 1/4 mile time sheets, Yamaha phoned in an low-buck entry branded as a Seca, and Honda dumped a significant portion of their inventory on “technical schools” in an attempt to recoup their investment and train the next generation on Big Red products.

Todays example of the CX650 Turbo – a one year only model for 1984 (George Orwell puns notwithstanding) – is one of those previously dreaded “school” bikes. These were examples meant to train future mechanics on the complex systems of the modern motorcycle, and were never intended for consumer consumption (check out the sticker on the tank). While each had a VIN number, none were released with a title, and each of these bikes were written off as crushed, destroyed or otherwise parted out. Very recently we have started to see an influx of these school bikes as more rare than the average CX650 Turbo, which may indeed be true. It is still early days to determine the impact this may have on the collector, as Turbos are still not really considered collector bikes (yet). However the price curve is on the rise and we have seen some high water marks eclipsed in the last year or so. This one has an opening bid of a relatively high $18k, so it will be interesting to see how the market responds. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Turbo City Madman: 1984 Honda CX650 Turbo
Featured Listing April 29, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 2004 Honda RC51 Nicky Hayden

AMA Superbike champion. AMA Superstock winner – in both 600cc and 750cc classes. Formula Extreme winner. MotoGP rookie of the year. MotoGP world champion. Dethroned Valentino Rossi by interrupting his 5-in-a-row championship streak. Three time MotoGP winner and 28 time podium visitor. Scored at least one point in each of his 14 seasons in the top class. Won in WSBK. Inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of fame. When it came to racing, there was not much that Nicky did not accomplish. Known as a genial and affable persona, Nicky was a wonderful ambassador on the world’s stage, and brought the US back to the top step in international competition. The Kentucky Kid will be missed.

2004 Honda RC51 Nicky Hayden Edition

Honda created the RC51 in order to go Superbike racing. With ruling changes that allowed twin cylinder motorcycles a displacement advantage over four-bangers, Honda ditched the successful RC45 (RVF750R) for an all new effort to be known as the RVT1000R in the US and VTR1000 in other markets. The new 90 degree v-twin displaced just under the rule book limit of 999cc and thus was born a Japanese interpretation of a Ducati. And while the 130-odd HP twin is special in its own right, the packaging of the narrow motor within a sculpted wraparound twin-spar aluminum frame is what made the RC51 successful. So successful that it won the WSBK championship in 2000 – its first year out – with Colin Edwards at the helm. The RC51 then won a spectacular double championship in 2002, with Edwards taking WSBK honors and Nicky Hayden winning the AMA Superbike title in America.

From the seller:
This is a Honda RC51 or RVT1000R Nicky Hayden Special Edition, #69.

Contact: Keri: kroskill@gmail.com
Asking $12,000
22,703 miles

This racing bike has been heavily modified with track riding/racing in mind. Meticulously maintained this RC51 is meant to be ridden and enjoyed. Starting from the top down it has a Power Commander III professionally tuned by BMW’s race team. Engine mods to the airbox/emissions. Sato Racing high mount exhaust and rear sets. New sprockets and gearing changed to favor acceleration over top speed. Stainless brake lines. Suspension professionally set up for a 180 lb rider. Custom undertail with LED’s. The bike has been tracked but never been down. There is some small cosmetic damage with the left fairing in the sticker kit very minor. (check pictures).

Included in the purchase:
Rear passenger seat, travel bag that goes in place of the rear seat, original front signals, original tail and signals, stock exhaust, original clip-on bars, and original brake and clutch levers.

The Nicky Hayden Edition of the RC51 is a special tribute to a special rider. This one year only offering differed very little mechanically from the same year base RC51, but included a special brushed aluminum finish on the frame and swingarm, a white area on the front and tail sections for numbers, and a unique Nicky Hayden sticker kit as part of the #69 livery. The tank is also bestowed with Nicky’s signature and 2002 AMA Superbike Championship creds.

