Posts by tag: endurance racer

Featured Listing March 31, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC

In case you thought race replicas were a recent innovation, Laverda set the world on it’s ear some 50 years ago, with its 750 Super Freni Competizione, first in endurance racing, and then on the road.  Presented by a Seattle area restorer, this 750 SFC has been restored to museum quality and is ready for its next display.

1974 Laverda 750 SFC for sale

A development of Laverda’s 650cc parallel twin ( itself a template of Honda’s 305 ), the 750 SFC immediately did well in competition, and was made in rather small lots from 1971-75.  For 1974, the factory blue-printed engine with two 36mm Dell’Orto carbs and 9.9-to-1 compression made a reliable 75 hp with Bosch electronic ignition.  The classic nickel plated chassis held the engine from above as a stressed member, stabilizing the 38mm forks with their Super Freni ( Super Brakes ) 280mm disks.  Orange was adopted as Laverda’s competition color at some point in the early 1970’s, and the small seat and long range tank on the SFC appear to have been the inspiration more than one generation of café racers.

Evidently a previous owner started the restoration using all factory Laverda parts, and Duncan has these notes about the SFC and this example in particular :

A Production Racer For Sale

Laverda 750 SFs achieved notable endurance racing success in 1970, including a win of the 500km of Monza, a 1-2-3 podium sweep at the 24 Hours of Oss in Holland, and a third and sixth in the Bol d’Or in France. These bikes improved incrementally, but so did the competition. By the end of the year, Massimo asked Luciano Zen to think about a production racer version of the Laverda 750 SF.

In May 1971, the Laverda 750 SFC, for (Super Freni Competizion) was launched. Compared to the 750 SF, the engine was extensively modified. The reworked cylinder head had bigger valves and a new cam profile (designated 2/C), rockers were polished and 36mm Amal concentric carbs replaced the 30mm Dell’Ortos. A close-ratio five-speed was fitted, and the crankshaft and rods were carefully balanced and polished. Power output was rated at 70hp, and each engine was dyno tested to ensure output. The frame was strengthened with gussets and the front brake was either standard Laverda item or an optional Ceriani four-leading-shoe unit. The bikes ran on Dunlop K81 TT100 tires.

Bodywork was also new, with a 23-liter (6.1 gallon) handmade aluminum gas tank, a single seat with fiberglass tail section and a half fairing, all painted in the now-famous bright orange, a color selected to make the bikes easy to spot on the track, especially at night. It was also chosen to please the Dutch importer, Jan Raymakers, orange being the national color of the Netherlands.

Laverda 750 SFC models were produced in small batches between 1971 and 1975. The first batch, built in May 1971, numbered about 20 bikes, all intended for factory competition. SFCs were hand built by a small team and with little regard to cost. They were built to meet exceptional standards of performance, and in particular were intended to excel in endurance races, where bulk and a relative lack of nimbleness would not be so much of a handicap and where their great strength and robustness would give them a competitive advantage.

In their first official race in 1971, the Six Hours of Zeltweg, SFCs finished first and second. That year, SFCs also placed first, third and fourth in the 24 Hours of Montjuic in Barcelona, first and third in the 24 Hours of Oss, and first in Vallelunga (Italy). They also placed second at the Bol d’Or in Le Mans, first and second at Imola, and finished first and second in the 500km of Modena. Not bad for the first year.

In November 1971, 80 more SFCs were produced, and some were sold to the public. The aluminum gas tank was now fiberglass (the alloy ones had a tendency to crack), and the bikes had revised gearbox ratios and exhaust systems. They also had a new Laverda drum brake, with the more effective Ceriani a popular option. Another batch of SFCs were produced in early 1972, with slight changes to the shape of the fairing and seat and a new exhaust with a crossover pipe.

