Posts by tag: Race Bike

Featured Listing December 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale

I love seeing race and trackday bikes built out of unlikely candidates like this well-prepared, race-winning Triumph Daytona T595. After all, the whole point of the Daytona in the first place was that it wasn’t pretending to be just a numberplate away from placing at Brands Hatch. Instead, it was intended as a fast roadbike, with a focus on character, build-quality, and humane ergonomics. A gentleman’s sportbike. In this case, a bike for a very fast gentleman…

The original Daytona introduced in the early 1990s was available in three or four-cylinder flavors and it was a big, burly GT to rival bikes like the Kawasaki ZX11. The second generation seen here was codenamed the T595, although it was fairly quickly renamed the 955i to avoid confusion regarding its displacement. That’s the kind of thing that never bothered Bimota, and I wonder how many people ask SB6 owners if their bike is a 600… In any event, the bike displaced 955cc and was much lighter and more agile than the bike that preceded it.

That being said, the T595 really wasn’t intended for competition: the suspension was too soft, the motor biased towards a flexible midrange, as opposed to top-end power, and it was still just a tad too heavy. But this is a Triumph we’re talking about, and sportbikes are in their DNA. Fit some stiffer suspension, do a bit of headwork, swap in some custom-ground cams, and change out the stock wheels and bodywork for some lightweight parts. Voila: racebike! It’s obviously not quite that easy, but someone clearly put in the effort here: the description goes into great detail regarding the work and parts that went into building this successful racing machine.

From the Seller: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale

This is an off road only track bike, no street parts available. This bike dominated at the local track in the Formula Thunder class in early 2000’s. Once retired from active duty it was sold to its current owner in 2003. At that time it was taken to a well known local engine builder go through entire motor and chassis and make get it ready for its last race, a 4 hour endurance race. The motor was torn down and a full fresh build took place. Invoice provided for build. It was then broken in on the Dyno (see chart) and off to the races it went. Retired after the event, until it was brought in to us to find a new home. It had sat for a few years so we carefully went over it, good compression @185-200, changed oil, filter, flushed coolant, fresh fuel and bike came right to life!

Here is a quick list of the obvious and a note from professional Triumph engine builder Scott Zollars.

  • 885cc
  • Dymag magnesium wheels
  • Rare Yoshimura full exhaust
  • Attack Performance Triple clamps and rear suspension linkage
  • Pro Circuit Suspension re-valved front and rear suspension
  • Penske rear shock
  • Brembo Master cylinder and calipers
  • 320 mm rotors with custom caliper brackets for Brembo’s

“The cylinder head is a ported 885 from a speed triple. The cylinder liners are the aluminum with nickasil coating items from the earlier generation Super 3. In particular they are all number 2 cylinder liners as they had a tighter tolerance from the factory. The pistons were from the earlier Super 3 also as they were 12-1 hi compression pistons. The cylinder head was decked when it was ported. A final compression ratio of 13.0 sounds familiar. The cams are a custom grind from Web Cam. The valve springs are a custom set from Kibblewhite. The airbox is a crudely made custom item. However it proved to be very effective. The transmission gears were back cut. The shafts that the shift forks ride on were shortened to allow them to float in the case similar in fashion as to what was standard on R6’s etc. All rod and main bearings were the White bearings. Carillo connecting Rods. This is how I remember the bike being set up. Things may have changed since 2004 though” – Scott

From one of the local forums:

“05-15-2005, 12:47 AM – Scott Zollars was the man behind I-90 Motorsports race 885 Daytona. That bike dominated the Formula Thunder class at Pacific Raceway for four years.
Also he was involved with Jack Lilleys highly successful 595 Daytona. I think it was the first British bike to win a National in eighteen years? I know first hand that Scott is an expert with fuel injection, electronics, motors and fabrication”

Credits cards accepted, up to $150.00 documentation charge may be added.

