Posts by tag: Triumph

Sport Bikes For Sale September 15, 2021 posted by

Neo Classic Hiding In Plain Sight: Triumph Daytona 765 Moto 2

It is not very often that RSPFS posts about a brand new motorcycle, but this Triumph Daytona 765 is very much worth a look in the current market.

When Triumph launched the Daytona 675 in 2006 the media heaped praise on the bike for the wonderful handling and sweet engine characteristics.  The appealing package took the fight to the other offerings in the middle weight class.  For 2011 Triumph upped the ante with the R version.  Ohlins front and rear as well as other subtle changes were sure to impress.  2013 saw the only real meaningful update to the platform with the introduction of a revised frame and engine with a new bore/stroke ratio.  While the middle weight class may have ultimately died off, the 675R remained a cult favorite by offering owners a beautiful bike for either road or track use.  Prices remained strong on the used market as demand stayed steady.  2017 was the last model year in the USA for the 657R and many fans were left wondering what was next.

Triumph Daytona 765 on eBay

For the 2020 model year Triumph announced the return of the Dayton name plate with the 765 Moto2.  Triumph is the exclusive engine provider for the Moto2 championship and wanted to capitalize on that connection.  Even with a global pandemic underway, Triumph was doing track days, press rides and loaning examples out to people on YouTube.  The updated website was rather impressive with epic photographs and a real sense of excitement.  All that buzz and fanfare seemed to fade rather quickly for some reason.

On paper there was much to love about the Daytona 765.  Carbon fiber body work, modern electronics suite and current generation suspension from Ohlins were just the highlights.  An Arrow exhaust system was standard, and the USA and Canadian market bikes were numbered from a limited allocation of 765 bikes.

The increased engine size did not yield more horsepower (128), but did provide 4 more lb/ft of torque for a total of 59.  5 pounds of weight were removed to get the 765 down to 363 pounds dry.  These numbers indicate that the 765 was an evolution of the well loved 675 and that should have been regarded as a positive.  But the elephant in the room was price.  Where the 2017 675R had an MSRP of $14,000, the 765 came in at $17,500.

Triumph Daytona 765 on eBay

It seems that this price point could have been the spark that caused the market to reject what otherwise would have been a home run motorcycle.  So at this point many of you are wondering why a brand new motorcycle with what appears to be an expensive price tag is here on RSBFS.  Well something funny is happening in the market that may interest some of you.

We have all been aware that the market for used vehicles is insane these days.  Production interruptions, pandemics, supply chain issues and geopolitical policies have all effected pricing on almost everything.  Some brand new bikes are selling for over MSRP, and there are even examples of used bikes selling for more money then they were new.  Does this mean that the bargain hunters looking for value are out of luck?  Not with the Daytona 765.  Triumph knows that dealers are stuck with these bikes on the showroom and has had no choice but to lower the price, and not just a little bit.  Some examples are being offered with almost $5,000 off of MSRP.  This means there are some used 2017 bikes with asking prices higher then the brand new 765!  It is not very common for anything brand new to be a bargain when compared to a used example.

Triumph Daytona 765 on eBay

If the original sticker shock was enough to scare some away, maybe these reductions will bring buyers back.  This example here is offered at a dollar under $13k, that is R6 money for a much more exotic, rare and special bike.  Is this enough to convince you to buy new?  Will the pricing on the new bikes suppress the values of the older 675Rs?  We certainly live in interesting times.

 

Neo Classic Hiding In Plain Sight: Triumph Daytona 765 Moto 2
Triumph August 29, 2021 posted by

British Bruiser: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III

When ever people talk about Triumph motorcycles they seem to gravitate to the Steve McQueen vintage bikes, or the neo classic bikes sold today.  Far too often the wonderful Daytona line from the 90s is overlooked.  This is unfortunate as they offer a really interesting option for buyers that might be focused on ZX9 or CBR900s.

Triumph Daytona Super III for sale on eBay

The best of the 900cc Daytona came in the form of the Super III.  Making 115hp with three cylinders and 9500 rpm the Super III was not short on performance, even if it was criticized for carrying too much weight at 465 pounds.  Records state that 805 were produced between 1993 and 1996.   These rebounded from being deemed too heavy to be a sports bike by gaining a reputation for being an outstanding long distance and fast motorcycle.

