Posts by tag: John Bloor

Triumph January 16, 2019 posted by

Goldilocks: 1999 Triumph Daytona T595 for Sale

After the John Bloor resurrection of the Triumph brand and some experimentation with both three and four-cylinder engines, it became clear the triple supplied the right blend of weight, power, and perhaps most importantly, character that provided an alternative to the run-of-the-mill fours then dominating the sportbike scene. The original Daytona used a spine frame common to all Triumph models of the period that compromised weight distribution and handling, but the newly revised Daytona T595 introduced in 1997 used an all-new tubular cast-aluminum frame that lowered the center-of-gravity and improved handling.

The new Daytona was still a bit heavier than the Japanese 750s and less powerful than the 1000s and 1100s, but that was exactly what Triumph intended. It filled a similar niche as the earlier bike, with a bit of a Goldilocks mission statement: not to hot, not too cold, it was just right. Build quality and finish were, as before, higher than the competition, with ergonomics  that were still very sporty but more relaxed as suited the roadgoing mission statement.

Handling was good but the racy swingarm was clearly a stylistic decision, as the bike had no racing pretensions and single-sided swingarm is generally heavier than a conventional unit. Power was a claimed 128hp that gave a top speed of over 160mph. The original Triumph performance exhaust adds value here, as aftermaket parts can often exacerbate the 3,500rpm flat spot and the early Sagem fuel-injection apparently works best with this pipe.

The graphics proclaim this a T595, although 1999 saw the introduction of the 955i that displaced the exact same 955cc as the earlier version and was mainly intended to clear up the misconception that the Daytona was a 600cc machine. Assuming the year is correct, it's likely from before the changeover to the new name. Black is always a classic choice, but the bike looks especially sharp in silver, or the retina-searing "scorched yellow" that somehow suits the otherwise elegant machine.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Triumph Daytona T595 for Sale

99 Triumph Daytona for sale. Has been sitting in the back of garage for years. All fluids need to be changed and bike needs to be serviced. Bike needed a rectifier when put away. Deployments and life got in the way of enjoying this beauty. Any questions about the bike feel free to ask. GRD Cycle in White Plains MD swapped the frame for me due to a hairline crack. I have the paperwork of original purchase and frame replacement. Triumph carbon fiber accessories and trim included. Original Triumph pipe and high mount Triumph pipe included. (High mount pipe adds some hp & shows off single side swingarm wheel) Racing belly fairing, bike stand & passenger seat included also. Clear title in hand.

The Buy It Now price is set at a very low $2,499 with a starting bid of $1,499 and no takers yet, which might be a result of the bike's current non-operational status, although a rectifier shouldn't be too difficult to source. The title is claimed to be clear and the paperwork documenting the replacement frame should hopefully ease the fears of buyers, considering that this was a well-documented issue and a factory recall on the earlier bikes. It's hard to get a good bead on the bike's condition from the photos: black can be tricky to photograph effectively, but it appears to have suffered a bit in storage or had a minor tip over, with a couple scratches and damaged signals. The bike is also missing its belly pan in the photos, but is claimed to be included in the sale. It needs a bit of love, but the important parts are there and the miles are extremely low.

-tad

Goldilocks: 1999 Triumph Daytona T595 for Sale
Triumph September 8, 2018 posted by

Well-Aged British Beef – 1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 with just 1,340 miles !

John Bloor's new Triumph engineers had a modular solution for their line of of four-stroke engines - all had 76mm bores and strokes were 65 or 55mm depending on multiples of 250 or 300cc.  The big 1200 was their atom smasher and had two balance shafts in the crankcase to smooth things out.  This time machine was parked halfway to its first oil change and has been professionally re-commissioned.

1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 for sale on eBay

Hard to call a company that had been manufacturing motorcycles for more than a hundred years an upstart, but the re-constituted Triumph was just that - with their new road-pounding 1200, good for 147 hp and 85 ft.-lbs of torque.  More GT than sport, it was big in every sense, plenty of room and stability for two, massive 6-speed powertrain, adjustable Kayaba forks and monoshock, 310mm Nissin disk brakes.  The generous fairing carried dual headlights and allowed the rider to hide from the 160 mph wind.