Seattle Used Bikes
4905 Aurora Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98103
dave@seattleusedbikes.com
Closed Sun/Mon Find us on Facebook, Instagram and the Web

The seller also includes a short walkaround video of the bike running and the throttle being blipped. There are obviously more sensible track-day mounts, bikes that are simpler to get parts for and faster. But if I was in the market for a $7,000 track bike, I’d be very tempted by this Triumph. It’s obviously a highly-developed machine for that kind of money, and you couldn’t replicate it for anything like what the seller is asking: just the rare parts fitted would probably be worth the asking price, not to mention the hours spent building and tuning it. And if you’re looking to go racing in a vintage class, you could certainly do worse than starting with a competitive machine like this one!

-tad

Check out the other Triumph SUB has Featured on RSBFS: 1998 Triumph T595 with just 2,518 miles ! Dave notes that a deal is possible on the pair! -dc

Featured Listing: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale
Harley Davidson December 6, 2019 posted by

Dr. Evel – 1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750

Harley-Davidson introduced the XR-750 in 1969 in response to an AMA rule change that made their flat head racers finally obsolete.  The 1972 revision had an updated engine design and went on to an unmatched series of flat track wins and stadium jumps.  This example is fitted with the optional rear brake and a tuneable SuperTrapp exhaust.

1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750 for sale on eBay

After the quick initial conversion of their Sportster race engine, Harley took more time with Rev. 2.0 and commissioned a different layout with a wider bore and shorter stroke, and alloy heads.  In an interesting redux of the sidevalve KR engine, each pushrod has its own cam, uncomplicating cam profile and timing changes.  Power was 80 hp or better, spinning pretty well for a pushrod mill at nearly 8,000 rpm.  The 19-inch front wheel is right at the end of the Ceriani forks, so handling should be true to the 26-degree rake.  Number plates and mufflers conceal the twin-shock rear, and the tank/seat combo is fiberglass.

Offered by a Florida dealer, no history or past ownership is offered, but the eBay classified does hold promise.  Gotta love racebike details like both brake and shifter on the right peg.  XR fans will have to comment in their thoughts, however it would be unreasonable to expect anything on a dirt track racer to be original or unmodified ( or even un-damaged ! ).  From the eBay listing:

Blast from the past and a beautiful example! Inquire and we will answer ALL and ANY questions and we will try hard to get the answers. Hagerty values this at $50,000!

A redesign in 1972 resulted in a motorcycle that would be the most successful in the history of American Motorcyclist Association Racing.
Evel Knievel made the bike famous outside the fairly narrow lane of flat track racing, jumping his 1972 XR to a string of then-world records.

The right collector could take this XR in any number of directions – as raced by Roger Jr., an AMA champion tribute, or Evel Knievel lookalike.  Or home to the dirt as an amateur ?  Nothing as sensible or practical as a sportbike, but a could be a great project.

-donn

Dr. Evel – 1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750
Aprilia November 8, 2019 posted by

For Offroad Use Only: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale

By 2001, the entire quarter-liter sportbike class was basically dead, leaving the Aprilia RS250 Cup a bit of an orphan. Yamaha TZR250 production ended in 1995, Honda’s NSR250R in 1996, and the Suzuki RGV250Γ held out until 1998. But I guess Aprilia still had some of the older 90° RGV250 engines lying around, so they kept churning out bikes for a few more years. The bigger issue was their viability as road bikes: one of the biggest reasons for the classes’ demise was the increasingly stringent emissions regulations that favored cleaner-burning four-stroke engines, instead of the light weight, but very dirty two-strokes that powered these bikes. They don’t call them “smokers” for nothing…

So the 249cc powerplant was from Suzuki, with a few Aprilia-branded bits to make the claim that they’d tuned it extensively somewhat believable. The frame was an aluminum twin-spar unit like the donor bike, but what a frame: unlike the industrial units seen on the Gamma and NSR, Aprilia’s was gorgeously sculptural, as was the swingarm. Brakes were more than up to the task, since the very same triple-Brembo setup was used on much heavier bikes like the Ducati 916 and Moto Guzzi Sport 1100…

