Posts by tag: SF2

Featured Listing July 4, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SF2 Cafe Racer

While an Italian cafe racer from the mid-1970s is somewhat outside of the usual focus of RSBFS, one look at this surviving hot rod told us that it belongs here. And after diving in a bit deeper, we are sure our readers will too. This is an awesome timepiece of a rare model that is often overshadowed by the competition-focused SFC offering. But the apple does not fall far from the tree as the saying goes, and the DNA that went into the SF and the SF2 largely made the SFC possible. Laverda was a powerhouse in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and continued to push the envelope of performance and displacement. These were endurance race bikes, with robust reserves to ensure longevity.

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SF2 Cafe Racer

The “SF” models from Laverda refer to Super Freni, which translates (roughly) into Super Brakes. On the original SF models, braking was via a technological double leading-shoe drum brake. While today drum brakes conjure up images of Fred Flintstone, the SF brakes were a definite step forward when it came to performance. As technology evolved, the implementation of disk brakes became the next big thing. Still leading the pack in terms of performance, Laverda created the SF2 and highlighted the world’s first production dual disk production street bike. No longer developed in house, braking duties were farmed out to famed braking icon Brembo. The rest of the bike was an SF evolution, the big 750cc parallel twin utilizing lightweight air cooling and a single overhead cam nestled in the 2-valve heads. In an interesting twist, electrics were a combination of Bosch and Japanese components, making Laverda one of the more reliable steeds when compared to either Italian or UK machinery of similar vintage.

From the seller:
974 Laverda SF2 cafe racer. Stylishly upgraded with Jota adjustable bars, Laverda solo seat

This bike has been in the previous owners hands for approx 7 years, when he first bought it from the previous owner (a collector of Laverda’s and other Italian bikes) he bought it to my shop (Moto Borgotaro Inc) for a going over. At this point the front suspension was re-freshed the clutch was upgraded to softer springs and a “easy clutch extended arm” the next round of repairs and upgrades were all functional, the wiring harness was completely remade with new fuse panel and micro relays, the original switches were kept in tact to keep the correct look. The generator was causing problems as most of the riding was happening in the New York, so we adapted a high output generator on to the existing sprag gear and pulley, it is very simple to put the stock generator back on, although the upgraded one puts out way more at lower RPMS…The mileage is low, but I don’t believe the OD is correct, the bike runs and rides great, but it is NOT restored, and to my knowledge the top end has NOT been rebuilt! —

Over the years it was ridden in and around the NY city area, proving the reliability of the Laverda. The paint was recently done, it has an almost new seat, almost new exhaust (small scrapes here and there) even has nice Conti clamps.

More from the seller:
This is not a show pony, she has been around the block and is still alive and kicking, waiting for a new owner ! A new set of Avon Roadrider tires are included in the sale*** not pictured

* New seat w/ key
* Newer complete exhaust
* Completely refreshed wiring
* newer paint job
* Upgraded charging
* Original shocks
* Original switches
* Complete recent service – oil, valves
* Jota Brevetto adjustable bars
* New Avon Roadriders
* Extended clutch arm, for softer clutch feel
* Airbox removed – set up with K&N filters
* Stainless brake lines

As if it needed any proof, this 1974 Laverda SF2 is a hardcore survivor. And like a great bottle of wine, it has somehow become better with age. Minor faults when new become character lines of a classic bike. And while the purist may claim to want a nearly zero mile, never been touched, ridden or ever been outside sort of bike for a collection, the experiences that this bike has under its belt makes it more of an enigma and that much more interesting. Intended as a rider, this SF2 sports some minor upgrades picked up along the way. There has been a considerable amount of work completed recently, and the deal will include a new set of tires. As the seller points out, it is by no means restored – but maintained as a cool piece of history, ready to rumble when you are.

