Posts by tag: Grand Prix

Honda October 14, 2014 posted by

Fresh From the Crate: 1989 Honda RS250

1989 Honda RS250 R Side

Here in the good ol’ US of A, 250cc motorcycles are generally lumped in with scooters in terms of the respect they get. And while scooters may be fun to ride, no one wants to be seen doing it. And two-strokes? Emissions legislation killed those by the early 1980’s so most Americans’ experience with smokers involves knobby tires and Renthal bars.

But if you’re a racing fan, or grew up in Europe, bikes like this Honda RS250 would have you drooling like a squid over a turbocharged Hayabusa with a ghost flame paint job. At a recent track day, I came across a beautiful Rothman’s NSR250R that attracted plenty of attention, although everyone gawking at it seemed to be speaking with a funny accent…

1989 Honda RS250 Engine

1989 Honda RS250 for sale on eBay

Make no mistake, the RS250 is no joke. It’s no learner bike, or inexpensive track ride: it’s a pure racing motorcycle, and needs the upkeep you’d expect of a GP machine. Powered by a nearly square 54×54.5mm two-stroke v-twin that snarled out over 90hp and weighed 223lbs dry.

1989 Honda RS250 Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda RS250 for Sale

A truly unique opportunity!

This is a brand new, never ridden Honda RS250 Grand Prix bike from 1989. It has been kept in one owners collection on display from new. As the photographs show it is in exceptional condition apart from some age-related deterioration (tyres cracked etc.) and fading at places on the fairing where at some point it had stickers. The build quality of these GP Honda’s is stunning and as would be expected everything is totally original down to the original Japanese factory warning stickers!

This is sure to be a great investment as prices for GP 2-strokes continue to rise.

1989 Honda RS250 Clutch

While on paper it seems like this RS250 be comparable to more familiar RGV or TZ, the Honda is generally considered to be less privateer-friendly because of its very high state of tune, with a harder edge and a less-forgiving nature.

Of course, you may not be worried about riding this one, since riding it would basically ruin the fact that it’s basically a brand-new motorcycle from 1989…

1989 Honda RS250 Airbox

Bidding is up over $17,500 with a bit more time left on the auction. It’s located in the UK, but the seller is ready to ship the bike anywhere in the world.

-tad

1989 Honda RS250 L Side

Fresh From the Crate: 1989 Honda RS250
Garelli February 8, 2013 posted by

Track Day Chicken Chaser: 1988 Garelli 125 cc Grand Prix

Garelli_2

What’s the point of chasing chickens if you can’t catch them? Garelli asked themselves the same question during the 1988 racing season. In fact, they asked a LOT of questions. Having won the 125 class from 1982 – 1987, the 1988 season was a bit of a disappointment. The much heralded – but very tempermental – monocoque chassis developed by Garelli failed to produce results. In an effort to salvage what they could, Garelli experimented with other chassis brands as well as copying and modifying chassis elements. This particular bike is actually a Honda RS125.

Garelli_1

From the seller:
Just like that of Garelli’s ill-starred 250, the 125’s rigid monocoque was the target of criticism. The team tried a stock Honda RS125 twin-spar chassis at Assen and also a Moretti frame that looked a lot like a Yamaha TZ250 Deltabox (see Lot 6). Carrying the Garelli frame number ‘AG 125M 002’, the machine offered here represents the Honda RS125 rolling chassis that was tried experimentally during the 1988 season.
Driver was Luis Miguel Reyes, Grand Prix moto 125 cm3 Assen 1988

Garelli_4

While searching for clues on this particular bike, I stumbled across the Bonhams auction site and discovered that this particular item had crossed the auction block earlier this month as part of a French auction of Garelli Grand Prix machines (see photos from Bonhams posted in the gallery below). I also discovered (if it was not made clear in the seller’s description) that this particular offering consists of the rolling chassis only.

Garelli_Bonhams_15Garelli_Bonhams_14

The lack of engine and trans might make it perfect for the collector who wishes to hoist this bike on a wall or park it in a living room, den or man cave. If you are intent on chasing – and beating – some chickens, however, you will have some work to do. Still, this is a pretty neat piece of history even if you can’t fold yourself in half and ride it.

Garelli_3

The seller has an opening ask of $5,000 USD, with a BIN of $10,000. At Bonhams this lot sold for approximately $6,500 USD. The bike is located in France, so be sure and factor in transportation costs if you are interested. And as always, make sure you do your homework beforehand so you know what is included in the sale. Good luck, and happy chicken chasing!