By 2001, new two-strokes weren’t legal for road use in many markets, including the US. The RS250 Cup got around this by not bothering to be a road bike. It was intended for a single-make racing series, although an awful lot of them turn up here on eBay with very few miles, suggesting folks bought them to collect and not to race. It’s not too difficult to source bits from the road-legal version if you’re looking to convert one, although that doesn’t appear to have been done in this case.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale

This is an Aprilia RS250 imported into the US for the Aprilia Cup club road racing series. It was sold as a race bike only so bill of sale only. This example was never raced and spent most of its life in a private motorcycle collection. The original owner added lighting, turn signals, horn, and other equipment typically found on a street bike. I have only ridden it 6 or 8 times in the years I have owned it but I recently went over it from nose to tail and made sure everything is in good working order. Other than the added street equipment the bike is as originally delivered by Aprilia. Having owned and road raced one of these for many years I am very familiar with them and this motor is quiet and tight. Factory shop manual is included with the bike.  Also includes a new Shorai lithium/iron battery.

The Aprilia RS250 Cup was originally a track-only machine, although the seller indicates that it’s been made nominally road-legal and that it has managed to accumulate 3,000k miles so far, and bidding is up to just $5,250 with a few days left on the auction. The projector-beam headlight isn’t stock, but actually works pretty well, although I’d replace those red-anodized fasteners with black as soon as I got the bike home. Obviously, any potential buyers should be wary if they intend to register this machine for road use, unless they just plan on converting it back to track-only configuration.

-tad

For Offroad Use Only: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale
Featured Listing October 2, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: real-deal 2014 Akira Kawasaki Avintia MotoGP bike

Short of a racing license and incredible luck, there generally just isn’t a way to get your hands on world-championship-caliber racing machinery. Even if it wasn’t out of the price range of mere mortals, you’d have a hard time convincing the companies that sell this stuff to let any old squid loose on the world with a 250-odd horsepower race bike. Today, though, our sponsors at Grand Prix Motorbikes have the fix for some well-heeled reader.

This 2014 Akira/Kawasaki MotoGP bike competed in MotoGP’s Open Class for most of the 2014 season. Open Class bikes replaced the CRT machines on the grid, and were a step below the full-factory and satellite team bikes. Because they were envisioned as a way to make the cost of entry lower for the MotoGP World Championship, you ended up with teams pairing bespoke chassis with the best engines they could find within the rules. Kawasaki seemed like a decent bet for Avintia, as the company had full-factory MotoGP rides until just a few years earlier, and the team in 2013 was given access to the company’s pneumatic valve setup.

But to hear rider Hector Barbera tell it, Kawasaki just never showed up for the ’14 season, leaving tuner Akira to do all the maintenance, development and build work. They also were not given the World Championship-caliber suspension bits they had been promised, according to the Spanish racer. That truly must have sucked for Barbera, but for whoever gets their hands on his old mount, the difference will be impossible to discern.

Down to the carbon brakes and 16.5-inch slicks, this is Barbera’s 2014 race bike. Even the livery from his last race remains, with a resplendent lime-green number 8 prominent above the air intake. The next buyer will probably be best served using this bike as a display piece, but it could make an amazing track day mount if you can find tires. We’d be content just staring for hours at the beautiful welds all over this thing.

From the seller:

SUMMARY

Model: Kawasaki MotoGP
Origin: Japan
Engine: Kawasaki SBK Engine
Last Service: 1020 km
Colour: White
Suspension: Showa
Brakes: Brembo
Marchesini 16.5″ wheels
Availability: Inmediately in our store of Barcelona (Spain)

EXTRA PARTS AVAILABLE: 17 wheels, steel disks, fairings, exhaust and many other parts

MODEL INFORMATION
The Kawasaki MotoGP is a MotoGP four-stroke Grand Prix racing motorcycle manufactured by Akira Racing Corporation and Kawasaki for racing purposes only.

This bike race on the World Championship with Hector Barbera and DiMeglio in 2014.

Contact AMATUMOTO – GP Motorbikes in Spain or USA for pricing on this unique opportunity.

