Posts by tag: Honda

Featured Listing April 16, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30

Often considered the darling of the collector world, the RC30 reigns supreme as being one of the most approachable of the highly sought-after rare bikes of the 80s & 90s. Volumes of research are readily available for these fascinating machines, and values remain strong with steady and continued appreciation. In short, the RC30 contains everything that RSBFS readers crave: A fantastic sport bike with racing DNA; A gorgeous silhouette that is THE iconic shape of the era; A mythical soundtrack that matches the good looks; A limited numbers homologation bike... and a good investment. There may be haters out there, but they are vastly outnumbered by those who understand what the RC30 brings to the table.

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30

Officially known as the VFR750R, the RC30 differs from the more pedestrian and economical VFR750F in more ways than the similarities. Both bikes have VFR in the title and both utilize a V4 engine arrangement. Apart from the Honda badge on the tank, that is where it ends and where the RC30 takes off. Throwing off the chain-driven engine internals of the previous VF series, the RC30 makes use of a gear-driven DOHC architecture which provides for ultra-precise valve timing and control. This is the piece that contributes to the characteristic whine of these VFR motors. And while the newer VFR-F models also utilized gear driven cams, the motor internals of the RC30 were decidedly more racy. Connecting rods were made of titanium to reduce reciprocating weight and raise the redline. The crank timing was changed to a 360 degree "big bang" sequence instead of the F-bikes 180 degree crank (the latter being smoother for street riding). The transmission was configured for racing - meaning a close-ratio box - and a slipper clutch was fitted. The twin spar chassis was all aluminum, including the revolutionary single sided swing arm. Suspension was all top line offerings from Showa. Devised for endurance racing and facilitating quick wheel/tire changes, even the front of the RC30 has quick-change hardware to minimize pit lane delays. And that is what the RC30 was built to be: a race bike with lights made available to the public. A total of 3,000 units were built.

From the seller:
1990 Honda RC30 For Sale

This beautiful motorcycle is for sale after 18 years of ownership. Its owner is selling his collection of desirable motorcycles due to health issues. It is complete, runs like it should, and has never been down. The bike has been ridden approximately 400 miles under its current owner. In its time it was never raced or abused, and always stored indoors in a dry and temperate climate.

More from the seller:

Because the bike has seen very limited road use over the past few years it received a total carb cleaning and synching within the past few months. At the time, while the carbs were removed, the fuel petcock was also dismantled and thoroughly cleaned by a former Honda mechanic.

The RC30 comes with its original factory tool roll, and the rear swing arm stand.

If you’re reading this post you already know this bike’s legacy both in Honda’s history, and in racing history. The bike was purchased from a collection in Georgia, and imported it into Canada after taking delivery there. It has been licensed in Ontario since that time, and has a clear ownership (title) in the province of Ontario. There are no warranties expressed or implied.

More from the seller:

Please feel free to email the seller at: v3powered@gmail.com if you have any inquiries about the bike.

Price: $28,000 (USD) or $35,000 (CDN)

The bike is located east of Toronto, Ontario. For you U.S. readers, importing a bike from Canada to the U.S. shouldn’t be anymore trying than it was to bring it to Canada. Filling out the appropriate forms, and having a bit of patience is all you really need. The owner can assist in shipping, but all planning and costs are the responsibility of the buyer.

This RC30 is in amazing condition, having traveled only some 2,200 miles in it's lifetime. This is helped by the limited ownership; RC30s tend to be coveted and kept in collections for longer periods of time than other machines. This one is no different, and has been fawned over for nearly two decades. These are the types of bikes you hang on to for as long as you can, and those fortunate enough to own one have realized significant gains in valuation. Year after year, this is about as reliable a sure thing that one can find when it comes to collecting motorcycles. And even if you are more into riding than collecting, the RC30 has much to offer. There are those who ride these bikes regularly, which is really how it should be. These bikes were built to go racing, and while they look fantastic as a static display they are much more beautiful at full song.

This particular bike is located in Canada, although it looks to have been a US bike originally. The clocks are in MPH and it has already been federalized. That should help with bringing it back over the border (that, and the fact it is more than 25 years old). This bike comes with some cool RC30 extras, and has been recommissioned to boot. Check out the pictures - feel free to drool a little - and then
give Barry a shout. At $28k USD this RC30 is priced to sell in the real world. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30
Featured Listing April 5, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30

Often considered the baby brother to the RC30, the 400cc NC30 deservedly stands proud on its own right. The V-4 with ultra-precise gear driven cams delivers a powerful 60 horsepower soundtrack that is unique to this model - especially when the tach swings up toward the 14,500 RPM redline. This is partly thanks to the NC30s 360 degree crank, creating a "big bang" motor when compared to the NC21 or NC24 predecessors. With a race-bred twin spar aluminum frame, endurance-bred single sided swing arm, four-into-one exhaust and adjustable suspension, the underpinnings of the VFR400R were anything but cheap. Drape the whole package in a glorious shape that is as iconic as any of the sport bikes we hold in high esteem (RC30, 851, 916, F4), throw in typical Honda build quality and reliability and you have the NC30 in a nutshell.

Featured Listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30

The seller knows quite a bit about this bike, and I'll let him share detail on this example.

From the seller:
1992 Honda VFR400R NC30
Currently has 11'558 Km that's about 7,100 miles, will go up as I do ride it at least once a week.
I just put on new tires front and rear, new brake pads front and rear, flushed and bled front and rear brakes. Had the rims powder coated as the original paint was peeling. I also noticed some of the smaller pieces were looking their age so I had them powder coated black also, instrument stay, Misc cable guides, fairing stays.

More from the seller:
I just serviced the forks, new seals and fluid, Valve check, replaced all o-rings in the carbs, they were starting to leak, flushed and replaced the coolant I got the bike 3 years ago from the original owner's estate, he passed away. Prior to his passing he was doing a full restoration and had removed the original body work. He ended up getting Dementia and that was as far as he got. Over the years the original body work got lost. I wanted to keep this bike original so after much searching I managed to find Honda body work that had been in an accident. I had the crash damage repaired and repainted. It looks really nice. The bike runs amazing, starts easily cold or warm, smooth, powerful and quiet. It is the best handling bike I have ever ridden. I've owned it for about 3 years now I'm 6'1" and 220 pounds. This bike was designed for someone 5'04" and 145 so as I am getting older I can only ride it for about 10 minutes due to the full racer tuck.

More from the seller:
The bike is not perfect but really nice and would make a perfect weekend canyon rider. If I were to keep it I would do the following:

- Paint the lower fork housings and the rear subframe
- remove all body work and detail the engine and frame.

Bike is located in Lake Havasu City, AZ. I have a clean and clear Arizona title with current registration till April 2020.

Asking Price: $10,500 (will consider reasonable offers)
Contact: baldyy@aol.com

I really like this seller's approach to the bike; it is not a perfect zero-mile statue, but a well-cared for and maintained rider. After all, these 400cc rockets are meant to be enjoyed in their element (which had better include lots of corners). Parts of the bike have been selectively restored, reconditioned or updated which is what you would expect from a fawned-over 27 year old motorcycle. Devoid of the hyper-focused attention bestowed upon the bigger RC30, the NC30 is a bike you can ride and enjoy for what it is. Not so expensive to be an unaffordable collector, and not so rare and finicky not to be a regular rider - provided you fit. As the seller notes, this is definitely not a spacious and airy bagger; the crop of 400cc grey bikes definitely cater to a slightly smaller set. If you do fit, there are few bikes that collect the handling accolades of a VFR400R. With a jewel of an engine that purrs at low revs and snarls & shrieks through 14,500 RPM, the NC30 is positive proof against those who say Hondas lack soul. This example is clean and fully operational, and priced fairly for today's market. If you think you are in the market for the gem known as the NC30, contact Paul for more information. We typically don't see these bikes last very long in the market; act quickly before it's gone!

MI

Featured Listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30
Honda April 2, 2019 posted by

Tropical Depression: 1988 Honda CBR250R

Deep in the vaults of exotic hardware purposely kept from the shores of America include examples such as this magnificent 1988 Honda CBR250R. There were extremely rare in the US during the late 1980s and 1990s - which is amusing since the venerable 250 Ninja was imported during the same period of time. But the CBR250R was the far sharper of the two, and was destined for the small-cube crazy home market of Japan where quarter liter racers dominate. The US had to make due with a relatively tame parallel twin that practically shrieked "entry-level-economy." But in the collector market today, the CBR250R has become easier to find, as evidenced by the number listed on these pages over the years. Still, they should be considered to be quite rare and finding one in good condition is the same thrill as with any other unique bike.