Despite the iconic looks and the same bones as other Laverdas of this period, the SF2 is a bike that mere mortals can collect AND ride. This is a bike that gives you the feeling of actually riding, one that makes you look like a macho he-man even when tooling about, and sounding glorious with open carbs barking through chrome tapered pipes. It’s no wonder that this bike currently resides in New York, where it undoubtedly makes a statement. But you can make the same statement in your town – just check out the eBay auction and then give Peter a call. Then go out and do the ton. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SF2 Cafe Racer
Laverda April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale

This is an unusual opportunity to buy a rough-and-tumble, forged-in-fire vintage racing Laverda. If you’re searching for a display piece to adorn your Manhattan loft, you should probably look elsewhere. This SFC-spec SF2 was made to run, and run hard. It’s all killer and no filler, built to race. Period. The original SFC is one of the most desirable and iconic sportbikes of the 1970s, with a stylish half-fairing, bright orange paint, and solo tail. The 744cc parallel twin was supposedly heavily influenced by Honda’s CB77 Superhawk engine, and Laverda built their bikes to last, with five main bearings in the engine, electrical components from Nippon-Denso, ignition components from Bosch, and a Verlicchi frame, and suspension from Marzocchi.

The result was the perfect basis for an endurance racer, and Laverda whipped up a hand-built factory special to capitalize on that potential. The SFC or “Super Freni Competizione,” which translates to “Super Competition Brakes.” The engine featured the usual race-oriented updates: a lighter crank, polished connecting rods, bigger valves, and high-comp pistons. 36mm carbs fed the high-performance engine and produced as much as 80hp, depending on the year, while a two-into-one exhaust made sure everyone within miles could count every one of them.

The original SFC was technically a road-legal bike, but it was stiffly-sprung, over-carbureted, and generally temperamental. Many that have come up for sale have their road-legal parts in a box that comes with the bike, since they really were a bit of an afterthought anyway. Even that solo tail is specifically shaped to include a round numberplate, as you can see. The bike was a literal “racebike for the road” in a way that you just don’t really see anymore. Or maybe it’s just that all serious sportbikes are racebikes for the road, but they’re just not really all that much of a compromise now, with 200hp, a gel touring seat, and heated grips…

This particular bike isn’t an authentic Laverda SFC, it’s a high quality replica built from the ground up using a regular production SF2 with many trick parts, and uses the powerful twin-disc front brake setup from the later bikes that should work much better on track than the earlier drum, although it doesn’t look quite as sexy. Speaking of the track: this started out as a regular road bike, but it’s been converted to race duty and campaigned for years by Larry at New York City Motorcycles [who is also selling his Harley Davidson XR750 here on our site], who is currently based, ironically, in Venice, CA.

His original eBay listing tells a great story about how the bike came to be: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale

Where to begin…

Gorizia, Italy (on the Northeast corner of Italy 1km from Slovenia). July 2012.

That is when this Laverda came into real life, from the pages of every conceivable magazine and poster since childhood.  In fact the first time I laid eyes on a Laverda 750SFC was at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City in 1998, at its renowned exhibition, Art of the Motorcycle. If I wasn’t already hooked, now I was obsessed.

In the years since that life changing show, I was always on the “lookout”.  Sorta like John Walsh chasing fugitives!  I can recall being wide awake at 3am looking in remote places, the mideast, japan and of course the US and Europe.

I couldn’t believe my eyes in the summer of 2012.  In fact, I couldn’t understand the Italian listing on eBay Italy, either.   When the sun rose the next morning I was at my neighbor’s door, an Italian.  Within hours we had the bike’s owner on a conference call.  I had a million questions.  My neighbor just wanted to go to work.

I learned that the motorcycle was built to race throughout Italy by an engineer who also owned a genuine SFC.  Too precious to race, he saw no obstacle to making an exact clone, particularly the specification of the motor:

  • 10.8:1  Compression
  • Carillo Rods
  • SFC Crank
  • SFC Cams
  • SFC Pistons, valves and porting
  • 36 mm Dell’Ortos

The rest is simply bodywork… on an SF2 frame. Other than the factory 750SFC’s VIN series and frame insignia depicting that its a factory SFC, this bike is exactly the same in specification and appearance of a 1974 (Disc brake front) 750SFC.

The last thing I thought about doing when I bought, imported and titled it in the US, was racing it. So it was cosmetically and exhaustively restored as a streetbike. Laverda’s are known to have indestructible motors. And this was no exception. When it cleared customs it set off car alarms a quarter mile away…

My good friend Kenny Cummings, the owner of NYC Norton had been taking care of another parallel twin of mine, a Norton Commando. And every few weeks Kenny would be “gone racing.” So it’s technically his fault. I caught the bug. And became just as obsessed about racing as Laverdas. 