 

Right up the road from upstate Albany, this Daytona begs to have its back story told.  How a machine perfect for the mostly suburban and rural area could have been parked so soon after riding it out of the dealership is a mystery, like the missing front signals.  The overall condition says back of the garage storage but thankfully missing the big tank dent and tipover that usually happen during nearly 25 years under a blanket.  From the eBay auction:

Super low mile, one owner  Daytona 1200. This Daytona was purchased back in 1995 from Berkshire Motor Works in Schenectady NY. I have all the original paperwork from when the bike was new. The bike is totally stock and has been ridden only 1300 miles from new!  The bike was taken to a local British bike specialist in Scotia and had a $900. Service. The carbs have been rebuilt, new air filter, new battery  and fresh oil change. The bike has never been down or crashed. Everything on the bike works as it should. I have new front turn signals on order.

 

The Daytona 1200 reviewed as very smooth, heavy without really feeling it, the relaxed riding position making for a nicer long trip.  Not destined to compete with sportier liters and 1100's from Japan, the 1200 was more in line with the boutique Europeans.  It's a lot of bike for the buy-it-now, but new rubber has to be factored in, and though the carbs have been cleaned, the condition of the tank should be determined.  As owners of black machines would tell you, after a serious detailing this Daytona will look really good - for about a half hour...

-donn

 

Well-Aged British Beef – 1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 with just 1,340 miles !
Triumph May 3, 2018 posted by

Better Late – 2006 Triumph Daytona 955i with 2,510 miles !

The owner of this 2006 Daytona bought it as a long-term leftover in 2014, from the unlikely sportbike haven of Denmark.  Since then his travel schedule has only allowed 2,510 miles, presenting the auction winner with a virtually new Triumph liter bike.  2006 was the last model year for the 955i, and it has some nice upgrades from earlier Daytonas.

2006 Triumph Daytona 955i for sale on eBay

An assault on the sportbike establishment in 1997, the later Daytona was a more mature GT, the fuel injected triple good for 149 hp.  The double-tube cradle frame is now black, but the same aluminum alloy.  Extra-large 45mm forks and 320mm brakes are Triumph's own design, and 2003 saw a return to the single-sided swingarm.  A nice re-design of the fairing and headlight was done in 2005, and black was introduced as a color choice.

Currently residing in Delaware, this Daytona had a bath for the occasion and looks excellent.  A carbon and polished exhaust has been added, but not much else in the way of personalization.  From the eBay auction:

Bike has straight papers, currently registered in Delaware.  Numbers are straight.  Bike had zero miles when I got it in 2014.  Only have 2510 miles ridden since and clearly looks the part.
Bike was manufactured at the end of the production run in 2006.  Has the gorgeous split headlamp, the preferable single sided swingarm and a number of other improvements made over the earlier years of the models.
Bike has the beautiful carbon factory high level exhaust which sounds heavenly.  Also has a rear seat cowl and a passenger seat as well.
Condition is 99% perfect.  Almost no flaws to speak of.  The clear coat on the carbon infills could be redone.
I installed a cell phone holder that holds my phone very well, that's included.
The legendary Triumph triple is a blast to ride and an absolutely unique machine.

Revitalized by John Bloor, Triumph proved itself a sportbike force with the Daytona.  It offered a different perspective for riders reacting to the vanill-ish offerings from the big four, and bonus points if one felt buying European was important.  The company soon made the 955i redundant to focus on the middleweight market, so the 2006 is the end of an era.  This example has spanned the globe to bring the new owner a smashing experience...

-donn

Better Late – 2006 Triumph Daytona 955i with 2,510 miles !
Triumph April 26, 2018 posted by

Fireball Orange: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

Fully-faired sportbikes of the 80s and 90s from Japan are almost without exception festooned with jagged graphics, huge logos, hilariously technical-sounding acronyms, and retina-searing colors. They're pretty cool now in a retro way and some of them, like the famous Rothmans designs, are truly iconic, but they feel like rolling billboards. Which of course is exactly what race-bikes, and therefore race-replicas are. They're fun and nostalgic and even ironic these days, but honestly? I wouldn't have been caught dead on one back when they were new. I've always been a classy, subtle guy and while this Fireball Orange Triumph Speed Triple may not be subtle, it is a pretty classy brute and exactly the kind of machine that interested me back when I got into motorcycling.

It's a shame folks on this site don't seem to like these first generation "T309" Triumph Speed Triples. You're really looking at one of the original factory streetfighters: a legitimate sportbike with the fairing removed, a modern cafe racer. Because while the period Daytona may not have been a cutting-edge performer, it certainly was a sportbike, just one that was more a "gentlemans's express" than a "racetrack refugee." Sure, the Speed Triple was limited by its modular spine-frame that allowed design flexibility at the expense of weight and handling, but people did actually race them, at least in a one-make series called, fittingly enough, the Speed Triple Challenge that was meant to promote the brand.