Today we are all spoiled by how much carbon is used on standard bikes, but in the 90s that material was still considered fairly exotic.  Certainly not something you find on a factory Japanese bikes from the period.

From the Seller’s eBay Listing:

1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for sale, Rare bike as only 179 or so made it to the states, who knows how many are left. Looks and runs great, Cosworth designed engine, 115 HP, 6 speed transmission, Carbon Fiber bits, Alcon 6 piston front brakes, Keihin Flat-slide carbs, Factory Pro Ignition Advancer, Nology Coils, Sebring Exhaust, The Yuasa battery is about a year old and is always on a tender, I’ve owned the bike for 6 years. I’m getting older now and the riding position is no longer comfortable for me. I start the bike and take it around the neighborhood but it hasn’t been out for a real ride in a while. Tires are good (no cracks)but need replacement due to age, Spark plugs, engine oil, and filter were just replaced, Valve shim clearances were inspected recently and four shims replaced, Fork oil and brake/clutch fluids should probably be replaced before putting bike back into service, No engine leaks whatsoever. $500 non-refundable deposit due with in 48 hours.

Bike is being listed locally.

I do not have the stock exhaust nor the stock carbs.

This specific example appears to be well taken care of and presents well.  Perhaps there is a Triumph expert that is reading this that can shed some light on why one would swap out the stock Mikuni flat slides for Keihin.  Fitment looks OEM with the use of the standard airbox.

Priced with a Buy It Now listing of $5500, a relative bargain when shopping for more pedestrian bikes of this era.  Sure to offer the next owner something unique and usable.  With 19,000 miles on the clocks, the next owner should have no guilt using the bike as intended.

British Bruiser:  1996 Triumph Daytona Super III
Triumph July 29, 2021 posted by

2000 Triumph Daytona 955i – with only 3858 miles!

This CL ad was removed before we could get it posted- dd

2000 Triumph Daytona 955i For Sale on Dayton Craigslist

It’s a little slow this week sourcing rare motorcycles from our normal stomping ground so, the CEO gave us little guys the green light to expand our searches. It took me all of 2 minutes to find this gem in Ohio and low and behold- the seller browses our site! Hey Seller and RSBFS.com reader! So, I figured I’d spread some Midwest love and help a brother or sister out and give them our global audience (Ssshhhh! Don’t tell the boss I’m doing this)

Single sided Swing-arm, gobs of torque, snazzy carbon canister and that Pretty Fly for a White Guy Triumph yellow paint.

From the seller-

A very nice, clean Triumph Daytona 955i with only 3858 miles. The bike has been garage kept and covered, and i’m selling it because I don’t get out and ride as much as the bike deserves… and she deserves a lot. The three cylinder engine produces great low and mid end torque which make the bike such a hoot to ride. This version of the 955i comes with a factory tuned and upgraded carbon slip-on exhaust. The timeless styling, Triumph badge, Ducati-like single sided swing-arm

“Hold on there fine gentlemen”

Everybody knows Ducati wasn’t the first to use a single sided swing arm- it was Honda . . . or was it Elf? Either way, I’d like to request a change please.

A very nice, clean Triumph Daytona 955i with only 3858 miles. The bike has been garage kept and covered, and i’m selling it because I don’t get out and ride as much as the bike deserves… and she deserves a lot. The three cylinder engine produces great low and mid end torque which make the bike such a hoot to ride. This version of the 955i comes with a factory tuned and upgraded carbon slip-on exhaust. The timeless styling, Triumph badge, Honda/Elf like single sided swing-arm

#Fixed

Like what you’re seeing? I do! Well, the Triumph headlights are a little wonky to me, but since I can’t see them while sitting in the saddle, I can live with them.

The specs on this 21 year old Brit are-
3858 miles on the clock
955cc’s under the hood . . er . . under the fuel tank
130hp @ 9900 rpm’s
73.8 lbft of torque at 7600 rpm’s
Wrapped up in a 436# package.