I raced two years before I became obsessed with the Laverda for a different reason. Though it was exhilarating to ride as a streetbike (outside of New York City where I lived), I soon learned this was a motorcycle that was designed, built and wanted to race. Long story short(er), that’s what it became.

The Laverda’s trophies include AHRMA National Series 5th Place in Formula 750 in 2015, 3rd Place AHRMA Pacific Crown, and various podiums at some of the most storied racetracks in America.

Recent marriage and move to Japan has put new goals on the horizon. Its time for my beloved Laverda to go from my back burner into the hands of someone whose passion picks up where mine leaves off.

The fuel tank is a Wolfgang Haerter special edition alumnium tank. 

As mentioned, it has never crashed. It could benefit from some TLC ie, valves adjusted, carbs rebuilt. A simplified wiring harness – though what’s on the bike now is perfectly functional for its current set up as a racer.

So much to list, these are the key pluses and minuses:

*The windscreen is cracked – it was “stitched” together with zip ties and continued racing. I always thought it adds character 🙂

  • One Sidecover flew off the bike at Willow Springs during competition. It was recovered but in a mangled condition (see photo)
  • Starter and generator (included; sprag gear is worn and should be replaced) were removed for racing; running a “total loss” set up
  • Needs a new battery
  • Missing the ignition key: bypassed
  • Runs an EMC electronic ignition (excellent) from Wolfgang Haerter
  • Slight weep from gas tank rubbing the frame. New Owner should either have the seam rewelded or coat the tank with Caswell
  • YSS Shocks in rear and Works Performance Springs in Front – Original Marzochi shocks included
  • Powdercoated frame completed 2014
  • No rust anywhere
  • 2 into 1 Conti exhaust
  • New York Title in my name
  • Street faring, street seat, tachometer included
  • Set of rear sprockets included
  • Uses an SFC’s shop manual, not an SF2’s.  Reproduced copy included
  • New racing foot pegs
  • Original Laverda clubman bars
  • Other extras all included

The motorcycle is sold as is, where is, and there are no warranties expressed nor implied. Judge the photos and make your own assessment of the bike’s condition, rather than rely on my opinion and/or description. Questions and clarifications are encouraged. These are my personal opin Bidders must be certain of their commitment before bidding, as once its submitted. If you win it, you bought it. No time for nonsense please. Bidders with less than 10 or any negative feedback must contact me prior to bidding or else expect your bid to be cancelled and removed.

This motorcycle requires thorough inspection and recommissioning before running or riding. Know what you are buying before you bid. If you don’t have the expertise and/or the budget, with all due respect, this is not the bike for you. 

New York City Motorcycles (nycmc dot com) is reasonably well known in the vintage motorcycle community and this is not the only platform for offering the bike. Therefore please consider not waiting until the final seconds of the auction to bid. Because while you’re waiting to pull the trigger, if a fair offer arrives from elsewhere and there is not a comparable bid here, the auction will instantly disappear from your watched items.

Multiples of the start price has been invested in this motorcycle. It was a privilege to lose money on this fabulous machine. Boyhood dreams fulfilled and then some 🙂

Motorcycle is located in Venice, CA. I will work with your shipper but its your responsibility.

On a personal note, I’ve come across this bike and owner before: I bumped into him at a 2014 AHRMA event in South Jersey, where I took the picture above. He was wrenching on this bike under a popup tent and, when I came over to babble excitedly about the Laverda, he stopped what he was doing to fire it up for me, a gleeful grin on his face. To me, that says about all you need to know about his passion and enthusiasm. The bike obviously isn’t a “real” SFC, but it is a real Laverda, and the engine specifications are, as he describes, SFC-spec. With real SFC prices headed into six-figures, they’re less and less likely to be raced as intended. Real or not, this Laverda won’t be cheap to buy or run, but is your best bet if you want to actually ride one of these fire-breathing Italian twins in anger.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale
Laverda April 16, 2019 posted by

Repli-Racer: 1972 Laverda SFC Replica for Sale

Largely forgotten now, especially by modern sportbike enthusiasts, Laverda was once a serious player in the Italian sportbike scene of the 1970s. In terms of reputation, anyway, if not in actual production numbers. Their big-bore parallel-twin was supposedly heavily “inspired” by Honda’s parallel twin design of the period, and Laverda’s grown-up engine was heavily overbuilt and basically all-around heavy. It wasn’t nimble, but it was durable and stable, the perfect bike to use as the basis for a production-based endurance racer, and the SFC or “Super Freni Competizione” was the result.

Laverda’s aim was to use the very best parts available on their road and race bikes, and included Italian suspension components, Japanese electricals, and German ignition components. The early bikes used a huge, magnesium Ceriani four leading-shoe front brake, with later machines switching to an improved twin-disc setup. In both cases, stopping power was superlative for the era. Engines were heavily massaged, and made between 71 and 81hp, depending on the year. A significant overhaul for the 1974 model year made changes to the frame to make it lower and lighter, and the suspension was improved.

With the very rare SFC out of reach for most collectors, a replica obviously makes practical sense, since it was basically a hot-rod 750 SF. It’d probably be relatively easy to take an otherwise stock SF1 and just slap on a fairing and tail-section, but the builder of this bike appears to have gone the extra mile. I’m a Laverda fan, but not enough of an anorak to be able to point out the minor differences that would mark this out as a fake. It probably doesn’t help that the fewer than 600 or so SFCs that were built varied a bit in terms of specification, and sometimes incorporated different components in what seems to have been the “whatever we’ve got on the shelf” kind of way typical of Italian manufacturers of the period.

From the original eBay listing: 1972 Laverda SFC Replica for Sale

This Laverda 750 SFC Replica was converted from a SF1 over a period of two years, essentially everything except the interior of the motor is new or reconditioned or modified. Estimated milage of the 1972 donor bike was 6,600 miles +/-. The conversion has been ridden approximately 150 miles and has been on static display in a climate controlled facility for the last five years. The following is an accounting of some of the components that make this such a special conversion:

  • Correct Ceriani 35mm forks w new internals
  • Correct Ceriani rear shocks
  • New Tommaselli clutch and brake lever assemblies w new cables and switch assemblies
  • Rebuilt Smiths “Laverda” Tachometer, new (NOS) Smiths “Laverda” speedometer
  • New SFC fairing, brackets and headlight assembly
  • SFC replica tank (lined against ethanol affect) and petcocks
  • SFC rear seat and pad
  • SFC inner fender
  • SFC front fender
  • All new paint on all painted parts
  • All new wiring tucked up under bodywork, all electronics moved up under seat pan
  • Carbs are correct Dellorto PHF36AS/AD and are in perfect order w Malosi bellmouths
  • SFC left and right side rearsets and mounting plates
  • Motor cases are polished and cut out as per SFC specifications
  • 2-into-1 custom tuned exhaust, sounds incredible, not for the introvert
  • All misc. hardware was replaced and zinc plated, all chrome was new, aluminum parts polished

This is a beautiful example of a Laverda Type SFC, one of the ultimate vintage sport bikes that will get attention everywhere it goes. Display it, ride it, you won’t be disappointed. Of course there is no warranty, implied or guaranteed, it is a vintage bike even though it certainly doesn’t look its age… Please look at the pictures closely, the bike is located in the Denver area and we will assist with shipping as buyer arranges. Clear title, $1000 deposit within 24 hours of winning bid, balance within seven (7) calendar days via wire transfer.

It may not be the real thing, but looks very clean in the pictures, with the desirable drum front brake that gave the bike its name. Individual SFCs varied from bike to bike in terms of the details, and I doubt anyone but a Laverda expert would realize it was a replica at a glance, although it’s almost too nice to be the genuine article. There are just hours left on the auction, and there’s been little interest in the bike so far. Bidding is up to just $10,300, which is cheaper than a nice, stock SF1 these days Obviously, this isn’t going to command the nearly six-figure prices of the best SFCs, but would be a great way to live out your Walter Mitty-style racing fantasies if you can’t cough up that kind of coin, but want an authentic SFC experience.