Unfortunately, the weight and top-heavy design meant it was as much a race bike as Harley's more recent XR1200 that also found its way into a one-make race series. But as a road bike? The Speed Triple's burly 885cc three cylinder engine had performance and charisma to spare. Triumph knew it couldn't compete in terms of raw performance against the Japanese, so they went for quality and character instead, and their bikes of the period had better detailing and better paint. You'd certainly be hard-pressed to find another bike from this era that looks this good without having been restored.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

Beautiful, mint, original ‘95 Speed Triple. Low miles & garage kept. Meticulously maintained. This bike is unique, draws a crowd, and performs extremely well for an older bike. Soulful exhaust note and a ton of character. There are not many like this one left. Mileage is subject to change, as I am still riding it.

Even if the early Speed Triple wasn't a pretty cool bike on its own, at least Triumph's strategy paid off and strong sales allowed brand to thrive, enabling it to produce machines like the much-lauded Daytona 675, Street Triple, and modern Speed Triple. Picking at them for their limitations seems unkind, especially considering the incredible bang for the buck they provide. You're a seasoned rider, you've got a few grand to spend, and you want something cool to ride to work and blast around the canyons on weekends? Something that your significant other will want to ride with you? Something with classic looks and reasonably modern performance? This is about the cleanest, lowest-mileage near-classic you're likely to find, and you can even pretend it's an investment...

-tad

Fireball Orange: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale
Triumph October 11, 2017 posted by

Black-Clad Bruiser: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

Triumph’s entire 1990s range of sport, sport-touring, retro, and naked machines like this original Speed Triple was built around a common spine frame and two engines, the 885cc inline triple seen here and a larger-displacement inline four. This allowed Triumph to quickly create new variations and mirror market trends without sacrificing quality, a strategy that led directly to today’s world-class motorcycles. But the company's road to success was a difficult one. They were long gone by the early 1990s, a victim of the Japanese motorcycle industry’s massive growth in the 1980s. Triumph was able to hang on throughout the 1970s, trading on their handling and reputation for performance. But once the Japanese bikes’ handling caught up with their reliably powerful engines, it was all over but the shouting.

The reborn Triumph of the 90s knew that it could never hope to compete with the Japanese in terms of outright performance, so they focused instead on quality and capitalizing on the brand’s undeniable mystique. The new Triumph motorcycles offered real-world performance, decent handling, and surprisingly high fit and finish. It's not the lightest or nimblest of machines: none of these first-generation John Bloor-era Triumphs were. But they were well-built and charismatic, just as intended.

T309 Speed Triples are definitely not track machines: a top-heavy weight distribution caused by the spine frame compromised handling, although there was a promotional one-make race series for them called the "Speed Triple Challenge" that must have been fun to watch. The rugged triple and five-speed gearbox may not offer performance that will set your hair on fire today, but the 98 claimed horses mean the Speed Triple is plenty fast for road use and the bike should sound great with the aftermarket three-into-one exhaust seen here.

The seller refers to the bike as "this original naked bike." If he means "one of the original naked bikes" then he'd be correct. The Speed Triple was introduced in 1994, but Italian rival Ducati's Monster was introduced a year prior in 1993 and Honda's proto-Monster Hawk GT was first available all the way back in 1988, although it was kind of a sales flop at the time. Nevertheless, the Speed Triple is one of Triumph's best-selling bikes of the modern era and, much like the Monster, can probably be credited with the company's current success.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

Thanks for looking. This is a very good condition 1995 Triumph speed triple. It has recently had a top end overhaul and new timing chain and tensioner/guides. The bike fires on the 2nd crank every time and runs awesome. I am looking to sell to downsize my collection due to a growing family. 

I have and will include with the selling price, the original Triumph dual exhaust that is pictured in one photo. It is not installed but all hardware is there. 

Many spares are included as well which were given to me by previous owner. 

I have owned for the last 5 years and have had a blast riding this original naked bike. This bike was the first year the speed triple was offered in the USA. My offering is your chance to own a modern classic. 