Sponsored Listing: real-deal 2014 Akira Kawasaki Avintia MotoGP bike
Yamaha July 28, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01

Update 7.26.2019: Dave has renewed his Featured Listing for his OW01. It is now available on eBay and he also notes that spare body work is also available at additional cost (pictures added to gallery). Thanks for supporting the site, Dave, and good luck to buyers! -dc

There was a time in the late 1980s when you could wander into your local powersports dealer and, if you planned properly, walk away with a bike so close to the WSBK kit that could scarcely be ridden on the street. The 1990 Yamaha OW01 was one such bike, crafted to homologate Yamaha’s efforts to beat Honda at the World Superbike game, and released to the hands of the unwashed and under-insured with a handshake and a stiff monthly payment.

1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 for sale on eBay

Where Honda used its might to build the RC30 from scratch, Yamaha made its bones by lightening, strengthening and adding go bits to the FZR750. The Deltabox frame on the OW is hand-welded and unanodized, and held off the ground by a nearly full-race suspension, including an Ohlins rear shock. The bikes also had titanium connecting rods pushing two-ring pistons. The cylinders were fed by five-valve heads breathing through a rack of flatslide carbs. Exhaust was kept manageable on the street and screaming at the track with an Exup valve. The trick engine meant peaky delivery, a voracious appetite for oil and slim maintenance intervals.

This one has been kept stock, ridden mostly on the street and has covered 9,000 miles. You wouldn’t know it to look at it. From the seller:

1990 Yamaha OW01 FZR750R. 9800 miles, (15k in Kilometers). Completely stock. Arizona titled and plated. This bike has seen most of its miles on the street and a few track days early in its life. Never damaged, all original paint and body pieces. If you know bikes, you know these are extremely rare. Looking for a good home for this unicorn. Located in Sunny,Dry, Arizona for the last 27 years.

It might not have the track record of it’s rival from Honda, but the OW01 is a serious piece of kit to this day, and as RC30 values push the stratosphere, the OW is sure to be close behind.

Contact Dave with your interest by email (Realexotica1@gmail.com) or cell phone: (520)977-4541

Featured Listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01
Ducati July 5, 2019 posted by

City Slicker – 1985 Ducati 750 F1 Race Replica

As if a 34 year-old Ducati race replica weren’t rad enough, this 750 F1 has been improved in just about every way to be an up-to-date race shop’s rep.  Developed in NYC and now just a few clicks north, this sparkling 1985 model would be a hit in any concours or vintage race.

1985 Ducati 750 F1 Race Replica for sale on eBay

Ducati was taking on water in the early 1980’s, but had four consecutive F2 championships in the TT series which competed with FIM Grands Prix.  Some privateer successes with F2-based 750cc machines led the factory to developed its own F1 race bike, and the Pantah-engined 750 F1 road machine.  The F1 brought a host of firsts for Ducati – first trellis frame for the road, first monoshock, first floating brake rotors, first 2-into-1 exhaust, first alloy tank.  Though not scary powerful or all that lightweight, it was very sporty for the time and a great basis for a race team’s mods.

Long time previous owner and TT maven Lou Saif curated the long list of updates to this now dedicated race machine.  Suspension was modernized, wheel sizes normalized, and tweaks copied from factory endurance racers.  Soon to be ex-owner Gregory Rathe had these comments on – bikeexif.com –

Lou owned this 750 F1 for almost 20 years, and developed it as a replica of Marco Lucchinelli’s factory bike. “Lou’s intention was to make this bike a street racer, and as light and reliable as possible,” says Rathe. So the motor is mostly original except for the cams, Supermono lightweight gears, and a (very loud) titanium exhaust. The wheels are 17″ x 4.5″/6″ magnesium, and Lou shortened the tail and replicated the lights of the works bikes. The front fairing is also in the racing style, and the headlights are quick release—like those used for night racing. The bike is sprinkled with titanium hardware, and weight was removed from everywhere possible—so it now tips the scales at only 305 pounds. Isn’t it just gorgeous?

The 750 F1’s popularity led to three special editions named for challenging race venues – Montjuich, Laguna Seca, and Santa Monica, and some F1 racers which did well in the Italian TT series.  Meanwhile the new Cagiva management reconsidered their plan to absorb the brand and Ducati rose to the occasion.  An interesting snapshot of the end of an era, and a museum-quality treatment of the subject.

-donn

 

City Slicker – 1985 Ducati 750 F1 Race Replica
Honda July 2, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Update 7.2.2019: We’d like to take this opportunity to thank Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes for being a sponsor of RSBFS! This NSF250RW is available now for purchase as is or as a custom build. Contact Amatumoto today! -dc

Why buy a race replica when you can pick up an actual race bike? Today’s Sponsored Listing from our friends over at Amatumoto GP Motorbikes is a Honda NSF250RW, and it’s no stripped-down streetbike in race plastics, it’s an evolution of the machine that won last year’s Moto3 Constructors Championship in a very competitive field. If you’ve never watched Moto3, the racing is very close, with bikes nose-to-tail at 145mph.

For years, the “lowest” of the three tiers of Grand Prix racing used to be the domain of tiny little two-stroke 125cc machines that weighed less than an average adult American male. This of course gave the class differentiation a nice symmetry, with 125cc, 250cc, and 500cc machines. But in 2012, the smallest class shifted to a formula using 250cc four-strokes to match MotoGP’s move away from two-strokes. Bikes are limited to singles with a bore of no more than 81mm, four valves, a rev ceiling of 13,500rpm, and a minimum weight for the combined bike and rider of 326lbs.

Unlike Moto2, where the entire field uses a single engine [formerly Honda, now Triumph] to keep costs down and ensure close racing, Moto3 allows a variety of engine builders to participate. While physically much larger than a two-stroke of similar displacement, the Honda single still needed to be as light and compact, while taking advantage of every opportunity to save weight, increase power, and centralize mass. To that end, the 249cc engine has its cylinder head reversed, with the ram-air intake to the front and the exhaust exiting to the rear. Other manufacturers have experimented with this configuration with varied success, but here, the main goal appears to be mass-centralization.

The engine is canted backwards in the frame 15°, allowing the engine to be placed further forward in the chassis and maximize airbox volume, with a bore and stroke of 78 x 52.2mm, below the class maximum bore size. The engine is backed, naturally, but a six-speed cassette gearbox for quick ratio changes to maximize the small engine’s potential, and the package weighs in at a claimed 185lbs dry.

From the Seller: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Do you want a Moto3 Honda NSF250RW? Our company can get the most exclusive bikes of the market. Only for VIP customers, museums or exclusive collectors! Contact with our team and inform yourself. Only 2 units available – RESERVE NOW

In our VIP club you will find the most exclusive race and road bikes, also you can offer your bike for manage the sale. We work with customers to worldwide and we want offer the best service and products.

At Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes Store, we take pride to have in our stock great exclusive bikes used on the races. That said, we understand that the collector of bikes hobby is enjoyed by some of the most passionate and diverse enthusiasts on the planet. Simply put: there are just too many awesome styles to fit in to one showroom. No need to worry though, as we’re happy to search for the bike of your dreams. Just give us a bit of pertinent information and we’ll keep an eye out. Amatumoto can build a READY to RACE bike… with engine, exhaust, wiring on demand with the specs that choose our customers.

Contact us via our website: http://www.gpmotorbikes.com/

If you’re a track day junkie or a racer, this is your opportunity to buy a very serious piece of hardware. Just add sponsor decals!

-tad

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!
Honda June 12, 2019 posted by

Rumble and Whine: 1990 Honda RC30

Trying to come up with something new and interesting to type about Honda’s [insert superlative] RC30 is like trying to tell a budding car nut something they don’t know about a Ferrari F40. The specs are available with a single Google query. The original and retrospective road tests drip with corn syrup-sweet praise for the torquey-but-temperamental V4, the obviously hand-made body panels, the wet weight that was 10 percent down on its rivals, the quick-but-forgiving handling and on and on and on.

1990 Honda RC30 for sale on eBay

On top of all that, the 1990 Honda RC30 is beautiful. The livery is perfect, the single-sided swingarm — a revolution at the time — distinctive, eye-catching and purposeful and the snow-white wheels subtly flashy and fully on display. Nothing about this bike says “take it easy today, fella.” This hype is to thank for the bikes’ recent and sharp uptick in value. In the last year, we’ve seen decent ones go for around $30k, but a couple of auction sales and more Internet forum gushing seem to have pushed that north.

This 1990 Honda RC30 is a fantastic example of the breed, with a tick over 5,000 miles on its analog clock. The fairings appear to be the original pieces with some scratches and evidence of paintwork to show for their 29 years. There is also some dust and dirt here and there, but the bike appears to be devoid of any real dirt or corrosion. As the seller says, those old Metzelers will need to go if you plan to ride this thing. Mechanically, it appears mostly stock, with the exception of a ridiculously rad period HRC exhaust.

From the eBay listing:

Fewer than 5,300 miles and from long-term ownership

1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 

Frame no. JH2RC3000LM200087

  • Legendary 16-valve gear-driven DOHC 90-degree V4 engine
    • Reportedly fewer than 3000 produced
    • Long term ownership as part of a fantastic car and motorcycle collection
    • Fewer than 5,300 miles from new

One of the modern era’s few immediately collectible classics, the Honda VFR750R – better known as the ‘RC30′ – was created for just one reason: to win the World Superbike Championship, a feat it achieved in the nascent series’ first two seasons of 1988 and 1989. And while American Fred Merkel was bringing Honda its first two WSB crowns, Britain’s Carl Fogarty used an RC30 to win the TT F1 World Championship in 1988 and 1989, and the equivalent FIM Cup in 1990.

No mere short circuit scratcher, the RC30 and its derivatives proved durable enough to win a hat-full of Endurance Classics too. That this latter requirement was also part of the design brief may be determined from the fact that a quick-release front fork and single-sided swinging arm – essential for speedy wheel changes – were part of an unrivalled specification that included a twin-spar alloy beam frame, 16-valve V4 engine with gear-driven cams, close-ratio six-speed gearbox and four-pot front brake calipers.

All of which did not come cheap: at the time of its launch in 1988 an RC30 cost near double that of other super-sports 750s. Despite the passage of time and progress of motorcycle technology, the RC30 remains a match for the latest generation of sports bikes but possesses an exclusivity that none of them can approach. ‘No other bike from the late-Eighties is lusted after like the RC30’, reckoned Bike, and few would disagree. And then there’s the exhaust note – loud, of course, but soulful enough to bring a pit crew to tears.

This RC30 was only very recently liberated from long-term ownership as part of a very discerning collection of cars and motorcycles. Regularly maintained since new, the bike runs and rides exceptionally well.

This legendary machine is offered in excellent condition throughout. The engine starts readily, though a little cold-blooded, idles smoothly and has an abundance of power. AN ABUNDANCE! The clutch is silky-smooth and brakes and suspension are near perfect. I would opt for a new pair of tires before serious road use and am happy to negotiate your tire choice and installation in to the price.

There are a few scratches in the paint finish around the bike, and I suspect the bottom of the fairing was repainted, likely because of scratches – there are no dings. All body panels are original, and the tank is totally free of blemishes and scratches/dents. Seat is excellent as is the rest of the bike. The bike is accompanied by a clean, clear title, books, spare keys, books/manuals, original rear track stand, and a full set of completely untouched tools.

This is a rare opportunity to acquire a motorcycling icon of performance and a must-have for a discerning collection.

For additional information and photos, please visit ClassicAvenue.com

At almost $37,900, the asking price for this RC30 is about in line with the market. We have seen other low-mileage RC30s change hands for a few thousand dollars more, but with the bodywork and imperfections, this bike is a notch below the upper echelon.

Rumble and Whine: 1990 Honda RC30