How about a video of this beast running? See below and turn up those speakers!

Today’s Feature Listing RC51 is a rare Nicky Hayden Edition with some tasteful performance mods. On the engine side, intake, fuel injection and exhaust have all been massaged thanks to a Power Commander module and those gorgeous Sato Racing cans. Running gear has also been upgraded in the way of improved gearing for the real world, and upgraded brake lines for even better stopping power. Visually the bike has been cleaned up with the undertail kit, and the trick adjustable levers serve double duty as good looking and highly functional. The Sato rear sets are a work of functional art in their own right. All in all, this bike appears to be well sorted and ridden as it was meant to be. The seller is asking $12k for this rare homage to the Kentucky Kid. Please send inquiries to Keri, and snag this rare beauty. Nicky would approve. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing – 2004 Honda RC51 Nicky Hayden
Honda April 13, 2021 posted by

Well Ridden: 1989 Honda VFR400R NC30

Pardon the title of this post. To be fair, I don’t know if this bike was well ridden, or ridden well. But I can tell you that it was ridden a lot. To the tune of nearly 28,000 miles, that is. That is not a problem for your typically over-engineered Honda motorcycle, but it is surprising to find such a rare gem as a NC30 to have been so heavily used. It is certainly a testament to the joy these 400cc machines bring to the table, and kudos are in order for an owner willing to get out there and ride.

1989 Honda VFR400R NC30 for sale on eBay

Like its bigger brother the RC30, the NC30 is powered by a liquid-cooled V-4 that has valve actuation driven by gears rather than chains, belts or pushrods. The result is more precise valve actuation – especially at high RPM – and the characteristic gear whine for which these these bikes are known. Couple that sweet, 60 HP V-4 with the big beam aluminum chassis, throw on some 41mm upside down forks and a rising rate single shock in the rear with the single sided “Pro Am” swing arm and you have a package that handles as well as it looks. And speaking of looks, the NC30 is nearly a direct copy of the RC30, complete with endurance racing inspired twin headlights.

From the seller:
1989 HONDA VFR400R NC30
VIN # NC301013367
45,000 KILOMETERS
TITLED IN ARIZONA, CLEAN AND CLEAR
GOOD CONDITION
NEW TIRES
RECENTLY SERVICED HAVE RECEIPTS
SERVICE WAS DONE ON SEPT 2020. IT INCLUDED OIL CHANGE, FORKS REBUILD, AND CARB CLEANING AND SYNC.
RUNS GREAT DON’T LET THE MILEAGE SCARE YOU
IF YOU ARE LOOKING AT THIS AUCTION YOU KNOW HOW RARE THIS MOTORCYCLE IS.
BUYER RESPONSIBLE FOR PICKUP.

Today’s tasty morsel of non-federalized fruit comes to us wearing the red, white and blue (and purple) robes that just seems to fit the U.S. perfectly. This is one of myriad color combos that the little VFR would wear during its run, although likely the most popular due to the resemblance to the RC30. None were ever officially imported into the United States, so that means you will have to do some quick math in your head to convert the all-metric clocks to actual speed. Aside from the miles, this bike appears to be wearing a non-stock, tinted windscreen. Other than that you might say this is a pretty good looking used bike. Short time left on the auction, with only a single bid at $5k at time of writing. There are a fair number of watchers, so something might play out near the tail end of this one. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Well Ridden: 1989 Honda VFR400R NC30
Honda March 26, 2021 posted by

Performance Redefined: 1998 Honda CBR900RR

In 1992 Honda lit the world on fire with the introduction of the FireBlade. The original project was headed up by legendary designer/engineer Tadao Baba, with the design goal of reducing or removing every ounce of weight possible while also ramping up horsepower. The 900RR was to the current sport bike world what the original Suzuki GSX-R750 was during the previous decade. It redefined what a sport bike should be, sharpening all of the inputs and edges until what existed was practically a new category: the lightweight superbike. It helps to think of the FireBlade design as a scaled up 750, rather than a liter bike on a diet. Imagine adding 4 pounds and nearly 30 ponies to a CBR600F2 and you have the general idea.