Oh, there is some light bubbling on the lower side of the fuel tank. NBD- just slap a sticker on it!

The seller so graciously referenced a 2019 post, written by Tad in their CL ad. Thank you!

Need more yellow in your garage? Make the jump to the original ad here for more information about the 955i.

Good luck with the sale!

dd

2000 Triumph Daytona 955i – with only 3858 miles!
Triumph March 23, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 2000 Triumph TT600

Update 7.10.21: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Spring has sprung and we are just starting to see the tendrils of growth that promise to make this another banner year. And right on queue comes this wonderful Triumph TT600 Featured Listing. While perhaps not as rare or expensive as some bikes in collecting circles, the Triumph is a wonderful and unique machine that certainly fits into the rare and unusual category here on RSBFS. We don’t see them all that often, and these 600s represent an inexpensive way to get into a quality sport bike riding the road less traveled.

Featured Listing – 2000 Triumph TT600

In 2000, Triumph was the only manufacturer outside of Japan to take on the Big Four at their own game: the 600cc hyper sport segment. To be successful in this ultra-competitive space, the Hinkley, UK-based constructor needed to bring some serious mojo to the design table. What they crafted was a powerful, fuel-injected inline four cylinder screamer housed in a twin-beam aluminum frame. Eager not to fall into the trap of “not invented here,” ancillary components were sourced from the best that the Japanese had to offer, putting the TT600 on the same footing as the competition. Brakes were excellent Nissin units (310mm front, 220 rear), and front and rear suspension pieces were provided by Kayaba. In an attempt at cutting edge, Triumph engineers fitted the TT600 with a Sagem digital fuel injection unit. This ensured that the bike was firmly rooted in the new century (producing power AND fewer emissions), but Triumph was to discover the this new technology was not without pitfalls.

From the seller:
2000 Triumph TT600 for sale in great condition. Has 13,000 miles on the unit. The unit is rated at 110 HP, I have replaced the stock exhaust with an aftermarket pipe. I do have the original pipe to go with the bike. I have purchased a rear fork jack for storage. The bike has Diablos for tires currently. The bike comes with a cover and also a tank and rear foot peg video or go pro attachment. I also have a TT600 jacket that is in red and silver color. New battery as 11/2020. The bike runs well, it will need service on oil and brake fluid before taking it out for a long ride. The bike has an excellent riding position for long rides or tearing up the corners. There are very few left in the market place.

Price: $4,000

Reviewers of the day lavished the bulbous Triumph with high praise, being extremely comfortable despite being a competitive crotch-rocket. The Kayaba suspension was set up a bit softer than the other middleweights, and the engine was a estimated 110 HP powerhouse that pulled hard in the upper revs – although suffered from some fuel injection stumbling at lower throttle settings. Handling was reported to be excellent as the alloy chassis was ultra stiff – even when compared to the Japanese competition. Overall build quality was up to a very high standard as well, making these motorcycles as exotic in the US as other European brands. Here is a video shot by the seller of this exact bike:

The TT600 model evolved in the 3 short years of its existence, paving the way for the Daytona series. Today these are relatively rare models, and difficult to find in decent condition. Today’s Featured Listing is a well-cared for rider that has the miles to prove the TT600 concepts works well, yet still looks as rare and unique as it did 20 years ago. In fact, given that most of the competition maintains a very angular design language, one might argue that the Triumph has aged far better that its peers; it certainly makes a distinctive statement in 2021. The exhaust upgrade helps with sound, performance and looks (win win win), and the overall package is listed for just $4,000. The Triumph TT600 is a great looking bike that owns a rightful place in history as a serious 600cc contender. Check out all of the pictures and video and then talk to the man.

MI

Featured Listing: 2000 Triumph TT600
Triumph September 20, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Low-mile 2002 Triumph Daytona 955i Centennial Edition

The 2002 Triumph Daytona 955i Centennial Edition is a sneaky beast, as at first blush it’s just Triumph’s big, hairy-chested early 2000s bruiser in a smart shade of green. It takes a real Triumph aficionado to see and feel the differences between this one-of-200 special and its less exotic counterpart.

This bike has seen very little use, showing just 3,923 miles. The original owner apparently took it on some longish trips around Idaho, before moving it on to the seller. The dormant periods have served it well, as the fairings appear to be blemish free and immaculately clean. A generous handful of tasteful mods — including ECU work, an under-tail kit and an exhaust — add to the aura.

Hidden under the Aston Green paintwork — a metallic hue a couple shades darker than British Racing Green — Triumph hid a set of carbon fiber fairings. The gauges also got a smattering of the black stuff to keep the high-tech materials brief going and make sure nobody would mistake the CE for a cheaper ride.

Triumph saved the real party pieces for the chassis, where they threw on the single-sided swingarm from the previous generation Dayona, which added style at a nearly four-pound weight penalty. They also lengthened the wheelbase, but snipped off .3 of a degree of rake and nearly 2.5 mm of trail. Doesn’t sound like much, but it sharpened the CE over the standard model.

From the seller:

Mostly original, with the only changes being a pipe/K&N with an under-tail kit and some handlebar/control changes to make the bike more comfortable.
I am the second owner. 49 state bike, was originally from Idaho where the owner only did a few long rides in good weather and then sold it to me in Apr 2013 with about 1900 miles, where I took the bike back to San Diego where it is at presently. Car-fax report will likely show 0 for mileage since reporting mileage on a bike over 10 years old was not required here in CA. -Please inquire for details on this. Since then I’ve ridden the bike only occasionally and never abused it. I had a 2009 Speed Triple but sold it after a couple years, I just wasn’t much of a fan of the way it rode but always wanted to try one of these Daytonas. I was surprised by how different the bikes were. The 02 despite being older and a very similar bike to start with was quite a bit stronger running. Torquier, and the transmission shifted like a swiss watch compared to the S3. I just don’t ride much anymore and would just like to see it go to someone else to enjoy. All maintenance was performed at San Diego Triumph (Rocket Cycles), and there is really nothing that needs done at this time except maybe for the tires. I put fresh ones on when I got it and the date stamp is oct 2012 so they are just reaching their in-service time even though they show hardly any wear. Brakes/chain/clutch are original and good condition. Bike has the solo tail cover and comes with the pillion saddle. Pics do not show the passenger footrests but they are available as are most of the stock parts and I’ve kept all receipts. Original toolkit available. General shape of the bike is excellent, with the only flaws being small scuffs that come more from just sitting in the garage than being on the road embarrassingly.

Wolf/Trident Unter-tail Kit (Original available and comes with the bike)
Wolf/Trident Carbon fiber exhaust (Original available and comes with the bike)
Aftermarket tinted windscreen (Original available and comes with the bike)
LSL Tour Match clip-ons, which I had titanium anodized (Original available and comes with the bike)
Polished, then titanium colored anodized top clamp to match the LSL parts (Original available and comes with the bike)
Titanium bar-ends (Original available and comes with the bike)
675 Daytona Clutch perch to fit the LSL bars (Original available and comes with the bike)
CRG levers in titanium (Original available and comes with the bike)
Shorai Lithium Ion Battery With Shorai charger
TuneECU programmed ECU with Julian tune. Engine idle/over-run is good. o2 sensor is used. Engine pulls clean with no flat spots.
Bridgestone Battleax BT016 Pro (Oct 2012 MFR Date)
Racetech front fork rebuild with new springs and gold valves for a 150lb rider.
Skyking fairing savers
Trimmed length gear shift lever (New OEM unit comes with the bike

I also have a spare fuel tank that is still new, in the box that comes with the bike. Original owner had chipped the paint on the original tank and bought a replacement but never installed it and I didn’t think the chip looked bad so I left it. The chip is touched up and you don’t see it unless your looking for it. I also have 2 extra front sprockets in the smaller, 17 and 18 tooth sizes in case you want a lower gear. Original owner bought them but didn’t need them, and I didn’t either with the torque the bike’s got. It always did fine off the line and a shorter sprocket would probably have made it more of a handful. During my ownership, I’ve had problems with charging. Common on these bikes, so I installed a shunt wire with fuze to improve the charging and the bike now puts out about 14-14.4V at idle so no issues now. Also had trouble with the low-fuel warning light and an associated EML light which is a design flaw with these bikes. So a new fuel sender went in with a float stopper modification that fixes the issue. Bike now just needs a new rider.