There's been no interest in the bike so far at the starting bid of $1,500 but there are still a couple days left on the auction. The first-gen Speed Triple is nearly a classic at this point, but modern enough you can count on it to start every day, and the build quality of the Bloor-era bikes is high. They've been pretty cheap for a while now, and many that come up for sale feature signs of neglect, but this one looks very nice, and supposedly comes with a bunch of additional parts, so it might be worth looking into as a future collectible.

-tad

Black-Clad Bruiser: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale
Triumph April 29, 2017 posted by

Grand Touring: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale

Motorcycling history is littered with storied nameplates undone by economic changes, and many have tried and failed to resurrect those brands, but one of the enduring success stories continues to be Triumph. Sunk by a changing economy, a changing market, and an inability to compete with the reliable, affordable, high-performance bikes from Japan, Triumph's long, slow slide into irrelevance was over by 1983. John Bloor originally purchased the defunct Triumph facility with an eye to razing it and building residences, but somewhere along the line, a bit of nationalistic inspiration struck him and he instead decided to revive the brand. Attempts to compete head-on with sportbikes from Japan a second time were always going to end in failure, so Triumph wisely chose to focus on quality and heritage instead of outright performance. That's not to say that bikes like today's Triumph Daytona 1200SE didn't have brawn to match their good looks, but that performance was never going be as focused or as inexpensive as it would be with something like a GSX-R1100. Instead, Triumph went for a different customer, one more concerned with quality and class than top-speed numbers or lap times.

The biggest limitation to ultimate performance was Triumph's decision to go with modular design based around a spine frame. That same basic frame and two engines, a triple or an inline four, could be wrapped in different bodywork to create an entire range of motorcycles and quickly add models to react to market changes, which gave versatility for a fairly low cost. Unfortunately, it meant a bit of a jack-of-all-trades quality, with too much weight carried too high for optimal handling. Nothing wrong in the engine room however: 147 horsepower may not sound all that impressive, considering the 1180cc engine, but it was one of the most powerful motorcycles available at the time and a claimed 85 lbs-ft of torque is BMW S1000RR territory. So the big Daytona can move out smartly and, most importantly, can sustain that 159mph top speed seemingly all day long, with plenty of wind protection from the big fairing and all-day ergonomics.

Styling is always subjective, but I think these look pretty cool, with that dual-round headlamp endurance racing style, but without the aggression or wild graphics of a 90s Japanese sportbike. The monochromatic color treatment, especially the black seen here, makes it look classy and elegant. I think they've aged well and prices mean you can have a classic road-burner with all-day comfort for relative peanuts. Personally, I'd prefer one of the hot-rod three-cylinder Super III models, but in either guise you're looking at a deceptively fast motorcycle.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale

I purchased this bike three years ago to add it to the other two Daytona's I already have. The reason for the sale is that I have my hands full with my other D-12's and the other bikes we have. So... In the three years I have owned the bike I have put less than 400 miles on the it. I replaced the left and right fairings as well as the front fairing, windshield, with trim, clip-ons, fork seals, tires, and battery. I am the third owner, from what I was told. I have the bike stored in my climate controlled basement since I brought it home. The bike is completely stock. All parts used are Triumph parts. There is a very small ding on the tank. On the right side from previous owner. Also a small scratch/rub on the left side rear body work. The only thing missing is the Union Jack that gets mounted on the side fairing underneath "Special Edition". I have not located one yet. The last thing the bike needs is a carb tune. I have not done this because I wasn't riding it. I have a shop that has tuned my other D-12's that has the bikes producing 120hp and 80ft.lbs. at the rear wheel. I can have them do the work for around, $400.00, or we can discuss other options.

Full disclosure is something we all appreciate when shopping for a bike. When obvious stuff is wrong but not mentioned, we bike folks think, "Hmmm... if he's not being up front with that, what else isn't he telling us?" Being upfront about minor flaws suggests that, not only is the seller honest, but that they are a bit obsessive themselves. I'm not obsessive about minor flaws like the ones present here, but I sure want to buy a bike from someone who is. For a bike meant to cover big miles at big speeds, this one shows remarkably little wear and tear, although mileage is pretty low and the seller is asking $5,199.00 for what appears to be a very nice motorcycle. This is another bike like yesterday's VF1000R where most examples that show up for sale seem to have held up very well, considering the fact that they're 20 years old devices that go belting along highways and back roads at speed, which speaks not only to build quality, but to attentive ownership. But then again, that's exactly the kind of customer Triumph was shooting for in the first place.

-tad

Grand Touring: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale