Posts by tag: inline six

Benelli August 3, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1976 Benelli Sei 750

Update 8.1.2019: Joe has renewed his Featured Listings. Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

Benelli and Honda exchanged flattery in the 1970’s, which began with Benelli creating a six cylinder look-alike of Honda’s CB500 Four in 1972.  Their flagship Sei began as a 750 and progressed to a 900 by 1979.  Honda returned the compliment in 1978 with their CBX.  Restored by a previous owner, this Sei is a magnificent labor of love.

Benelli made a careful study of the air-cooled Honda and made a few changes – the gear-driven alternator, located behind the cylinders, keeps the engine’s width manageable.  With three Dell’Orto carburettors, 76 hp was almost effortless and the Sei created usable torque from 2,000 rpm.  The chassis is a hefty downtube with right-side-up Marzocchi forks, and twin Sebac shocks.  Dual front disks make up for the tried-and-true rear drum.  Styling is dominated by the six-way calliope, with a few angular details on the instrument cluster, side covers, and cylinders.

A bottle of chrome polish might be on the new owner’s shopping list, since the Sei is all metal, with not even the side covers executed in plastic.  On display since shortly after the restoration was completed, it shows almost as a new machine, with sparkling finishes and new rubber parts, like the carburetor boots.  The owner shares these notes:

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

The 1976 Benelli SEI 750 six-cylinder is another one of those iconic Italian motorcycles. It was the first six-cylinder production motorcycle, and, yes, those six exhaust pipes not only sound great but look phenomenal. The bike was restored by a gentleman that spent what looks like half a lifetime to get it to such perfection. This bike starts and runs as it should and I don’t personally know of one important criticism that I could make on the bike for show or riding.

The Benelli winding through the gears sound like a Gran Prix rarer and the slick handling is something has to be experienced. These six cylinder Benelli bikes have a long way to go in terms of collector appreciation. When you buy a first series Benelli six cylinder you will find a crowd wherever you stop.

Then just wind up through the gears and it seems that the roar of those six exhaust pipes can be heard a mile away.

Check out the pictures of this Benelli it has to be one of the best, if not The Best, restored 1976 Benelli SEI 750’s ever!

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.


Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857

Check out the pictures and be a little amazed – you are seeing the best!

As the 1970’s opened, industrialist Alejandro DeTomaso had high hopes for his new acquisition, and funded the development of the magnetic Sei.  The big-band sound of six individual 125cc cylinders is more like a fleet of motorcycles than just one.  Never destined to be in every garage, the bright light in the Benelli showroom was reflecting off the Sei’s six chrome mufflers.  The owner has curated and preserved this example to a high standard, and not insignificantly, kept it ready to ride.  Please contact Joe with offers at 847-774-4857.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1976 Benelli Sei 750
Honda January 30, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Pristine 1979 Honda CBX

Update: eBay shows sold at $15,500. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The 1979 Honda CBX, a six-cylinder behemoth dressed up as a buttoned-down commuter, was an exercise in weird, but impressive, flex from Honda. As the long run of the original CB750 was at its peak, Big Red decided it was time to show off the ultimate evolution of the CB line, but elected to bare its engineering fangs instead of building a taught, sinewed race bike on the CB platform. Honda brass at the time even admitted that, if they had been going for track records, they could have made it with a much lighter, more focused and faster four cylinder.

1979 Honda CBX for sale on eBay

But that wasn’t what the CBX was for, so they took the lessons from their tiny 250cc grand prix six cylinders of the 1960s and made a mill four times that size that put out 105 horses at 9,000 rpm. Honda stuck the accessory drives in the middle of the crank, as opposed to at the ends, to keep the crank short for cornering clearance. That also helped balance the big engine, which otherwise would have vibrated mercilessly. Though the technology and thought meant the CBX was a true feat of manufacturing and engineering, it was also heavy, flexy and intimidating. Reports from the time said the handling was more impressive than it had any right to be, but few people were buying it.

This 1979 Honda CBX has been mothballed since 1988, when it was placed on display in a family dealership. The carbs were drained as it was put in storage and the engine was turned over regularly to keep it free. It had a new tank at some point in the 1990s after the original was dented. The tires were last changed in 2001. The seller says he plans to leave it as-is and let the purchaser decide what to do with the bike. Between 1979 and 1988, it covered just 8,400 miles.

From the eBay listing:

This is an original 1979 Honda CBX. It has not been registered or on the road since 1988. It has been stored in a climate controlled garage in Northern Nevada until I purchased it from a friend a few years ago…it had been in their family and on in display in their dealership since the 80’s.

I received the original California small pink slip with 1988 registration ( I have photos of this when I took it to DMV ) I have since registered and titled this in Arizona, it has a clean and clear title in my name.

I bought the bike as it sits today. Carbs were drained and the bike has been in stored conditioned for over 15 years. The engine was turned over occasionally. The tires are from 2001 I believe which I think is when it was last freshened up a bit. I also was told that the original tank suffered a dent while on display in the early to mid 90s and the original tank was replaced with one of the last new oem ones available from Honda. The tank is perfect and like new inside and out as seen.

I am selling the bike as is, I am going to leave it up to the new owner to display as is or make it a runner. I added a new battery and fresh avgas last week and the bike runs and the carbs do not leak, however it only ran on 5 cylinders and did not want to idle. So carbs will need a proper going over if you plan to bring it back to life.

Two other flaws on the bike. The tach was lazy when I started the bike, this might sort it self out with some run time. There is also some scratches on the gauges as shown in the photos.

I have not spent much time trying to detail the bike so it will clean up much better than what is shown in the photos if you dedicate a day or two, but as it sits it is very nice…it has basically been inside the last 30 years!!!

Original owners manual and tool kit in place and perfect. The original keys were lost, I had new ones made. I took photos with the tank, side covers and seat off so you can get an idea of the condition.

I will add a few more photos over the next few days, please email me with any questions or if you need specific photos, have questions etc.

I CAN SHIP ANYWHERE IN THE U.S. and help ASSIST with WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!!!

The asking price for this time capsule is $15,500, for which you are getting a pristine, absolutely unmolested example of a piece of Honda’s corporate history. They do not make them like this any more.

Featured Listing:  Pristine 1979 Honda CBX
Benelli September 16, 2018 posted by

Oh Sei – 1983 Benelli 900 Sei

New CEO DeTomaso ( yes that one ) led the historic Benelli company to higher performance machines and the 750 Sei ( Six ) in 1973.  Benelli increased bore and stroke on the Sei to displace 906cc for the 1979 model year.  Simultaneously outrageous, exotic, handcrafted, and occasionally disappointing, the Sei was Benelli’s flagship until they merged with Moto-Guzzi in 1988.

1983 Benelli 900 Sei for sale on eBay

Looking for all the world like a SOHC Honda engine from the era, the Sei had some innovations, like placing the alternator behind the cylinders ( which were wide enough already ).  80 hp were routed through a 5-speed and double-row final drive chain, speaking to the torque that was available at just above tickover speed.  Good as they are, the Brembo brakes are hopelessly outgunned by the power and mid-500 lbs. weight.  In spite, the Sei got high marks for handling, steady in a corner when the competition was wallowing.

Looking excellent in its late -70’s flowing bodywork and controls, this Sei has just over 11,000 miles.  A machine of this age will have an afternoon’s worth of tales, but the owner stays on message in the eBay auction:

A meticulously maintained 1983 Benelli 900 SEI with extremely low miles at 11300.
This bike is almost perfect, serviced and runs and drives perfectly.
They don’t come up often so here is an opportunity to get one.
Bid with absolute confidence.
Don’t waste my time with silly questions, low offers and if you don’t have money.
Viewing is welcomed before you buy.

Already in boutique territory, the Benelli pricing and complication of three carburetors made the Sei a rarity.  Performance was a few bullets down on the mission statement, under pleasing the crowd, honoring the Benelli name, and showing off the factory’s skills.  Further down was a reliable ride, and the Sei got gigged repeatedly on electrical issues.  But the sound !  More 911 than motorbike, especially with the six-into-six.  For a collector with a European interest, this is just the bike for the end of the row…

-donn

 

Oh Sei – 1983 Benelli 900 Sei
Honda February 25, 2018 posted by

Six-y Beast: 1980 Moto Martin CBX for Sale

You might initially be confused by what you’re looking at here, but get past that riot of color and the swoopy bodywork, and the big aluminum brick of an engine could only be one thing: Honda’s 1047cc, 24-valve straight-six CBX motor. But what about the rest of it? What exactly is a Moto Martin CBX?

Honda’s original CBX was a bit of a missed opportunity. It seemed designed to capitalize on the six cylinder racing bikes of the late 1960s, but no real link between the two seems to have been made in advertising the bike. And certainly there was no obvious visual connection, either: the original machines were jewel-like, pure racing motorcycles, while the CBX was a sophisticated, premium machine clearly designed for the road. It was big, heavy, and pretty powerful for the day, but handling was poor due to a flexible frame and the bike’s overall weight.

The main reason to own a CBX was always that huge brick of an engine with its cascade of exhaust pipes sweeping around and under it, the wild shriek of the engine, and its smooth power. But in its original iteration, that was pretty much the only reason to own one. They could be made to get around a race track: some great videos exist of them shaking a leg on track, but they weren’t really suited to it. And styling was relatively bland as well, typically conservative 70s UJM, with just a small duck-tail spoiler at the rear t0 add a bit of zing.

The solution was pretty simple if you had a bit of money and the ability to twirl some wrenches: find a nice, clean CBX, remove the motor and electrical system, and basically ditch the rest. By 1980, the Japanese manufacturers had gotten a handle on the art of making their motorcycles go around corners, but the small frame builders that had sprung up during the 60s and 70s were still around, and the CBX was a perfect candidate for a custom creation. Certainly Frenchman Georges Martin thought so, and his Moto Martin-framed CBXs are often considered the CBXs to have.

There’s no getting around the width of the inline six, and any replacement frame is going to have to figure out how to go over or under, since there’s just no going around… The Moto Martin part hugs the back of the engine pretty closely, making the stock airbox pretty much impossible, and replaces the original twin-shock arrangement with a monoshock setup, with thicker forks up front. Interestingly, it kept the original bike’s geometry, which was basically fine. A finished Moto Martin CBX was both lighter and stiffer than the original bike, with new bodywork, including a one-piece tail, kept the ducktail spoiler but gave the finished bike a much sleeker, more purposeful look, while twin round lamps gave it a bit of endurance racing cred.

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Moto Martin CBX for Sale

This is an extremely rare and highly desirable Moto Martin CBX built from a complete Moto Martin rolling chassis with all of the best equipment of the day as fitted by Moto Martin including: Moto Martin aluminium 18inch wheels, Marzocchi forks, Brembo brakes front and rear with drilled cast iron rotors, braided hoses, De-Carbon under tank rear mono-shock. It has been customised with a different bikini fairing and single piece fibreglass tank and seat unit as in the pictures (and has received a FB like from Georges Martin himself) but the original Moto Martin aluminium tank, fairing, fairing bracket, headlight bracket, seat unit, screen with a spare as shown, are also included in the sale.

The motor is very strong as befitting the bike and is fitted with Carrillo Rods and Arias 1168cc big bore Arias forged piston kit and has done very little mileage since the big bore kit was fitted (hence my reason for sale), being ridden by me only in a few exhibitions for historic motorcycles at our local racetrack.

All in great condition with a few marks and slight damage to the side cover as shown in the photographs. I am the third owner, the previous owner and I each owning the bike for over 15 years.

Your opportunity to own the rarest and most desirable bike in the CBX world!

Seller can help with shipping – I live in a city with a major port.

Like a Spondon or a Rickman, there’s really no “standard” Moto Martin: they were generally sold as kits and built to the customer’s specifications. As few as 50 may exist that are actually titled as Moto Martins, but more kits were probably sold. The listing shows this as a 1980 model, but I believe the Martin kit wasn’t introduced until a bit later, so this might be titled as a Honda CBX, per the donor engine and transmission. The starting bid is $10,000 with no bids as yet. Depending on the reserve, this might be a good opportunity to get a very rare machine for a pretty good price, but note that this bike currently resides in South Africa, so keep that in mind if you’re suddenly having fantasies of wheeling this beast past your local bike hangout.

-tad

Six-y Beast: 1980 Moto Martin CBX for Sale
Honda February 13, 2017 posted by

X-Rated! 1979 Honda CBX

In the world of bike porn, there are many shapes and sizes. And while most lust-worthy machines are built from the ground up to become a whole – frame, suspension, motor, bodywork – the outrageous, plus sized Honda CBX seems to be a machine totally built around the motor. The first gen CBX made no bones about what made it special – it was a naked bike showing off its wares to the world. Born from the engineering might of Honda during a time of great experimentation, this inline six-cylinder with DOHC and four valves per cylinder pumped out an impressive 105 brake horsepower. And while the motor looks impossibly wide when viewed from the front, Honda spent considerable effort to reduce the flare at the bottom end, stacking ancillaries such as the alternator behind the block.

1979 Honda CBX for sale on eBay

The CBX debuted in the latter part of 1978 and were badged as 1979 models. The first generation bikes actually developed more outright HP than the follow on models, although the later years did have overall improvements in torque and general responsiveness. Sold alongside the CB900F, the CBX was a bigger, badder and far more expensive machine. And while CBX sales were far better than other “experimental” bikes of the time (think the CX-series Turbos), it was handily outsold by the cheaper 900F.

The seller’s text goes a long way to describing the CBX history, variances and qualities:

From the seller:
Introduced in 1978 as a 1979 model, the Honda CBX topped its competitors with a 6-cylinder dual overhead camshaft engine; however, it was not the first inline 6-cylinder from the Japanese-motorcycle titan. Honda developed a series of sophisticated multi-piston 4-stroke Grand Prix-racing entries culminating in the RC165 and RC166 250cc inline 6-cylinder machines. The engine was successful in 1966 and 1967, and was the precursor to the CBX. The fact the CBX engine has its roots in Grand Prix racing is not coincidental. Engineer Shoichiro Irimajiri developed the 6-cylinder Grand Prix engine and led the team behind the CBX powerplant. Six cylinders, 24 valves and chain-driven dual overhead camshafts help the 1,000cc Honda engine crank out 105 horsepower. Six Mikuni carburetors with an integral accelerator pump deliver the right combination of fuel and air into the cylinders. The CBX engine is integrated into the frame as a stressed member, and the absence of conventional downtubes makes for a clear display of all six cylinders and the exhaust. Honda pushed into the future with bold styling and innovative features on the Super Sport CBX. The sculpted tank blended into CBX-logo side covers and the kicked-up winged tail section looked fast at rest. Lightweight Comstar 5-spoke alloy wheels were equipped with dual front and single rear disc brakes to slow the CBX from velocity. In an effort to improve lagging sales Honda pushed the CBX away from pure sport into a sports touring direction in 1981-82. Full fairings and hard saddlebags position the earlier and more powerful CBX1000 Super Sport into a unique spot in collectible Honda history. This 1979 Honda CBX first and most powerful year of what was then the fastest production motorcycle in the world. This bike will thrill you with its smooth idle and fantastic power and the sound is unmistakable, go for a ride or just add to your collection.

While Honda did race six-cylinder machines in the 1960s, this was their first jump into sixes for the street. However they were not alone: Benelli had already come (and gone) with the Sei models, and Kawasaki was soon to follow with their excellent KZ1300 liquid cooled example. And while Kawasaki transitioned their naked bike into a full-blown touring bike, Honda elected to evolve the CBX into a sport tourer. They would re-enter the six-cylinder world with the dominating Gold Wing touring RV, but chose to drop the inline arrangement in favor of a boxer layout. Most recently BMW introduced the K1600, an inline six more narrow than some fours.

The CBX line has always been a visceral affair. These bikes have serious presence, amazing sound, and actually function as a terrific day-to-day rider. Being a Honda, they are well built and surprisingly reliable. Parts are still available for the model, making it an excellent collector choice. Prices have been on the rise with these machines – especially the earliest models – but nothing compared to an RC30, RG500 Gamma or D16RR. Interest in this particular bike is solid, with bidding up to $7,700 with reserve still in place. I, for one, will be watching this one. This bike is clean and looks very, very original. Check it out here, and then share your six-cylinder thoughts in our Comments section. Is a CBX on your bike porn bucket list? Good Luck!

MI

X-Rated!  1979 Honda CBX
Honda July 30, 2015 posted by

Six Appeal – 1979 Honda CBX1000

1979 Honda CBX-1000 on eBay

CBX_rightside

Honda produced the CBX-1000 from 1978-1982 and it was intended to be their flagship model… and how could it not be?  With that big beautiful inline six and the trademark six headers it was showing off without even trying.  The CBX made 102hp and with it’s surprisingly sharp handling, the big Honda was almost universally praised by anybody who rode it.  Unfortunately, it was a little more expensive than many wallets could handle and it didn’t sell as well as the lesser CB900 and disappeared after just four short years.  If you have been paying attention the collector’s market recently, you’re undoubtedly aware that CBX prices are skyrocketing right now.  Later CBX’s were detuned by anywhere from 5-20hp, depending on whom you believe, and the loss of HP did not go unnoticed.  As such, the early years have become the more desirable of the bunch.  This is certainly a fine example and the seller’s asking price reflects that.  It will be interesting to see if it actually sells for $15,000!

CBX_leftside

From the seller’s eBay auction found here: 1979 Honda CBX-1000 for sale

Super nice example of a 1979 Honda CBX100
i  got this from the original owner a few years back…..as you can see…..it is in exceptional condition …….it runs perfectly, has a new battery , fresh fluids   and the tires are like new…….what is exceptional on this bike is the Vin number ,,,,,it is 269….very early in the production, making it highly collectable
the exhaust is original, however it was show chromed a few years ago…….and they look great
the paint is in perfect shape!……bike runs mint, has a clear title  and is ready to go

CBX_tank

Six Appeal – 1979 Honda CBX1000