The Daytona 955i Centennial Edition has yet to reach the upper echelons of collectability, but with so few produced and with as special as the machines are, they’re likely to stay valuable to the right seller. If you’re looking for a rare, special, brute-in-a-suit British sport tourer, this is your steed. Seller Joseph can be reached here and asks $5,800.

Featured Listing: Low-mile 2002 Triumph Daytona 955i Centennial Edition
Honda October 27, 2017 posted by

Time Travel: 1989 Honda GB500 TT for Sale

At a glance, you might be thinking, “Hey, when did I get redirected to ClassicSportbikesforSale?” But no, this isn’t a vintage machine, it’s a Honda GB500 TT that was built in 1989. Strangely, it was both ahead of its time and retro, something that was really only achieved by the GB500 and Moto Guzzi’s 1000S. These days, classic is king, and many of the major manufacturers are cashing in on their heritage: Ducati, BMW, Triumph all have very successful lines of retro-styled bikes with modern performance. But in the late 1980s, the classic-style craze hadn’t really caught on yet here in the US, and the GB500 has languished in obscurity for a long time, although used examples command decent prices and values are now on the rise.

Styled to evoke British classics from the 50s and 60s like Norton’s famous Manx racers, the GB500 is one of those “everything you need and nothing you don’t” kind of machines, assuming you’re not trying to cut some serious lap times at the track or stalk superbikes in the canyons. Powered by a sleeved-down version of Honda’s XL600, it’s simple, fun, and easy to maintain. The four-valve single gave 33hp at the rear wheel, enough to push the 390lb wet machine to a top speed north of The Ton: 108mph in period tests. It’s not very fast in a straight line, but handling was very good and it’s obviously a handsome machine: anyone who doesn’t know what it is will probably assume it’s much, much older than it is, and you’ll get plenty of questions.

So with good looks, reliability, and usable performance, why didn’t it sell very well? Well it actually did sell pretty well in its home market. But in the late 1980s, vintage nostalgia hadn’t really taken off in the US, where the bike was sold for just two years: 1989 and 1990. Part of the problem might have been that you could still buy the real thing for reasonable prices, so the main reason to get one was that you wanted the style of a 50s or 60s British bike without the hassle. The price didn’t help either: it was a well-built machine, but the $4200 Honda wanted was just $500 less than a Kawasaki ZX-7, so it’s pretty obvious why the bike wasn’t popular among more is more” American motorcyclists.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda GB500 TT for Sale

The GB500 TT derives its name from “Great Britain, 500cc and from the Tourist Trophy” a classic 37-mile motorcycle circuit on the Isle of Man.
It was originally produced 1989-1990. It is a 498cc SOHC single cylinder with a 5 speed transmission at approx. 390 lb. It has both an electric push start and a kick start. Paint is a metallic black-green with gold pin-striping and lettering, as well as chrome wire wheels. Although the British inspired the style of the bike, Japan polished the details and improved on the engines’ smoothness and durability.

My bike is the 1989 GB500.

I am the second owner and bought this bike form a collector on 08/1998. It had 1,853 mi on it at the time. I have kept it garaged and rode it for pleasure around town. The current mileage 5,226. It is in great condition. The bike is light, easy to handle and fun to ride. Its vintage British styling turns heads. It has Metzler tires. The bike has a couple of faint paint scratches on the tank. It runs great. It has a Supertrapp exhaust that reduces the overall weight and makes the bikes single cylinder thumper earn its name. The chrome on the Supertrap is slightly aged. I also have the original exhaust system that goes with the bike. I previously purchased a Corbin dual seat made specifically for this bike. This also goes with the bike.

This is a classic bike so serious buyers who are interested in this particular bike should respond. I am asking $ 6,500. If you want to have to look at the bike in person I will meet serious buyers only. If you want to take the bike for a ride you will need to bring the asking price in cash as collateral.