-tad

Repli-Racer: 1972 Laverda SFC Replica for Sale
Laverda August 10, 2018 posted by

Blue-Chip Classic Friday: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Back in the 1960s and 1970s you could buy race cars and race bikes that were basically road-legal, vehicles you could actually drive or ride to the track and reasonably expect to be competitive with pretty minimal changes. Of course, those days are long gone: race machines often share very few components with their road-going counterparts and frequently bear little resemblance to any sort production vehicles whatsoever. But today’s Laverda 750 SFC was a machine from the tail end of that earlier era and was very much a race bike with some lights and signals slapped on to make it vaguely road-worthy.

I mean, just take a look at that taillight: was it thoughtfully integrated into a specially-designed cut-out? Nope, it was literally bolted to the sloped rear face of a solo tail section that was obviously designed with a number-plate in mind. The instruments are basically just a tach, ignition barrel, and indicator light bolted to the inside of the fairing: this thing is the epitome of crude, at least in terms of creature-comforts and finish. Speedo? Who cares? Just figure out what revs approximate which highway speeds in top gear and assume you could just outrun cops of the period anyway.

But forget refinement: the mechanicals are where it’s at, and the bike has those in spades. Early models used a huge alloy drum brake, and later machines like this one a pair of discs, giving the bike it’s name: “Super Freni Competizione” or basically “Super Braking Racebike.” Laverda used the very best components available everywhere they could, and the basic parallel-twin was overbuilt and very durable, making it ideal for endurance racing.

Ceriani forks, Bosch ignition, and Nippon-Denso electrical components, and that 744cc parallel twin with five main bearings, backed up by a five speed gearbox that put the bike’s claimed 75hp to the rear wheel. This example isn’t some museum-piece and the seller mentions it’s done quite a bit of track time. How much? Who knows: like many SFCs, this one lacks a speedometer, and therefore an odometer. The tach looks non-standard, although I’ve seen several different types fitted to the original bikes. It’s hard to tell from the pic, but maybe it’s a Scitsu unit?

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Am 76 and it’s time to let go of my collection. Started collecting about 50 years ago and the main objective was to buy one owner high end cars and motorcycles for pleasure and investment. I won’t bore you repeating the history of the 750 SFC Laverdas – If you are reading this you already know of the Laverda 750 SFC’s iconic competition accomplishments, background and rarity. Hand built by a small number of employees, there were only 100 of these limited production Laverda 750 SFC competition motorcycles manufactured in 1974. Recently brought out of storage, it is an authentic two owner (I am the 2nd owner) matching numbers factory original survivor. I purchased it from the gentleman who bought it new at a dealership in Florida. He raced it on every motorcycle race track East of the Mississippi up until around 1984, when he found out he had terminal cancer and put the bike in storage. He did not want to sell it but had to liquidate his holdings. It is a beautiful piece of art. The engine had a complete overhaul from a company called Megacycle in California after it’s last race and is in fresh like new original condition. Runs perfectly. What a sound. An exhilerating deep throbbing sound that can only come from a Laverda 750 SFC. It has been cleaned and the brakes rebuilt. It is in it’s original racing condition complete with period stickers, as it came off the last track. The engine mount tab is indeed stamped “SFC” from the factory. My collection included many motorcycles but I kept this one for the last and had no intention of ever selling it – but to be realistic it needs to move along to another caretaker. I have framed photos of it being raced at different tracks and the original 1974 owners manual. Please read the complete description so you will understand all conditions and any issues. THERE IS NO TITLE – Sold on a Georgia bill of sale and Georgia Sheriffs Department inspection certificate. I will answer all email questions and consider offers.

Just 549 total were built between 1971 and 1975. So the Buy It Now for this race-bred classic? A mere… $195,000?! Well, maybe that’s a mistake. I mean, it is eBay after all. So the starting bid is… $150,000?! Wow, I guess he is serious. Well I’ll be curious to see if anyone bites. Seems like a major auction might be a better bet for something like this, but who knows? Certainly the SFC is one of the most valuable and collectible bikes of the era, and prices are certainly headed in that direction.