By this time, the Japanese had made significant progress in the development of their machines, and while there were SFC victories in 1972, they did not match the stellar performance of 1971. Only three 750 SFCs were made in 1973, and these served as test beds for radical changes like magnesium crankcases, new cylinder head designs and even lighter crankshafts. The results were not impressive, the bikes becoming more fragile and difficult to ride.

1974 would see the largest single-year run of SFCs. For the first time, the Laverda 750 SFC was considered part of the normal product range offered to the public and was no longer reserved solely for racing. The SFC was promoted as a “Production Racer,” similar to Ducati’s 750SS or Norton’s Commando-based production racers, and the changes were numerous. The bodywork was improved, and the zinc-plated frame was lowered and modified with revised steering geometry, larger front forks, and triple 280mm Brembo disc brakes. A new, strengthened close-ratio gearbox was fitted and the engine was enhanced by a lightened crankshaft, slim, polished connecting rods, a new camshaft (5/C), a higher capacity oil pump, new 36mm Dell’Orto carbs (without accelerator pumps), modified valves and valve springs, a new exhaust system and higher, 9.9:1 compression ratio. Power was now rated at 75hp at 7,500rpm.

A total of 222 SFCs were built in 1974, with slightly less than half of them going to the U.S. To comply with federal regulations, U.S. models had turn signals, bigger taillights, side reflectors, adjustable handlebars and Nippon-Denso speedometers and tachometers. Even though the bike was being sold to privateers in 1974, factory-prepared racers were performing well in the national production class races.

During the 5 year production run, a total of 549 were made. The SFC being offered is one of only 100 SFCs made for the North American market in 1974. According to well-known SFC expert Marnix van der Schalk (in correspondence with the previous owner), the factory records state it was shipped to the USA on July 8, 1974.

The last version of the SFC was the 1975 Laverda SFC Elettronica, its name reflecting its Bosch electronic ignition. It had a new cylinder head, revised valve angles, re-shaped combustion chambers and a new, optional high-lift cam with 10.5:1 compression ratio. A contemporary magazine test produced a 12.5 second quarter mile at 180kph (top speed over 220kph). A final batch of 33 SFC Elettronicas featuring five-spoke cast-alloy wheels were built in 1976.

The following is a list of much of the work commissioned by the previous owner and performed by Ron Small in 2002-2003, with the invoices totaling nearly $6,000.  Previous owner noted that all replacement parts used on the bike were authentic Laverda SFC parts purchased from Wolfgang Haerter at Columbia Car and Cycle in British Columbia, Canada (receipts totaling $1,000).

Motor:

Re-sleeved cylinders

bore and size cylinders

valve job

new valve springs

new valve guides

new cam chain

new cam tensioner

new guide wheel

new rings

blast and clean heads

Cam and timing set correct.

 

Other items:

new gas tank

sealed new tank 

paint new tank

new fork seals

new swing arm bushings

paint swing arm

rebuild brake master cylinders

new clutch cable

new throttle cables

new tires

new brakes

Subsequent to the work being completed at Maximum Effort, the previous owner only rode the bike 900 miles. The current owner has ridden it less than 100 miles. It has spent the past 13 years on display in a climate-controlled garage. 

There is no knowing if the 6753 miles showing on the odometer is the actual mileage, but the condition of the bike, combined with the minimal miles ridden by the current and previous owner in the past 20 years would lend credibility to that number. 

There is a small amount of surface rust on center stand.

Recently recommissioned for the road, it has a new battery, new fluids, top end adjust and inspection. Carburation adjustments and tune. Bike has had complete nut and bolt, safety inspection and test ridden. 

Tires are 15-20 years old.  They are not dry rotted, but if the bike is going to be ridden, changing them would be a good idea. 

For at least the past 20 years, this SFC has been adult owned, never down, always maintained by marquee knowledgeable technicians. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.

Being offered at $49,950 in US Funds. Will assist on Worldwide Shipping.

 Email sennaducati79@gmail.com your contact numbers for an immediate return call. 

