Posts by tag: Race Bike

Featured Listing May 14, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP

Here we go. RSBFS comfort food in its finest form and coming from one of our most trusted allies in Moto2 Imports. Like a big bowl of mom’s mac and cheese, there is little that can sate us like a pristine 1989 Suzuki RGV250SP. If you have followed us for any length of time, you know the numbers on these babies chapter and verse, but a good chorus is always worth repeating.

1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP Pepsi For Sale at Moto2 Imports

In ‘89, Suzuki’s two-stroke v-twin GP replica spat out the best part of 60 horsepower from a deliciously peaky powerplant that was endowed with years of GP paddock trickery. The paintwork aped Kevin Schwantz’s RG500 race livery, and outsized brakes and USD forks showed this thing intended no half-assery. It was also a damn sight cheaper than the legions of 1,000cc sportbikes prowling showrooms, and in the right hands could be made to keep up, at least when things got twisty.


Because these things were never sold in the U.S., thanks mostly to the EPA, but in part because we don’t have Europe’s tiered licensing laws, young riders on these shores were left with a bunch of uninspiring sub-500cc machines, or a suite of not beginner-friendly 600s. Wannabe racers in this country never learned the true joy of a featherweight, unforgiving two-stroke ripper.

This 1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP is as nice as they come, and wears nicer suspension front and rear and a close-ratio gearbox to separate itself from the non-SP machines. Everything on the bike is original with the exception of a set of stainless steel front brake lines, and it will be supplied fully serviced. It has a clean US title, so registering it should not pose a problem.

From the seller:

1989 Suzuki RGV250 VJ21 SP in factory Pepsi color scheme. The bike has 5,755 miles (9,265km) and has been prepped by our partner Speedwerks. The fairings and tank are all OEM and in very good (~9/10) condition. Chassis is similarly nice. The SP model features close-ratio gearbox and upgraded front/rear suspension, however contrary to popular opinion, the VJ21 SP did not come with a dry-clutch. Bike is all original, minus braided front brake lines. Tank interior is clean. The bike has been serviced and is in excellent running condition. Bike will come with a US title. Price is $9,999 or best offer and buyers can contact us at info@moto2imports.com or (844) 44-MOTO2

Even today, there isn’t much that weighs as little as this bike and packs a similar wallop, especially if you want blinkers and a license plate. If you really want to separate yourself from the ranks of FZ07s and Gixxers at your local cruise, look no further.

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP
Featured Listing April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale

This is an unusual opportunity to buy a rough-and-tumble, forged-in-fire vintage racing Laverda. If you’re searching for a display piece to adorn your Manhattan loft, you should probably look elsewhere. This SFC-spec SF2 was made to run, and run hard. It’s all killer and no filler, built to race. Period. The original SFC is one of the most desirable and iconic sportbikes of the 1970s, with a stylish half-fairing, bright orange paint, and solo tail. The 744cc parallel twin was supposedly heavily influenced by Honda’s CB77 Superhawk engine, and Laverda built their bikes to last, with five main bearings in the engine, electrical components from Nippon-Denso, ignition components from Bosch, and a Verlicchi frame, and suspension from Marzocchi.

The result was the perfect basis for an endurance racer, and Laverda whipped up a hand-built factory special to capitalize on that potential. The SFC or “Super Freni Competizione,” which translates to “Super Competition Brakes.” The engine featured the usual race-oriented updates: a lighter crank, polished connecting rods, bigger valves, and high-comp pistons. 36mm carbs fed the high-performance engine and produced as much as 80hp, depending on the year, while a two-into-one exhaust made sure everyone within miles could count every one of them.

The original SFC was technically a road-legal bike, but it was stiffly-sprung, over-carbureted, and generally temperamental. Many that have come up for sale have their road-legal parts in a box that comes with the bike, since they really were a bit of an afterthought anyway. Even that solo tail is specifically shaped to include a round numberplate, as you can see. The bike was a literal “racebike for the road” in a way that you just don’t really see anymore. Or maybe it’s just that all serious sportbikes are racebikes for the road, but they’re just not really all that much of a compromise now, with 200hp, a gel touring seat, and heated grips…

This particular bike isn’t an authentic Laverda SFC, it’s a high quality replica built from the ground up using a regular production SF2 with many trick parts, and uses the powerful twin-disc front brake setup from the later bikes that should work much better on track than the earlier drum, although it doesn’t look quite as sexy. Speaking of the track: this started out as a regular road bike, but it’s been converted to race duty and campaigned for years by Larry at New York City Motorcycles [who is also selling his Harley Davidson XR750 here on our site], who is currently based, ironically, in Venice, CA.

His original eBay listing tells a great story about how the bike came to be: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale

Where to begin…

Gorizia, Italy (on the Northeast corner of Italy 1km from Slovenia). July 2012.

That is when this Laverda came into real life, from the pages of every conceivable magazine and poster since childhood.  In fact the first time I laid eyes on a Laverda 750SFC was at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City in 1998, at its renowned exhibition, Art of the Motorcycle. If I wasn’t already hooked, now I was obsessed.

In the years since that life changing show, I was always on the “lookout”.  Sorta like John Walsh chasing fugitives!  I can recall being wide awake at 3am looking in remote places, the mideast, japan and of course the US and Europe.

I couldn’t believe my eyes in the summer of 2012.  In fact, I couldn’t understand the Italian listing on eBay Italy, either.   When the sun rose the next morning I was at my neighbor’s door, an Italian.  Within hours we had the bike’s owner on a conference call.  I had a million questions.  My neighbor just wanted to go to work.

I learned that the motorcycle was built to race throughout Italy by an engineer who also owned a genuine SFC.  Too precious to race, he saw no obstacle to making an exact clone, particularly the specification of the motor:

  • 10.8:1  Compression
  • Carillo Rods
  • SFC Crank
  • SFC Cams
  • SFC Pistons, valves and porting
  • 36 mm Dell’Ortos

The rest is simply bodywork… on an SF2 frame. Other than the factory 750SFC’s VIN series and frame insignia depicting that its a factory SFC, this bike is exactly the same in specification and appearance of a 1974 (Disc brake front) 750SFC.

The last thing I thought about doing when I bought, imported and titled it in the US, was racing it. So it was cosmetically and exhaustively restored as a streetbike. Laverda’s are known to have indestructible motors. And this was no exception. When it cleared customs it set off car alarms a quarter mile away…

My good friend Kenny Cummings, the owner of NYC Norton had been taking care of another parallel twin of mine, a Norton Commando. And every few weeks Kenny would be “gone racing.” So it’s technically his fault. I caught the bug. And became just as obsessed about racing as Laverdas. 

I raced two years before I became obsessed with the Laverda for a different reason. Though it was exhilarating to ride as a streetbike (outside of New York City where I lived), I soon learned this was a motorcycle that was designed, built and wanted to race. Long story short(er), that’s what it became.

The Laverda’s trophies include AHRMA National Series 5th Place in Formula 750 in 2015, 3rd Place AHRMA Pacific Crown, and various podiums at some of the most storied racetracks in America.

Recent marriage and move to Japan has put new goals on the horizon. Its time for my beloved Laverda to go from my back burner into the hands of someone whose passion picks up where mine leaves off.

The fuel tank is a Wolfgang Haerter special edition alumnium tank. 

As mentioned, it has never crashed. It could benefit from some TLC ie, valves adjusted, carbs rebuilt. A simplified wiring harness – though what’s on the bike now is perfectly functional for its current set up as a racer.

So much to list, these are the key pluses and minuses:

*The windscreen is cracked – it was “stitched” together with zip ties and continued racing. I always thought it adds character 🙂

  • One Sidecover flew off the bike at Willow Springs during competition. It was recovered but in a mangled condition (see photo)
  • Starter and generator (included; sprag gear is worn and should be replaced) were removed for racing; running a “total loss” set up
  • Needs a new battery
  • Missing the ignition key: bypassed
  • Runs an EMC electronic ignition (excellent) from Wolfgang Haerter
  • Slight weep from gas tank rubbing the frame. New Owner should either have the seam rewelded or coat the tank with Caswell
  • YSS Shocks in rear and Works Performance Springs in Front – Original Marzochi shocks included
  • Powdercoated frame completed 2014
  • No rust anywhere
  • 2 into 1 Conti exhaust
  • New York Title in my name
  • Street faring, street seat, tachometer included
  • Set of rear sprockets included
  • Uses an SFC’s shop manual, not an SF2’s.  Reproduced copy included
  • New racing foot pegs
  • Original Laverda clubman bars
  • Other extras all included

The motorcycle is sold as is, where is, and there are no warranties expressed nor implied. Judge the photos and make your own assessment of the bike’s condition, rather than rely on my opinion and/or description. Questions and clarifications are encouraged. These are my personal opin Bidders must be certain of their commitment before bidding, as once its submitted. If you win it, you bought it. No time for nonsense please. Bidders with less than 10 or any negative feedback must contact me prior to bidding or else expect your bid to be cancelled and removed.

This motorcycle requires thorough inspection and recommissioning before running or riding. Know what you are buying before you bid. If you don’t have the expertise and/or the budget, with all due respect, this is not the bike for you. 

New York City Motorcycles (nycmc dot com) is reasonably well known in the vintage motorcycle community and this is not the only platform for offering the bike. Therefore please consider not waiting until the final seconds of the auction to bid. Because while you’re waiting to pull the trigger, if a fair offer arrives from elsewhere and there is not a comparable bid here, the auction will instantly disappear from your watched items.

Multiples of the start price has been invested in this motorcycle. It was a privilege to lose money on this fabulous machine. Boyhood dreams fulfilled and then some 🙂

Motorcycle is located in Venice, CA. I will work with your shipper but its your responsibility.

On a personal note, I’ve come across this bike and owner before: I bumped into him at a 2014 AHRMA event in South Jersey, where I took the picture above. He was wrenching on this bike under a popup tent and, when I came over to babble excitedly about the Laverda, he stopped what he was doing to fire it up for me, a gleeful grin on his face. To me, that says about all you need to know about his passion and enthusiasm. The bike obviously isn’t a “real” SFC, but it is a real Laverda, and the engine specifications are, as he describes, SFC-spec. With real SFC prices headed into six-figures, they’re less and less likely to be raced as intended. Real or not, this Laverda won’t be cheap to buy or run, but is your best bet if you want to actually ride one of these fire-breathing Italian twins in anger.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale
Featured Listing April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750

It’s hard to think of a racing bike more uniquely American than the Harley-Davidson XR750. The bike combines all of the qualities that make us who we are as a nation, and carries a long history of victories through grit, determination and dedication to the art of plying your trade better than anyone else. For riders and racers in the 1970s and 1980s, the XR is as hallowed as Richard Petty’s sacred 43 or McQueen’s trademark smirk.

1972 Harley-Davidson XR750 for sale on eBay

The XR750, which is variously quoted as having anywhere from 80 to 100 horsepower is the winningest motorcycle in AMA history, thanks in large part to the fact that, 50 years after it bowed, flat trackers are still finding success aboard updated versions. Evel Knievel made the bike famous outside the fairly narrow lane of flat track racing, jumping his 1972 XR to a string of then-world records.

This 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750 was raced by Mike Boyes in the 1970s and 1980s. It sits in unrestored, as-raced condition, and has not started since Boyes last rolled it into the pits. It is a time capsule in the purest sense of the word. It is the first year of the alloy-head XR750 engine, and carries nearly 50 years of race patina on its simple orange bodywork. The fiberglass tank is uncoated and unlined, and therefore is likely unfit for use. The seller says that, despite its long slumber, the bike shows every sign that it would fire and run with minimal work.

From the eBay listing:

1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750 flat track racing motorcycle
Engine no. 1C101XH0
Unrestored. As raced.
• First year of the alloy head XR
• Raced throughout California in the 1970’s and 1980’s
• Delivered in as-raced, unrestored condition
This 1972 alloy XR-750 was purchased by Mike Boyes from renowned Harley tuner Michigander Tex Peel. Boyes then raced it mainly in California in the mid-to-late 1970s and early 1980s. He lives near Seattle, Washington today. Boyes sold the bike to Yoshi Kosaka of the Garage Company, now of Inglewood, California, who kept the bike for many years before selling it to Mike Cheiky, a California-based inventor. Mike died last year and so his wife Charity enlisted a family friend to find it a new home. The XR-750 found its way to New York City Motorcycles. Its appearance – the patina, that is – has been ‘undisturbed’ since it was last raced at Ascot, San Jose, Sacramento, and others. The motor gives every indication of firing up with a minimum of proper servicing and safety checks although it is recommended that fuel not be poured inside of the XR750’s original, un-lined, uncoated tank. To run it, a substitute tank or external fuel feed should be used.
Ran when parked 🙂
This is my third vintage XR750 and the purest racer of them all. The motorcycle looks exactly as it did when it exited the racetrack the last time.
Recent marriage and move to Japan makes keeping, shipping and/or storing impractical. My move is your gain 🙂
See other motorcycles offered for sale along with the XR.
*missing left footpeg
*Sold with a BILL OF SALE ONLY. XR750’s do not have titles and are not legal for road use!*
***optional Harley Racing factory stand available to the winning bidder only. $500 value***

The motorcycle is sold as is, where is, and there are no warranties expressed nor implied. Judge the photos and make your own assessment of the bike’s condition, rather than rely on my opinion and/or description. Questions and clarifications are encouraged. These are my personal opin Bidders must be certain of their commitment before bidding, as once its submitted. If you win it, you bought it. No time for nonsense please. Bidders with less than 10 or any negative feedback must contact me prior to bidding or else expect your bid to be cancelled and removed.

This motorcycle requires thorough inspection and recommissioning before running or riding. Know what you are buying before you bid. If you don’t have the expertise and/or the budget, with all due respect, this is not the bike for you.

New York City Motorcycles ( nycmc dot com) is reasonably well known in the vintage motorcycle community and this is not the only platform for offering the bike. Therefore please consider not waiting until the final seconds of the auction to bid. Because while you’re waiting to pull the trigger, if a fair offer arrives from elsewhere and there is not a comparable bid here, the auction will instantly disappear from your watched items.

Motorcycle is located in Venice, CA. I will work with your shipper but its your responsibility.

I’ve had several questions regarding the engine number.  Firstly, thank you for pointing out the number being incorrect, incomplete or possibly the engine number of the prior series, 1970 Ironhead.  I’ve just added addtional photos of the engine case, which shows the full number: 1C1013(followed by 2 with a slash over the number) H8

The slash through the two is consistent with a 1975 model I owned previously – in that instance the number 6 followed by the number 5 slashed out.  The unanimous opinion from experienced XR owners and collectors was 6 referring to 1976, the bikes completion date; the 5 slashed out refers to the 1975 model.  In that case labor disruptions at Youngstown were responsible for some 1975 bikes being carried over and released the following year. 

The number first shown was indeed incorrect.  I used the text from the Bonhams auction catalog from the Barber Motorsports, sale in October of last year, where the XR was listed.  Bonhams conducted their own independent review of the bike’s provenance.  I should have proofread their reference then, as well as now before I put the bike up for auction now.  Apologies for my oversight and hope this clears up any confusion caused.  Feel free to ask additional questions if my hypothesis appears incorrect!

Thanks again.

Running original XRs command silly money, and this one is a true museum piece with race provenance to back it up. Hurry over to eBay if it tickles your fancy, the auction is about to wind down!

Featured Listing: 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750
Laverda April 16, 2019 posted by

Repli-Racer: 1972 Laverda SFC Replica for Sale

Largely forgotten now, especially by modern sportbike enthusiasts, Laverda was once a serious player in the Italian sportbike scene of the 1970s. In terms of reputation, anyway, if not in actual production numbers. Their big-bore parallel-twin was supposedly heavily “inspired” by Honda’s parallel twin design of the period, and Laverda’s grown-up engine was heavily overbuilt and basically all-around heavy. It wasn’t nimble, but it was durable and stable, the perfect bike to use as the basis for a production-based endurance racer, and the SFC or “Super Freni Competizione” was the result.

Laverda’s aim was to use the very best parts available on their road and race bikes, and included Italian suspension components, Japanese electricals, and German ignition components. The early bikes used a huge, magnesium Ceriani four leading-shoe front brake, with later machines switching to an improved twin-disc setup. In both cases, stopping power was superlative for the era. Engines were heavily massaged, and made between 71 and 81hp, depending on the year. A significant overhaul for the 1974 model year made changes to the frame to make it lower and lighter, and the suspension was improved.

With the very rare SFC out of reach for most collectors, a replica obviously makes practical sense, since it was basically a hot-rod 750 SF. It’d probably be relatively easy to take an otherwise stock SF1 and just slap on a fairing and tail-section, but the builder of this bike appears to have gone the extra mile. I’m a Laverda fan, but not enough of an anorak to be able to point out the minor differences that would mark this out as a fake. It probably doesn’t help that the fewer than 600 or so SFCs that were built varied a bit in terms of specification, and sometimes incorporated different components in what seems to have been the “whatever we’ve got on the shelf” kind of way typical of Italian manufacturers of the period.

From the original eBay listing: 1972 Laverda SFC Replica for Sale

This Laverda 750 SFC Replica was converted from a SF1 over a period of two years, essentially everything except the interior of the motor is new or reconditioned or modified. Estimated milage of the 1972 donor bike was 6,600 miles +/-. The conversion has been ridden approximately 150 miles and has been on static display in a climate controlled facility for the last five years. The following is an accounting of some of the components that make this such a special conversion:

  • Correct Ceriani 35mm forks w new internals
  • Correct Ceriani rear shocks
  • New Tommaselli clutch and brake lever assemblies w new cables and switch assemblies
  • Rebuilt Smiths “Laverda” Tachometer, new (NOS) Smiths “Laverda” speedometer
  • New SFC fairing, brackets and headlight assembly
  • SFC replica tank (lined against ethanol affect) and petcocks
  • SFC rear seat and pad
  • SFC inner fender
  • SFC front fender
  • All new paint on all painted parts
  • All new wiring tucked up under bodywork, all electronics moved up under seat pan
  • Carbs are correct Dellorto PHF36AS/AD and are in perfect order w Malosi bellmouths
  • SFC left and right side rearsets and mounting plates
  • Motor cases are polished and cut out as per SFC specifications
  • 2-into-1 custom tuned exhaust, sounds incredible, not for the introvert
  • All misc. hardware was replaced and zinc plated, all chrome was new, aluminum parts polished

This is a beautiful example of a Laverda Type SFC, one of the ultimate vintage sport bikes that will get attention everywhere it goes. Display it, ride it, you won’t be disappointed. Of course there is no warranty, implied or guaranteed, it is a vintage bike even though it certainly doesn’t look its age… Please look at the pictures closely, the bike is located in the Denver area and we will assist with shipping as buyer arranges. Clear title, $1000 deposit within 24 hours of winning bid, balance within seven (7) calendar days via wire transfer.

It may not be the real thing, but looks very clean in the pictures, with the desirable drum front brake that gave the bike its name. Individual SFCs varied from bike to bike in terms of the details, and I doubt anyone but a Laverda expert would realize it was a replica at a glance, although it’s almost too nice to be the genuine article. There are just hours left on the auction, and there’s been little interest in the bike so far. Bidding is up to just $10,300, which is cheaper than a nice, stock SF1 these days Obviously, this isn’t going to command the nearly six-figure prices of the best SFCs, but would be a great way to live out your Walter Mitty-style racing fantasies if you can’t cough up that kind of coin, but want an authentic SFC experience.

-tad

Repli-Racer: 1972 Laverda SFC Replica for Sale
Aprilia March 29, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2004 Aprilia RS250 Cup

Update 4.8.2019: Sold for full asking price! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

We showcase a lot of two strokes, and we wax poetic about their knife-edge handling and peaky, unforgiving powerbands. Most of the time, we’re showing off nice but rider-quality machines that will make the new owners very happy on the track or in the canyons. Not today. Today we have a time capsule 2004 Aprilia RS250 that the seller couldn’t bring himself to tear up on the track. It’s so nice that he went to the length of sourcing another RS250 rather than ride this one in anger.

Instead, it sat, unmolested and unblemished in his basement on display. As such, it is as close as you’re going to get to perfect, and is original down to the scrub in on its first set of tires. It comes with all the factory documents and stickers and shows less than 400 miles on the odometer. Having been sold in or around New Hampshire originally, there’s little chance it’s ever going to see an American road. That’s all well and good, as it’s almost too cherry to tear up now.

The RS250s were powered by a version of the Suzuki RGV250 v-twin that Aprilia tweaked heavily for their purposes. With a lighter and more focused chassis and suspension than the RGV, the Italian became the mount of choice for up-and-coming racers including Loris Capirossi, Max Biaggi, Jorge Lorenzo, Marco Melandri and Alvaro Bautista, all of whom went on to MotoGP fame. For a hammer-simple 70 horsepower two-stroke, that ain’t a bad CV.

From the seller:

If you are looking for a perfect, as new RS 250 for your collection, look no further this is your bike. Here’s the back story, I was looking for an RS 250 as a track bike ten years ago. I found this one and was amazed how nice it was. I purchased it then once it was home, concluded it was too nice to track as it needed to be preserved. So I bought another RS 250 for this purpose which I still have. As such this one has been in my climate controlled finished basement on a lighted display table ever since to be looked at and admired. This one is a time capsule that has less than 400 miles original miles on it, 100% stock including tires, no modifications and all of the idiot stickers that came on it. I’m a collector so selling this to fund a new addition to the herd. I know that peoples definition of condition varies greatly much to my chagrin in looking at other bikes, because of this I tend to understate the condition of things. I would rate this close to a 10 out of ten, no blemishes, never dropped, like new, perfect paint, just a pleasure to look at. As it was in my basement the paint is in great condition with no oxidation or sun damage. I just pulled it out to get it ready for sale, added a new battery and it’s on its way this week to Seacoast Aprilia – Ducati, which was the original dealer that sold it to change out the fluids and go through it to make sure there are no issues. It will be in perfect running condition for the lucky buyer with the original MSO. If you are serious I am sure I can arrange for you to speak with someone as Seacoast to get an unbiased second opinion. Like all two strokes RS 250’s are getting harder to come by, finding one in this condition is very rare as most have been flogged on the track and modified. Thanks for looking, $10,500 located in New Hampshire.

As either a display bike or a track day toy, you can’t say fairer than this little RS250.

Featured Listing: 2004 Aprilia RS250 Cup
Featured Listing March 7, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Why buy a race replica when you can pick up an actual race bike? Today’s Sponsored Listing from our friends over at Amatumoto GP Motorbikes is a Honda NSF250RW, and it’s no stripped-down streetbike in race plastics, it’s an evolution of the machine that won last year’s Moto3 Constructors Championship in a very competitive field. If you’ve never watched Moto3, the racing is very close, with bikes nose-to-tail at 145mph.

For years, the “lowest” of the three tiers of Grand Prix racing used to be the domain of tiny little two-stroke 125cc machines that weighed less than an average adult American male. This of course gave the class differentiation a nice symmetry, with 125cc, 250cc, and 500cc machines. But in 2012, the smallest class shifted to a formula using 250cc four-strokes to match MotoGP’s move away from two-strokes. Bikes are limited to singles with a bore of no more than 81mm, four valves, a rev ceiling of 13,500rpm, and a minimum weight for the combined bike and rider of 326lbs.

Unlike Moto2, where the entire field uses a single engine [formerly Honda, now Triumph] to keep costs down and ensure close racing, Moto3 allows a variety of engine builders to participate. While physically much larger than a two-stroke of similar displacement, the Honda single still needed to be as light and compact, while taking advantage of every opportunity to save weight, increase power, and centralize mass. To that end, the 249cc engine has its cylinder head reversed, with the ram-air intake to the front and the exhaust exiting to the rear. Other manufacturers have experimented with this configuration with varied success, but here, the main goal appears to be mass-centralization.

The engine is canted backwards in the frame 15°, allowing the engine to be placed further forward in the chassis and maximize airbox volume, with a bore and stroke of 78 x 52.2mm, below the class maximum bore size. The engine is backed, naturally, but a six-speed cassette gearbox for quick ratio changes to maximize the small engine’s potential, and the package weighs in at a claimed 185lbs dry.

From the Seller: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Do you want a Moto3 Honda NSF250RW? Our company can get the most exclusive bikes of the market. Only for VIP customers, museums or exclusive collectors! Contact with our team and inform yourself. Only 2 units available – RESERVE NOW

In our VIP club you will find the most exclusive race and road bikes, also you can offer your bike for manage the sale. We work with customers to worldwide and we want offer the best service and products.

At Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes Store, we take pride to have in our stock great exclusive bikes used on the races. That said, we understand that the collector of bikes hobby is enjoyed by some of the most passionate and diverse enthusiasts on the planet. Simply put: there are just too many awesome styles to fit in to one showroom. No need to worry though, as we’re happy to search for the bike of your dreams. Just give us a bit of pertinent information and we’ll keep an eye out. Amatumoto can build a READY to RACE bike… with engine, exhaust, wiring on demand with the specs that choose our customers.

Contact us via our website: http://www.gpmotorbikes.com/

If you’re a track day junkie or a racer, this is your opportunity to buy a very serious piece of hardware. Just add sponsor decals!

-tad

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!
Yamaha February 27, 2019 posted by

Deltabox Racer: 1992 Yamaha TZ250D for Sale

Racebikes are different than other bikes we feature on RSBFS. Where the goal for many collectible roadbikes is absolute originality, or at least limited, period-correct updates, the whole point of a racebike is that it’s a rough-and-tumble artifact, a bit of living history, and battle scars are okay. If the machine in question is historically significant, that goes double. But race bikes are more like living organisms than ones trapped in amber, and some have evolved over time, especially if they’re still being used in competition, like today’s Yamaha TZ250D.

Note the missing “R” in the name: this isn’t simply a TZR250 with the lights removed. While people did use the TZR250 road bike as the basis for competition machines, the TZ250 was Yamaha’s pure competition machine, available over-the-counter to racers. Both the original TZ and TZR were powered by parallel twin engines, but Yamaha eventually began experimenting with a v-twin engine to keep pace with competitors in Grand Prix raxing, and the YZR250 used what was essentially half of the YZR500’s two-stroke V4. For a number of years, Yamaha produced the two machines in parallel: the v-twin powered YZR250 seen in Grand Prix and the parallel-twin TZ250.

1991 saw the introduction of a completely new version of the popular TZ250 racing platform, incorporating the v-twin configuration from the YZR250, along with upside-down forks, a banana-swingarm to clear the expansion chamber on the right side, a wider 5.25″ rear wheel, and a set of 38mm Mikuni carburetors. The “D” model that came along in 1992 featured a significant reworking of the rear suspension that meant the rear subframe could be made extremely light, with just one job: provide a perch for the rider. The new package worked well, taking the fight to Honda, and was popular among privateers.

Of course, this being a racebike and not a warmed-over streetbike brings its own set of problems. Racebikes generally aren’t designed with durability as a top priority, and two-strokes, although mechanically simple, are pretty maintenance-intensive. It’s also the nature of racing two-strokes, especially 125s and 250s, that they need gearing or jetting changes need to be made to suit the track, temperature, and altitude, to perform at their best. The trade off is incredible light weight and handling from the spartan machine, as well as racebike engineering to drool over. Honestly, I think Yamaha’s Deltabox designs of the era are some of the most beautiful frames ever created, and I think I’d just want to ride it around with the bodywork off, although I’d prefer the original finish in place of the polished part seen here.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Yamaha TZ250D for Sale

1992 YAMAHA TZ250D

One of a kind with a beautiful polished frame!!

  • All new bearings (swing arm, steering head, and wheels).
  • Suspension rebuilt will new oil, bushings, and seals, set up for 185 lb. rider.
  • .8 kg/mm fork springs 8.5 kg/mm shock spring
  • Rebuilt Shindy Daytona Steering Damper
  • 120 mile Rick Schell crankshaft (crank is a work of art, lightened and polished flywheels and rods)
  • 120 mile top end (pistons, rings, bearings)
  • Roland Cushway 8.0cc heads
  • 96′ cylinders and pipes with 2.5mm pipe spacers per Roland Cushway
  • New plugs and caps
  • New reeds
  • New gaskets throughout
  • Dual EGTs
  • Daytona digital water temp gauge
  • New clutch and pressure plate
  • Every bearing in cases replaced with new (trans, case, water pump, balance shaft)
  • New EBC HH brake pads
  • GP tech thumb brake
  • Custom rear sets and foot pegs
  • Vortex Clip-ons
  • New DID x-ring chain
  • EBC Prolite rotors
  • Professional Paint
  • Airtech Aerotail w/anti Draft Shield
  • New Center front stand by Battle Factory
  • Original Rear Stand
  • New Multi-Temp Chicken Hawk Tire Warmers

Shipping to arranged and paid for by the buyer. I will assist the shipping company as needed. 

This Yamaha TZ250 has no racing history of note, so interested buyers will likely focus on race preparation and spares, since I’d assume they’re planning to use it in anger, and sourcing some parts for these now obsolete two-strokes is only going to get harder. No mention is made of any spares package, so a quick email to the seller might be in order to see if there are any available. That aside, this looks like a killer track bike or race bike for someone with the skills or friends or money to keep it running, and the Buy It Now price is set at $12,500 which seems reasonable, considering the preparation that’s gone into it.

-tad

Deltabox Racer: 1992 Yamaha TZ250D for Sale
Kawasaki January 31, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

Update 3.8.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

There is obviously no practical reason to own a 300hp, track-only motorcycle that isn’t eligible for any racing series of which I’m aware. Maybe something involving quarter miles and ETs? Reviewers of the Kawasaki H2R generally don’t even seem to regard the bike as a particularly good track-day weapon: it’s just too heavy, and that fat rear tire needed to keep the power on tap from going up in smoke slows steering significantly. So you can’t race it, it’s almost too fast for track-day antics, likely eats tires like they’re free donuts at a sales meeting, and you can’t ride it on the street… or can you? Apparently, you can, with a bit of DMV chicanery, since this Featured Listing Kawasaki H2R comes with a street title!

The original H2 from the 1970s seemingly has nothing in common with this iteration, other than the name: it was an unfaired, upright machine with handlebars and a long, Schwinn-style “banana” seat that was powered by a two-stroke triple, while the new bike has room for just one and is powered by a supercharged 998cc inline four. But the spirit is there in spades, since both bikes were about speed, speed, and more speed, and all other considerations be damned.

People often forget that there were two different versions of the H2 when the name was resurrected by Kawasaki: the regular road bike and the H2R seen here. The regular bike is a… regular bike: it has the usual turn signals, mirrors, and a really cool projector-beam headlamp in the center of the fairing that looks like it shoots some sort of death-ray. It also made a claimed 200hp, which is impressive, until you consider that Ducati’s V4 Panigale makes well north of that, and even several of the v-twin Panigales got shockingly close. BMW’s S1000RR, Aprilia’s RSV4, and most of the other liter bikes hover around 200hp as well.

And all that power is dulled a bit by the bike’s 475lb wet weight, which is significantly higher than those bikes. Of course, the Kawasaki still has a massive midrange hit of supercharged torque, but on paper, the literbike brigade makes the regular H2 look… a bit regular, although I’m reliably informed it’s anything but in practice. But it doesn’t matter anyway, because this isn’t the regular H2.

The H2R upped the game by saving weight by deleting the lighting and mirrors, replacing them with some extremely expensive carbon-fiber winglets to increase downforce, a set of slicks, and 35psi of boost. The increased positive pressure results in 300 claimed horses that announce their arrival through a stunningly gorgeous and deafeningly loud titanium exhaust that will require earplugs for your unborn descendants: the H2R is so loud that Performance Bikes Magazine wasn’t even able to test one in the UK, as it wouldn’t meet the dB limits at any track in the country.

It’s also worth noting this H2R benefits from the most recent electronic revisions from Kawasaki in 2017 including an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and autoblipper. Cosmetically it has updated upper wings and the “matte mirror” paint.

From the Seller: 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

For sale is a 2018 Kawasaki Ninja H2R, complete with a clean street title in hand. The H2R only has 60 miles on the clock, and hasn’t been rode enough to register even one hour on the service interval tracker (it tracks based on time spent above 8000 rpm). Bike was broken in per Kawasaki’s specs on a dyno, at which point it was immediately serviced at the dealer. I took it out for a few minutes on the track and otherwise it has sat on front and rear stands plugged into a battery tender.

Includes all original accessories: front and rear OEM stands, Chicken Hawk tire warmers, and Dr. Beasley’s wax kit. Also includes one unused front tire and three rears (OEM-spec Bridgestone slicks), complete with spare rear wheel (you’ll need it for a track weekend!). The bodywork has been completely ceramic coated and the edges of the lower wings have a clear film on them for protection.

This is a tremendous bike and is virtually new, with the added benefit of a street title so you can easily turn around and take it on the street rather than wait for the next track day.

Regarding pricing, because H2Rs are so fantastically rare and streetable H2Rs even moreso, I find it difficult to put a price on it. I am not desperate to sell, but I’ve had a few opportunities come up, so I’d like to see if anyone is interested in one of the most incredible bikes out there that is only some tires and a mirror away from being street-legal.

For perspective on rarity, the VIN number on this bike ends in 10. I was told by a Kawasaki rep that Kawasaki skips VIN number 1, and this was the last 2018 H2R built worldwide. Unfortunately this is purely anecdotal but if you look for photos of H2Rs, there are so few images of them with the 2017+ revised wing design that it is not hard to believe.

Located in Indiana, USA but am happy to cooperate to find shipping within the US.

This isn’t the first H2R we’ve seen with a street title, so it can’t be all that difficult to manage, assuming you don’t live in California or New York. I’m assuming it has a normal VIN to help things along, and this has been done in the past with the Ducati SPS, which apparently wasn’t road-legal either, but came with lights and signals and a VIN, making it more of a, “Of course you’re not going to ride this very fast, very loud exotic racing motorcycle on the road, even though it has headlights and turn signals and treaded tires…” [wink, wink] Obviously, do your homework if you intend to buy it and actually use it on the street, as your local DMV may have some problems with this one, depending on where you live. But other than that, I love the idea of an over-the-top track-day weapon you can use to commute to work on Fridays.

-tad

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale
BMW January 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Honest-to-God 2012 Suter BMW MotoGP bike

You read the headline correctly. What you are looking at is an honest-to-God MotoGP racebike that won the CRT class at the 2012 Qatar Grand Prix under American roadracing hero and two-time World Superbike champion Colin Edwards. The overall win went to Jorge Lorenzo, who was on his way to his second MotoGP championship. Edwards crossed the line 12th overall, a testament to the difference between CRT and the factory machines.  

Based on a bespoke Suter chassis, the bike was powered by a warmed up WSBK-spec BMW S1000RR engine. Even with the better part of 240 horses, the BMW mill was handicapped compared to the factory rides by electronics and development time. Having almost 240 horses is one thing, putting it down is quite another. For a painfully detailed look at the season, click here.

The seller’s description of the bike is pretty basic, but there is a detailed fact sheet with more photos here.

Being a MotoGP machine, this bike does not have the battlescars and booboos that former racebikes generally wear. It’s got just enough dirt to look as if it just cooled down from taking the checkered flag at Valencia, but otherwise is in beautiful shape.

The bike wears all of its as-raced MotoGP parts, including the Bosch data acquisition electronics, and 16.5-inch magnesium wheels, with a fresh set of GP-spec Bridgestone slicks included.

CRT, short for claiming rule team, was a short-lived section of the MotoGP rules that allowed teams without factory money to compete at the big dance. Head over to the always wonderful Moto Matters to learn how the CRT bikes differed from the full-on factory mounts.

Though the bikes were always destined to be slower than their better-funded factory-backed competitors, they made for some truly innovative and interesting machines. This 2012 Suter BMW CRT machine was a work-in-progress for the season Edwards was aboard, and even on the night he won in the desert, the famously blunt Texan was only medium happy with its performance.

For anyone below The Texas Tornado’s talent level (which is everyone), the bike will be an absolute monster. At $99,000 not including transport, it represents something of a bargain, considering Forward Racing would have spent more than that on just the engine back in 2012. If you have the means and the skill, Speedbox can be contacted through their website.

Featured Listing: Honest-to-God 2012 Suter BMW MotoGP bike