1998 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

From the seller:
This 98 Honda CBR900RR is in excellent condition with no signs of damage. The bike has 29K miles on it and runs great. Very strong and crazy fast! Just installed a brand new racing clutch and battery last week. Also did an oil change. The tires are both brand new. Aftermarket red C&C levers, red CBR engraved foot pegs, red chain. This bike has been very well kept. Please contact me with any questions and/or offers. Thank you!

Honda evolved the FireBlade continually during the next decade, upping the displacement and power while adhering to the hyper-light-superbike idea. Based on the year of manufacture, today’s example appears to be a 4th gen RR, making it a 919cc model (Honda continue to punch out the power plant, first to 929cc then to 954cc before debuting the 1000RR in 2000). There are not too many pictures of this bike, but the few that are posted show a clean, used bike. Legendary Honda build quality applies here, and the nearly 30k of mileage should not be a huge concern if scheduled maintenance was performed. The FireBlade was never on the collector list quite like more exclusive homologation machines, but today these are fantastic motorcycles that retain a bit of mystique. It is likely that values will appreciate in time, especially for the first-gen bikes. Check out all of the details here (such as they are) and Good Luck!!

MI

Performance Redefined: 1998 Honda CBR900RR
Honda March 17, 2021 posted by

Future Optimism: 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo

During the early 1980s, the future was a bright and amazing place to be. The world was full of optimism that technology would solve all of our problems and provide us with transportation that eclipsed the cave man cars and bikes of just a few years ago. And during this time manufacturers pulled out all of the stops to try to deliver on the promised land, including the concept of 1 liter power in a package half the size. Enter the turbocharger; all of the Big Four dabbled in the concept of atmospherically-boosted intake for better power and smaller displacement. And while all the Big Four delivered turbocharged goods, the reality was not exactly the same as the promised vision.

1983 Honda CX650 Turbo for sale on eBay

Honda offered not one but two techno sleds during this time: the original CX500 Turbo, followed by the radically remade CX650 Turbo only one year later. One year after that, the wastegate opened up and the boost party was completely over. But for those few years, Honda raised the stakes at the technological poker table to a level unmet by any other manufacturer. Utilizing the existing CX platform with a beefed up bottom end, Honda engineering computerized fuel injection and a raft of sensors to ensure that reliability was as prominent as horsepower. The Buck Rogers bodywork and paint was specific to the model, as were the multiple “Turbo” badges that festooned the final package (including the large “obruT” decal on the front of the fairing). The CX650T delivered power – and most importantly gobs of torque – just as the prophets had promised. But with that performance came complexity, weight (more than 600 lbs of it) and a high price tag. Turns out the buying public was more interested in an affordable future – and a significant number of bikes were left unsold.

From the seller:
Up for sale is a 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo. This bike was never sold by the Honda Motorcycle Company so there is NO TITLE. EBay does not have an option for “no title” so it was listed as “clean” but just to be clear there is NO TITLE for this machine. EBay does not allow a decimal point in the stated mileage category so it was listed with “2” miles, in actuality it has 2.6 miles and we show this in the photos. This bike is NEW OLD STOCK with 2.6 miles on the odometer, it has never had fuel inside the tank and has never been started.

This bike is one of 500 bikes that was donated by Honda to the Vocational trade school donation program and still has the decal showing this on the tank. It was never sold and was intended to be destroyed therefore Honda never issued a title for the bike. This bike is a true survivor in stunning condition. The only flaw I see is a small scratch in the paint on the right side tail piece by the grab bar. Total production numbers for the 1983 CX650 Turbo was 1777 worldwide. Out of the 1777 about 1025 of them were imported into the USA and only 500 were part of the vocational program through Honda.

