Posts by tag: Super III

Triumph July 28, 2018 posted by

Tuned Triple: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

In the 90s, it was foolish to take the Japanese Big Four head on: they were on a roll, and if you wanted to compete, you needed to offer something else, something different. They had the high-tech theme down cold, but no one can be all things to all people, and there has always been room in the margins for players with something unusual to offer. And a reborn Triumph had just such a machine with the Daytona Super III.

Sheer economic necessity dictated the design. The bike’s spine frame meant versatility and the same basic component could be used as the foundation for a series of bikes with vastly different missions: sportbike, roadster, tourer, cruiser. But the downside was inherent compromise: that configuration carried weight high up and meant that the resulting bikes were generally heavier than more focused rivals.

Engines had the same issues: Triumph’s three and four-cylinder designs were versatile, but they could never be as light or as powerful as something designed for screaming revs and maximum aggression. But although inline fours are powerful, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha’s reliance on them to power sports motorcycles during this period made the whole class a bit same-y, which likely explains some of Ducati’s contrarian appeal.

Freed from the need to fit into displacement restrictions imposed by racing classes, Triumph was able to create a sportbike focused for the road. The Daytona came in two flavors originally, one powered by the three cylinder and one by the four. The triple was lighter and ultimately more popular, but was very outclassed in the performance stakes compared to Japanese rivals. So Triumph introduced the Super III to at least close the gap and make the bike a viable alternative to more focused sportbikes.

Cosworth tuning increased power from 98 to 115hp and gave the bike a 140mph top speed, along with six-piston brakes. Performance was at least within shouting distance of other sportbikes, but the Triumph offered that charismatic and torquey three-cylinder that had great midrange punch, stable handling, reasonable comfort, much higher build quality and paintwork, along with classic styling that was a complete 180°, compared to the wild graphics and lurid colors found on bikes like the GSX-R750.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

Between 1992 and 1997 Triumph produced the much appreciated but ultimately underpowered 3 cylinder Daytona 900. This bike was a successor to the original Daytona 750 and boasted a more acceptable riding position designed to increase its sporting ability. But the power to weight ratio was still a problem, especially when compared to other bikes at the time such as the GSX-R and the ultra-light Fireblade/CBR. So for the 1994-96 model years Triumph produced the Daytona Super III, and exported a very limited production run of ~150 bikes to the USA (numbers are approx 1000 worldwide).

Having been bitten by the Triumph triple bug, I searched for 2 years for a Super III and was ecstatic when I came across this extremely clean and well cared for example. Sadly, priorities have shifted and looking to thin the herd. This is not a divorce sale, baby sale, or other emergency sale. I’d like this to go to someone who will appreciate it as I have.  

Bike details: 8779.3 miles although that may go slightly up. 1 season old Michelin Pilot Power tires with less than 1k miles. Forks serviced at the end of last season with fresh oil, seals, and .95kg springs. Everything on the bike is OEM except for e-code halogen headlights for better night vision. All bodywork and paint is original. All factory carbon fiber parts are present, original, and unbroken.  

Extras: extremely rare Sprint Fox Fairing and custom made carbon fiber fill pieces. Comes with an extra fairing mount. Sudco FCR39 carbs (true triple carb setup for the 885, not a re-rack). Spare seat for re-upholstering. Can include some German basketweave vinyl (60’s Porsche restoration supply) if desired. It is very similar to the 60’s Triumph seat covers, albeit much higher quality.  

Very minor cons: small scratches on each muffler, less than 2″. Right side lower fairing has a few light scratches. Some chipping on fairing V behind front wheel.  

This is one of the lowest mileage original Triumph Super IIIs in existence. Extras worth $2,500 alone. Will not separate at this point.  

Japanese sportbikes of this era are old enough that the splashy graphics and DayGlo colors have become cool again, but the simple lines of this bright yellow Super III still appeal. These are very rare and certainly the most valuable of the early Daytonas, but still pretty affordable compared to other exotic machines. The $6,500 asking price is pretty high for a Super III, but the bike appears to be in superlative condition and has been enthusiast-owned, with low mileage, and comes with some very desirable extras. Speaking of: the seller mentions “Sudco” carbs, but I’m assuming they’re actually Keihin flat-slides, since Sudco doesn’t actually make carburetors, they just sell them.

-tad

Tuned Triple: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale
Triumph January 10, 2017 posted by

British Beef: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

Faced with the onslaught of powerful, dead-reliable motorcycles from Japan, many of the storied British and European motorcycle brands folded and Triumph was among them, although the story of their eventual resurrection is suitably British. These days, they’re famous for their characterful performance machines, but it took them years to earn that enviable reputation. This Daytona Super III represents ground-zero for this new generation of Triumph motorcycles and was their sportiest bike at the time.

John Bloor was actually looking at the defunct Triumph factory as a residential building site when he decided instead to relaunch the brand, which is about as much a change of heart as it’s possible to have. Building a wide variety of bikes to suit different markets and niches with entirely different frames and engines would have been prohibitively expensive, so the new range of motorcycles was built around a modular frame, with either a 900cc triple or 1200cc inline four for motivation: the 900cc triple in the Daytona was the same basic engine that also powered the Thunderbird, Trident, Sprint, Tiger, Trophy, and Speed Triple. Pretty impressive, considering how different those bikes appear at first glance.

The standard Daytona 900 made 98hp, but Cosworth tuning took the Super III to 115hp, with a near 140mph top speed, with upgraded, six-piston brakes up front to bring the whole thing to a halt quickly. Those numbers were healthy for the time, although they didn’t really compete with the fastest bikes of the era. But as you can see from the displacement, Triumph wasn’t looking at competing in racing for the most part, and the displacements reflect this roadgoing mission, an area in which the bike excelled.

Handling was very stable, although the spine frame carried weight high and the bike was fairly heavy overall so it couldn’t really be considered nimble. But quality was a step up from the Japanese, comfort was good, and the look was much more classic and conservative to appeal to a different segment of the sportbike marketplace. These days, nice Daytonas and even Super IIIs can be had for relative peanuts, as you can see with today’s example, and offers up useable performance and distinctive looks.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

This is a good clean example of a rare 1996 Triumph Daytona Super 3.  The bike is in great shape with limited modifications and most of the original parts.  I do not have the original exhaust, but have seem them on e-bay for 100-$300.  This bike has just had a fresh tune-up, rebuilt carbs, plugs, all new rubber hoses, coolant flush, valve adjustment, and new Pilot 3 tires.  One of the side panels may have been repainted at some point, but I’m not sure, and one of the rear turn signals has a broken stalk.   Aftermarket parts  4 into 1 full race exhaust by Sebring K&N pod filters (original air box included) Available Parts 1 Brand new Penske fully adjustable remote resivore rear shock $1,000 (paid $1300).  If the bike buyer dose not want it, I’ll list it in a separate auction. Additional Super 3 info: The Triumph Daytona Super III was a limited edition of the under-appreciated Daytona 900. Just 805 were sold worldwide and they featured engine work by Cosworth. In addition to Cosworth’s touch, this bike got bigger cams, flat slide carbs, 6 piston front brakes, and a whole lot of carbon fiber. The results of the engine work yielded a healthy 115 horsepower, though the bike was too heavy to be a true sports bike. It instead ended up being a fantastic sport-tourer, and a bike you had to muscle around to have a lot of fun with.

That “repainted side panel” does look a bit off in a couple of the photos, but the seller is asking a very reasonable $3,500 for what appears to be a clean, well-maintained and upgraded bit of Triumph’s comeback story. The styling may be a bit dated, but the bike oozes class and while it may not be a “true sportbike” it has muscle where it counts: on the road. And let’s be honest, that’s where most motorcyclists spend their time. Track day junkies should probably look elsewhere,  although one of the coaches at the track-day organization I rode with on the East Coast had a Daytona like this one set up for track riding, so they can be made to handle if you’re willing to expend a bit of time, money and effort.

-tad

British Beef: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale
Triumph September 26, 2015 posted by

Just A Little TLC: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III R Side

Unlike many reinvented marques that attempt to trade on nostalgia, the resurrected Triumph knew they would be unable to compete head-on with the Japanese in terms of raw speed, so they created bikes like the Daytona and Super III to appeal to the heart with character and quality, while appealing to the head with real-world performance and reasonable pricing. On paper, it was no contest. On the street however, it was a different story, and the Daytona offers up plenty to like for street-focused riders looking for something different.

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III L Side Front

The Super III was a Cosworth-tuned version of the Daytona, with 115 claimed horsepower, up from 98 in the standard bike. Honestly, neither of those numbers will impress anyone today. But that was hardly the point, and the main selling point these days should be the modern-classic looks, the engine’s muscular, flexible midrange, and the upgraded front stoppers on the Super III that are a major improvement compared to the fairly weak standard Daytona bits.

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III L Side

If you’re looking for a “pure sports” motorcycle or track-ready handling, you’re barking up the wrong tree here. The Daytona is relatively light, but feels big. Roomy. Handling is stable rather than nimble, and the engine is all about that mid-range, not top-end power. Max speed is around 140mph or so, but it feels like it could do that all day long and period testers described it as an excellent point-to-point motorcycle.

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III L Side Rear

Getting the picture? Triumph knew they couldn’t compete with the Japanese, so they didn’t bother. They made a classy gentleman’s express that needed to make no apologies on the road, with usable power, handling, and sport-touring comfort to go with quality construction. There’s a reason that, as rare as they are, these so often seem to show up in such good shape. Except for when, you know, the owners crash them and stuff…

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

For sale is the Rare Triumph Super III. Only 179 were ever imported into the United States from  805 that were ever produced. After nearly 20 years, that number has dwindled down to just a few remaining. I’ve only seen one other for sale and they asking $7000. Now is your chance add this great running specimen to your collection. 

The good: 

  • 19129 miles of mellow adult riding. Low miles! This number is last week’s number. I will be riding with my wife later today. It will be sold with less than 19,500 though.
  • Re-upholstered rear seat
  • Fork seals done
  • Valves checked (no adjustment needed)
  • Carb cleaned and tuned
  • Inside tank rust-free
  • Meat left on the tires NEW FRONT TIRE INCLUDED FREE!
  • Chain and sprockets clean and oiled (look great)
  • Rear solid cowel included(it covers rear seat)
  • Box of extras included free
  • Runs like New!

The not so good:

Bike went down at a slow speed when plastics were off. This resulted in scratches on right hand brake, light dents on exhaust, part of windscreen missing, exhaust cap on left side missing, rear brake lever bent slightly. Rear decals were sanded off sadly, as was right middle decal. See pictures, it’s quite minor but I like to fully disclose what I can see.

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III Dash

This example obviously needs a bit of paint and bodywork, but the paint that isn’t sanded off looks shiny and well cared-for, and everything else looks in order. These bikes were well-built and nigh-unburstable: they may not have been able to compete in terms of performance, but they beat the pants off the Japanese in terms of quality. Daytonas of this period have very few inherent mechanical problems and for the $2,600 asking price, this looks like a bargain.

-tad

1996 Triumph Daytona Super III Front

Just A Little TLC: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale
Triumph May 16, 2015 posted by

Triple sec – Sweet 1995 Triumph Daytona 900 Super III

Revived by entrepreneur John Bloor after their final bankruptcy in 1983, Triumph Motorcycles engineered a family of engines using a 76mm diameter piston and established a manufacturing facility in Thailand.  The venerable brand celebrated it centenary in 2002 and has continued manufacture and now completes almost 50,000 motorcycles per year.  This particular bike is a nice example of one of their best machines.

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii left

1995 Triumph Daytona 900 Super III

20150515 1995 triumph daytona 900 super iii right front

Initially designed in 1989, the smooth-running 885cc triple underwent a major review in 1993 and with Cosworth’s help emerged with 115hp, and somewhat lighter thanks to pressure casting the engine cases.  Too busy trying to stay alive to enter into racing, modern Triumph cycles never experienced the weight loss racing requires, and the Super III carries 465 lbs wet.  But with the aluminum frame, 43mm forks, 310mm front disks, the entire package tests lighter than it should, a well-balanced handler.

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii cockpit  20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii left tank

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii left seat fairing  20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii left engine

The speed yellow fairing on this example appears better than excellent, the lower reaches of the classic shape protected from chips by automotive film.   The black monoposto seat looks cushy and in nice shape, the pillion seat under a fairing.  Very polished and very pretty 3-into-1 header with carbon muffler appears to be the only modification, and belies the 8900 miles the odometer shows.  Have to like it when someone’s been detailing the engine !

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii right engine detail  20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii right rear wheel

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii tool kit  20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii right engine

From the eBay auction:

Proudly kept and displayed indoors with only 8900 original miles. (That’s less than 450 miles/year)100% Original everything*. Perfect condition; no scratches, dents, or nicks of any kind. Carbon fiber everywhere. Aluminum 6.6 gallon tank.

As second owner, I’ve meticulously maintained the bike in every way. All questions will be answered immediately.

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii right rear

Though a revised 675cc engine has led to recent racing successes by a contingent of privateers, the Daytona Super III was developed before the racing program and is a smooth, powerful road bike, the 1995 being a nice update from the original design.  This auction looks to be for one of the very best of this model.

Triple sec – Sweet 1995 Triumph Daytona 900 Super III
Triumph November 12, 2014 posted by

Cosworth: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III 900

super31

Triumph Motorcycles Ltd. is the largest surviving British motorcycle manufacturer but it hasn’t been an easy path for the Uk-based manufacturer.  The entire British bike industry basically collapsed back in the early 1980’s and  Triumph went into receivership in 1983.  After a few years and a lot of legal wrangling, British businessman John Bloor ended up acquiring the name and manufacturing rights and his “new” Triumph motorcycle company re-started sportbike production in the early 1990’s.

Between 1992 and 1997 Triumph produced the much appreciated but ultimately underpowered 3 cylinder Daytona 900. This bike was a successor to the 0riginal Daytona 750 and boasted a more acceptable riding position designed to increase its sporting ability.  But the power to weight ratio was still a problem, especially when compared to other bikes at the time such as the GSX-R and the ultra-light Fireblade/CBR.  So for the 1994 model year Triumph produced the Daytona Super III, a very limited production run of 150 bikes designed to help re-balance the power/weight issue for the big Triple.

super33

1995 Daytona Super III for sale on ebay

The Daytona Super III had a host of changes from its predecessor, with the major one being a significantly more powerful engine. The power improvements were due to a collaboration with the tuning gurus at Cosworth and was accomplished by using higher compression pistons and a redesigned cylinder head. The end result was a power increase from 97 bhp to 115 bhp.  Overall the Super III was a more responsive and higher performance ride, and also had many parts switched to carbon fiber and improved brakes.

super38

While the new Daytona sill wasn’t as light and agile as the CBR/Fireblade, it was certainly a big step forward and it offered something the ultra-light hyperbikes did not; the ability to be used for both blazing speed runs and medium duty touring.    Almost immediately after being introduced, the Super III was identified as a speed touring monster; consider the following review from the August 1995 issue of Motorcyclist magazine.

 First thing you notice is it isn’t in the same mold as Japanese race replicas such as Suzuki’s GSX-Rs,  it feels long, tall and still a bit heavy.  It can’t flick through chicanes like a repli-GP machine and it doesn’t rev way into five figures. But the Daytona is deceptive; its point-to-point performance is superb, with most of the credit for this belonging to a new engine that ticks over with a slightly cantankerous rumble that tells you ‘I’m an engine’.  From the instant you press the button, the Triumph exudes the sort of engine character that Japan largely designed out years ago. 

There are no bottom-end flat spots, just a rising tide of willing revs. The Daytona Super III is content to potter at slow speeds but useful power begins to swell at 3000rpm, continues unabated until the 9500rpm red line and at no point does it ever feel remotely stressed.  Peak revs equates to 148mph in top gear which might not seem impressive in an age of 150mph 600s but it is how the new triple’s getting there that sets it apart.  While most engines of comparable range are either bland or plain slow, the 900 is a speed touring monster, an unburstable projectile from A to B. 

The rest of the package is of the same high quality.  The gear changes are positive, with no under-selection, the truck-sized clutch practically redundant once on the move. Six speeds is overkill, but allows relaxed top gear ratios. In almost every area, the bike seems over-engineered. 

The Super III does a superb job of filling a segment that seems to have been vacated except for the ZZR; charismatic sportbike that can also be used as a daily rider and medium distance touring machine.   No doubts that this bike will become an important piece of the reborn Triumphs legacy and a future classic.

super34

This particular Super III looks to be amazingly pristine.  The seller includes excellent hi-res photos on the ebay auction and also a link to a youtube video.

Here is some of what the seller has to say about this particular Super III.

If you have been looking for a collectable Triumph from the modern era, this is the one!   There were only 150 of these bikes worldwide.Bike only has 9767 original miles, has always been garaged and has never been in the rain. Special features include carbon fiber fender and sub-fender, carbon dash, 6 pot calipers, and seat cowling. Paint and carbon fiber look as new. All fluids are fresh and bike has been maintained perfectly.Tires are almost new with 95% tread remaining. Lots of extras (see auction for details)

super3carbon

So what’s this particular Super III worth?  The KBB website doesn’t have a price for these which is a common problem if the bike is produced in small numbers like this one was.  A few Super III’s previously posted here on RSBFS seemed to go for around 3-5k USD, which is pretty cheap for a bike that gives you this much performance and versatility and given the outstanding condition of this example, I would expect price expectations to be at the upper part of the range.   This bike seems like an excellent opportunity for a collector to acquire a pretty rare bike that they could also use on a regular basis without having to go to the chiropractor afterwards.

MG

Cosworth: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III 900
Triumph June 27, 2014 posted by

Out of the Ashes: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III

This was really where the modern Triumph began. Basically a mix-and-match of triples and fours stuck into a modular, steel spine-framed chassis that allowed the reborn British company maximum versatility to create different bikes on a common platform at a relatively minimal cost. The 900 in the Daytona was a three-cylinder and the same basic engine also powered the Thunderbird, Trident, Sprint, Tiger, Trophy, and Speed Triple.

1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for sale on eBay

1995 Triumph Daytona III Front Rear

Unfortunately, this modularity came at the price of increased weight. Handling isn’t ideal, and the bikes weren’t competitive in terms of ultimate performance when compared to the Japanese machines of the time. But they exuded character, were reasonably reliable, and allowed Anglophiles to “fly the flag” with pride.

1995 Triumph Daytona III Rear Speedo

While the bike as a whole may have been a bit heavy and slow-steering, the engine was, as the Brits say, “a corker.” Powerful, smooth, and relaxed, it would pull from low and wind out to redline, whichever struck your fancy. Too heavy for track work, it’s an excellent GT. A road-destroying tool for fast street riding, with a protective fairing and reasonable comfort, stable handling, combined with strong brakes and that peach of an engine.

1995 Triumph Daytona III R Front Wheel Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Daytona Limited Edition Super III

Bike is always garaged. It is a solid 9.5 out of 10. There is 1 tiny blemish a half an inch long on the tank but barely noticeable. The bike is one of 150 world wide. Special features include carbon fiber fender and sub-fender,flat side mikuni carbs, 6 pot calipers, and seat cowling. The motor is a 900cc triple, tuned by Cosworth (of rally car fame). The bike was fully serviced 30 days ago. It is started periodically but not driven to ensure the battery and motor stay in good working order. Tires are fairly new with 95% tread remaining. Though the bike retains all stock pieces (exhaust cans as well) with sale, some tasteful upgrades were made. Micron carbon pipes, handlebar risers, throttle meister cruise control and a beautiful Corbin seat. This is a rare bike in an important time in Triumph’s rebirth. It is sure to appreciate, and I will miss it.

I think the styling on these early Bloor-era Triumphs has aged particularly well. Like the Ducati 900SS, they comfortably straddle eras, with design cues both vintage and modern. I prefer the first-gen Speed Triple, but this bike looks great in yellow and would make an excellent get-out-of-town bike for long weekend rides.

-tad

1995 Triumph Daytona III R Tank

Out of the Ashes: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III