-tad

 

Blue-Chip Classic Friday: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale
Laverda May 24, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SF2

In 1974, the Laverda SF2 was roughly equivalent to an R1M, though at the time, twin disc brakes sufficed for high technology. Over-engineered and powerful, the bike in its day was as fast as it was premium. They aren’t easy to find in any condition, let alone fully restored.

1974 Laverda SF2 for sale on eBay

This one, which is located in a dusty corner of New Mexico, has been treated to a full engine and transmission rebuild recently  and wears an older cosmetic restoration. The seller says it isn’t perfect, or entirely correct or original, but it will make a great riding addition to a Euro bike collection.

The seller went over the bike’s attributes in great detail, so we’ll let him take it from here. From the eBay listing:

1974 Laverda 750 SF2

First introduced at the 1966 Earls Court Show the big Laverda twin was a 650. Barely 100 were made before becoming a 750 in 1968. As production was about to begin, in 1968, four prototype twins were entered in the Giro d’Italia and all four finished in the top ten. The factory officially began racing in 1969 enjoying considerable success in long distance events like the Barcelona 24 hours and the Bol d’Or. These successes lead to the production development of the road bikes. In 1971 two intrepid Italians, one just 20 years old, took a pair of production 750s on a 34,000km ride from Tierra del Fuego to Alaska. They actually started in Buenos Aires, then to Tierra del Fuego, then to Anchorage, Alaska (if you’d like to read more about this adventure pick up a copy of Jean-Louis Olive’s book Raid Tierra del Fuego – Alaska ISBN 9782956254812

A bike that was built to stay built. Laverda’s own foundry sandcast the alloy engine components. The crankshaft is a pressed up full roller affair with a duplex chain drive to a camshaft running in ball bearings. Ancillaries were all top shelf components; much of the electrics including the starter and generator by Bosch, suspension by Ceriani, rims by Borrani, switchgear and instruments by Nippondenso (starting 1974), etc.

By 1973 the 750 shared carburettor and valve sizes with the illustrious SFC. The SF2 of 1974 introduced disc brakes. The first production bike with twin front discs. Further reading can be found online at RealClassic uk , simply search for Laverda SF750.

This example of the SF2 is an older restoration which has recently benefited from a full mechanical rebuild of the engine and gearbox, carbs, front suspension, brakes. It has also been fitted with fresh tires, drive chain and battery. This numbers matching bike sports the optional solo seat with locking glove box. It is finished in a dark metallic grey close to one of the 17 factory shades offered on these machines. This is not a concours machine by any means yet it is an attractive and reasonably correct (seat should be satin black, pattern silencers and stainless brake hose) rider in sound mechanical condition. If I were to do anything toward modernization it would be to upgrade the rear dampers to Koni or Ikon units. Included is the original exhaust crossover box, indicator stalks and owners manual. Please ask if you wish for specific images.

Something you’ll appreciate, as a rider, is the ease of service by the owner and the absolute reliability of its operation. Simple to maintain it begs a “How to keep your Laverda 750 alive for the complete idiot” (with apologies to John Muir). However, the esteemed Mssrs. Tim Parker and Phil Todd have conspired to produce the Twin and Triple Repair & Tune Up Guide; ISBN: 9780979689109 aka “the Green Book”. Get one. There are also international forums and facebook pages for the marque.

With a total production run, of all models 650/750, being something less than 19,000 units you’ll be fortunate to see one on the road (compare this to something like 150,000+ Norton Commandos) or at a bike show. This is a good time to saddle up on a relatively unknown and undervalued, sporting machine known for its stable handling and inspiring reliability. For mountain residents I can jet for your altitude.

As it is for sale locally (Santa Fe -Taos CL) and may be removed from auction do consider the buy it now option.

The bike is on Craigslist in New Mexico for $12,000, though the bidding is at just over $8,000 with three days left.

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SF2
Laverda July 27, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SF2 for Sale

Today’s Featured Listing Laverda 750 SF2 is definitely more of a classic sportbike, but it’s definitely rare and such an icon we couldn’t help but publish! For fans of the site who aren’t really familiar with low-production Italian bikes of the 1970s, you could probably think of Laverda as “the Lamborghini of motorcycles,” since they also got their start building farming machinery. Bikes were added to their repertoire to help supply the post World War II need for cheap transportation with early examples clocking in under 200cc. But Laverda knew that, in order to compete with rivals like Triumph and sell bikes in the USA, they would need to expand their range to include bigger, faster machines.