More from the seller:
This is one of the 500, a super rare piece of Honda History. You may likely never get an opportunity to purchase a machine of this rarity or significance again in your lifetime. We obtained this bike from a museum where it was on display since 1992 after being donated to the museum by the vocational school. Before this the bike was in storage since the early ’80’s at the college, it was never used in their training program, it is an unmolested time capsule. We have the provenance documentation from the museum showing this chain of ownership and it will be conveyed to the new owner.

The sad fact is that the Honda CX650 Turbos are extremely rare today primarily because there was little interest from the buying public. Honda invested untold amounts of money to engineer a solution that did not really solve a problem that people were willing to spend money on – not when there were plenty of adequate motorcycles for less than half the cost. With little demand, Honda shut down production after only one year – and struggled to get rid of the remaining bikes. A large portion were simply donated to automotive/technical trade schools to be used as learning tools. Honda received some brand recognition, likely a significant tax deduction, AND got rid of expensive leftover inventory. These bikes were donated without title as if they had been destroyed, and were never intended to hit the road. Most of them by now have been parted out.

The valuation of Honda Turbos has definitely been on the rise, but the ascension has been gradual (to say the least). Low mile Turbos in good to excellent condition seem to have maxed out in the $10k range as of late, which is definitely an improvement to past financial performance of the model. Today’s bike, a school donated machine with fewer than 3 miles has spent its life in a museum, and looks the part (as in a never started, never ridden “new” motorcycle). In fact, it looks better than it should given its age. However in the past these “school bikes” have been the less desirable of the Honda models due to the fact that they were not intended to be titled. Perhaps being the most rare of the one-year only model will make them more popular with collectors, but we have not seen that in the past. If you have a take on this subject, please hit up the comments and share your thoughts. Regardless, the Buy It Now price is significant for a Turbo. You can check out all of the details here. Good Luck!!

MI

Future Optimism: 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo
Honda March 6, 2021 posted by

Fan Favorite: 1986 Honda VF1000R

Let’s set the record straight right up front: The Honda VF1000R is not as rare as true homologation machines such as the RC30 or the RC45. It was not as hard to come by in the US as the NC30 or grey market two strokes such as the NSR250 or NSR400. Yet it still has a place on these pages as it is undeniably cool, packs a massive performance punch, and to find one in today’s condition is quite simply a treat. Interested? Read on!

1986 Honda VF1000R for sale on eBay

The VF1000R gains it’s good (if not slightly porky) looks from a long line of Honda endurance racers, and the model was meant both celebrate – as well as homologate – the gear-driven V-4 for production-based racers worldwide. The fact that the VF1000R was itself an accomplished endurance racer belies the fact that homologation never happened; the metamorphosis of the VF1000F block to accommodate gear driven cams was unusually complex – and heavy. The move to geared cams added significant weight, and the bloat did not stop there. Newly revised cylinder heads raised compression and altered the airflow into the chambers, resulting in an engine producing approximately 10 HP more than the lowly “F” model – and weighing about the same amount more.

From the seller:
Out of a Bob Weaver Collection from New York is this 1986 VF1000R classic from the past.
The was the fastest production bike of its time. This is the rare desirable 2 headlight version low VIN # and was the 23rd bike produced for this year. The pictures will state it all. This is not a clapped out old bike that you can buy for a few thousand dollars. Paint and condition is great. Most of the things you would have to mess with on an old bike has been done: New fork seals/oil, tires, brake pads, air filter, spark plugs, coolant, thermostat, brake fluids, carb rebuild, starter clutch, battery and hard to find fuel pump. Has been serviced by local dealer. Ready to ride.

This is not a beginners bike or a bike for a small person. This is big, heavy, fast bike and not for the timid.
This is a beautiful 80’s bike that is now on every sport bike collectors list and prices are climbing quickly. Get yours before its too late.