Duncan asks $49,950 and reminds readers – This bike is absolutely correct, adult owned, never down, never abused, maintained by the best techs, riders in the business. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.  He can be reached via email – here –.

Early in the 1970’s the orange bikes sometimes captured multiple podium spots at championship events like Bol d’Or and Suzuka 8 Hours, but increasing competition from the east made it more of an occasion as the decade wore on.  Mostly made a handful at a time, production peaked at 222 in 1974, and total production is said to be 549.  As happens to race bikes, few survive to be restored, and just 100 of the federalized SFC’s were said to be imported in 1974.  But the SFC put Laverda in the exclusive company of a leading motorcycle manufacturer.  Duncan requests offers via email – here –.

-donn

Featured Listing:  1974 Laverda 750 SFC
Featured Listing November 4, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing – 1983 Honda CB1100R

Update 11.4.2020: Price lowered to $27,000. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Honda went endurance racing in the early 1980’s, to learn things there was really no other way to know, with long stretches of Wide Open Throttle for unlimited class machines.  RSBFS reader Par brought this homologation special home from Europe and has had it tuned to match the very nice cosmetics.

1983 Honda CB1100R for sale in Phoenix

Though it has passing similarities to the CB1100F and 900F, the CB1100R is engineered for long weekends at the track.  With 10:1 compression and upgraded cams, the 1100R would like premium or race gas to get to its rated 120hp.  The engine is rigidly mounted as a stressed part of the chassis, which helps handling but transmits more vibration to the rider.  The twin rear shocks and right-side-up forks denote the decade, both multi-adjustable.  Four piston calipers are fed by braided lines but the disks are more exotic, 296mm of cast stainless with internal venting.  Gold anodized Comstar wheels were wide for the day, at 2.5 and 3.0 inches.  Hand-laid carbon fiber was used for the fairings, and there is a theoretical pillion ( required for homologation ) under the tail fairing.

Par is a longtime fan of the CB1100R, and knows their strengths and foibles.  Surprisingly stock, right down to the black-finished muffler.  Along with its rarity and very good condition, the bombproof build and recent maintenance can give the new owner confidence in the ride.

Par’s comments on the CB1100R:

Very rare 1983 CB1100R for sale.  To my knowledge it’s the only one in the states.

I used to have one of these bikes that I bought new in 1983 and rode for several years and from that point on it has always been my favorite bike. I was over working in Europe last year and found this bike for sale and could not resist buying it. I was not disappointed, it still rides like a dream. The bike is not mint but in very good shape for a bike that is almost 40 years old. After I brought it back I had mechanics go through the bike very thoroughly and all I ended up having to do was having the valves adjusted properly, rebuilt/cleaned the carburetors and rebuilt the rear brake. It now runs and rides as new and is 100% stock. And has 92,400 kilometers on it.

Registered in Arizona.


Extremely Rare Classic Collectable.  Only 1500 full-powered CB1100R D series were built and none were imported into the U.S. The B and C series were only 100 hp.

The RD is painted in pearlescent red, white and blue. The engine covers are painted in gloss black, the gold covers received a much deeper color than the earlier models. The engine shares many parts with the CB1100F bike. The rear swing arm is made of rectangular steel painted silver.

“The ‘R’ bikes were produced in limited quantities from 1981 to 1983 to compete in factory endurance racing in Europe. They have been touted as “the ultimate peak of development for the DOHC, air-cooled, twin shock, across-the-frame four.” and dominated their racing class in 81, 82 & 83. To this day, they are considered comparable to many “modern” sport bikes. Only a few lucky people in the United States will be privileged to own a CB1100R-D as they were never officially made available for the U.S. market.”

Honda was very successful with these bikes in the famous Isle of Man TT races and they were piloted by legendary riders such as Wayne Gardner, “Rocket” Ron Haslam and Joey Dunlop.

Par asks $27,000 for his CB1000R and welcomes offers by email – here –.

Honda did well with the CB1100R, especially in Australian and New Zealand 6-hour events, the Bol D’Or and the Isle of Man.  The clock keeps ticking however, and Honda adopted their V-4 for 1984 and brought the VF1000R.  But even the homologation special wasn’t the “endurance racer for the road” that the CB1100R was, and 1981-83 models are a distinct moment in Honda history.  Par’s sorted example looks ready to bring that experience to the next owner.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1983 Honda CB1100R
Kawasaki April 20, 2018 posted by

Un-Green – 1990 Kawasaki ZX7 H2

Kawasaki threw a spanner into the manufacturer ID-by-color system with this black and gray metallic harlequin.  The green was for guys who wanted you to know they were on an H2 Ninja, a lower-cost challenger to the RC30 in the race-on-Sunday-sell-on-Monday sweepstakes.  This example had a couple of close shaves but has been studiously rejuvenated.

1990 Kawasaki ZX7 H2 for sale on eBay

The ZX7 was Kawasaki’s passport to the AMA Superbike Championship with the RR variant, but the base model H2 had great power with the 748cc four supplying 107 hp.  The CAD designed twin spar chassis was massive and supported fully adjustable Uni-track monoshock and the last year of 43mm right-side-up forks.  The flex tubes supplied fresh air to the updated engine, and countless vacuuming jokes.

The owner has put improved running with a jet kit, and battled the NLA demons of the water pump, bodywork, and exhaust shields.  Each repair found a way forward, looking good except for the exhaust which cries out for a NOS Muzzy.  From the eBay listing:

Given the bike’s age and mileage it has survived exceedingly well. The finish on the alloy parts, the painted engine cases and wheels and, of course, on the plastics is very nice. There is a small, chafed area in the paint atop the tank; aft and to the right. It is responding to hand polishing with Maguire’s #6 Polish/Wax and gets better every time I go after it. There’s one of those clear adhesive paint savers on the back of the tank which seems to have protected the paint as it shows some scratches. Every time I walk up to the bike, it puts a smile on my face; it is a very handsome motorcycle and I’m sure I’ll miss it when it’s gone. As seen in the pictures, all the original pieces are there; windshield, grips, levers, reflectors, exhaust, solo seat cowl, tool kit and Owner’s Manual. The guy who owned the bike before me obviously cared for the bike, (despite the drop…but it’s happened to all of us, right?) while not being shy about riding the thing; it looks like a much lower-mileage bike.

Doug Chandler and Scott Russell combined for four AMA Superbike crowns in the 1990’s, the road machine close to the racer at least with precise handling, a tough riding position and hard suspension.  The overall stock appearance works in this Ninja’s favor, and the monochrome livery is a quiet attention-getter.  The owner states that the ask is just that, and the Make Offer button is ready…

-donn

 

 

 

Un-Green – 1990 Kawasaki ZX7 H2
Honda August 11, 2015 posted by

Low-Mileage Endurance-Racer: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale

1985 Honda VF1000R R Side

Introduced in 1985, the Honda VF1000R could be thought of as a precursor to the legendary RC30, a low-production V4 homologation special. But while the later Honda sportbike is one of the most desirable machines of the modern era, the big VF has languished largely forgotten, although interest and values are on the rise.

1985 Honda VF1000R L Side FairingSpecifications are impressive: gears replaced the previous cam-chains in the 998cc V4, anti-dive TRAC forks improved braking, and modular Comstar wheels could be fitted with radical radial tires. Quick-release axles made racing tire-changes a simple affair and even the rear disc was vented. Note: not cross-drilled, vented.

1985 Honda VF1000R Front

Unfortunately, although the resulting machine was capable of an honest 150mph, the nearly 600lb wet weight made it less than brilliant, and the bike never captured riders’ imaginations the way later V4 Honda sportbikes did.

1985 Honda VF1000R Clocks

The VF1000R was only built for two years, and the 1986 model featured a more European twin-headlight design not seen here, but that desirable option shouldn’t detract from the value, considering the fresh-from-the-crate condition and non-existent mileage. With just 249 miles on the clock, this machine isn’t even broken in.

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale

In 1985 Honda introduced the VF1000R.  It was a two-year model.  It was the most glamorous, limited edition, super sport bike of its time.  With the full fairing and racy red, white and blue paint work, it looks like a street legal competition bike.

This museum quality bike is part of a retired CEO’s collection.  He is reducing his inventory of bikes.  This pristine bike has been given “loving care”.  It has been stored in a garage and only has 249 miles.  It has been mechanically maintained over the years and has clean carbs, fresh fuel, new battery and fresh hydraulics.  EVERYTHING works like new.  The original tires show no wear or age cracks.  The bike matches Honda’s original specifications..

This bike is impressively fast, sophisticated and reliable with its carbon fiber reinforced fairing, adjustable alloy handlebars and quick change front tire. Honda spared no expense building this bike.

This bike oozes Honda quality from every pore and will make a great bike for a collector – it is stunning! This bike is a show stopper. (see photos).  Bike is stored in Birmingham, Alabama. 

This bike became the forerunner of the popular Honda VFR series V-four sports bike which has won “bike of the year” awards for decades and is still a motorcycling favorite today

1985 Honda VF1000R R Side Front

Bidding is up to almost $9,000 as I write this, pretty serious money for a VFR1000R. But this may be one of the nicest in existence, and it’s certainly one of the lowest-mileage. Take a look at that shot of the dash: I can’t remember seeing a bike of this vintage with such a clean instrument cluster: it basically looks brand-new.

1985 Honda VF1000R Seat

It used to be that I found all these 80s sportbikes to be a bit awkward and chunky, but they’re really starting to grow on me, particularly this one: big, powerful, and sophisticated, I bet this’d be a fun machine for weekend blasts up the Pacific Coast Highway…

-tad

1985 Honda VF1000R L Side

Low-Mileage Endurance-Racer: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale
Honda December 20, 2014 posted by

Old School Endurance Racer: 1985 Honda VF1000R

1985 Honda VF1000R L Side

Honda’s VF1000R was from a fascinating transitional period in sportbike design, as companies moved away from racebikes based on big, heavy roadbikes like the Wes Cooley Suzuki and Kawasaki ELR to bikes like the lithe and lightweight GSX-R and ZX-7. This hulking brute has the monoshock rear and fully-faired look of those later bikes, but scaled up to almost epic proportions. Clearly meant for endurance racing, the VF1000R was a technological tour de force that showcased Honda’s technical brilliance, but ended up being less than the sum of its parts.

1985 Honda VF1000R R Side Detail

Powered by a 998cc V4 that made 117 claimed horses that could push the bike to almost 150mph, the bike was built to homologate bits for Honda’s endurance-racing bikes, and included revised heads that chucked the “F” version’s cam-drive chains for a set of precision gears. Other race-oriented bits included Honda’s Torque-Reactive Anti-dive Control that used a mechanical system to increase damping under hard braking and prevent the “dive” associated with telescopic forks. Wheels were modular Comstar items that were, in Europe at least, fitted with new-to-motorcycling radial tires. Axles featured a quick-release system for faster tire changes during races, the rear disc was vented, and the bars were adjustable.

1985 Honda VF1000R Tank Detail

Unfortunately, the changes added up to a significant weight increase over the sport-touring VF1000F, and the bike weighed in at over 600lbs with fluids. 1985 models used a rectangular headlight designed to meet expected US safety standards that never materialized, and the 1986 bikes used the intended, dual-round unit set up that is generally better-looking and more desirable.

1985 Honda VF1000R L Side Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale

One owner! In great shape! 9600 original miles.

This bike is not only a great looking machine, but it runs very well too.  Recent  regular service, oil/filter change/plugs/ect, has been well cared for and is a one owner machine.   Always stored indoors and is not rusted or modified.  Controls, gauge, lights, ect are in good shape as the pictures will show.

