Posts by tag: FZR400

Yamaha May 18, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Yamaha FZR400RR 3TJ1 for Sale

We've spilled a lot of ink [pixels?] here on RSBFS about the Yamaha FZR400 so you're probably thinking if you've seen one, you've seen them all. But take a closer look at this little sportbike, especially the front: in place of the usual twin round lamps like you'd normally see on the FZR is a single, trapezoidal light that leaves the bike looking quite a bit like the two-stroke TZR. What we have here is a grey-market FZR400RR, a bike seldom seen outside its home market of Japan.

The RR was the slightly less extreme, less expensive, road-biased version of the very trick FZR400RR SP. It features a revised gearbox with a more street-oriented first gear compared to the SP, which means less clutch-slippage is required to get underway. It also has a dual seat on the off-chance your prospective passenger is proportioned like a 10 year old child, although it shares a committed riding position with its racy sibling. A 352lb dry weight and a lightweight aluminum frame mean confidence-inspiring handling and the RR has a 17" wheel at each end so modern rubber can be fitted, although the rear is a skinny-ish 160.

399cc might not sound like all that much, but a claimed 66hp, combined with exemplary handling, means plenty of thrills and fun to be had chasing the 14,000 rpm redline. Plenty of bigger machines rev just as high these days, but the FZR really only makes power near redline, so you'll need to keep the engine spinning to extract the available power. Or just find a nice FZR600 powerplant and slot that in: the FZR600 used a heavy steel frame and is generally much less desirable than the flyweight FZR400, but it's pretty simple to fit the bigger, punchier motor into the nimbler aluminum-framed FZR400 to create a bit of a canyon-carving hot rod.

From the Seller: 1992 Yamaha FZR400RR 3TJ1 for Sale

Up for auction is one of the best handling motorcycles ever made from Yamaha. The 1992 Yamaha FZR400RR 3TJ1 with only 3663 kilometers (2276 miles). This bike is in almost perfect condition. Still has the factory warning labels. I can only find a few flaws (for the boys in the cheap seats) The ignition switch decal has been carelessly rubbed off from extra keys on the key chain vibrating while the bike was being ridden. A little bit of sun fade on the left handlebar control switches. A couple of tiny paint dots (touch up) on the right side of the tank that don't show up in pictures but they are there. Original tires are soft but have cracks in them. This bike doesn't need much to be turned into a museum quality addition to any collection.

The bike is 100% OEM original Yamaha fairings and components. Original brake pads, chain and sprockets, tires, exhaust and components. This is a very nice unmolested collector quality FZR. This is a premium bike. A Utah state title will be presented to the lucky winner. This FZR400RR has been titled as a street motorcycle for road use.

Bidding on the auction is up to $2,370.00 at this point, with a few days left on the auction. This particular bike comes from a seller that's been unloading quite a few high-quality, quirky grey-market bikes in the past couple of weeks. This may not be the most valuable bike in his collection, but should be affordable and, like the other bikes that we've seen, is in very nice, if not absolutely perfect cosmetic condition: there is minor corrosion on some of the metal surfaces, but is generally very very sharp and the plastics look great considering the age. It also comes with a valid Utah title, which means you might just be able to ride it on the street if your local DMV is sympathetic.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1992 Yamaha FZR400RR 3TJ1 for Sale
Yamaha April 27, 2017 posted by

Collector Alert: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 with 94 Original Miles for Sale

Sometimes, the amazingly low-mileage bikes that we stumble across surprise me. I mean, who at the time it was new would think to ferret away a pristine Yamaha FZR400? Of course it was always a cool bike, but the kind of thing you'd buy and preserve as a collectible? Seems strange, but the upside is that someone gets to bid on this example that has the classic white-and-blue "speedblock" graphics and just 94 miles from new.

Modern vehicle technology is incredible, offering up reliability, safety, and efficiency at an affordable cost. New motorcyclists are almost spoiled for choice these days, with slick, utilitarian offerings from Honda, Kawasaki, Yamaha, Suzuki, and even KTM that look good and perform well. They don't offer much in the way of inspirational engine notes or cutting-edge handling, however: all are powered by parallel twins or singles and sound a bit agricultural or slightly obnoxious, depending on whether you have a Two Bros exhaust fitted or not.

The middleweight sportbike class is fast disappearing as well, with just the GSX-R600 and R6 left as Honda and Triumph discontinue their 600cc sportbikes. But in the late 1980s, you were spoiled for choice, and the FZR400 offered a stepping-stone up in terms of refinement from something fast but a bit crude like a TZR250. Most of the 400cc sportbikes never made it to the USA officially, as demand for what would be considered "small" sportbikes has always been pretty non-existent. We got a few bikes with their genes like the Honda CB1, but those never sold well either, making all bikes in the class pretty rare and desirable these days.

The FZR400's 399cc four-cylinder produced a claimed 64hp, still plenty of power for a bike that weighed 410lbs wet, but, with little power below 5,000 rpm, the rev-happy motor meant you had to work it like a two-stroke to make fast progress for maximum rider involvement. Interestingly, the FZR400 was a much more serious weapon than the bigger 600 although they look nearly identical at a glance. The 400 made less power but handled better due to the lighter, stiffer aluminum frame used by the smaller bike, versus the 600's steel part. Yes, the 600 fits into the 400's frame, so if you come across a 400 with a blown or high-mileage motor, you might want to consider finding a 600 to rebuild and slot in instead.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale

Up for your consideration is a very RARE, very nice low mileage almost new 1988 Yamaha FZR 400 3EN1 with only 152 Kilometers (94 miles). It is in mint condition and has new battery, Yamaha filter & engine oil, new coolant flush, new fork seals and fork oil,  new brake fluid, new spark plugs and original air filter was serviced. Runs like the day it was new. Carburetor jets and needles are original and still comes with the factory jetting set from the factory. This FZR in mint condition and near museum quality. It still has the original factory tires, however there are age cracks in the sidewalls. There is patina here and there as you would expect from a 29 year old motorcycle. This FZR still has its original chain & sprockets, original brake pads and all original fairings and factory components. There is a small crack in the windscreen, however I have a new windscreen that will come with the bike. I haven't installed it to preserve the originality of the bike.

When we received the bike, It was taken apart and cleaned and inspected along with the full service. The muffler was chromed and re-finished to look new again. This FZR would make a excellent candidate for restoration, making it a true museum piece for your living room or just keep it and ride the hell out of it and make your friends jealous, lol. This FZR comes with a clean Utah title in my company name that will be presented to the new owner.

Okay, so the $8,999 asking price is pretty stupid money for a 400cc Japanese sportbike. Or at least is is right now: scoff all you like but I bet in a few years, Yamaha fans will be wishing they'd jumped in when these were so cheap... Especially at this mileage, although part of what's so cool about the FZR400 is the light weight and agile handling, so it's kind of a waste as a museum piece. I'm also not sure even very many of your motorcycling buddies will be very jealous if you have this in your garage or living room, let alone your more normal friends. Bidding's already up to $7,600 with plenty of interest, so I'll be interested to see if it makes it to that Buy It Now price.

-tad

Collector Alert: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 with 94 Original Miles for Sale
Yamaha April 1, 2017 posted by

No Fooling: 1988 Yamaha FZR400

April 1st has often been a day maligned by trickery. Even the hallowed pages of RSBFS have been besmirched by the occasional April Fools Day joke in past years. Not so this year. This year there are FAR too many excellent bikes available to waste time and web space on foolery. For example, 2017 seems to be the year of the FZR400 as evidenced by this fantastic find. This is a two-owner model that looks very clean and has obviously been well-loved. That is always good to see - especially with the Fizzers, as they are all too often raced, modded and generally abused.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

With an aluminum Delta Box frame wrapping itself tightly around the rev-happy Genesis inline four, the FZR400 emerged as the sweetest handling machine of the 1980s. Able to carry higher cornering speeds than comparable middleweights (or even open class bikes), the relative lack of power is more than made up for by conservation of forward motion. This is a bike that loves to be ridden, and rewards a smooth, committed rider most of all. The fact that it is also a very forgiving platform makes it all that much more approachable; you will be hard pressed to find negative reviews on this gem from Yamaha.

From the seller:
1988 Yamaha FZR 400. Owned since 2012 (2nd owner). Penske rear shock, Race Tech front suspension upgrades. Very good overall condition, blemishes represented in pictures. Kerker exhaust, Lockhart tank cover, 2009 swingarm, Includes original exhaust, Corbin seat, OEM service manual and many receipts from the original owner.

This particular machine has had some interesting mods. The suspension upgrades are non-destructive and warranted; technology has come a long way in 30 years, and some refresh/upgrades are definitely in order for a bike that has seen some use. Pipes and jetting are common to extract the maximum from what small displacement is available, and the original exhaust is available with the bike (nice!). The Corbin seat is another common mod. The swingarm update is curious; this is normally a cure for the limited tire selections due to the wheel size - but no mention is made of any changes there. Interested buyers might want to find out more. There is nothing inherently negative about this change, but there may be more to the story.

The market remains curiously soft on these smaller machines. In the US, there seems to be a general lack of interest in anything below 750cc. Of course the production numbers don't help the supply/demand equation either, as this was a mass-produced Japanese machine. Still, these hold their value much better than a comparable middleweight (say, a FZR600), and with parts growing scarce we may see an elevation in status for these underrated canyon carvers. Check it out here, and enjoy the glut of FZR400s this year - it may not last!

MI

No Fooling: 1988 Yamaha FZR400
Yamaha March 7, 2017 posted by

On the bubble? 1988 Yamaha FZR400

In the feast-or-famine world of eBay, we seem to be experiencing a bit of a glut from the Fizzer 400 quarter. We don't always see a ready supply of these bikes, but in the first part of 2017 we have witnessed a steady stream. That is the good news. A RSBFS fan favorite, there is much to recommend when it comes to this little 400cc machine. While HP is not impressive, this in-line four will rev to the moon, and with an aluminum delta-box twin-spar frame, adjustable suspension and a tidy riding position, cornering speeds usually surpass those of the bigger (heavier) bikes. What's not to love? Well, therein lies the bad news: prices are rising on these underrated sport bikes. If you have one now, hang on to it. If you are in the market for one, tread carefully (and prepare to spend some cash). Or wait to see if the bubble bursts.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

This FZR400 is claimed to be an original one-owner bike with fewer than 3,000 miles on it. The pics show a clean bike with no discernible rash. There seems to be a slight mark on the upper left corner of the fairin, but is easily forgiven on a bike of this age. Even the tops of the trees are free from the swinging key syndrome. The bodywork appears to be intact, and overall the bike is very clean and presents well. Given the difficulty of finding parts for these models, we recommend to purchase the best example you can find; the more complete the better. This looks like a complete bike, with some spares. Did I mention it is clean?

From the seller:
Up for your consideration is an original 1988 FZR400 Motorcycle with 2,609 original miles. Motorcycle has had one owner and stored in the garage since new. The auction includes owners and service manuals, spare keys and period performance parts that were never installed. The bike needs carb work to idle well.

I often wonder about additional performance parts included with the sale of a stock motorcycle. I wonder about exceptionally low miles in a cable-driven odometer world. The devil's advocate in me also wonders about the idle issues; is this simply a case of sitting unused too long, or is there something else lurking behind the scenes. Why are the tank cover mount grommets and screws missing/broken (or appear to be) - oversight or other? To be precise, this bike is not completely stock - the NRC case covers are clear aftermarket items. Again, the devil on my shoulder prods at me; is this preventative maintenance or evidence of a previous boo boo? There is nothing nefarious going on that I can tell from the advert, but if I had any Spidey sense it might be tingling, prompting me to either ask more questions or check the bike out in person.

Of course the devil that is poking at me sprang up from the asking price: $7,500. That would be a serious high-water mark for one of these models, and at that price I would expect perfection. We typically see FZR400s as $3,500 - $5,000 bikes, with exceptional examples fetching a bit more. You can't blame a seller for trying to get top dollar, and you can be sure I will be watching this one carefully, as it could be a price barometer for the type. If nothing else, we continue to see good examples of the FZR400 in the market - and that is something that should make all of us very happy. Check it out here and let us know what you think.

MI

On the bubble? 1988 Yamaha FZR400
Yamaha February 25, 2017 posted by

Clean Machine: 1988 Yamaha FZR400

Aluminum perimeter chassis. Aluminum swingarm. Inline four-cylinder power plant. Four valves per cylinder. 14,000 RPM redline. Racing-inspired bodywork with dual headlights. Solo saddle cover to look like a monoposto. Triple disk brakes. Competent, adjustable suspension on both ends. The list of included technology reads like our favorite recipe. The only difference is in the calories: We're not talking about a middleweight 600 or open class liter bike here, but rather the smaller 400cc rocket from Yamaha.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