The dual-headlight VF1000R model is the last version in the line of a relatively short production run (the model launched in 1984), and really brought the Euro look to America. Remember, the early 1980s were a time that D.O.T. did not really allow two headlights on a motorcycle; by 1986 this was still a novelty. The overall livery of the bike helped to disguise some of the R model’s weight; all told you are looking at a 600+ lb sport bike. According to reviewers at the time, a lot of that weight is concentrated high up, making for some interesting riding dynamics. The seller is correct in that these are really not for the inseam or muscularly challenged. Nor is this a great first bike: With 122 HP and on tap and a 150 MPH top end, things can go wrong in a hurry.

While the VF1000R was not homologated nor offered in any sort of “Limited Edition” packaging (read: it was a mass produced Honda motorcycle), it remains relatively rare today. These were expensive in the day, and were outsold by the cheaper F model in the years they overlapped. To find one in excellent condition these days is not an every week occurrence. This particular example is far from a zero mile affair (the ad states 28K on the clocks), but does come out of a known collection. The pictures show an honest example of the breed rather than an abused rat bike. The VF1000R looks as stunning today as when it first dropped in 1984, and will continue to look great for decades to come. The Buy It Now is set at a rather high $10,750, but as these are sought after models the market may indeed go in that direction. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Fan Favorite: 1986 Honda VF1000R
Honda February 17, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1993 Honda CBR900RR

Update 2.17.2021: This bike was relisted in late July and we’ve just learned it has SOLD to an RSBFS reader. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

From the mid-1980s through the late 1990s, superbike development burst forth hot and heavy from the engineers behind the big three Japanese brands, with each redesigned or all-new bike of the time period resetting the genre’s limits and possibilities. Tadao Baba’s Honda CBR900RR is perhaps the best exemplar of that trend, as it re-wrote record books as it changed what it meant to be a near-liter capacity bike.

Up until the Fireblade’s release in 1992, any capacity over 750cc meant you were getting into porky waistlines and putting a priority on out and out speed over accurate handling. But riding on a 600-sized chassis with 16-inch wheels to quicken turn-in, the 110-horsepower, 450-pound CBR900RR was from another plane. It undercut the Yamaha FZR1000 on the scales by 34 pounds.

This 1993 Honda CBR900RR is in immaculate shape, with a bunch of tasty modifications to increase style, function and comfort, and a raft of NOS parts to aid maintenance. We love the red-black-silver livery, which is a nice break from the ubiquitous HRC red-white-blue paint scheme that was splashed across every magazine test of the time.

From the seller:

1993 Honda CBR900rr, complete stock bike minus original exhaust but has many period-correct parts to make up for that.
Aftermarket parts:
Full Akrapovic Exhaust System
Heli Bar clip ons
Race Tech front springs
Ohlins rear shock
Brand new Sargent seat
Targa solo seat cowl
original seat, rear seat, clip ons and front springs come with bike
has original 37,700 km which is 23,425 miles
only 2 owners since new, never in rain, no accidents , uncut rear fender, and original
turn signals
I have some many parts some of which include, extra gas tank top end, extra forks,clutch plates, wiring harness, pistons, NOS new zero gravity tinted windshield, NOS lockhart tank bra and a few more items that could be included for a few extra bucks.
Has been stored in a climate controlled environment for last 5 years and not ridden, fresh gas and oil was put in this week and she fired right up. Will need a rad flush and brake fluid flush as it hasn’t been on the road for five years.
Looking for $8,000 USD
Bike is located in Vancouver, Canada and I can assist with shipping

These days, every literbike is pretty close chassis-wise to its 600cc brandmates, but when this bike dropped that was a revelation. Thanks to their reputation for speed and their legendary status, early, well-kept CBR900RRs will only get more valuable.

Featured Listing: 1993 Honda CBR900RR
Honda January 24, 2021 posted by

A Tale of Two Turbos: 1982 Honda CX500T (x2!)

With attribution (and apologies) to Charles Dickens, this was the best motorcycle, this was the worst motorcycle. This was an age where technology soared, yet this was an age where average triumphed. This was the time of lag, this was the time of boost. This was the Spring of hope, this was the Winter of despair. This was the early 1980s, and this was the Turbo era.

Forced induction has paved a long and storied road in the automotive world. For motorcycles, it represented more of a novelty cul-de-sac. And although started by Kawasaki farming out the Z1R TC model to a tuner and selling it in showroom without a warranty, the first fully-fledged, factory created and supported Turbo bike came from Honda: the 1982 CX500T. Utilizing the robust CX500 twin platform, Honda did some minor bottom end beef-up and some major electronics engineering on a computerized fuel injection and delivery control module to ensure engine longevity. The result is the space-ship resembling, very heavy, long turbo-lag inducing unicorn that you see here. Sadly, despite all of the technological innovations that Honda threw at the CX-T model, public interest in the beast never took off. And neither did values for these models, although that is definitely changing. Read on about these two bikes!


1982 Honda CX500T #1

From the seller:
CX500 Turbo Has Been On Display For 17 Years In My Climate Control Museum.
It’s Been Pulled Off The Display Floor And, Over Last Month, As Time Permitted I Have Had The Following Service Items Performed By My Master Mechanic –
-Storage Fuel removed and replaced with Non-Ethanol Premium Fuel.
-New AGM Battery Installed
-New Oil & Filter Change
-Both Front And Rear Brake Calipers Serviced – Disassembled Cleaned & Brake Fluids Flushed From The Long Time sitting Idle While On Display
-New front brake pads on both sides. The OEM ones were hard squeaked some and we have everything apart already.
-Both fuel Injectors Professionally cleaned by Mechanic
-Air filter check and was OK
-New OEM spark plugs installed

This bike looks absolutely awesome, and has been bid up to nearly $10k as of time of writing with the reserve still in place. There are a lot of bidders, and even more watchers. The activity is certainly pushing the envelope in terms of price point for these rare bikes (which should represent a *very* welcome trend for Turbo collectors), and this one may end up a new high-water mark for the model.


1982 Honda CX500T #2

From the seller:
1982 Honda. Condition is “Used”.
I’m Selling my CX500Turbo because I have to many bikes and someone needs to enjoy this one.
Bike is in immaculate condition for a 39 year old machine.
Only 3100 miles
All original paint
Original tires
Runs and drives perfect
Recent work completed includes all master cylinders and calipers rebuilt, injectors sent out and cleaned, new fuel pump, oil and filter changed.
I can take more photos if needed. Also have a video I can text of bike running with a walk around.
Chance to own a very rare motorcycle that has been climbing in value.

This particular example has very few miles for the age, and looks to be in good shape overall. There appears to be some paint cracking on the front fairing, and the original tires would make me nervous as a rider. This one has a bit longer to go at auction, with no reserve and the latest bid at over $7k at time of writing. Again, this is elevated territory for these techno-wonder machines, and we might see this one climb even higher before the auction ends.


Dickens closed out his famed novel (A Tale of Two Cities) with: “It is a far, far better thing I do than I have ever done…” Looking back at the monumental moment when Honda rolled out this amazing motorcycle, you can forgive the Engineers if they thought along the same lines. This was truly a remarkable undertaking, and endures as the most complex and technological effort of the Turbo era. To see not one but two great examples available at the same time – and being bid up to the current prices – bodes very well for these machines in the future. Check out the pics and videos for 1982 Honda CX500T example #1 here, and jump to 1982 Honda CX500T example #2 here. Enjoy, and Good Luck!


1982 Honda CX500T example #1 gallery

1982 Honda CX500T example #2 gallery

MI

A Tale of Two Turbos: 1982 Honda CX500T (x2!)