1988 Honda CBR250R for sale on eBay

The CBR250R does some shrieking of its own, but that is largely due to the sheer number of revs this bike requires in order to produce forward movement. A liquid cooled inline four cylinder with four valves per pot and a 11.5:1 compression ratio, the CBR250R relies on a 18,000(!) redline to achieve a respectable 40 - 45 horsepower. With full sport bodywork, twin headlamps and a single, beefy front disk (certainly enough to stop this 330 pounds dry machine), the CBR250R was marketed as part of the Hurricane lineup in some European markets. Given that the Hurricane model range scaled up to the mighty 1000F, you might think of this as more of a squall.

From the seller:
This very rare MC19 CBR250R is the 963rd bike produced for the 1988 production run. It was purchased about a year ago with 318km on the speedometer (about 190 original miles). It was imported by a dealer in UT and purchased in running condition. It still had the original 1987 date code tires on it, which were badly cracked, so a new set of Avon tires were installed. The carburetors were removed, re-jetted and installed on new OEM intake manifolds. The rear sprocket was changed from 54 to 52 and finally to 50 teeth, in order to reduce highway cruising rpms by about 1,000.

These bikes weigh 350lbs wet and are rated at 45 horsepower at 14,500rpms. The redline is at 18k rpms and the engine will run up to redline quite willingly. With stock gearing the bikes were rated at 110 mph top speeds.

This bike sat in Japan for 30 years, perhaps at a dealership or in a personal collection. It has a fair amount of patina on alloy parts and in little nooks and crannies in the engine bay area. If you love to polish aluminum, you can make this bike really shine again. The frame is aluminum.

These bikes were never imported/sold in the US and only after they are 25 years old can they be brought into the country and legally registered in CA and elsewhere. Yes, the bike IS registered with its 11 digit serial number!

I do have PDF files of the service manual in English and there are a few spare parts, including the rear sprockets. The oil filter is a common Honda part. The thermostat was replaced with a 180 degree unit, which keeps the little engine cooler than when they have the stock 190 degree unit installed.

A new choke cable was installed. These bikes have electric fuel pumps and inline filters.

A few paint scratches are evident here and there. The original OEM factory windscreen is checked but not cracked. One of the forward fairing tabs is broken, but held in place with the original modified nut-plate.

Riding these bikes is an unreal experience, especially when you rev it up past 14k rpms. You can easily imagine yourself as being Mike Hailwood at the IOM races, with the little four screaming out unimaginable rpms through the gears.

Due to recent ankle surgery, I am no longer able to ride the bike as before, so sadly must let it go to an appreciative new owner. Current miles are about 2,995 km, which is about 1,800 miles. This is one of my favorite bikes of all times... and I have owned hundreds of Hondas of all types and sizes. I will miss it dearly and will enjoy the memories that it gave me over the past year.

This particular CBR250R has an interesting history and shows how rare these bikes are... and how small our collecting community really is. This bike was sold on the pages of RSBFS a few years back, as highlighted in this post by Tad. And while the VIN number remains the same, the mileage has grown from 192 up to 1,800. What has not grown is the price - the Buy It Now figure is right at the $6k mark, just like the earlier sale. I've grabbed one of the photos from that post (above), as the current seller has not included very many. There are a few more sharp, high-res photos available via the older post - although please note they do not necessarily represent the bike as it sits today. Check out the current advert here, and then imagine what 18,000 RPM sounds like as you strafe the apexes of your favorite canyon. Good Luck!!

MI

Tropical Depression: 1988 Honda CBR250R
Honda March 25, 2019 posted by

Late-century modern: 1999 Honda CBR 900RR

This is what a sportbike should still look like, if you ask me. Loud, high-contrast, aggressive graphics wrapped around a stubby, purposeful chassis carrying more engine than makes sense. There are, of course, a ton of newer bikes that hit the right aesthetic notes, but none have the same Air Jordan vibe of the mid-late '90s bikes. This 1999 Honda CBR900RR hits all those perfect notes, and is in excellent condition so the madness can be fully appreciated.

1999 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

It has clearly been garaged and well cared for, and the seller says he recently checked the valves and made sure the carbs are clean. It has also apparently been lowered. It's not a flawless bike after 20 years and 14,000 miles, but it's an excellent rider that stands above most other CBR900RRs you'll run across.

From the eBay listing:

This bike is probably the cleanest CBR900 you will see in awhile ,it is all stock except Yoshimura bolt on and braided steel brake lines...it has been lowered about an inch or two...it has a threaded adjuster bikes has a spot or two on fairings...small blemish....all who see it say its like new. Runs perfect as it should, valves were checked by me as were carburetors...I have over 30 years exp....has Yoshimura bolt on exhaust, braided steel brake lines ....any questions call 407-791-3584

By the time this bike was built, the model's star had faded somewhat, as the Yamaha R1 had bowed the year before and managed to scare the pants off anyone with the brass to go near its limit. When the Honda CBR900RR debuted in 1992, it had landed with a similar seismic impact. It had the stature of a 600 but an engine that very closely approached the power of its rivals' 1,000cc offerings. With less weight to pull around and snappy handling thanks in part to a 16-inch front wheel, the 900 made everything else seem a little flabby and out of touch.

The later CBR900s had a very slightly punched out engine, a stiffened chassis and bigger brakes than the original. An angular single headlight had replaced the original's iconic round-eyed visage.

If you're looking for a really nice now-classic sportbike to liven up your weekends, this thing looks like the ticket. Since it's a later model, it might not approach the collectibilty of the originals, but it'll stand out anywhere you take it.

Honda March 9, 2019 posted by

Twice as nice: 1979 Honda CBX

The mighty CBX is one of those bikes that don't really make a lot of sense to some riders. While a liter bike in size, that size is really the problem. Rather than a twin or even a four-banger, the CBX is a bona fide six lanes wide when viewed from the front. A wild and strong statement by Honda when it was released, there is much about the CBX that is stuff of legends. This was the cusp of the 1980s, and Honda was firing a shot across all bows; they had engineering and technology and were not afraid to use it.

Italian firm Benelli created the first factory inline six cylinder motorcycle, but Honda upped the tech ante and mass produced it. Starting in 1978, the early models were six-banger versions of the bikes of the time: standards. Today the standard is known by the more evocative alias of naked, but that is only because after the discovery of ABS plastic nearly every motorcycle since has been a molded canvas of one stylist or another. I'm not discounting the aerodynamic (or aesthetic) benefits of bodywork, but bikes like this CBX provide that hanging it all out where it can be seen really makes a lasting impression.

From the seller:
Beautiful and very clean 1979 Honda in Pegasus Silver with 2,075 miles since restoration. Please note, true mileage before complete restoration is unknown. Starts very easily and runs strong. Everything is ready to go riding or to be a great collectors piece.

Very reasonable reserve. Here is what is known about the bike.

I had been seeking a 100% stock and complete 1979 CBX in Silver for many years to add to my collection of 12 bikes. (Wife calls it a disease.)
Bike was owned by a gentlemen in Florida who passed away around 2010. Bike had a complete nut and bolt restoration completed by Tim's CBX International in Georgia. (Verified by Bill @ Tim's). Tim's early restorations, when OEM Honda parts were more readily available, are regarded by many as the best CBX restorations to be found. The paint work is fantastic. Chrome is bright.
Spouse eventually sold the bike to Louis Mintrone, distributor of CBX parts in Florida in 2017. I purchased this Bike from Louis Mintrone in 2017.

More from the seller:
I shipped the bike to Preston Marks of CBX Motorworks. Although the bike had very few miles since restoration, I had Preston go completely through the bike again as it had set for awhile. Carburetors were Flushed, Rebuilt and Sync'ed. All fluids including brake fluids were flushed. Amsoil motor oil and brake fluids were used. Many rubber intake boots, seals and gaskets were replaced. New Battery installed. New Swing arm bushings were installed. New Bridgestone Battlax tires, in the correct size were mounted and balanced.
Bike is in stock conditions with a few small exceptions. Brake lines are braided Stainless steel instead of the stock rubber hoses. Brake lines are better than Stock so I kept them. Dyna coils and electronic ignition were installed during the restoration to eliminate the weak stock coils and ignition points. Progressive Shocks are installed in the rear for better handling. I have the original OEM shocks (see photograph) that is included with the sale.

I located a reproduction owners manual and a stock tool kit that is included. The tool kit is complete with the exception of the OEM Shock spanner wrench is missing.

Issues that are know are very , very minor. The right side exhaust muffler has some minor rust "pin holes" on the very bottom of the exhaust collector. Very minor but it is there for full disclosure. (see Photo). Left side muffler is solid. Also a small fin, under the motor and next to the drain plug is chipped. (see Photo) Very minor but again, full disclosure. That is everything known. Bike is available for preview.

Sold with a clean Texas title. Title mileage is marked "EXEMPT" as is standard in Texas for vehicle of this age and again, mileage before restoration is unknown. Since the bike has been in my collection, it has been stored in a climate controlled garage, under a cover with a Battery tender.

More from the seller:
I am selling the CBX because after many years of enjoyment, I am selling my entire collection of 12 motorcycles. This bike is the next to last to be sold. This CBX and my Norton Commando are the last 2 bikes to be offered for sale. It is time for someone else to enjoy.
The bike is located in a Northern Suburb of Dallas. Should you want more information, message me with your phone number or email address and I will get back to you.

Shipping is the responsibility of the buyer. As I have done my best to describe this beautiful bike, it is 40 years old so no warranties. Upon pick up of the bike, if it is not as described, I will refund all deposits.

The CBX is old enough to have a loyal following of riders and collectors who get it. And prices for these mammoth machines proves it. Prices are regularly in the teens for well-preserved or restored examples, and today's specimen has been gone through not once but twice! The forecast for CBX models continues to remain strong. They may not appreciate in value as quickly as certain homologation machines but with great examples (and parts!) becoming a bit more rare you will find that good examples will always find a home in the market. This is a long-term buy if you're looking to flip, but an awesome showcase and an interesting, classic rider. The advert claims only 2,000 miles on the restoration, but total mileage unknown. As always, RSBFS recommends you do your homework and ask questions. But there is no doubt that this example is clean, clean clean. Check it out here as there are only a few more days left to go. Bidding has been moderate, and there is still a reserve in place. Good luck!!

MI

Twice as nice: 1979 Honda CBX
Honda March 2, 2019 posted by

A Nordic Natural: 1988 Honda VFR750R RC30

The multiple motorcycle auctions in Las Vegas in January each year are somewhat of a bellwether for prices overall. Sure, pricing is a bit over-inflated due to peer-pressure, bidding competition and the general excitement of the auction atmosphere, but what sells high at these auctions will generally do well on the open market. If you've never been, you should definitely consider going - at least once. The lights, the noise, and the thousands of bikes that cross the block over multiple days and multiple auction houses are a sight to behold. It also gives you an appreciation for what is hot, and what has cooled off (or failed to make the cut). But you didn't need to attend - or even follow - this year's auctions to know that the RC30 is hot. Possibly the most collectible of the 80s vintage homologation racers, the VFR750R tops the bucket list of many, and remains on a rocket ship trajectory in terms of value. If you want one you will have to stand in line, and bring your wallet.

1988 Honda VFR750 RC30 for sale on eBay

The RC30 is known for good looks, sharp handling, and glorious sound. The latter comes courtesy of a mass-centralized V4 engine, utilizing gear-driven cams for precise valve control - which contributes to that legendary and iconic whine. The flatter sound of the RC30 exhaust is the result of a 360°crankshaft. The approach results in greater traction due to the more widely distributed power cycles (when compared with a conventional 180° crank). Everything that makes beautiful noises also helps with the sharper handling; pull the bodywork off of an RC30 and you quickly realize how packed in tight everything is. Mass centralization is the real deal, and the more you can concentrate weight centrally and down low, the easier the bike will be to flick from side to side, etc. And while those who are lucky enough to see an RC30 in its naked form will call that magical V4 beautiful, the good looks really come from the beefy aluminum twin spar frame and endurance racing inspired bodywork. The twin headlamps are straight out of the 80s, and they went straight into the book of classic looks. The single sided swing arm completes the package, and proved its worth during wheel changes at the racetrack - especially during those endurance events.

From the seller:
Selling my rc30 vfr750r, very low mileage (3553km) and extremely well take care of. 100% working order. Been standing in the living room as eye candy since bought in 2002.
Got first bought in Germany by the original owner,then driven to Monaco and back, after that parked in his office. I then later purchased it. (2002)

The bike is located in Norway (Sarpsborg).
Contact me for more info/pictures.
Price is 500,000 nok (Norwegian Kroner)
We can help with shipping.

Most RC30 we find these days are collector bikes. It is pretty rare indeed to find a RC30 thrasher, and few are regular riders. This particular bike has but 3,500 KM (2,200 miles) and appears to be in complete, original order. Which brings us to problem #1: as RC30 enthusiasts are not limited to North America, this wonderful example is located in Norway. US-based buyers might want to start consulting shipping and importation guides now. Problem #2: RC30s are no longer $15k, $20K, $25K or even $30k. The asking price on these models continues to rise. This particular example is asking well neigh on $60k. And the worst part for those that have a hankerin' for homologation is that the asking price is not really out of line with where the market is going. We have seen higher asks - much higher - and not just at auction. Check it out here. Look over the pictures. And then decide if you want to board the RC30 price elevator. We have seen nothing but up for these models with nary a dip in valuation over the years. If you want in, you best commit before these are $75k and then $100k bikes. Good Luck!!

MI

A Nordic Natural: 1988 Honda VFR750R RC30