Posts by tag: Bevel Drive

Ducati February 21, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1979 Ducati 900SS

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

The next offering from the amazing Edinger Ducati Collection is here, and it is a stunner: a 1979 Ducati 900 SS bevel in iconic gold and black. These long, sleek machines tell an important story in history, and are responsible for Ducati’s rise to power and popularity. This all began with the 1972 Imola win by Paul Smart (fun fact: Paul’s wife was Barry Sheene’s sister). Smart was riding a green-framed Ducati 750 Super Sport for that Imola race – as close an ancestor to this 900 Super Sport as can be found in history. You see, while displacement climbed over the next 15-ish years, little else seemed to outwardly change on these models. The similarities between the earlier bikes and later models is remarkable, highlighting what a fantastic platform the original Super Sport represented in the first place. The last of the big bevel twins had more in common with the earliest bikes of the same model than could be imagined. These are bikes with serious bones.

Featured Listing: 1979 Ducati 900SS

The Super Sport series began with what was essentially the mating of two Ducati single cylinder top ends to a common crankcase. The instantly recognizable L-twin arrangement came about due to the need to ensure adequate air flow to the rear cylinder; laying the front barrel down kept it from blanking the wind. Later this arrangement showed promise for weight distribution (low down and as far forward as possible), but it was the need for cooling and reliability that lead the way. And one key element really shows the history of this design; although this is a “modern” motorcycle with electric start, the kick starter carries over as a vestige of earlier days. And speaking of electrics, that is the one area where the Super Sport series made significant strides over the years, building in better reliability and efficiency.

From the seller:
This is a 1979 Ducati Classic with less than a 100 miles on it following the complete ground up restoration. The bike was purchased in Texas and was restored by Revival Cycles in Austin and has been serviced by Ducati Austin. There is only one flaw shown on the cosmetic ring on one gauge, the speedometer, new tires, this bike is in art. Vin# 089083 and has a clean title which says it’s a 1980 but the Vin # tells me it’s a 1979. Current mileage is 18,004 and the bike is in Texas

Asking Price: $30,000
Contact: Edinger.david@gmail.com 317-908-2573

Classic bevel Ducatis continue to drive to new heights in the marketplace. They are simply a standout design that bridges the gap between old and new; they are modern enough to ride today (in anger), yet retain the classic good looks and arcane technical elements that make them unique. By the early 1980s the bevel cam drive arrangement was being phased out in favor of the Pantah “rubber band” engines, the valve timing setup being tremendously less resource intensive on the production line. But today these older bevels simply look, sound and run fantastic. Today’s example has been restored, appears to be in wonderful shape for a 40+ year old sport bike and is ready for a new home. Interested parties should reach out to David quickly, as this black beauty is unlikely to be available very long!

MI

Featured Listing: 1979 Ducati 900SS
Ducati February 4, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1959 Ducati Elite 200 for Sale

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

If you’ve already got Ducati fatigue from the past couple weeks, scroll right on past today’s Featured Listing, this Ducati Elite 200. Or, if you didn’t realize that Ducati had a life before their big, booming superbike line existed, go ahead and read on. In fact, they didn’t even make a regular production multi until the introduction of the v-twin 750 in the early 1970s: their Cucciolo, the original Ducati, was actually a small, four-stroke engine designed to motorize a bicycle. Humble beginnings for a company whose name is synonymous with Italian exotica today.

Later machines used their light weight and handling to win victories in smaller racing classes. Fabio Taglioni designed their first overhead-cam engine, which eventually developed into the machine seen here that was introduced in 1958. The Elite displaced 204cc and used a four-speed gearbox with the heel-toe shifter that was characteristic of the era. The 18 horses and light weight meant a top speed of nearly 90mph, an impressive velocity for such a small motorcycle.

The distinctive candy-red “jelly mould” tank with mirror-like chrome details and Ducati wing logo, complete with mounting loops, to the copper-colored frame and amazing details like the “DUCATI” molded into the peg rubbers, headlight bucket-mounted speedometer, and tapered shotgun exhaust, it’s a surprise to me that they haven’t built a retro-styled model that references this bike yet. Even a Scrambler variant painted to match this might work, combining modern performance with classic style and colors…

From the Seller: 1959 Ducati Elite 200 for Sale

This is a rare, award winning piece of Motorcycle art. This bike was previously in a museum and is also an Antique Automobile Club of America winner “National First Prize”. The bike was purchased from Vicki Smith in 2013 who is well know among Ducatista. Apparently the bike was first purchased in Italy. I probably never rode the bike more than 20 miles and it was then properly put back into Museum mode by Revival Cycles in Austin and has complimented the other bikes in my house. I have all the receipts that came with the bikes and everyone since. The key in the headlight is one of my favorite things and the bike also comes with a Ducati tire pump. The one into two exhaust is rare and motorcycle art. This is the price I paid in 2013 and is more valuable and rare today.

Contact: David Edinger (Edinger.david@gmail.com) +1-317-908-2573

The seller is asking $20,000 for this very nice example of an appreciating classic. The bike isn’t perfect, but the paint looks amazing, it has great patina, and it comes with documentation and should certainly continue to appreciate. It’s a shame that most of these end up sitting in collections, since they’re apparently great to ride and would be lots of fun on a casual Sunday morning ride, or a great choice for a classic rally like the Motogiro.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1959 Ducati Elite 200 for Sale
Ducati March 6, 2019 posted by

Tripping the Light Pantahstic: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600SL for Sale

Ducati’s original “round-case” v-twin may be one of the most beautiful engines of all time but, while tower shafts and bevel gears may be a very precise way to operate valves, they sure aren’t an economical one. Think about the shimming that must be done during assembly; it’s a very labor-intensive way to construct an engine, not at all suited for mass-production. The Ducati Pantah that followed showed the way forward, and is the grandfather of all modern Ducatis. Introduced in 1980 in 499cc form as the 500SL, it grew to 593cc in 1981 as the 600SL seen here. The styling is very distinctive, like nothing else being produced at the time, and handling was up to the standards expected of Ducati.

But before the Pantah, there was one of Ducati’s most infamous misfires, corporate thinking that led to a failed experiment with parallel twins. It all made so much sense: a parallel twin has similar two-cylinder character and compact dimensions that improve packaging, while a single head saves production and material costs, as well as weight. What could go wrong? Well basically everything. The 500GTL might have looked like a winner on paper, but pretty much rejected everything that fans of the marque loved, and was famously unreliable as well. Luckily, Ducati engineer Fabio Taglioni had continued to develop a new v-twin, just in case…

The new engine incorporated toothed rubber belts to drive the overhead cams instead of tower shafts and gears, or the chains that were popular in other high-performance motorcycles of the period. This made assembly and mass production of the new engine a relative snap, but passed the costs on to the owners: regular belt changes are a traditional part of the Ducati ownership experience, although that particular maintenance chore can be handled by a home mechanic, and even the two-valve Desmo valve adjustment isn’t all that difficult.

On the plus side: the push towards standardization and mass-production also meant that Ducati’s signature Desmodromic positive valve actuation now appeared on all models, and not just their SuperSport machines, giving the 600SL pretty good power for a two-valve v-twin of such small displacement.

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600SL for Sale

If you are a collector of classic and iconic sportbikes – or would like to become one – here is something you might want to investigate. The Ducati 600 SL Desmo “Pantah” was the first of the next generation of Ducatis, powered by an updated L-twin desmo motor with valve actuation done via toothed rubber belts instead of the traditional bevel drive. The belt driven valvetrain was instrumental to production volume for Ducati, as the older bevel drives required a great deal of time-consuming, skilled adjustment during assembly. Belt driven valves made true mass production a reality.

Was in storage for the past 10 years (with no petrol in the tank). Will need tune up/oil change. Carburetor was rebuilt 2 years ago.

Nice original condition motorcycle come with its original no rust Conti pipes. Will need very little work to bring it back to mint show room condition. Comes with spare Desmo Belt.

These used to be very affordable bikes, but the seller is correct: these are now definitely collectible and, considering how many were made, you don’t see them up for sale all that often. The $10,000 Buy It Now price is ambitious, but maybe not totally outrageous, considering the general condition. However… this one does have 69,000 miles on the odometer, which means it definitely isn’t low-mileage. The Pantah engine is pretty rugged, and parts should be available to maintain or restore, or you could even box up the original engine and build a hot-rod 900 that should bolt right in with just a few modifications…

-tad

Tripping the Light Pantahstic: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600SL for Sale
Ducati July 26, 2018 posted by

1974 Ducati Mk.3 450 Desmo

Hard to believe it was just 1968 when engineering director Fabio Taglioni put Ducati’s street eggs in the desmo basket, having used the valve actuation technique in race machines for several years.  The Mk.3 line included 250, 350, and 450cc singles, and while this last-year model hasn’t run in a while, its low miles and great cosmetics make it look worth some effort.

1974 Ducati Mk.3 Desmo for sale on eBay

The original bevel-drive engine uses separate cams to drive each valve, singing to 8,000 rpm on their way to 30 hp.  The Dell-Orto carburetor with a throat just over an inch in diameter handles the fuel mixing, and while there is an electrical system, starting is by a left side kick lever.  The Mk.3 gained a 5-speed transmission, helping keep the single on the boil.   The chassis has a hunch about the future of the engine being a stressed member, but in this case the steel backbone keeps things together.

A limited amount of this bike’s long history is available, but it looks to be an older restoration and re-paint in a typical Ducati chrome yellow.  The age makes the correctness of details way beyond my knowledge base, but maybe a knowledgeable reader can point out a great original component or glaring faux pas.  The owner says this in the eBay auction:

Up for sale a beautiful 1974 Ducati single Mark 3 450 motorcycle.  10,785 miles show on the odometer.  This used to be a blue Mark 3 originally.  The original seat will be included.  Clear title in hand.   The bike has not been started in years, so it will need to be sorted out if you want to put it on the road, no battery. Sold as is with no returns.  Light scuffs and scratches from years of storage.

Many of the elements on the Mk.3 appear almost comically lightweight, but the magic 100 hp/liter was still just over the horizon.  With the gear driven desmo and cable brakes, not much to refurbish in the return to service.  But a careful inspection and slow start are advised, brake and shifter are not on their usual sides…

-donn

1974 Ducati Mk.3 450 Desmo
Ducati May 7, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale

It’s obvious that we’ll continue to see Ducati’s iconic “L-twin” for the foreseeable future, but the recent introduction of their V4 Panigale represents the end of the v-twin superbike era that really began with today’s Featured Listing Ducati 750GT. If you ask anyone to name the earliest Ducati v-twin, one of the Supersports is the one most likely to spring to mind. But this GT was actually the first, and possibly most significant machine to be powered by the elegant and desirable “Round Case” twin.

It’s difficult to overstate how important the v-twin was to Ducati’s present fortunes. Prior to the introduction of the 750GT in 1971, Ducati built single-cylinder road and race motorcycles, the most sophisticated of which used their now widespread Desmo heads that eschewed springs for a more precise and positive system of cams to both open and close the valves. But, singles, while profitable and popular in much of the world for their simplicity, economy, and light weight, would never have allowed Ducati to develop a real fan base in that largest and most lucrative of markets: North America.

The original incarnation of the roadgoing v-twin did not include Desmodromic valve actuation: until the Pantah, that was reserved for the Supersport models exclusively. However, it did use a system of tower shafts and bevel gears to operate the cams for very precise timing, and that clockwork masterpiece is a far cry from modern motorcycle engines that are often mercifully hidden behind fairings or a tangle of wires and hoses.

Performance for the 748cc engine was relatively modest by today’s standards, but this was a considered a serious machine and a 750GT can definitely keep up with modern traffic. Braking won’t be up to current standards, but the 60 claimed horses and 407lb dry weight meant a top speed of 125mph, so you can easily out accelerate most cars leaving a stoplight and handling was excellent.

Although only 4,000 or so 750GTs were actually built, they paved the way for Ducati’s big-bike ambitions and their current status as the premier European bike brand, with a balance of sales volume and exotic cachet that extends well beyond the enthusiast market and into the general population. This example is being offered by Moto Borgotaro, a Brooklyn-based shop that specializes in quality classic bikes, maintenance, and restorations.

From the Seller: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale

Bike is presented by Moto Borgotaro Inc. located in Brooklyn , N.Y. 

This is a fantastic 3rd production stage 750GT that has a lot touches from the earlier series 750GT’s — I would call this the ultimate rider as that how it was set up… Why? well lets start with the good… complete motor rebuild in 2009 by Mike Duzick of Mikmar Motors, Paxinos, PA. earlier 72′ tank and tins, completely rebuilt wheels (high lip Borrani style), frame re-done, chrome redone, new Conti pipes, updated electrical, low bars, newer Avon’s.. the works.

Close up, flaws etc… The bike is excellent in person, minor flaws as follows — dash is cracked (common) and it is the earlier style 3 light, scratch on underside of rt. hand pipe, you only see it if your looking for it, brake lever bent out a bit on the end. No it is not 100% original but frankly the bike is fantastic and Mr. Duzick’s motor and restoration is excellent… ride this bike.. this is the one. 

— There are more than 50 additional photos from restoration. 

DETAILS

  • Third production stage 750GT with earlier body work 
  • Engine # 756389
  • Engine crank on up rebuild in 2009 by Mike Duzick of Mikmar Motors, Paxinos, PA
  • 72′ GT tank and tins all re-done in black 
  • Restored seat 
  • New Contis 
  • New Chrome all around 
  • Complete rebuilt wheels 
  • Original shocks
  • Sold with a clean New Jersey title
  • Only 513 miles since restoration in 2009 
  • New Sealed battery 
  • New electrical, and electronic ignition 
  • Newer Avon Roadriders 

The 750GT was probably the most practical of the original v-twins, and this one looks like the perfect collectible, round-case Ducati to actually ride on weekends. I’m a fan of Moto Borgotaro’s recent offerings and this bike seems pretty representative of the kind of bikes they’ve had available in the past: not over-restored, cosmetically “perfect” museum pieces, but extremely clean, well-maintained bikes for collectors who also want to regularly use their acquisitions. Head on over to the eBay listing for some more info, or just to keep an eye on the auction: there are just a couple days left, and bidding is up north of $18,000.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale
Ducati January 19, 2018 posted by

Dusty deal? 1982 Ducati MHR900

Collectable motorcycles – especially those from the late 1970s through 1980s – are on the rise. Values have been notching up to the point where many of us can remember when “…you could buy one for (insert paltry sum here)…” This is true of practically any desirable bike in recent memory; for every bike there is a bubble developing. This certainly holds for memorable Ducati models – on the ropes in the late 70s & early 80s, Ducati fought back with a replica model dripping with nostalgia. Hopelessly outgunned by the technology of the Japanese, the 1982 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica recalled a more successful time for the Bologna factory (specifically, the Isle of Man TT win in ’78), and traded outright performance for repli-racer glorly. Today these are 5 figure collector models with a strong following.

1982 Ducati MHR900 for sale on eBay

Essentially an offshoot of the 900 Super Sport of the day, the air-cooled twin utilized a bevel drive to actuate the two-valve desmo heads. Claimed power was a reasonable 64 HP, which was decent in the day. Today this is a laughable sum achievable by entry level cycles, but there is nothing that can compete with the onslaught of time and tech. The pros of power delivery included usable torque throughout the rev range, and a very narrow profile. This was capitalized by the straight section trellis frame, enabling confident handling and impressive lean angles. Improved Marzocchi suspension and upgraded brakes elevated the original MHR from the standard SS. Additional chassi details included magnesium wheels and a model specific fuel tank feeding 40mm Dell’Ortos. Bespoke Conti mufflers completed the visual effect.

By 1982, the differences between the 900SS and the MHR shrunk down to all but bodywork and graphics. Magnesium wheels were replaced by more durable aluminum units. The model-specific gas tank survived, as did the larger carbs. But the real difference between the standard SS and the MHR was the bodywork; a large flowing fairing, tight talk section and new side panels all emblazoned with the star power of Mike Hailwood. Depending upon sources, an estimated 7,000 MHRs were built between 1979 and early 1986. Cagiva’s takeover of Ducati in 1985 spelled the end of the bevel twin and the MHR model line.

From the seller:
Here is your chance to buy an extremely rare Ducati that simply does not come up for sale very often. I have owned this bike for over 25 years including back in Australia and brought it to the USA over 15 years ago. I never bothered to title it here as it was in my personal Ducati collection and I rode it very rarely, it had a noisy gearbox bearing on 5th gear so I gave it to a friend who was starting his own European bike repair shop and he was going to take his time and replace the bearing and freshen it up a bit…5 years later I had to take it back in the condition you see it here, I have all the parts safely stored in a plastic tote and it is complete, and the engine covers etc have all been polished. This motorcycle was invited to a special event of hailwoods held at daytona speedway where I got to meet nobby Clarke, Pauline and David hailwood and they all signed my tank, sadly those signatures have all faded but there is pics on the internet somewhere of the meeting and then signing my tank, I also got to ride this bike in the procession lap on the banked track where I got to open her up..I always swore I would never sell this bike and if I don’t get the money I’m asking I doubt I will.this is a matching numbers bike.. I have taken pics of the bike before I cleaned it…it has been in my air conditioned warehouse for the last 10years and will need a good going over, new Tyres etc…cleans up extremely well..

Ducati specs vary greatly within a given model year – partly due to the relaxed attitude of the Italian manufacturer during this time frame, and partly due to the initial destination of the bike in question. For example, US-based bikes came devoid of the Conti pipes due to noise regs (thank you, Mr. EPA). Thus is it not uncommon to find some variances in bikes built in the same year – making collecting a bit more of a challenge. What is stock and original can change from region to region.

This particular seller has committed every sin that RSBFS preaches against when it comes to the advert: Pictures are few and poor, and show a bike that could use a bit of cleaning. Instead of telling us that it “…cleans up extremely well…” it would be of great help to show us – by cleaning it up and *then* taking pictures. Nobody knows what the fiberglass looks like, the condition of the paintwork, etc. It also doesn’t help to see that this is not a running bike – and may not be complete. I won’t even ask why the rear cylinder is missing when the stated issue was a bearing in the tranny (maybe a bevel expert can help us out there). These are all very important items considering the starting bid opens at a cool $22k USD. Now a clean MHR is will definitely top $20k in today’s collector market, but this one feels a bit closer to basket case than concours. I’m not sure the rarity of the model warrants a piecemeal example at this price, and thus far the internet agrees with me at zero bids. Check it out here and share your thoughts. Good luck!!

MI

Dusty deal? 1982 Ducati MHR900
Ducati September 13, 2017 posted by

Classic Heavy Metal: 1980 Ducati Super Sport for Sale

Although it’s date-stamped as a 1980 model, this Ducati 900 Super Sport is obviously a sportbike from an even earlier era: twin-shock suspension aside, the engine features vintage, half-faired style and nearly Victorian-era detailing on the engine. A bit of a throwback, this machine is nonetheless significant to modern sportbike fans, as it was the more commonly available update of the original 750 Super Sport that was Ducati’s first foray into big sportbikes. These early Super Sports were basically ground zero for the company as it exists today, especially significant as we’re now staring down the barrel of the end of Ducati’s v-twin superbikes with the introduction of their MotoGP-aping V4.

The 900 Super Sport was introduced in 1975 as an evolution of their iconic, but very limited-production 750 Super Sport. It used an updated version of their overhead-cam, air-cooled v-twin, here punched out to 864cc and fitted with the restyled “square” engine cases to replace the “round” cases on the 750. Keep in mind that, up until the introduction of the rubber-belt Pantah engine, it was only the Super Sport models that had Ducati’s spring-less Desmo valve actuation. Combined with a system of tower shafts and bevel gears to drive the cams instead of chains or belts, the “bevel-head” v-twin engine was more Swiss watch than propulsion system, and manufacturing costs were unsurprisingly high, a major reason for the switch to rubber belts.

Aside from the increased displacement, the 900SS featured a number of changes intended to broaden the bike’s appeal for the US market, with modern cast aluminum wheels, a quieter exhaust [blasphemy!], improved kick start, and the gearshift redesigned for the left side of the bike. Earlier examples with left-foot shifter used a cumbersome linkage to convert the bike from its original right-foot shift and the new mechanism was much more precise. Originally, the bike came in classic silver with blue graphics, with the black-and-gold scheme seen here introduced in 1979. This particular example has aftermarket bar-end mirrors fitted that are obviously not period-correct, but pretty innocuous and easily removed if you’re going for the original, mirror-less style. The engine also features a clear glass “Gear-Gazer” for the upper cylinder’s bevel-drive gears, and aftermarket addition but one I’d probably want for myself, originality be damned.

 

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Ducati 900 Super Sport Desmo for Sale

17,066 original miles – Collector owned

Restored to Perfection in 2015

History:

After the round case twins 750 GT, Sport and Super Sport Desmo entered the scene, Ducati management found that the line-up lacked a super sport bike capable of competing with the Japanese superbikes with over 750 cc and the Ducati 900 Super Sport was developed to fill that gap.

Initially, Ducati opted for a more touring-oriented approach, with the 860 GT styled by Giugiaro, that unfortunately did not win the public’s favour. At the same time, however, the Bolognese manufacturer also introduced a sportier version, the 900 Super Sport, reminiscent of the sales success of the gorgeous 750 SS Desmo.
The 860 cc engine was derived from the original L-twin engine conceived for the 750 GT, however with a redesigned, more squared case.

Throughout its history, the 900 SS actually underwent few modifications, from the fuel tank to the light-alloy wheels, and was offered in a gold and black livery, in addition to the classic silver and electric blue colour scheme.

Asking Price: $35,500 obo.

The Buy It Now is listed at $35,500 and for that kind of cash, I’d like a little less “brief history that we probably already know” and more information on the who-what-where of the “restoration.” Describing something simply as “restored to perfection” is the kind of thing that can mean different things to different people, although I’d expect that the seller would be happy to answer any questions, and the bike looks terrific in the photographs.

-tad

Ducati August 10, 2017 posted by

Big Bevel – 1984 Ducati MHR Mille

A bit down on their luck in the late seventies and early 1980’s, Ducati brought out a string of repli-racers celebrating Mike Hailwood’s 1978 Isle of Man win. The ultimate was a 973cc desmodue, claiming 76 hp and and a new frame design. This collector bike has under 3,000 miles and would make an outstanding addition to any stable.

1984 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica Mille for sale on eBay

Though largely a 900 Super Sport below the waterline, the MHR had the exciting full body and national paint, as well as Marzocchi suspension front and rear, triple Brembo disks, and gold Oscam 18-inch alloys.  The new liter engine used the bevel-gear-driven cams, plain bearings and had a healthy increase in torque to 62 ft.-lbs.

Apparently un-restored, this Mille still has the original rubber, and everything else.  Wafer-thin fairings look excellent, as do the option Conti mufflers.  The Texas owner says this in the eBay auction:

The Hailwood Mille is the final development of the bevel drive engine. This bike has only 4356 km, original condition with orig tires, Conti 2 into 1 exhaust system.  SS front brake lines.  This bike would make a great addition to any Ducati collection.

Riders of a certain age will recall Mike Hailwood as a great champion who drove Formula 1 cars as well as bikes.  Though earlier MHR machines celebrated his comeback TT win, later editions marked his untimely 1981 death.  Either way the MHR made up a healthy percentage of Ducati sales.  Cagiva’s Castiglioni brothers liked Ducati’s new belt-driven cam engine so much, they bought the company, and wound bevel production down as Ducati finished up development of the 750 F1.  Some collectors focus on a model’s introductory years and some see value in later developments.  Often displacement increases are part of the development, in this case a great reason to look into this very collectible Mike Hailwood Replica.

-donn

Big Bevel – 1984 Ducati MHR Mille