MI

Sport Bikes For Sale December 6, 2011 posted by

“B” Is For Bitchin: 1983 RGB500 MK8

“B” Is For Bitchin:  1983 RGB500 MK8

That “B” means a lot, this isn’t your buddy’s RG500.  Not to take anything away from the street-going Gammas, but the RGB version of this bike is the true factory Grand Prix bike made available to well-heeled teams in very limited numbers. With no concessions to the EPA, DOT or any other federal agencies, the RGB500 was designed with a single goal in mind: win 500cc GP races.

With a square four, 500cc two stroke powerplant, disk-valve induction, full floater rear suspension and leading caliper, anti-dive front fork, this RGB500 represents the latest racing technology available in the day. And how well did it work? While the ’83 season was dominated by Freddie Spencer and Kenny Roberts (with Spencer stealing the title with only 2 points to spare), Randy Mamola managed to capture 3rd overall in the standings riding a RGB500.

From the seller:
New ground up rebuild..race ready…will need break in, as it has a new top end. No known history, as bike came from Japan years ago. Depending what you plan to do with it, I have a large inventory of parts that cover MK 7 & 8 and can be purchased separately.
All new glass work and paint. All hydraulics have been rebuilt….has original race slicks for display only. Comes with original stand.

RSBFS has listed a few of these RGB models in the past, including one from this same seller (check out this 1981 model or this 1982 bike). And thanks to the RSBFS research staff, we have this great video of Randy Mamola hot-dogging on a 500cc GP bike in anger (in this case a Cagiva). Watching tires light up as these big two strokes come up on the pipe just gives me chills!

This RGB500 is available now. While it does not have any documented racing history (according to the seller it was imported out of Japan), it is still a full-fleged RGB racing machine and is thus very rare and very valuable. The BIN figure is $40,000, although the seller is open to other offers. This sounds like a reasonable price for the pristine condition and appearance, and is listed for much less than earlier examples we have witnessed. The lack of history and spares does detract from the value, but the bike appears to be priced in line with others of this caliber. For more information and details, click the link and jump over to the auction. This bike is definitely worth checking out!

Ian and MI

Honda March 1, 2011 posted by

1993 Honda RS125 NF4 Described As “Museum Quality”

This is a fantastic looking RS125, Castrol replica!

Bike:  1993 Honda RS125

Miles:  0 (Since rebuild)

Price:  $5,500USD

Location:  Winter Haven, Florida

The seller states that this RS was completely restored and rebuilt by Rising Sun Cycles–a very prominent name in the U.S. two-stroke GP bike segment.  The paint for this bike, alone, came in at $4,500–ouch!  Anyway, this is a fantastic looking RS in, what looks to be, a Castrol scheme very similar to what Joey Dunlop ran.

The auction also includes:

Bike also comes with a complete roller, minus tank. There is also two sets of new bodywork and a ton of other spares, plus some new rains.

I have 2 complete extra motors, 1 new, 1 with time on it.

If you’re still reading this, you’ve probably started to reconsider your original assumptions after seeing the asking price.  The Museum Quality RS also comes with $1.2K-1.5k worth of spares, possibly more.  That being said, is the main bike shown here worth the remaining $4k?  Well, it would be very difficult to replicate the restored bike using the $1.5k and an additional $2.5k:  knowing what parts & labor would add up to at RSC combined with the purported paint cost.  If you’re in love with the NF4 RS125, or would simply like a living room piece and a track bike (with a little work) for the price of an older NX4 RS125; I’d say this auction should absolutely be considered.  The asking price is a bit startling, but with the whole picture and some math, it doesn’t sound that bad at all.  See this fantastic looking RS on eBay .

AG

Honda January 21, 2011 posted by

A Few, Very Rare, Race Bikes For Sale; Ex Roberts & Aoki

These three authentic race bikes are very special in their historical value, for winning and for not!

First Up:

Bike:  1999 Honda CBR900RR Erion Racing; Ex Kurtis Roberts

Location:  California

Price:  POR

The seller, RMD Motors, is sparse on the details, but it should be obvious what you’re looking at being that this bike is said to be authentic.  They do state that the bike produces 200hp at the rear wheel, comes with nothing other than what is in the photos (Read: No spares)–but that does include Kurtis’ actual leathers.

The AMA Formula Xtreme series is intended for production bikes, with some, but not many, rules on what parts of the bike you can exchange for aftermarket parts.  The intent of Formula Xtreme is to allow as many types of motorcycles to compete, anything from inline-fours to air-cooled V-twins.  Formula Xtreme racing is usually one of the more competitive and entertaining races of an AMA weekend; Many veterans such as Eric Bostrom, Jake Zemke, Josh Hayes, Nicky Hayden and Kurtis Roberts among others have cut their teeth in Formula Xtreme.

Erion Racing has continued to be a prominent name in Honda AMA racing with even a special Erion Racing edition CBR929RR released for the U.S. market by the manufacturer.  For 1999, Erion Racing was the winner of the Formula Xtreme championship with another title in 2000.  I’m not adept on the Formula Xtreme rules for 1999, but it’s obvious looking at the bike what some of it’s features are:  Race bodywork with mounts, analog tach’,  race fuel tank, larger radiator, Erion SS/Carbon full exhaust system, aftermarket triple clamps, Ohlins forks & rear shock, Brembo calipers, Marchesini wheels and I’m sure much more that I didn’t notice!  This is a chance to own a fantastic looking, legitimate, race bike with a championship under it’s belt.  I’m unaware how many races this particular bike won, I’m not sure about the 900 designation as this should be a 919 or 929 based on the year, but you still have a serious piece of AMA history regardless and I’m sure RMD would be happy to answer your questions.

See this Erion CBR900RR on RMD’s website here.

Next Up:

Bike:  2002 Kenny Roberts Proton KR3; Ex Nobuatsu Aoki

Location:  California

Price:  POR

As you may know, 2002 was the last year for two-strokes in MotoGP.  Two-strokes had their last hurrah in 2001, but couldn’t overcome the 490cc deficit they had to the four-strokes in 2002 and were finally obsolete–How you may feel about this is up for debate.  Regardless, Proton KR racing had a respectable finish in the 2001 championship with Nobuatsu Aoki & Jeremy Mcwilliams finishing 12th & 14th in the championship, respectively.  The disadvantages for the privateer team of Proton KR were immense and they didn’t receive much help from their V-3 format.  The four cylinder bikes of 500gp had the most tractable power delivery–If it’s possible to say that for a GP two-stroke–while also having the most power.  As an example, the NSR500v was a V-Twin example of Honda’s factory NSR500 designed for privateers and had nowhere near the power of the factory bike.  The theory was that the two and three cylinder machines had a lower weight and could out corner the larger bikes, in practice the two and three cylinder bikes hadn’t a chance but on a wet course or a very tight one.  The Proton KR3 debuted in 1997 and was a joint venture between legendary racer Kenny Roberts and Malaysian giant Proton.  While they may not have won any championships, or come close–and as frustrating as I imagine it was for KR–I’m sure “King” Roberts enjoyed it, I know I would have!

This example looks to be in fantastic condition.  The seller states that this bike will run and comes with a small selection of spares.  As I’m sure you can imagine, it would be no small feat to run this bike anywhere, especially when consumables are accounted for.  However, if you have the funds, ask yourself:  How many times does a 2001 500GP bike come up for sale?

See this bike on RMD’s website here.

Lastly:

Bike:  2004 Kenny Roberts Proton KRV5 XM2; Ex Kurtis Roberts

Location:  California

Price:  POR (Rumor has it $300,000)

The Proton KR KRV5 debuted in 2002 with the adoption of four-strokes.  The V5 in KRv5 denotes that this bike has a 60deg V5 arrangement and a displacement of 990cc, putting out 200hp @ 15,000rpm.  The bodywork appears to be the latter iteration of the KRV5, which is consistent with the Valencia technical inspection sticker.  For 2004, Kurtis Roberts was only able to finish twice in France and Brazil with 15th and 19th, respectively.  The bike for sale here shows a technical inspection sticker for Valencia in 2004, however Roberts never started the GP at Valencia in 2004.

So, what are you getting for your money?  As things stand right now, you’ll get a fully functioning seven year old, privateer, MotoGP bike with a minimal spares package.  This bike currently doesn’t hold the value that any of the factory bikes would and shouldn’t for a long, long time.  However, none of those factory bikes are currently available–that I’m aware of–and you’ll probably be waiting a very long time for one to pop up if you don’t already know someone who has one.

See the bike on RMD’s website here.

So, all of these bikes look to be from the same seller/collection, but which one is the one to have if you can only choose one?  Obviously, the most expensive will always be one of the Proton KR bikes, with a large gap back to the CBR.  My money says that the 2002 Proton KR3 will always be the most valuable bike of the three; The most important influence being that it is one of the last two-stroke 500GP/MotoGP bikes to ever be produced–privateer or otherwise.  The 2004 KRV5 will always be a interim MotoGP bike and if the rules are again revised to allow 1000cc bikes, it won’t even have a displacement draw.  The CBR is a National Championship bike, even if it’s only in Formula Xtreme, and that kind of provenance doesn’t come everyday.

There are two kinds of collectors these bikes are for:  One who has a decent amount of money to spend on a collector bike, and someone who has obscene amounts of money for a collector bike.  The Proton’s are obviously the expensive bikes with the Erion CBR checking the affordable box.  Both of the MotoGP bikes have parts that you’re never going to be able to purchase from any retailer, and I’m sure the CBR has some good HRC bits on it too.  I wouldn’t be ashamed to have any of these three bikes, but I’d absolutely love to have a final year Grand Prix two-stroke.  If nothing else, spend a little time to enjoy the photos!

AG

Classic Sport Bikes For Sale September 29, 2010 posted by

1976 Yamaha TZ750C Project on eBay

A genuine TZ750 on eBay!

Bike:  1976 Yamaha TZ750C

Location:  Franklin, Michigan

Mileage:  TMU, engine is a later S/N replacement.

I’ll let the seller state the description so I don’t get anything wrong:

1976 Yamaha TZ750C Road Racer: Frame No. 409 – 100101, Engine No. 409 – 200224.HISTORY: I purchased the Yamaha in 1990. No other known history.

ORIGINALITY: The frame number is the first of the 1976 TZ750C production run. It is estimated that 40 machines were built. The engine number indicates that it is dated 1979. The left and right side cylinder barrels each have “347cc 40900” embossed at the rear. The fairing and screen are new Mead Speed parts. The swing arm has been reinforced, but has a very similar appearance to original. The wheel rims are stamped “Daido Japan”. The tires are Continental 3.25 H 18 RB2 (front) & Goodyear Eagle Drag Racer 25 x 7.0 x 18 (rear). The kill switch is missing, but the kill switch pigtail is original and attached to the CDI Controller Box. (2) tiny black tie wraps are used to mount the water temp gauge in place of the original clips. Some of the metric fasteners are not original Yamaha parts. All other parts are original Yamaha. Restoration has been carried out using the pages from the parts manual for reference.

CONDITION: The fairing and all black parts have been professionally painted. The screen to fairing attachment is adequate, but not excellent. The fuel tank, seat and front fender have the original paint. The tank has a tiny surface scratch on the left side and a ding and scratch mark on the right side, as shown in the pictures. These parts have been intentionally left unrestored to retain their originality. All other parts are excellent, but not all have a museum quality finish.

COMMENTS:
1) The mileage is unknown and the listed mileage is an approximation.
2) I have never had the engine running.
3) Engine compression, gear selection and clutch operation are normal. During storage, the cylinder bores were oiled and the transmission fluid was installed.
4) The transmission and brake fluids have recently been drained.
5) Many of the fasteners have not been correctly torqued and the machine is not suitable for immediate use.
6) The Yamaha does not have a title.

If you like sportbikes, and I assume you do, the TZ750 is pretty much a to-die-for bike and probably even more so than a Black Shadow depending on your generation.  The TZ750 debuted in 1975, following the TZ700, with cantilever rear suspension and put out near 140hp giving it a top speed of over 185mph.

If a TZ750 doesn’t get your blood flowing, this probably isn’t a hobby for you.  Read a fantastic write up of a, California, street titled TZ750 from 1979 here.

This example for sale has obviously been a display piece and would hold it’s value nicely if you decided to continue letting it sit in your living room.  However, this bike has enough influence to possibly make you make, perceived, rash decisions and cash out retirement funds just to be able to head out to the garage and listen to it.  Drool over it on eBay .

AG

Consider these other Yamaha’s:

[AffomaticEbay]yamaha rz[/AffomaticEbay]

Quick Spot June 13, 2010 posted by

1977 Yamaha TZ250 Restoration Project In Virgina

This is a TZ250D in Virgina that needs  to be rescued!

Bike: 1977 Yamaha TZ250D

Price:  $3,500 USD

Location:  Roanoke, Virgina

The seller only states that this bike last raced in the late ’80’s and has been sitting since.  Looking at the photos it looks to be in quite good shape–pictures can be deceiving–and just might need a mechanical restoration if you’d like to keep the original look.  These bikes were very competitive in the ’70’s and still make great vintage machines with good parts availability if you know where to look.  See the bike on Craigslist here.

AG