Posts by tag: F4

MV Agusta June 3, 2019 posted by

Italian Stallion: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750

After designing the Ducati 916, Massimo Tamburini could have quite justifiably turned in his pen and waltzed into retirement with a professional accomplishment under his belt that few people will ever be blessed enough to match. But Tamburini, apparently, wanted to make sure, so he set about resurrecting an iconic Italian brand with a bike so good that it would see a 20-year production run.

2002 MV Agusta F4 750 for sale on eBay

This 2002 example is a fairly early example of the result of Tamburini’s efforts at the Cagiva Research Center to resuscitate MV. With a screaming inline four, those unmistakable four-barrel exhaust pipes and the unique star wheels, the F4 750 is everything a sportbike should be. It’s flashy, almost to the point of being gaudy. It’s fast to the point that 95% of people who ever touch the starter button will be entirely overmatched. And, most importantly, it is proudly, ferociously and unapologetically Italian.

This 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 has done 17,000 miles, and looks to have aged gracefully. There appears to be some dirt and wear here and there, but the bike is still in absolutely lovely condition. After a good checking over for maintenance, this bike would make a great summer rider.

From the eBay listing:

Now is your chance to own a very unique, historic bike, and at this price, you can afford to ride it every day. This design is known by everyone that really knows bikes, and appreciated everywhere. I get comments on this bike wherever I go- by real bike people, not teenagers at the mall.

This bike has been maintained very well, and only has 17,000 miles on it. Excellent condition! Comes with a rear service stand and a sexy MV custom bike cover. It’s got raised clip ons for a more comfortable seating position, and a license plate/turn signal eliminator kit.

When it was new, the F4 750 carried around astounding numbers, with 130 horsepower on tap and a near-170 mph top speed, numbers that are still pretty damned impressive. Today, it stands as a collectible, but usably modern sportbike. To the untrained, it’s impressive. To motorcycle fanatics, you will be the subject of envy.

Italian Stallion: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750
MV Agusta May 29, 2019 posted by

F1 Dreams: 2018 MV Agusta F4 LH44

How do you take a very exclusive motorcycle and push it over into the mega-dollars collector category? Star power always works. Just like Ducati with exclusive models based around Mike Hailwood (two of them!), Troy Bayliss, Ben Bostrom, Carl Fogarty and Ayrton Senna, Italian art dealer MV Agusta has celebrated Claudio Castiglioni, Giacomo Agostini and Ayrton Senna. Both the Ducati and MV Agusta Senna tribute bikes were used to raise funding for Senna’s foundation to care for poor children in his native Brazil. And while other F1 racers have indulged in a bit of two-wheeled motor sports, Lewis Hamilton is – to my memory – the only current driver with a bespoke motorcycle model to his name. Behold, in all its glory, the #41 of 44 Lewis Hamilton MV Agusta F4.

2018 MV Agusta F4 LH44 for sale on eBay

Reportedly built with direct input, only 44 units of this rare bike were built (Hamilton races the #44). The engine and control unit are straight from the top-spec RC (Reparto Corse) model, pulling 212 ponies in all – but for non street use only. If you abide by the rules and don’t run the superbike spec ECU or exhaust (with Hamilton’s logo and number, no less), you limit yourself to only 205 ponies. Throttle is fly by wire (no push-pull cables), which runs straight through the MV Agusta MVICS system to provide for multiple engine maps and traction control. The electronic transmission features a quick shifter as well as a slipper unit. The radial mount Brembos are also wired to a brain and offers full-race ABS and anti rear wheel lift for maximum braking capability. Tires are special Pirelli builds with a red line around the sidewall and the “LH44” logo. Slippery carbon bodywork offers Lewis Hamilton graphics, including the #44. The top speed of this 386 pound missle is listed as 302 KPH (~188 mph).

From the seller:
A very rare opportunity to purchase what is probably the only Lewis Hamilton F4 still in its crate in existence today.

This bike is number 41 of 44 units built, with Lewis himself taking three units for him and his family leaving just 41 of these incredible machines available to the worlds market.

All units were immediately snapped up, however we are particularly pleased to offer this machine for sale on behalf of our client.

NOTE: – Free Shipping via International Sea freight.