The $6,500 asking price is at the high end of the spectrum for a decent GB500, but this one looks especially nice, with extremely low miles. If you like the style of a classic Triumph or Norton, but want something you can ride every weekend without having to gap the plugs, replace the points, reattach wayward brackets, make sure all the lights work, and clean up puddles of oil, the GB500 is a surprisingly classy and faithful replica of the real thing, without all that famous British bike “character…”

-tad

Time Travel: 1989 Honda GB500 TT for Sale
Triumph April 29, 2017 posted by

Grand Touring: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale

Motorcycling history is littered with storied nameplates undone by economic changes, and many have tried and failed to resurrect those brands, but one of the enduring success stories continues to be Triumph. Sunk by a changing economy, a changing market, and an inability to compete with the reliable, affordable, high-performance bikes from Japan, Triumph’s long, slow slide into irrelevance was over by 1983. John Bloor originally purchased the defunct Triumph facility with an eye to razing it and building residences, but somewhere along the line, a bit of nationalistic inspiration struck him and he instead decided to revive the brand. Attempts to compete head-on with sportbikes from Japan a second time were always going to end in failure, so Triumph wisely chose to focus on quality and heritage instead of outright performance. That’s not to say that bikes like today’s Triumph Daytona 1200SE didn’t have brawn to match their good looks, but that performance was never going be as focused or as inexpensive as it would be with something like a GSX-R1100. Instead, Triumph went for a different customer, one more concerned with quality and class than top-speed numbers or lap times.

The biggest limitation to ultimate performance was Triumph’s decision to go with modular design based around a spine frame. That same basic frame and two engines, a triple or an inline four, could be wrapped in different bodywork to create an entire range of motorcycles and quickly add models to react to market changes, which gave versatility for a fairly low cost. Unfortunately, it meant a bit of a jack-of-all-trades quality, with too much weight carried too high for optimal handling. Nothing wrong in the engine room however: 147 horsepower may not sound all that impressive, considering the 1180cc engine, but it was one of the most powerful motorcycles available at the time and a claimed 85 lbs-ft of torque is BMW S1000RR territory. So the big Daytona can move out smartly and, most importantly, can sustain that 159mph top speed seemingly all day long, with plenty of wind protection from the big fairing and all-day ergonomics.

Styling is always subjective, but I think these look pretty cool, with that dual-round headlamp endurance racing style, but without the aggression or wild graphics of a 90s Japanese sportbike. The monochromatic color treatment, especially the black seen here, makes it look classy and elegant. I think they’ve aged well and prices mean you can have a classic road-burner with all-day comfort for relative peanuts. Personally, I’d prefer one of the hot-rod three-cylinder Super III models, but in either guise you’re looking at a deceptively fast motorcycle.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale

I purchased this bike three years ago to add it to the other two Daytona’s I already have. The reason for the sale is that I have my hands full with my other D-12’s and the other bikes we have. So… In the three years I have owned the bike I have put less than 400 miles on the it. I replaced the left and right fairings as well as the front fairing, windshield, with trim, clip-ons, fork seals, tires, and battery. I am the third owner, from what I was told. I have the bike stored in my climate controlled basement since I brought it home. The bike is completely stock. All parts used are Triumph parts. There is a very small ding on the tank. On the right side from previous owner. Also a small scratch/rub on the left side rear body work. The only thing missing is the Union Jack that gets mounted on the side fairing underneath “Special Edition”. I have not located one yet. The last thing the bike needs is a carb tune. I have not done this because I wasn’t riding it. I have a shop that has tuned my other D-12’s that has the bikes producing 120hp and 80ft.lbs. at the rear wheel. I can have them do the work for around, $400.00, or we can discuss other options.

Full disclosure is something we all appreciate when shopping for a bike. When obvious stuff is wrong but not mentioned, we bike folks think, “Hmmm… if he’s not being up front with that, what else isn’t he telling us?” Being upfront about minor flaws suggests that, not only is the seller honest, but that they are a bit obsessive themselves. I’m not obsessive about minor flaws like the ones present here, but I sure want to buy a bike from someone who is. For a bike meant to cover big miles at big speeds, this one shows remarkably little wear and tear, although mileage is pretty low and the seller is asking $5,199.00 for what appears to be a very nice motorcycle. This is another bike like yesterday’s VF1000R where most examples that show up for sale seem to have held up very well, considering the fact that they’re 20 years old devices that go belting along highways and back roads at speed, which speaks not only to build quality, but to attentive ownership. But then again, that’s exactly the kind of customer Triumph was shooting for in the first place.

-tad

Grand Touring: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale
Triumph January 10, 2017 posted by

British Beef: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

Faced with the onslaught of powerful, dead-reliable motorcycles from Japan, many of the storied British and European motorcycle brands folded and Triumph was among them, although the story of their eventual resurrection is suitably British. These days, they’re famous for their characterful performance machines, but it took them years to earn that enviable reputation. This Daytona Super III represents ground-zero for this new generation of Triumph motorcycles and was their sportiest bike at the time.

John Bloor was actually looking at the defunct Triumph factory as a residential building site when he decided instead to relaunch the brand, which is about as much a change of heart as it’s possible to have. Building a wide variety of bikes to suit different markets and niches with entirely different frames and engines would have been prohibitively expensive, so the new range of motorcycles was built around a modular frame, with either a 900cc triple or 1200cc inline four for motivation: the 900cc triple in the Daytona was the same basic engine that also powered the Thunderbird, Trident, Sprint, Tiger, Trophy, and Speed Triple. Pretty impressive, considering how different those bikes appear at first glance.

The standard Daytona 900 made 98hp, but Cosworth tuning took the Super III to 115hp, with a near 140mph top speed, with upgraded, six-piston brakes up front to bring the whole thing to a halt quickly. Those numbers were healthy for the time, although they didn’t really compete with the fastest bikes of the era. But as you can see from the displacement, Triumph wasn’t looking at competing in racing for the most part, and the displacements reflect this roadgoing mission, an area in which the bike excelled.

Handling was very stable, although the spine frame carried weight high and the bike was fairly heavy overall so it couldn’t really be considered nimble. But quality was a step up from the Japanese, comfort was good, and the look was much more classic and conservative to appeal to a different segment of the sportbike marketplace. These days, nice Daytonas and even Super IIIs can be had for relative peanuts, as you can see with today’s example, and offers up useable performance and distinctive looks.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

This is a good clean example of a rare 1996 Triumph Daytona Super 3.  The bike is in great shape with limited modifications and most of the original parts.  I do not have the original exhaust, but have seem them on e-bay for 100-$300.  This bike has just had a fresh tune-up, rebuilt carbs, plugs, all new rubber hoses, coolant flush, valve adjustment, and new Pilot 3 tires.  One of the side panels may have been repainted at some point, but I’m not sure, and one of the rear turn signals has a broken stalk.   Aftermarket parts  4 into 1 full race exhaust by Sebring K&N pod filters (original air box included) Available Parts 1 Brand new Penske fully adjustable remote resivore rear shock $1,000 (paid $1300).  If the bike buyer dose not want it, I’ll list it in a separate auction. Additional Super 3 info: The Triumph Daytona Super III was a limited edition of the under-appreciated Daytona 900. Just 805 were sold worldwide and they featured engine work by Cosworth. In addition to Cosworth’s touch, this bike got bigger cams, flat slide carbs, 6 piston front brakes, and a whole lot of carbon fiber. The results of the engine work yielded a healthy 115 horsepower, though the bike was too heavy to be a true sports bike. It instead ended up being a fantastic sport-tourer, and a bike you had to muscle around to have a lot of fun with.

That “repainted side panel” does look a bit off in a couple of the photos, but the seller is asking a very reasonable $3,500 for what appears to be a clean, well-maintained and upgraded bit of Triumph’s comeback story. The styling may be a bit dated, but the bike oozes class and while it may not be a “true sportbike” it has muscle where it counts: on the road. And let’s be honest, that’s where most motorcyclists spend their time. Track day junkies should probably look elsewhere,  although one of the coaches at the track-day organization I rode with on the East Coast had a Daytona like this one set up for track riding, so they can be made to handle if you’re willing to expend a bit of time, money and effort.

-tad

British Beef: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale