Posts by tag: Race Bike

Featured Listing July 28, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01

Update 7.26.2019: Dave has renewed his Featured Listing for his OW01. It is now available on eBay and he also notes that spare body work is also available at additional cost (pictures added to gallery). Thanks for supporting the site, Dave, and good luck to buyers! -dc

There was a time in the late 1980s when you could wander into your local powersports dealer and, if you planned properly, walk away with a bike so close to the WSBK kit that could scarcely be ridden on the street. The 1990 Yamaha OW01 was one such bike, crafted to homologate Yamaha’s efforts to beat Honda at the World Superbike game, and released to the hands of the unwashed and under-insured with a handshake and a stiff monthly payment.

1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 for sale on eBay

Where Honda used its might to build the RC30 from scratch, Yamaha made its bones by lightening, strengthening and adding go bits to the FZR750. The Deltabox frame on the OW is hand-welded and unanodized, and held off the ground by a nearly full-race suspension, including an Ohlins rear shock. The bikes also had titanium connecting rods pushing two-ring pistons. The cylinders were fed by five-valve heads breathing through a rack of flatslide carbs. Exhaust was kept manageable on the street and screaming at the track with an Exup valve. The trick engine meant peaky delivery, a voracious appetite for oil and slim maintenance intervals.

This one has been kept stock, ridden mostly on the street and has covered 9,000 miles. You wouldn’t know it to look at it. From the seller:

1990 Yamaha OW01 FZR750R. 9800 miles, (15k in Kilometers). Completely stock. Arizona titled and plated. This bike has seen most of its miles on the street and a few track days early in its life. Never damaged, all original paint and body pieces. If you know bikes, you know these are extremely rare. Looking for a good home for this unicorn. Located in Sunny,Dry, Arizona for the last 27 years.

It might not have the track record of it’s rival from Honda, but the OW01 is a serious piece of kit to this day, and as RC30 values push the stratosphere, the OW is sure to be close behind.

Contact Dave with your interest by email (Realexotica1@gmail.com) or cell phone: (520)977-4541

Featured Listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01
Ducati July 5, 2019 posted by

City Slicker – 1985 Ducati 750 F1 Race Replica

As if a 34 year-old Ducati race replica weren’t rad enough, this 750 F1 has been improved in just about every way to be an up-to-date race shop’s rep.  Developed in NYC and now just a few clicks north, this sparkling 1985 model would be a hit in any concours or vintage race.

1985 Ducati 750 F1 Race Replica for sale on eBay

Ducati was taking on water in the early 1980’s, but had four consecutive F2 championships in the TT series which competed with FIM Grands Prix.  Some privateer successes with F2-based 750cc machines led the factory to developed its own F1 race bike, and the Pantah-engined 750 F1 road machine.  The F1 brought a host of firsts for Ducati – first trellis frame for the road, first monoshock, first floating brake rotors, first 2-into-1 exhaust, first alloy tank.  Though not scary powerful or all that lightweight, it was very sporty for the time and a great basis for a race team’s mods.

Long time previous owner and TT maven Lou Saif curated the long list of updates to this now dedicated race machine.  Suspension was modernized, wheel sizes normalized, and tweaks copied from factory endurance racers.  Soon to be ex-owner Gregory Rathe had these comments on – bikeexif.com –

Lou owned this 750 F1 for almost 20 years, and developed it as a replica of Marco Lucchinelli’s factory bike. “Lou’s intention was to make this bike a street racer, and as light and reliable as possible,” says Rathe. So the motor is mostly original except for the cams, Supermono lightweight gears, and a (very loud) titanium exhaust. The wheels are 17″ x 4.5″/6″ magnesium, and Lou shortened the tail and replicated the lights of the works bikes. The front fairing is also in the racing style, and the headlights are quick release—like those used for night racing. The bike is sprinkled with titanium hardware, and weight was removed from everywhere possible—so it now tips the scales at only 305 pounds. Isn’t it just gorgeous?

The 750 F1’s popularity led to three special editions named for challenging race venues – Montjuich, Laguna Seca, and Santa Monica, and some F1 racers which did well in the Italian TT series.  Meanwhile the new Cagiva management reconsidered their plan to absorb the brand and Ducati rose to the occasion.  An interesting snapshot of the end of an era, and a museum-quality treatment of the subject.

-donn

 

City Slicker – 1985 Ducati 750 F1 Race Replica
Featured Listing July 2, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Update 7.2.2019: We’d like to take this opportunity to thank Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes for being a sponsor of RSBFS! This NSF250RW is available now for purchase as is or as a custom build. Contact Amatumoto today! -dc

Why buy a race replica when you can pick up an actual race bike? Today’s Sponsored Listing from our friends over at Amatumoto GP Motorbikes is a Honda NSF250RW, and it’s no stripped-down streetbike in race plastics, it’s an evolution of the machine that won last year’s Moto3 Constructors Championship in a very competitive field. If you’ve never watched Moto3, the racing is very close, with bikes nose-to-tail at 145mph.

For years, the “lowest” of the three tiers of Grand Prix racing used to be the domain of tiny little two-stroke 125cc machines that weighed less than an average adult American male. This of course gave the class differentiation a nice symmetry, with 125cc, 250cc, and 500cc machines. But in 2012, the smallest class shifted to a formula using 250cc four-strokes to match MotoGP’s move away from two-strokes. Bikes are limited to singles with a bore of no more than 81mm, four valves, a rev ceiling of 13,500rpm, and a minimum weight for the combined bike and rider of 326lbs.

Unlike Moto2, where the entire field uses a single engine [formerly Honda, now Triumph] to keep costs down and ensure close racing, Moto3 allows a variety of engine builders to participate. While physically much larger than a two-stroke of similar displacement, the Honda single still needed to be as light and compact, while taking advantage of every opportunity to save weight, increase power, and centralize mass. To that end, the 249cc engine has its cylinder head reversed, with the ram-air intake to the front and the exhaust exiting to the rear. Other manufacturers have experimented with this configuration with varied success, but here, the main goal appears to be mass-centralization.

The engine is canted backwards in the frame 15°, allowing the engine to be placed further forward in the chassis and maximize airbox volume, with a bore and stroke of 78 x 52.2mm, below the class maximum bore size. The engine is backed, naturally, but a six-speed cassette gearbox for quick ratio changes to maximize the small engine’s potential, and the package weighs in at a claimed 185lbs dry.

From the Seller: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Do you want a Moto3 Honda NSF250RW? Our company can get the most exclusive bikes of the market. Only for VIP customers, museums or exclusive collectors! Contact with our team and inform yourself. Only 2 units available – RESERVE NOW

In our VIP club you will find the most exclusive race and road bikes, also you can offer your bike for manage the sale. We work with customers to worldwide and we want offer the best service and products.

At Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes Store, we take pride to have in our stock great exclusive bikes used on the races. That said, we understand that the collector of bikes hobby is enjoyed by some of the most passionate and diverse enthusiasts on the planet. Simply put: there are just too many awesome styles to fit in to one showroom. No need to worry though, as we’re happy to search for the bike of your dreams. Just give us a bit of pertinent information and we’ll keep an eye out. Amatumoto can build a READY to RACE bike… with engine, exhaust, wiring on demand with the specs that choose our customers.

Contact us via our website: http://www.gpmotorbikes.com/

If you’re a track day junkie or a racer, this is your opportunity to buy a very serious piece of hardware. Just add sponsor decals!

-tad

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!
Honda June 12, 2019 posted by

Rumble and Whine: 1990 Honda RC30

Trying to come up with something new and interesting to type about Honda’s [insert superlative] RC30 is like trying to tell a budding car nut something they don’t know about a Ferrari F40. The specs are available with a single Google query. The original and retrospective road tests drip with corn syrup-sweet praise for the torquey-but-temperamental V4, the obviously hand-made body panels, the wet weight that was 10 percent down on its rivals, the quick-but-forgiving handling and on and on and on.

1990 Honda RC30 for sale on eBay

On top of all that, the 1990 Honda RC30 is beautiful. The livery is perfect, the single-sided swingarm — a revolution at the time — distinctive, eye-catching and purposeful and the snow-white wheels subtly flashy and fully on display. Nothing about this bike says “take it easy today, fella.” This hype is to thank for the bikes’ recent and sharp uptick in value. In the last year, we’ve seen decent ones go for around $30k, but a couple of auction sales and more Internet forum gushing seem to have pushed that north.

This 1990 Honda RC30 is a fantastic example of the breed, with a tick over 5,000 miles on its analog clock. The fairings appear to be the original pieces with some scratches and evidence of paintwork to show for their 29 years. There is also some dust and dirt here and there, but the bike appears to be devoid of any real dirt or corrosion. As the seller says, those old Metzelers will need to go if you plan to ride this thing. Mechanically, it appears mostly stock, with the exception of a ridiculously rad period HRC exhaust.

From the eBay listing:

Fewer than 5,300 miles and from long-term ownership

1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 

Frame no. JH2RC3000LM200087

  • Legendary 16-valve gear-driven DOHC 90-degree V4 engine
    • Reportedly fewer than 3000 produced
    • Long term ownership as part of a fantastic car and motorcycle collection
    • Fewer than 5,300 miles from new

One of the modern era’s few immediately collectible classics, the Honda VFR750R – better known as the ‘RC30′ – was created for just one reason: to win the World Superbike Championship, a feat it achieved in the nascent series’ first two seasons of 1988 and 1989. And while American Fred Merkel was bringing Honda its first two WSB crowns, Britain’s Carl Fogarty used an RC30 to win the TT F1 World Championship in 1988 and 1989, and the equivalent FIM Cup in 1990.

No mere short circuit scratcher, the RC30 and its derivatives proved durable enough to win a hat-full of Endurance Classics too. That this latter requirement was also part of the design brief may be determined from the fact that a quick-release front fork and single-sided swinging arm – essential for speedy wheel changes – were part of an unrivalled specification that included a twin-spar alloy beam frame, 16-valve V4 engine with gear-driven cams, close-ratio six-speed gearbox and four-pot front brake calipers.

All of which did not come cheap: at the time of its launch in 1988 an RC30 cost near double that of other super-sports 750s. Despite the passage of time and progress of motorcycle technology, the RC30 remains a match for the latest generation of sports bikes but possesses an exclusivity that none of them can approach. ‘No other bike from the late-Eighties is lusted after like the RC30’, reckoned Bike, and few would disagree. And then there’s the exhaust note – loud, of course, but soulful enough to bring a pit crew to tears.

This RC30 was only very recently liberated from long-term ownership as part of a very discerning collection of cars and motorcycles. Regularly maintained since new, the bike runs and rides exceptionally well.

This legendary machine is offered in excellent condition throughout. The engine starts readily, though a little cold-blooded, idles smoothly and has an abundance of power. AN ABUNDANCE! The clutch is silky-smooth and brakes and suspension are near perfect. I would opt for a new pair of tires before serious road use and am happy to negotiate your tire choice and installation in to the price.

There are a few scratches in the paint finish around the bike, and I suspect the bottom of the fairing was repainted, likely because of scratches – there are no dings. All body panels are original, and the tank is totally free of blemishes and scratches/dents. Seat is excellent as is the rest of the bike. The bike is accompanied by a clean, clear title, books, spare keys, books/manuals, original rear track stand, and a full set of completely untouched tools.

This is a rare opportunity to acquire a motorcycling icon of performance and a must-have for a discerning collection.

For additional information and photos, please visit ClassicAvenue.com

At almost $37,900, the asking price for this RC30 is about in line with the market. We have seen other low-mileage RC30s change hands for a few thousand dollars more, but with the bodywork and imperfections, this bike is a notch below the upper echelon.

Rumble and Whine: 1990 Honda RC30
Laverda June 6, 2019 posted by

The Other Woman – 1979 Laverda Formula 500

Known here mostly for bigger GT’s, Laverda tried to tap the European mid-size market in the 1970’s with a 350 and 500cc twin.  A single marque race series was developed to drum up interest, pre-dating the IROC and BMW Boxer Cup.  Surprisingly, the four year series generated only 200 or so racers, making it a rare bird indeed.

1979 Laverda Formula 500 Mk. 1 for sale on eBay

Laverda knew their way around a parallel twin and the DOHC motor with uprated cams and 10.5:1 pistons delivered 52 hp.  It has a six speed transmission with a tall first and closely spaced ratios befitting a racer.  Marzocchi provided forks and dual rear shocks, with Brembo supplying dual front disks, most surviving because of the requirements of the race specification.  Though a full fairing was added, road-worthy lighting and electrics were removed, keeping the dry weight to 338 lbs.  Menani clip-ons had a forward offset to stretch the cockpit as did the sand-cast alloy rearsets.

Though both Formula 500’s previously seen on RSBFS were overseas, this one was re-commissioned at Moto Borgotaro in Brooklyn and currently resides in SoCal.  Evidently this Formula was restored early on by the late Mike Waugh, owner of Montydons  in Britain and Laverda luminary.  It bears the bumps and scrapes of many moves but appears complete and correct.  A replacement for the cracked windscreen might have to be custom made but is very do-able.  Comments from the eBay auction:

This very Formula 500 is one of the two Laverdas pictured on the cover of the Brooklands book,”Laverda 500 Twins 1977-1983″.  The book is a compilation of reviews, company materials and magazine articles, one of which features this motorcycle.  The bike belonged to Mike Waugh, owner of MontyDons, a UK specialist restorer of Laverda 500’s.  Waugh was well-known in the Laverda community.   Quoting from the article written by John Colley, “Little is known of this Mark 1’s history.  It was discovered in Wales after being ‘laid up’ for many years, and is one of the very few [Mark 1’s] brought to the UK”.  Even fewer were shipped to the States.  Mike restored the bike.

In the close up of the photo of the Formula 500 Mark 1 on the bike’s cover and again in the article inside, note the additional holes drilled in the faring at the upper and lower bracket mounts.  These correspond exactly with the bike, as does the license plate mount and orange wheels.

This bike, identified by VIN in its entry registration, went to the Isle of Man in 1999.  It is not however, one of the six Formula500 (Mark II’s) Slaters entered in the 1980 Formula 2 TT, winning the Team Prize.   Included in the sale are the original race number 124 decals that were on the bike at the Isle of Man.  The decals were removed and preserved.
An extremely scarce set of original factory special tools for the Laverda 500 comes with the bike, as does the original shop manual, Brooklands book and original one-sheet marketing print.
I bought the bike in late 2014 from a PA collector who had owned (but never started) the Laverda for many years.  Soon after, I brought the bike to respected Laverda specialist Motoborgotaro, in New York City.   Peter Boggia thoroughly inspected, serviced and recommissioned – but did not restore – the bike.  The last time the bike was run, was in October 2015.

No sense challenging DMV with a time machine like this, it really belongs in the vintage races.  Reviewed as more 250 than 500 sized, a suitably classic rider might want to try it on before committing to purchase.  This could be a total gem with not much more than a large tube of elbow grease, though track preparation would be more involved.  Either way the Formula 500 might not be practical but sure is easy on the eyes.

-donn

The Other Woman – 1979 Laverda Formula 500
Suzuki May 14, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP

Here we go. RSBFS comfort food in its finest form and coming from one of our most trusted allies in Moto2 Imports. Like a big bowl of mom’s mac and cheese, there is little that can sate us like a pristine 1989 Suzuki RGV250SP. If you have followed us for any length of time, you know the numbers on these babies chapter and verse, but a good chorus is always worth repeating.

1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP Pepsi For Sale at Moto2 Imports

In ‘89, Suzuki’s two-stroke v-twin GP replica spat out the best part of 60 horsepower from a deliciously peaky powerplant that was endowed with years of GP paddock trickery. The paintwork aped Kevin Schwantz’s RG500 race livery, and outsized brakes and USD forks showed this thing intended no half-assery. It was also a damn sight cheaper than the legions of 1,000cc sportbikes prowling showrooms, and in the right hands could be made to keep up, at least when things got twisty.


Because these things were never sold in the U.S., thanks mostly to the EPA, but in part because we don’t have Europe’s tiered licensing laws, young riders on these shores were left with a bunch of uninspiring sub-500cc machines, or a suite of not beginner-friendly 600s. Wannabe racers in this country never learned the true joy of a featherweight, unforgiving two-stroke ripper.

This 1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP is as nice as they come, and wears nicer suspension front and rear and a close-ratio gearbox to separate itself from the non-SP machines. Everything on the bike is original with the exception of a set of stainless steel front brake lines, and it will be supplied fully serviced. It has a clean US title, so registering it should not pose a problem.

From the seller:

1989 Suzuki RGV250 VJ21 SP in factory Pepsi color scheme. The bike has 5,755 miles (9,265km) and has been prepped by our partner Speedwerks. The fairings and tank are all OEM and in very good (~9/10) condition. Chassis is similarly nice. The SP model features close-ratio gearbox and upgraded front/rear suspension, however contrary to popular opinion, the VJ21 SP did not come with a dry-clutch. Bike is all original, minus braided front brake lines. Tank interior is clean. The bike has been serviced and is in excellent running condition. Bike will come with a US title. Price is $9,999 or best offer and buyers can contact us at info@moto2imports.com or (844) 44-MOTO2

Even today, there isn’t much that weighs as little as this bike and packs a similar wallop, especially if you want blinkers and a license plate. If you really want to separate yourself from the ranks of FZ07s and Gixxers at your local cruise, look no further.

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP
Laverda April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale

This is an unusual opportunity to buy a rough-and-tumble, forged-in-fire vintage racing Laverda. If you’re searching for a display piece to adorn your Manhattan loft, you should probably look elsewhere. This SFC-spec SF2 was made to run, and run hard. It’s all killer and no filler, built to race. Period. The original SFC is one of the most desirable and iconic sportbikes of the 1970s, with a stylish half-fairing, bright orange paint, and solo tail. The 744cc parallel twin was supposedly heavily influenced by Honda’s CB77 Superhawk engine, and Laverda built their bikes to last, with five main bearings in the engine, electrical components from Nippon-Denso, ignition components from Bosch, and a Verlicchi frame, and suspension from Marzocchi.

The result was the perfect basis for an endurance racer, and Laverda whipped up a hand-built factory special to capitalize on that potential. The SFC or “Super Freni Competizione,” which translates to “Super Competition Brakes.” The engine featured the usual race-oriented updates: a lighter crank, polished connecting rods, bigger valves, and high-comp pistons. 36mm carbs fed the high-performance engine and produced as much as 80hp, depending on the year, while a two-into-one exhaust made sure everyone within miles could count every one of them.

The original SFC was technically a road-legal bike, but it was stiffly-sprung, over-carbureted, and generally temperamental. Many that have come up for sale have their road-legal parts in a box that comes with the bike, since they really were a bit of an afterthought anyway. Even that solo tail is specifically shaped to include a round numberplate, as you can see. The bike was a literal “racebike for the road” in a way that you just don’t really see anymore. Or maybe it’s just that all serious sportbikes are racebikes for the road, but they’re just not really all that much of a compromise now, with 200hp, a gel touring seat, and heated grips…

This particular bike isn’t an authentic Laverda SFC, it’s a high quality replica built from the ground up using a regular production SF2 with many trick parts, and uses the powerful twin-disc front brake setup from the later bikes that should work much better on track than the earlier drum, although it doesn’t look quite as sexy. Speaking of the track: this started out as a regular road bike, but it’s been converted to race duty and campaigned for years by Larry at New York City Motorcycles [who is also selling his Harley Davidson XR750 here on our site], who is currently based, ironically, in Venice, CA.

His original eBay listing tells a great story about how the bike came to be: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale

Where to begin…

Gorizia, Italy (on the Northeast corner of Italy 1km from Slovenia). July 2012.

That is when this Laverda came into real life, from the pages of every conceivable magazine and poster since childhood.  In fact the first time I laid eyes on a Laverda 750SFC was at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City in 1998, at its renowned exhibition, Art of the Motorcycle. If I wasn’t already hooked, now I was obsessed.

In the years since that life changing show, I was always on the “lookout”.  Sorta like John Walsh chasing fugitives!  I can recall being wide awake at 3am looking in remote places, the mideast, japan and of course the US and Europe.

I couldn’t believe my eyes in the summer of 2012.  In fact, I couldn’t understand the Italian listing on eBay Italy, either.   When the sun rose the next morning I was at my neighbor’s door, an Italian.  Within hours we had the bike’s owner on a conference call.  I had a million questions.  My neighbor just wanted to go to work.

I learned that the motorcycle was built to race throughout Italy by an engineer who also owned a genuine SFC.  Too precious to race, he saw no obstacle to making an exact clone, particularly the specification of the motor:

  • 10.8:1  Compression
  • Carillo Rods
  • SFC Crank
  • SFC Cams
  • SFC Pistons, valves and porting
  • 36 mm Dell’Ortos

The rest is simply bodywork… on an SF2 frame. Other than the factory 750SFC’s VIN series and frame insignia depicting that its a factory SFC, this bike is exactly the same in specification and appearance of a 1974 (Disc brake front) 750SFC.

The last thing I thought about doing when I bought, imported and titled it in the US, was racing it. So it was cosmetically and exhaustively restored as a streetbike. Laverda’s are known to have indestructible motors. And this was no exception. When it cleared customs it set off car alarms a quarter mile away…

My good friend Kenny Cummings, the owner of NYC Norton had been taking care of another parallel twin of mine, a Norton Commando. And every few weeks Kenny would be “gone racing.” So it’s technically his fault. I caught the bug. And became just as obsessed about racing as Laverdas. 

I raced two years before I became obsessed with the Laverda for a different reason. Though it was exhilarating to ride as a streetbike (outside of New York City where I lived), I soon learned this was a motorcycle that was designed, built and wanted to race. Long story short(er), that’s what it became.

The Laverda’s trophies include AHRMA National Series 5th Place in Formula 750 in 2015, 3rd Place AHRMA Pacific Crown, and various podiums at some of the most storied racetracks in America.

Recent marriage and move to Japan has put new goals on the horizon. Its time for my beloved Laverda to go from my back burner into the hands of someone whose passion picks up where mine leaves off.

The fuel tank is a Wolfgang Haerter special edition alumnium tank. 

As mentioned, it has never crashed. It could benefit from some TLC ie, valves adjusted, carbs rebuilt. A simplified wiring harness – though what’s on the bike now is perfectly functional for its current set up as a racer.

So much to list, these are the key pluses and minuses:

*The windscreen is cracked – it was “stitched” together with zip ties and continued racing. I always thought it adds character 🙂

  • One Sidecover flew off the bike at Willow Springs during competition. It was recovered but in a mangled condition (see photo)
  • Starter and generator (included; sprag gear is worn and should be replaced) were removed for racing; running a “total loss” set up
  • Needs a new battery
  • Missing the ignition key: bypassed
  • Runs an EMC electronic ignition (excellent) from Wolfgang Haerter
  • Slight weep from gas tank rubbing the frame. New Owner should either have the seam rewelded or coat the tank with Caswell
  • YSS Shocks in rear and Works Performance Springs in Front – Original Marzochi shocks included
  • Powdercoated frame completed 2014
  • No rust anywhere
  • 2 into 1 Conti exhaust
  • New York Title in my name
  • Street faring, street seat, tachometer included
  • Set of rear sprockets included
  • Uses an SFC’s shop manual, not an SF2’s.  Reproduced copy included
  • New racing foot pegs
  • Original Laverda clubman bars
  • Other extras all included

The motorcycle is sold as is, where is, and there are no warranties expressed nor implied. Judge the photos and make your own assessment of the bike’s condition, rather than rely on my opinion and/or description. Questions and clarifications are encouraged. These are my personal opin Bidders must be certain of their commitment before bidding, as once its submitted. If you win it, you bought it. No time for nonsense please. Bidders with less than 10 or any negative feedback must contact me prior to bidding or else expect your bid to be cancelled and removed.

This motorcycle requires thorough inspection and recommissioning before running or riding. Know what you are buying before you bid. If you don’t have the expertise and/or the budget, with all due respect, this is not the bike for you. 

New York City Motorcycles (nycmc dot com) is reasonably well known in the vintage motorcycle community and this is not the only platform for offering the bike. Therefore please consider not waiting until the final seconds of the auction to bid. Because while you’re waiting to pull the trigger, if a fair offer arrives from elsewhere and there is not a comparable bid here, the auction will instantly disappear from your watched items.

Multiples of the start price has been invested in this motorcycle. It was a privilege to lose money on this fabulous machine. Boyhood dreams fulfilled and then some 🙂

Motorcycle is located in Venice, CA. I will work with your shipper but its your responsibility.

On a personal note, I’ve come across this bike and owner before: I bumped into him at a 2014 AHRMA event in South Jersey, where I took the picture above. He was wrenching on this bike under a popup tent and, when I came over to babble excitedly about the Laverda, he stopped what he was doing to fire it up for me, a gleeful grin on his face. To me, that says about all you need to know about his passion and enthusiasm. The bike obviously isn’t a “real” SFC, but it is a real Laverda, and the engine specifications are, as he describes, SFC-spec. With real SFC prices headed into six-figures, they’re less and less likely to be raced as intended. Real or not, this Laverda won’t be cheap to buy or run, but is your best bet if you want to actually ride one of these fire-breathing Italian twins in anger.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale
Harley Davidson April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750

It’s hard to think of a racing bike more uniquely American than the Harley-Davidson XR750. The bike combines all of the qualities that make us who we are as a nation, and carries a long history of victories through grit, determination and dedication to the art of plying your trade better than anyone else. For riders and racers in the 1970s and 1980s, the XR is as hallowed as Richard Petty’s sacred 43 or McQueen’s trademark smirk.

1972 Harley-Davidson XR750 for sale on eBay

The XR750, which is variously quoted as having anywhere from 80 to 100 horsepower is the winningest motorcycle in AMA history, thanks in large part to the fact that, 50 years after it bowed, flat trackers are still finding success aboard updated versions. Evel Knievel made the bike famous outside the fairly narrow lane of flat track racing, jumping his 1972 XR to a string of then-world records.

This 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750 was raced by Mike Boyes in the 1970s and 1980s. It sits in unrestored, as-raced condition, and has not started since Boyes last rolled it into the pits. It is a time capsule in the purest sense of the word. It is the first year of the alloy-head XR750 engine, and carries nearly 50 years of race patina on its simple orange bodywork. The fiberglass tank is uncoated and unlined, and therefore is likely unfit for use. The seller says that, despite its long slumber, the bike shows every sign that it would fire and run with minimal work.

From the eBay listing:

1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750 flat track racing motorcycle
Engine no. 1C101XH0
Unrestored. As raced.
• First year of the alloy head XR
• Raced throughout California in the 1970’s and 1980’s
• Delivered in as-raced, unrestored condition
This 1972 alloy XR-750 was purchased by Mike Boyes from renowned Harley tuner Michigander Tex Peel. Boyes then raced it mainly in California in the mid-to-late 1970s and early 1980s. He lives near Seattle, Washington today. Boyes sold the bike to Yoshi Kosaka of the Garage Company, now of Inglewood, California, who kept the bike for many years before selling it to Mike Cheiky, a California-based inventor. Mike died last year and so his wife Charity enlisted a family friend to find it a new home. The XR-750 found its way to New York City Motorcycles. Its appearance – the patina, that is – has been ‘undisturbed’ since it was last raced at Ascot, San Jose, Sacramento, and others. The motor gives every indication of firing up with a minimum of proper servicing and safety checks although it is recommended that fuel not be poured inside of the XR750’s original, un-lined, uncoated tank. To run it, a substitute tank or external fuel feed should be used.
Ran when parked 🙂
This is my third vintage XR750 and the purest racer of them all. The motorcycle looks exactly as it did when it exited the racetrack the last time.
Recent marriage and move to Japan makes keeping, shipping and/or storing impractical. My move is your gain 🙂
See other motorcycles offered for sale along with the XR.
*missing left footpeg
*Sold with a BILL OF SALE ONLY. XR750’s do not have titles and are not legal for road use!*
***optional Harley Racing factory stand available to the winning bidder only. $500 value***

The motorcycle is sold as is, where is, and there are no warranties expressed nor implied. Judge the photos and make your own assessment of the bike’s condition, rather than rely on my opinion and/or description. Questions and clarifications are encouraged. These are my personal opin Bidders must be certain of their commitment before bidding, as once its submitted. If you win it, you bought it. No time for nonsense please. Bidders with less than 10 or any negative feedback must contact me prior to bidding or else expect your bid to be cancelled and removed.

This motorcycle requires thorough inspection and recommissioning before running or riding. Know what you are buying before you bid. If you don’t have the expertise and/or the budget, with all due respect, this is not the bike for you.

New York City Motorcycles ( nycmc dot com) is reasonably well known in the vintage motorcycle community and this is not the only platform for offering the bike. Therefore please consider not waiting until the final seconds of the auction to bid. Because while you’re waiting to pull the trigger, if a fair offer arrives from elsewhere and there is not a comparable bid here, the auction will instantly disappear from your watched items.

Motorcycle is located in Venice, CA. I will work with your shipper but its your responsibility.

I’ve had several questions regarding the engine number.  Firstly, thank you for pointing out the number being incorrect, incomplete or possibly the engine number of the prior series, 1970 Ironhead.  I’ve just added addtional photos of the engine case, which shows the full number: 1C1013(followed by 2 with a slash over the number) H8

The slash through the two is consistent with a 1975 model I owned previously – in that instance the number 6 followed by the number 5 slashed out.  The unanimous opinion from experienced XR owners and collectors was 6 referring to 1976, the bikes completion date; the 5 slashed out refers to the 1975 model.  In that case labor disruptions at Youngstown were responsible for some 1975 bikes being carried over and released the following year. 

The number first shown was indeed incorrect.  I used the text from the Bonhams auction catalog from the Barber Motorsports, sale in October of last year, where the XR was listed.  Bonhams conducted their own independent review of the bike’s provenance.  I should have proofread their reference then, as well as now before I put the bike up for auction now.  Apologies for my oversight and hope this clears up any confusion caused.  Feel free to ask additional questions if my hypothesis appears incorrect!

Thanks again.

Running original XRs command silly money, and this one is a true museum piece with race provenance to back it up. Hurry over to eBay if it tickles your fancy, the auction is about to wind down!

Featured Listing: 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750