The LH44 model F4 is RARE. This is RSBFS-worthy rare, but it may not tick all the right boxes for everybody. First off, this is a pricey piece of kit – with MSRP in the $72,000 range. That is Desmosidicci D16RR territory, and you will recall that those bikes all sold quite quickly (and they continue to trade relatively strongly today). But the collector that picks a zero mile $70k+ motorcycle tends to be far different than those that covet other desirable models to ride (i.e. RC30, MHe, etc). After all, the whole purpose of this bike is to show off the LH44 branding; otherwise save yourself the $25k and pony up for the F4 RC and ride the wheels off of it. It won’t be as rare, but is every bit the LH44 equal in terms of street (or on track) performance. But if you are collecting to fill an indoor, climate controlled, hermetically sealed parking spot, this might be your bike!

With only 44 pieces available world wide and Lewis being a glutton and claiming 3 units, there are really only 41 bikes still remaining in this very exclusive collection. Today’s example is purported to still be in a crate according to the advert, and is located way down under in Christchurch, New Zealand. That is a long way to go for a US buyer, however with such rarity I’m sure prospective buyers are simply happy to find one on the open market. Asking price is $67,905 USD. It’s not often that one would think an asking price of that amount is reasonable, but its not often you can score a rare and collectible bike still new in the box at lower than MSRP. Are you looking for a bargain? International shipping is INCLUDED, and the seller is open to offers. I’d prefer more pics of the actual bike rather than MV Agusta promo shots, but there is enough there to indicate this bike is legit. Check it out here, as you won’t likely be seeing very many of these around. Good Luck!!

MI

F1 Dreams: 2018 MV Agusta F4 LH44
MV Agusta May 25, 2019 posted by

Beautiful Boy: 2000 MV Agusta F4 750

There are fast motorcycles, there are unique motorcycles, there are iconic motorcycles and there are truly beautiful motorcycles. The re-introduction of the fabled MV Agusta brand in 1999 seemingly achieved all those goals thanks to the vision of Massimo Tamburini and the might and wealth of the Cagiva Research Center.

2000 MV Agusta F4 750 for sale on eBay

Following the well-trodden path to sport bike glory, the MV Agusta F4 utilizes an in-line four cylinder engine with four-valve heads, fuel injection, and novel variable length intake runners to help control engine power across the rev range. Dubbed Torque Shift System (or TSS for short), that intake wizardry is one of two Formula 1 technologies utilized by the F4. The second is the oft-hyped hemispherical head chamber with 4-valves per cylinder. And while the hemi head and radially splayed four valves definitely maximize the airflow and flame front during combustion, neither are particularly new in terms of technology. All told the 750cc power plant was good for a stout 126 HP.

From the seller:
This motorcycle looks like is brand new…..it’s a model year 2000. 750 cc engine. sounds fantastic… bought it from the original owner who use to keep it in his own room…..always garaged and covered. it only has 3,900 original miles on it, it has good tires and all the fluids have been exchange recently. runs beautifully. it has quite a few carbon fiber pieces and the previous owner did some polishing on the engine cover, chain cover and foot pegs along with the rims… . too many things to list here. Look at the pictures and give me your thoughts about it. This one of a kind has to go to a good home. If you are looking for a unique, head-turner, clean bike, blast to ride, this is it….check what is available in the market!

In addition to the F1 technology, the F4 borrowed heavily from the fertile past of designer Tamburini. Both the single sided swing arm and the under seat exhaust are derivations of the Ducati 916 (which Tamburini also designed). The exhaust pokes out of the underside of the seat in a not-so-subtle fan out of four separate pipes, and sounds glorious. The rest of the bike relies upon yards of aluminum for the frame, beefy front forks (Showa), and a fair bit of carbon fiber flair.

The introduction of the F4 was a massive investment into technology, and the resultant bikes were as beautiful as they were fast. Limited production and high prices kept them to the exclusive territory of well-heeled riders or even better heeled collectors. Today they are available on the used bike market at more realistic prices – but still not cheap. This particular example is an early model with few miles (<4,000) and what appears to be a great deal of care bestowed upon it. With a Buy It Now price of $7,500, this bike is asking strong, but not outrageous money. The seller is open to offers, so there may be an opportunity to pull this down somewhat. With bikes of this caliber, prospective buyers would do well to find the cleanest, best example possible. I could do with less of the polished bits, but this 2000 MV Agusta F4 750 looks to be better than most we have seen in some time and is worth checking out. The full details are here. Good luck!!