Their first big bike was a 650cc parallel-twin that was introduced in 1966 and then enlarged to 750cc’s in 1968. It was powerful, with 60hp and fast, with a tested speed of over 100mph, no slouch for a stock motorcycle of the era. It was also legendarily overbuilt with five main bearings in the twin-cylinder engine, and every part not designed and built in-house was chosen for quality. The “SF” in the name stands for “Super Freni” or “super braking,” a reference to the huge twin leading-shoe drum brakes fitted to the original machines, although by 1974 the system had been updated to a pair of Brembo calipers and discs.

The Laverda SF wasn’t light or nimble, but it was very stable and proved successful in endurance racing when kitted out in SFC or “Super Freni Competizione” form. As rare as they are, they’re pretty reliable for vintage machines, relatively simple to work on, and parts are apparently available to keep them running.

From the Seller: 1974 Laverda SF2 750 for Sale

As seen on a recent cover of Classic Bike Guide. This Laverda was acquired in 2012 from the second owner (I believe) who did extensive restoration on the bike including a complete engine rebuild from renowned Laverda expert Scott Potter. This bike runs as good as it looks with no issues.The original Nippon Denso gauges were rebuilt and function perfectly. The original polished Borrani Wheels were laced and trued by Buchanan’s, the rear shocks have been updated to Hagons, the front forks have been upgraded to Works Performance dual rate springs etc. The bike has been restored using either original NOS parts or correct reproduction parts mostly sourced from Columbia Car & Cycle in BC Canada. Even the two keys for the seat storage box are included.The bike is complete and ready to ride or show.

It is original with a few exceptions that I am aware of as noted: the Euro rear tail light; (the original large US tail light is included with the sale); the front brake rotors have been drilled; the original foot pegs have been replaced with modest rear sets; the horns work great but are not original. The pictures tell the rest of the story.  It has the original exhaust with the crossover pipe and it even has the rare “Conti” stamped exhaust brackets. This Laverda comes with the complete correct tool kit in the correct stamped Laverda tool bag. It also has a new battery. Included with the sale if the reserve is met are the optional  solo seat, a front and rear fender painted to match the bike, an optional left foot shifter kit, (I have not used this) Tommaselli Clip-Ons, and a considerable treasure trove of literature including 2 copies of Tim Parker’s Laverda Twin and Triple Repair Guide (one original and one revised). Two period correct (if tattered sales brochures), a copy of Nolan Woodbury’s extensively researched article on the Laverda SF/2 twins as it appeared in the November 2016 issue of Classic Bike Guide, a Laverda Spare Parts List for the SF2.  I will also include related vintage articles that I have collected on this Laverda model. They are from the 1974 issue of Cycle Guide with a cover story on the SF/2, the 2013 issue of Classic Bike Guide with a cover story on the SF/2, the January 1992 Bike Journal with a cover story on the SF/1and various other articles on the SF/2. Please note that this bike is a right foot shifter. 1974 was the last year for the right foot shift Laverda SF/2. This bike is being sold as is with no guaranty or warranty. The bike is currently registered and titled in California.  

A $1,000 deposit is due within 48 hours of purchase with the balance due in ten business days. The bike is available for inspection in the Rancho Santa Fe, San Diego, CA area. Inspections can be arranged with advance notice. I can assist in helping the shipper of your choice. The bike can be stored indoors for up to 90 days as long as the bike is paid in full and insured by the buyer. I can also deliver the bike in an enclosed trailer (for a fee) if you are in the vicinity. I reserve the right to end the auction at any time as the bike is for sale locally.  

The days of reasonably-priced SFs are long gone and nice Laverda twins are not only hard to find, but command high prices when they do come up for sale. While the competition-oriented SFC sits at the very top of the Laverda twin hierarchy, the SF1 and SF2 are much more practical motorcycles, as the SFC is literally a race bike with lights and mirrors tacked on almost as an afterthought. This example is about as nice as you’re ever likely to find, and it’s even appropriately Laverda-orange. Bidding on the eBay listing is up to over $10,000 with several days left on the listing.

-tad

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