The FZR was not the only 400cc class participant, but in the US it was the only game in town. Honda, Kawasaki and Suzuki all offered some version of a tweener, each in some way more potent than the FZR. Yet the smaller Fizzer (although not the smallest Fizzer by any means) holds a loyal following among riders, and is generally praised as THE BEST handling sport bike to come out of the 1980s - and maybe beyond. Targeting more advanced riders, the FZR was neither the cheapest form of transport available nor was it really a beginner's bike. Unfortunately in the US, sub-500cc motorcycles are generally lumped into "first timer" categories, and many were purchased (with good intentions) as exactly that. If the bike was not abused at the hands of a newbie rider, it had a good chance of being flogged in competition, or just generally thrashed hard on the street. Not many pristine FZRs exist today, and those that do command a price.

From the seller:
ONE OF THE FEW NICE UNMOLESTED RED/WHITE FZR 400'S OUT THERE. All original except Supertrapp pipe and alarm. Manual, seat cowl, cover, original rear fender/turn signals. RUNS EXCELLENT !!

EXCELLENT CONDITION FOR THE YEAR a few minor cracks in plastic. The lower fairings having been cracked up but the bike never actually having been laid down !!!

This FZR definitely looks clean and pretty well cared for. It is well known that most of these bikes have lived a hard life - many of them on the racetrack. This one seems to have escaped much of that, but is not without some scars. The damage to the plastics is unfortunate, as these pieces are no longer available from Yamaha. And given the way the fairing scoops stick out, the damage to these areas is common. The remedies are not easy, but should be cosmetic only; this bike could still be an outstanding rider. And speaking of the riding experience, if the carbs have been rejetted properly for the exhaust then this could be quite the screaming little Fizzer.

The non-stock add-ons (signals, pipe and alarm) detract from the collector value of this bike, but some of the stock pieces are included with the sale. We don't see too many FZR400s - even though they were legally imported into the US - as these were not high-volume bikes in the day. The asking price for this one is a bit steep as far as Fizzers go, with an opening ask of $5k USD and zero takers thus far. The price is in the ballpark for a well-loved example , but probably a bit on the high side for an opening bid. Check it out here, and be sure to share your experiences with the FZR400 in the Comments section.

MI

Clean Machine: 1988 Yamaha FZR400
Yamaha December 21, 2016 posted by

Feelin Fizzy: 1989 Yamaha FZR400

A perennial fan favorite, the 400cc edition of the Yamaha FZR has often been lauded for its razor-sharp handling and overall balance. While generally best suited for riders of smaller stature, the smaller Fizzer filled the gap currently occupied by the modern crop of 300cc machines; small enough to be entry level, but with the DNA to carve some serious corners in the right hands.

1989 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

Powered by an in-line four cylinder that is happy to rev to a stratospheric 14k, the FZR400 is encased in an aluminum Deltabox perimeter frame with triple disks all around. Wrapped in full bodywork that evoked images of the bigger FZRs - including dual headlights - there was nothing small or cheap about the 400. And while the model run started in 1986 and ran through the mid 1990s, Yamaha only imported them into the US for a few years, and even fewer into California.

From the seller:
You are looking at my 1989 Yamaha FZR400 California EXUP model. I am the original owner and the bike is in amazing condition both cosmetically and mechanically. I have a complete file on the bike that includes the original receipt from when I bought the bike from Golden Gate Cycles in SF in July 1989. I spent over $4,000 this summer to have the bike mechanically reconditioned by Speed Motorcycles in Bronx, NY and it runs well. The only problem is a sticky front master brake cylinder. I had it rebuilt by Speed but it might need replacing. I'm selling the bike because I've lost interest - when I had it reconditioned this summer I thought I was going to get back into riding but it turns out that I'm just not that into it anymore. I never tracked this bike - I did put an aftermarket Kerker slip-on muffler on it and had it dyno tuned but I have the original exhaust.

This bike is very rare and I'd be very surprised if there are any out there in this condition and still owned by the original owner.

Today the FZR400 is hard to find in unmolested condition. So many of these bikes ended up on the racetrack (refer above to "razor-sharp handling"), that most of the available Fizzers have been thrashed. And rebuilding a FZR400 is not an exercise for the weak or impatient; parts are not exactly plentiful, and stock fairings are all but impossible to find. My recommendation: Find the cleanest, best example you can, and jump on it. Could this original owner bike be the one? Check it out here and see!

MI

Feelin Fizzy: 1989 Yamaha FZR400