MI

Beautiful Boy: 2000 MV Agusta F4 750
MV Agusta April 3, 2019 posted by

Meccanica Verghera: 2009 MV Agusta F4 1078 312RR

Originally conceived as an aviation company, famed motorcycle marque MV Augusta turned to the two-wheeled world after World War II in a move to survive European post war economics. With transportation being a key element and need, the firm began at the small end of the spectrum and only grew from there. From transportation to bikes with more sporting intent to reaching the very pinnacle of the racing scene, MV Agusta has long been a powerhouse in the motorcycling community. And it is a community; many of the early employees of MV Agusta were from the family aviation business. And let’s not forget Claudio Castiglioni’s involvement in the firm, having been at the helm during more than one of the corporate turnarounds. It is the latter incarnations of the company that produced the F4 (the world’s most beautiful motorcycle according to some) and from that F4 spawned many special models. One such rarity was the hyper 312RR.

2009 MV Agusta F4 1078 312RR for sale on eBay

If speed is king, the MV Agusta F4 312RR set out to become the ruler of the land. The name of the bike – 312 – refers to the top speed in kilometers per hour. That equates to about 194 MPH in Americanese. The 312RR started life out as a F4 1000 R model, and MV-A engineers played with internals to pile on the horsepower. The original 312R (2007 – only a single R) offered a stout 9 HP increase over the already-over-the-top standard R bike. The second generation model (2009 – two Rs in the name) offered the 1078cc engine and 190 horses – another 7+ over the previous gen. By 2010 the top speed party was all over, the final version of the bike being mechanically the same Gen II machine, but with “312 RR Edizione Finale” graphics and exclusivity generated by only 30 units total.

From the seller:
Very Rare 2009 Mv Agusta F4 1078 312RR in perfect condition, Priced to sell fast as im moving, only 1799 miles, bike is from North Carolina Dealership and has a North Carolina title and the bill of sale, bike is hand made in Italy engine was made by Ferrari 190 hp fast is a understatement best handling bike ever. I didn’t like the original seat so a changed it to red black and silver suede and leather , looks great and feels better. Too much to say I’m selling my baby and a few others in my collection New tires on it and just serviced needs nothing and in Brand new condition never in rain.. Serious buyers please, questions please ask. bike will sell. The bike comes with the stand all keys books, alarm, gps, charger and cover. Can arrange shipping for a extra fee. Bike is located in Miami Florida. North Carolina Clear Title.

The 312RR is undoubtedly rare-ish out in the real world. Part of this is due to the low volume production of MV Agusta, and the limited number of units bestowed upon the various editions. The other part if it is that these were simply horrendously expensive motorcycles to begin with. Often branded as the Ferrari or Lamborghini of motorcycles, F4 Limited Edition models had sticker prices 4x or more when compared to the more readily available (and serviceable) Japanese cutting-edge sport bikes. That kept ownership numbers low, and exclusivity high. The downside is that several MV Agusta models have not really translated that exclusivity into resale dollars. While stronger than contemporary Japanese peers on the resale side, the ratio has certainly dropped. This is true for the base F4 models as well as some of the lesser special editions – although the Senna, CC, and Claudio continue to hold value (or appreciate).

This particular 312RR looks very, very good. Mileage is low, and at least from the pictures there are no major red flags. The opening bid is a very fair (low?) $8k, which means that you could be riding away on an iconic Italian machine for a song. Sure, the 312RR will be eclipsed by more modern machinery (time has a way of putting everything in its place), but this is still a damn fine motorcycle that will exceed the limits of most riders – and looks 200 MPH even when sitting still. We will ignore the controversy regarding the actual top speed of the bike given the majority of our readers are in the US where limits are much, much lower. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on the F4. Any 312R or RR owners out there? Share your stories. Good Luck!!

MI

Meccanica Verghera: 2009 MV Agusta F4 1078 312RR
Honda March 30, 2019 posted by

Low Tech, Big Fun: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale

When the original “jellymould” CBR600F Hurricane was introduced in 1987 the enclosed, sleekly aerodynamic fairing hid a dark secret: a steel frame. While racier competitors had switched to lightweight aluminum construction, the simple, effective CBR600 F3 stuck with the less expensive material until the CBR600 F4 was introduced in 1999. Although the styling was hyper-modern, it also helped Honda save money on manufacturing and development costs. Instead of a finished frame and engine cases, or carefully routed wiring and hoses, the whole functional mess could all just be hidden behind relatively cheap, sleek plastic. So while pragmatism may have driven the design and the ingredients were, on their own, not very exotic, the complete package was a world-beater when it was introduced.

Produced between 1995 and 1998, the F3 was an evolution of the earlier CBR600 F2. Compared to that bike, it offered adjustable cartridge forks, a Pro-Link rear, and and ram-air to feed the engine. The result was a few more ponies from the 599cc inline four and a 454lb wet weight. That might sound heavy for a 600, but it was just a couple pounds heavier than a ZX-6R or GSX-R600 of the same period, and actually a good bit lighter than the aluminum-framed YZF600. At a claimed 105hp, peak power wasn’t best-in-class either, but the CBR offered a smooth spread of power with no real dips or flat spots, the perfect balance in a road engine and pretty handy on track as well.

The CBR600 was always pitched as a more versatile mount than competitors from Suzuki and Kawasaki, a bike that was at home in the canyons, in the city, and could even do a bit of commuting or light touring. The CBR600 was never really about the numbers, it was about the complete package, a sort of Goldilocks solution to the Supersport problem. It didn’t make the most in-class horsepower. It wasn’t the lightest. It didn’t have much in the way of headline-stealing innovation. It didn’t even have any acronyms plastered across the fairings!

It also made a perfectly good foundation for a racebike, winning multiple AMA SuperSport Championships, and didn’t seem to suffer at all for its relatively ordinary underpinnings. Eventually, the entire class became more and more track focused, and led to the development of the CBR600RR that was sold alongside the CBR600 F4i as a direct alternative to the high-strung offerings from Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Yamaha. But for a while, Honda’s versatile CBR meant you really could have your cake and eat it too.

This particular machine needs a bit of maintenance before it time-warps you back to your youth, but the miles are shockingly low for such a practical machine, and it looks to be in exceptional cosmetic condition. It may never be as desirable as a CBR900, but I these are certainly functional classics and much more attainable, since prices for the bigger machine are currently spiraling upwards and nice examples are hard to find.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale

Hello, up for sale is my 1997 Honda CBR600F3 with 2,916 orig miles.  Clean title in hand in my name. Bought it 4 years ago and spent lots of time and money trying to make it near perfect (it’s the same model, year and color as what I had in college so it was me trying to relive my youth). Sadly, my bad back in combination with it being too dangerous for a slow, fat guy like myself to ride in Vegas forces the sale.  I have all receipts and replaced parts baggies/boxes for every OEM part I put on it. I saved the old parts to prove it wasn’t wrecked. Feel free to contact me to see it in person 850-five 86-38two8.  Not showroom perfect but damn nice for a 1997! PS: front chock included!

The bad: carbs need to be cleaned. Ran fine in 2014 and I did drain bowls before tear down but no luck in getting it started. Needs battery too as no point in buying one and letting it rot.

The good: over $1,000 in brand new parts. No cracked fairings at all!

  • Brand new oil and filter
  • Brand New Dunlop Q3s with not 1 mile on them – $285 mounted
  • New Ariete 90degree valve stems in gold – $29
  • Powder coated rims in gold – $175

The following all new OEM parts

  • Front lower chin – $35
  • Left side lower fairing – $374
  • Alternator cover and gasket – $69
  • Parts below over $400
  • Various OEM decals still new in OEM packing for spares – $149

The CBR600 may have been anything but exotic, but that was exactly the point: it was an everyman sportbike, and it was damn good at being that. The shape has aged pretty well I think, and the non-standard gold-painted wheels really flatter the Erion Racing-inspired colors. It’s a shame that this attempt to capture the seller’s youth has been put up for sale, but his loss is your gain! Can you really put a price on reliving the dreams of your youth? Apparently you can, and those dreams are going to cost you $3,950.00. That Buy It Now price is obviously on the high-end for an F3, but if this one is as nice in person as it looks in pictures, I think you’d be hard-pressed to find a better example with so few miles.

-tad

Low Tech, Big Fun: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale
MV Agusta December 1, 2018 posted by

Understated bruiser: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750S

When Massimo Tamburini was done laying waste to the sportbike world with the sinewy beauty and kneecap shattering performance of the Ducati 916, he wasted no time in returning to the Cagiva Research Center to one-up himself. The resulting MV Agusta F4 series plucked heart strings and squeezed adrenal glands in a totally different way, but its 20-year run as a pinup, racer and peerless track toy are evidence that Tamburini was a man whose talents knew no ceiling.

2002 MV Agusta F4S for sale on eBay

This 2002 MV Agusta F4S has the ’02 evolution engine, which pushed out nearly 140 horsepower at the crank, up from just shy of 130 in the earlier bikes. This one is as bog-standard as MV Agusta F4s get, with no special packages or limited-edition packages. It is just a simple, classy Italian rocketship in its purest form. Down to the fantastic, classy and stone-simple livery, everything about these turn of the century MVs is classy.

The seller says this example is basically in showroom condition, and the digital dash shows fewer than 3,000 miles. From the photos, the bike looks very clean and well kept, with one or two little exceptions. The lovely stock exhaust has been replaced with a set of carbon fiber jobs that have been relieved of their emblems. The seller spends the description gushing about F4s in general and doesn’t mention who made the pipes or what happened to the stock ones.

From the eBay listing:

One of the most beautiful motorcycles ever produced and a testament to Tamburini’s engineering skills. Buy an MV and you really do get your own personal slice of the legend. An F4 to look at, to polish…and to admire.
An incredible slice of Italian exotica.
Mechanically reliable with a build quality that rivals any manufacturer, the MV Augusta F4 750 S is as stunning to ride as it is to look at.

With an engine derived from a Ferrari F1 engine, the 750S rides as good as it looks.

As an objet d’art, an icon, a talisman, F4S is peerless. As a modern high-end sportbike its performance is legendary.

Through fast, sweeping corners, the F4’s slot-car stability, grippy Pirellis and effectively limitless cornering clearance permit as much speed and lean
angle as your skill and personal sphincter calibration can tolerate. If cornering speed is the name of the game, you’re looking at a major player. Still, this is a
motorcycle that goes fast on its own rules, not yours. Carve your way through corners. No flicking. The F4 responds best to firm input, and not just through the bars. Weight that inside peg. Push the fuel tank with your outside knee. Relative to the average Japanese sportbike, it’s like learning a new instrument. The tighter the road, the more effort it takes to make beautiful music together.

This 2002 750S is as clean as you’ll ever find. Virtually flawless in near-showroom condition with only 2817 miles.

Marin Speed Shop is the San Francisco Bay Area’s premier Ducati, Triumph and Vespa dealer. We also specialize in rare and vintage and custom motorbikes.

All of our pre-owned inventory had been through a thorough multi-point inspection and comes with a 30 day warranty.

Extended warranties are available on most models

We can provide financing from one of our many lenders and can also arrange shipping.

Email us for more details

The $8,400 asking price is probably on the optimistic side even for such a low-mile F4S, but I won’t be shocked if it grabs every bit of it.

Understated bruiser: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750S
MV Agusta July 27, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300 for Sale

7.25.2018: Josh has decided to upgrade this post to a Featured Listing. New asking price is $15k and interested parties can contact him here: jahshua@me.com

As much as I love the MV Agusta F4 750 in the classic red-and-silver colors, it’s nice to know that it also looks pretty good in basic black-and-grey. Or flat-black. Or silver-and-blue, or… Reportedly, the design for the MV Agusta F4 was originally intended by Massimo Tamburini as the replacement for the venerable Ducati 916. And I’m sure in retrospect, Ducati very much wishes it had worked out that way, considering the reactions to their Pierre Terblanche-penned 999…

When it was introduced, I was a little disappointed that the new MV was powered by an inline four, instead of a v-twin. But the F4’s radial-valved engine has a much more exotic quality than other four-cylinder engines: they sound sort of generically inline-y as they go by, but the pilot is treated to a much more complex noise. Or maybe I’m just infatuated.

In any event, this particular F4 is powered by the earlier, 749cc version of the engine. A claimed 126hp meant the MV was making the right power to compete in the 750cc class, but there were really two problems. One, it was also a bit heavier than other bikes in the class. And two, interest in the 750 class basically evaporated right as the F4 was introduced. Sure, Suzuki still made a GSX-R750, but it lived in the shadow of the new superbike king, the GSX-R1000. And the F4 750 couldn’t hope to compete against performance like that.

F4s show up regularly for sale with incredibly low miles, which reinforces the bike’s reputation for a punishing riding position. It also points out that they get bought as display items more than actual bikes. Which is sad, because they’re pretty great, rewarding sportbikes. If you’re expecting this to flatten your eyeballs, you will be very disappointed, and the F4 is hard, and uncomfortable, and very serious. Handling is more stable than agile, but the potential is there for a seriously rapid bike, if you’re willing to deal with the uncompromising ergos and bit of extra weight.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300

The MV Agusta F4 was the motorcycle that launched the resurrection of MV Agusta in 1998. The F4 model was created by motorcycle designer Massimo Tamburini at CRC (Cagiva Research Center), following his work on the Ducati 916. 

The F4 series bikes have a four pipe undertail exhaust, single-sided swingarm, large front forks (50 mm diameter) and traditional MV Agusta red and silver livery on the F4 Series Oro. The F4 model is also one of the few production superbikes to have hemispherical chamber 4 valves per cylinder engine.

After meeting and becoming friends, Formula One Racing Legend, Ayrton Senna and MV Agusta President, Claudio Castiglioni began a close collaboration. Borne of a mutual passion for speed, performance, and the painstaking quest for excellence, their friendship continued to grow. 

Today this spirit continues, embodied in the form of a very special motorcycle, the MV Agusta SPR SENNA. Based upon the SPR’s increased performance and capability, the SENNA edition is further distinguished by its limited production (only 50 imported into the USA) and exclusive black color, distinctive red accents, and SENNA graphics.

The SENNA was produced in a limited worldwide quantity of 300 units worldwide, with proceeds benefiting the SENNA Foundation. 

The SENNA Foundation was created to assist in improving the lives of over 300,000 Brazilian children and contributes 100% of its proceeds to the development and implementation of social programs.

The F4 750 Senna was released in 2002 and is rated at 0-60 2.9 quarter mile 10.7 @ 135. The Senna was a limited production run of 300 bikes like the orginal F4 Series Oro. The Senna shared the 136 hp (101 kW) engine of the Evo 02 but with a higher redline of13900 rpm, and top speed estimated at 175 mph (282 km/h) @ 12750 rpm . The Senna also had some suspension upgrades and some carbon fiber bodywork compared to other MVs. 

MSRP was $24,995 in 2002. Only 50 units of 300 produced worldwide arrived in the USA and this one with only 188 miles is arguably the finest Senna available anywhere!

7.25.2018: Additional note from the seller:

A little background why I’m selling these bikes is that I am raising capital to start a business for the first time in my life so I need to trim the fat sort to speak. The Senna F4 is by far the cleanest most beautiful bike I’ve ever owned.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300 for Sale
MV Agusta June 15, 2018 posted by

Naked Super Sport – 2005 MV Agusta Brutale 750S

MV’s 749cc Brutale was their first dabble in the naked sector after Cagiva’s investment, and the F4 sportbike without fairings has stood the test of time and a few engine updates.  Compared to more specialized Agustas, the 750S or Strada used little carbon or magnesium but imprinted a very sporty feel and sound on the rider.  This example has just under 11,000 miles and should prove to be a nice introduction to the MV world.

2005 MV Agusta Brutale 750S

Coming over from the F4 750 in a slightly less peaky tune, the Brutale’s engine still makes 127 hp at a lofty 12,500 rpm.  The chrom-moly trellis suspends the engine from above and is hung with 49mm Showa forks.  The 4-1-2 exhaust isn’t constrained under the seat and makes its exit across from the single sided swingarm.  The aluminum frame connectors, and plastic fender and covers were a small step down from the Serie Oro, but adjustable suspension and 6-piston Nissin brakes reflect the overall quality.

This Brutale has just a few modifications, includes a rear stand, and its original catalyst for a prospective Cali buyer.  Replacing the patina-ed ignition switch cover would be a quick way to improve things.  The Pennsylvania owner keeps it short in the eBay auction:

Garage kept, 3rd adult owner, never raced, never dropped.
Everything in pictures goes with bike, plus correct oil and filters.
Mid pipe installed, but CAT comes with bike
Non OEM mirrors installed, OEM mirrors also along with sale.
Rear tire has less than 100 miles.

Reviewed as sweet handling and smooth, it doesn’t have much of the cruel and ruthless the name implies.  It tackles the difficulties of hiding the plumbing and bracketry with a lot of style, and comes off a lot sportier in person.  This example seems about the middle of the pack, substantially stock but not fawned over, and unless the reserve is out of line, on target for a reasonable price…

-donn

Naked Super Sport – 2005 MV Agusta Brutale 750S
MV Agusta May 18, 2018 posted by

Handsome Brute: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

Launched at almost the same time, MV Agusta’s Brutale has always lived in the sleeker F4’s shadow. Styling aside, it was just a little bit lower-spec, a little less focused, a little too practical. Like that’s a dirty word. I happen to love the design, although it’s hard to argue that the F4 isn’t a better-looking bike. But you have to suffer for that sublime style. The fact is, as much as I love the F4, it’s hard work: the riding position puts lots of weight over the front wheel, the pegs are high, and the suspension is stiff. The Brutale, while by no means plush, certainly can feel that way after spending time on an F4. Which makes sense, since the F4 was designed for the track. For the road? It honestly doesn’t get much better for canyon hooliganism than the Brutale.

Like the original F4 750, the Brutale 750S was considered by some to be “too slow,” as if 127 high-strung horses in a lightweight naked bike with a nearly dirt-track riding position isn’t a recipe for a good time. The 910R seen here followed the original Brutale and displaced… 910cc. At 136hp, claimed power isn’t up all that much, but midrange is improved and honestly, it’s all the power you need in a naked road bike. Seriously, who is riding these things and really thinks they’re not fast enough? Sure, moar power is great and all, but the later 1078 and 1090 versions just seem like overkill, making the 910R the Goldilocks of the Brutale range: not too fast, not too slow. Just right.

The seller of this very clean example mentions a Titanium exhaust, and it looks like a set of beautiful headers and a de-cat link pipe have been fitted, but the bike retains the original “shotgun” style end-cans. Not the worst choice, as the aftermarket never really did come up with anything that looks quite as elegant as these slash-cut bits, although the actual openings in the ends do look kind of… inadequate. But if you’re worried about a lack of noise, trust me: this one probably isn’t all that quiet.

The only problem I see here is a lack of a Power Commander. MV’s of this era can generally use fueling help. They’re typically very lean through most of the rev range, then run overly rich at the top end. It makes sense, given limited development resources and the fairly crude technology available when the bike was introduced, but an aftermarket fueling module and some dyno time gives the instant response and fluid midrange the bike was always designed to have. It’s perfectly rideable without one, but is well worth the investment.

From the original eBay listing: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

Selling an MV Agusta Brutale 910R in excellent condition

KBB value at $5880 without considering the premium extras we have here. Price firm.

With top notch quality accessories
1. Titanium exhaust
2. Stock carbon fiber body parts (from MV Agusta)
3. Rizoma mirrors
4. CRG clutch and brake levers
5. MV Agusta cover and upright stand
6. Trickle charger

Title status: clean 
Transmission: manual 

Never down or raced/tracked. Low miles:4890 !!! 
Serviced at Ducati dealer every time.
Have the stock exhaust as well.

Have title in my name.

Good to know the title is clean, but did the seller really need to tell us the transmission is a “manual”? Does a constant-mesh, sequential gearbox even qualify as a manual? The seller also seems pretty impressed by all the “premium extras” included but honestly, this is basically a stock bike, by MV Agusta standards. And that’s really the appeal of this one: it’s clean, looks very sleek in the unusual black, and hasn’t been messed with too much, although the missing Power Commander is something I’d rectify as soon as possible if it were mine. Is it worth the maintenance hassles? Well that’s a different story: a Street or Speed Triple certainly handles as well, has plenty of character, and is much easier to maintain. I’d like to say those bikes are less expensive as well, except at the moment they’re not: the asking price for this particularly nice Brutale is $5,999. That’s pretty much bang-on for a good 910 these days, but Brutales in general are a screaming deal, considering the looks and performance. Anyone have $6,000 they can loan me?

-tad

Handsome Brute: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale