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Just A Little TLC: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III R Side

Unlike many reinvented marques that attempt to trade on nostalgia, the resurrected Triumph knew they would be unable to compete head-on with the Japanese in terms of raw speed, so they created bikes like the Daytona and Super III to appeal to the heart with character and quality, while appealing to the head with real-world performance and reasonable pricing. On paper, it was no contest. On the street however, it was a different story, and the Daytona offers up plenty to like for street-focused riders looking for something different.

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III L Side Front

The Super III was a Cosworth-tuned version of the Daytona, with 115 claimed horsepower, up from 98 in the standard bike. Honestly, neither of those numbers will impress anyone today. But that was hardly the point, and the main selling point these days should be the modern-classic looks, the engine’s muscular, flexible midrange, and the upgraded front stoppers on the Super III that are a major improvement compared to the fairly weak standard Daytona bits.

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III L Side

If you’re looking for a “pure sports” motorcycle or track-ready handling, you’re barking up the wrong tree here. The Daytona is relatively light, but feels big. Roomy. Handling is stable rather than nimble, and the engine is all about that mid-range, not top-end power. Max speed is around 140mph or so, but it feels like it could do that all day long and period testers described it as an excellent point-to-point motorcycle.

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III L Side Rear

Getting the picture? Triumph knew they couldn’t compete with the Japanese, so they didn’t bother. They made a classy gentleman’s express that needed to make no apologies on the road, with usable power, handling, and sport-touring comfort to go with quality construction. There’s a reason that, as rare as they are, these so often seem to show up in such good shape. Except for when, you know, the owners crash them and stuff…

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

For sale is the Rare Triumph Super III. Only 179 were ever imported into the United States from  805 that were ever produced. After nearly 20 years, that number has dwindled down to just a few remaining. I’ve only seen one other for sale and they asking $7000. Now is your chance add this great running specimen to your collection. 

The good: 

  • 19129 miles of mellow adult riding. Low miles! This number is last week’s number. I will be riding with my wife later today. It will be sold with less than 19,500 though.
  • Re-upholstered rear seat
  • Fork seals done
  • Valves checked (no adjustment needed)
  • Carb cleaned and tuned
  • Inside tank rust-free
  • Meat left on the tires NEW FRONT TIRE INCLUDED FREE!
  • Chain and sprockets clean and oiled (look great)
  • Rear solid cowel included(it covers rear seat)
  • Box of extras included free
  • Runs like New!

The not so good:

Bike went down at a slow speed when plastics were off. This resulted in scratches on right hand brake, light dents on exhaust, part of windscreen missing, exhaust cap on left side missing, rear brake lever bent slightly. Rear decals were sanded off sadly, as was right middle decal. See pictures, it’s quite minor but I like to fully disclose what I can see.

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III Dash

This example obviously needs a bit of paint and bodywork, but the paint that isn’t sanded off looks shiny and well cared-for, and everything else looks in order. These bikes were well-built and nigh-unburstable: they may not have been able to compete in terms of performance, but they beat the pants off the Japanese in terms of quality. Daytonas of this period have very few inherent mechanical problems and for the $2,600 asking price, this looks like a bargain.

-tad

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III Front

8 Comments

  • The owner of this Super III is quite the salesman. A perfect Super III with about 6,000 miles couldn’t get $4,500 earlier this summer. I think it was on your website.

  • I reckon this is an old stunt pig.
    Why is there damage to both sides of the bike if it was involved in a mere “slow speed” stack?
    My guess is that the plastics were off and the accident was slow speed, because the dude threw it down the road trying something he saw on YouTube…

    • Your question is a good one, but do you really think someone was using a Daytona as a stunt bike? I find it hard to believe that anyone who bought one of these first or even second-hand would use it for that kind of thing… But I’m sure people have stunted even stranger things.

    • Lol, no, no stunts.. The original owner is an oldtimer who misjudged a turn as we all may have done. The screen was broken after a screw came loose and original owner was waxing with too much strength. I wish I had more info, but I only know what was told to me.
      Tad, great write-up! It makes me want to keep it now 🙂 Why does a masters degree cost so much!?

    • Ha! Always funny when someone related to one of the bikes we post stumbles across it here on the site!

  • The left side fairing is incorrect…it’s off a standard Daytona 900

    • good catch, the script should be black rather than in white.

      These were more along the lines of sport touring than sport. Although with their very low clip ons and high pegs, they weren’t all that comfortable either.

      The 6 piston calipers on these were very overrated, with a very wooden feel.

      The front carbon fiber fender was very high quality when new but they faded badly in the sun, just as this one has.

  • Ahem! TURD! Next…

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