An overview of this machine:  The VF1000r was patterned after the FWS “Works Bike” that Wise, Baldwin & Spencer used to race regularly.  This was Honda’s effort to homologate an endurance racer. Full fairing (in fiberglass not plastic) with a single headlight lens and small vents on either side and two cute round tail lights out back, 16″ front wheel & 17″ rear wheel were of the NS/NSR style “Comstar” bolt together wheels, not cast (hub an rim where connected via bolted on struts), endurance racer spec. quick release forks, with the obligatory TRAC mechanical anti-dive mechanisms. Single rear shock w/ 2 sided Alloy swingarm, Gear driven cams, 4/2 exhaust. Color was typical Honda HRC colors – White base with lots of red (in fairing and on the front fender and forks) a small blue stripe and black wheels.

This is definitely a must have for your collection!

These show up on eBay from time-to-time, but are rarely in such quality, original shape. An eminently useable superbike, VF1000R’s aren’t the fastest things on the road, but they feature a wealth of 80’s-tech details for Honda geeks and should offer plenty of real-world riding performance, accompanied by a howling V4 soundtrack.

-tad

1985 Honda VF1000R R Side

Old School Endurance Racer: 1985 Honda VF1000R
Honda August 25, 2012 posted by

1982 Honda CB 1100 R

For Sale: 1982 Honda CB 1100 R


Update 8.25.2012: Back up on eBay with 2 days to go. Currently at $13.6k reserve not met. Links updated. Thanks for the heads up Jason! -dc

Update 9.25.2011: This bike was originally listed on eBay and is now on Craigslist for $22k. Links updated.

Many thanks to Bret who sent me the updated link. He’s deployed in Afghanistan and surfs our site everyday in his downtime. I’ve recently received several emails from military members and would like to take this opportunity to thank them all for their service! Thank you so much for reading from so far away and be safe!


This CB1100R is the perfect bike for RSBFS: As an endurance racing homologation special it is very rare, it is clearly a sport bike (although “sport” was a bit more pudgy back in the 1980s compared to today), and this beauty is for sale right now on eBay. Score!

Very clean and sporting less than 3,000 miles on the clock, this CB1100R is an inline four-cylinder. Cooling is done the old fashioned way: with air. The frame is steel, but to save weight the 6.3 gallon (remember, this is an endurance racer) tank is aluminum. With 18″ wheels on both ends, triple disc brakes and the solo seat, this bike was ready for the racetrack right off the showroom floor. Unfortunately, those showrooms were not located in the United States; the CB1100R was never imported into the US.

From the seller:
1982 Honda CB 1100 RC ORIGINAL SURVIVOR with only 46XX KM which is only around 2863 miles. You will not find a nicer original bike then this. It’s only been a 2 owner bike and lightly used. The bike runs perfectly with no issues. The bike has had new tires put on but still have the original tires that came on the bike. Feel free to ask any questions and I can email more pics if need. Happy bidding and good luck!

You can see more than a hint of the future VF1000R in that front fairing, as Honda followed its own success by an evolutionary process. Still, this is far more special, and far more rare than the VF-based models that followed. Produced during a brief span of 2-3 years and in very limited numbers, the CB1100R continues to be a sought after model from a collector perspective.

Due to the rarity of these models, estimating a value for these bikes is somewhat spotty. The last one we posted did not sell after a run up to the mid-$7k region (which was certainly low money). This particular bike is much cleaner and with lower miles – and the pricing reflects it. The current bid at the time of this writing is $8,700, with reserve still in place. Although there is no telling where the reserve is set, I would lay a guess at the $10k mark – which is still fair money for a rare, homologation bike from Honda.

To see all of the pictures and detail – or to just to check out the bidding action – click on the link and jump over to the auction. Good luck, and make sure you tell ’em you found it on RSBFS!

MI