Posts by tag: GPZ

Kawasaki July 27, 2019 posted by

Peer Pressure: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo

The 1980s were wild time of experimentation. There was a technology explosion as liquid cooling, computerized fuel injection and other performance enhancers hit the scene. The sport bike battleground became a dizzying array of different configurations, each manufacturer vying for top honors on the racetrack and the showroom. Nowhere was this more evident than the brief window of the Turbo craze; the promise of liter bike power in a mid-sized sport bike never materialized, but the Big Four made seemingly every effort to make it so. Today what remains are the carcasses of the aftermath; an antiquated reminder of how quickly technology moves forward.

1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo for sale on eBay

Honda Turbos followed the route of the 500 & 650 cc CX twins, Suzuki went with a 650cc Katana rip-off that originated the air-oil cooling later made famous by the GSX-R series, Yamaha phoned in a warmed over Seca with a unique blow-through, carbureted 650 cc configuration, and Kawasaki built the Top Dog of the bunch with the GPz750 Turbo. Rated by motorcycle magazines as the fasted bike in 1985, the Kawi Turbo did deliver on the 1/4 mile promise of turbocharging. However the drawbacks of forced induction – weight, cost, complexity, turbo lag, lack of power predictability, etc – quickly sunk the ship. Buyers weren’t interested in paying the premium for the Turbo, and riders preferred the real world performance of the less expensive liter bikes. The year of the Turbo was over.

From the seller:
1985 KAWASAKI GPz750 TURBO (ZX750E), RARE and ORIGINAL
Manufacture Date – 08/84. One of 1,500 1985 GPz750 Turbos produced!!

An ALL ORIGINAL example of the fastest production motorcycle made in 1985, per Kawasaki. OEM motor, bars, seat, pipes, turbo, levers, mirrors, signals, brakes, fairing, wheels, etc. The ONE exception is an after-market uni-shock (single shock) the previous owner installed. I have the OEM uni-shock for it too and it still works great.

CLEAN and CLEAR TITLE!

Runs great! Looks great! Collector quality! This rare bike has already surpassed collector and vintage status. And, dependent on who you ask or where you look, has reached Antique status at 35 years old. Does NOT run like an old, decrepit bike….no way. ONLY 10,846 original miles on the odometer (see pic). There may be a few more miles on it when it sells. A RARE TURBO ANTIQUE YOU CAN RIDE! And ride fast…if you’re into that sort of thing. How cool is that? Fresh gas. Fresh battery. Newer front and rear brakes. Turbo works like it should. All electrics work like they should. Good compression. Good tires. All those little OEM Kawa stickers and decals are still in place; see RPM gauge, chain guard, base of tank, etc. Dual helmet locks! Original, original, original. If you are tired of looking at GPz 750 Turbo’s that are not original and in great condition, you can now stop looking. You have found The One.

This Turbo was last ridden in 2012 – see pic of temp tag – with annual fuel and oil changes. Basically long-term storage. New battery installed and starts right up. Currently has 92 octane in it (premium). There is very, very light surface rust around the base of the tank neck filler hole – see pic. Tank is very, very clean.

This bike isn’t new (obviously) but in very, very, very excellent condition with SUPER LOW miles on it and the starting bid reflects that condition.

More from the seller:
Many OEM Kawi parts and accessories go with this antique GPz750 TURBO motorcycle. Items such as (see pics):
OEM Kawa Uni-shock absorber
OEM Kawa GPz750 Turbo tool kit!
OEM Kawa Ignition keys, 2 each
OEM Kawa SERVICE MANUAL (1984)
OEM Kawa WORKSHOP MANUAL; SERVICE MANUAL SUPPLEMENT (1985), TWO EACH
OEM Kawa GPz750 TECHNICAL TRAINING MANUAL, TWO EACH
OEM Kawa 20-page “PRESS KIT”. This is cool. An OEM (copy) of a 1985 Press Kit, authored and published in Japan but written in English. Used for the roll-out introduction of the 1985 GPz750 Turbo for the Press
OEM Kawa “750 Turbo” sticker (bumper sticker)
OEM Kawa Fuel filter, NEW, 1 each
OEM Kawa Air filter, NEW, 1 each
OEM Kawa Clutch Cable, NEW, 1 each
OEM Kawa Horns, dual set, 1 each

Kawasaki-branded key fob; color matched to bike
Mini-turbo key ring ornaments, color matched to bike, 2 each – Super Cool!
Bike cover with custom Kawasaki patch
Master Lock wheel disc lock; color matched to bike, 2 keys
OEM equivalent NEW battery, 14L-A2 (replaces 12N14-3A); just installed
Deltran “Battery Tender Automatic” (full size) WITH pigtail connection already installed on bike
K & N oil filters, NEW, 2 each
Canyon Carver handlebar tie-down set, 1 each
Custom aluminum license plate bracket
Some extra high-pressure fuel line hose

As stated previously on these pages, Factory Turbos are rare. But they are rare for some of the wrong reasons; nobody wanted them. The big Four quickly realized the poor ROI this direction was offering, and pivoted back to more mainstream sport bikes. Nearly 35 years later the song remains the same. Yes, prime examples of the XN, CX, XJ and ZX have slowly gained in value in recent years, but certainly not any faster than a super-clean example of any other 80’s era sport bike. It seems completely unfair, given the rarity, uniqueness and performance of these puffer bikes – but the public votes by wallet share, and these machines have proven to have a narrow focus of interested buyers. This particular GPz750 Turbo looks awesome and has some cool stuff that comes with it. But is it worth the opening ask of $9,999? Historic values would say probably not, but the market is constantly changing and conspires to make fools of us all. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Peer Pressure: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo
Kawasaki May 1, 2019 posted by

Beast of Boost: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo

During the wild years of the decade known as the 1980s, there was a lot going on. Legwarmers were hot. The brat pack were hot. And most importantly, Turbos were hot. Every major Japanese manufacturer played with the puffer configuration at least once (Honda tried it twice) before giving up on induction-enhanced motorcycles. Honda built a pair of large, heavy sport touring bikes. Yamaha built a lazy Seca with futuristic fairing in a “me too” effort. Suzuki took the bonkers approach and built a no-apologies sport bike like a Katana on turbo steroids. And Kawasaki watched, learned, and eventually dipped their toes into the water with an updated GPz.

1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo for sale on eBay

The largest of the turbo bikes by displacement, the Kawasaki GPz was also the fastest. The only factory turbo bike to break into the 10s in the quarter mile, the GPz 750 Turbo was not only faster than all its forced-induction peers, it was the fastest street bike tested in 1984. With an estimated 112 HP on tap thanks to the Hitachi turbo unit sitting low down and in front of the inline four. With ideal turbo placement for short exhaust primaries, Kawasaki’s approach minimized lag and maximized horsepower. Even then, power windup changes suddenly as the engine builds boost – making for a fun ride, but a less than predictable mount for tight canyons. Like all but the Yamaha, the Kawasaki Turbo introduced fuel injection in an effort to better control engine operations and promote rideability and longevity.

From the seller:
1985 KAWASAKI GPZ750 TURBO

Here’s a real nice Kawasaki 750 Turbo for sale. Bike is in near perfect original condition except for 1 flaw/crack on right lower side of faring. Always stored inside and covered. Runs and rides excellent with fresh oil and filter change. It is all original with factory owners manual and tool kit and has 530 chain conversion to get rid of the factory heavy 630 chain, see last 2 pics. Newer tires and battery.

While the Kawasaki Turbo takes after the GPz models, it differs in many ways. Engine internals, chassis geometry and suspension, and custom factory lowers were all bespoke to the Turbo, although Kawasaki did raid the GPz750 and GPz1100 parts bins to keep costs down. The resultant looks made it familiar to the GPz, yet officially it was known as the ZX750E and referred to simply as the Kawasaki 750 Turbo. Lasting only a couple of years with no significant changes, the Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo shared a similar life cycle with the rest of the Turbo packing offerings. Expensive, complicated and generally unloved, they all failed to sell well in the showrooms – despite the flash and the speed.

Today’s Turbo example is a 1985 model, and it looks like a true survivor. It does not appear to be scuffed, dropped, hot rodded or significantly modified. The seller states that the chain was downsized; the 530 chain is pretty stout, and the factory 630 size was incorporated no doubt due to concerns over longevity. Other than that, this appears to be an honest machine presented to us by a turbo collector (notice the XN85 in the background). The opening ask is a fair $6,999 – but there do not appear to be many bidders as of yet. Not terrifically valuable when compared to more elite machinery (RC30s, OW01, MHe, etc), Turbo bikes are slowly gaining ground as well as the respect of riders and buyers. If you are in the market for one of these unique time pieces, this 10,000 mile machine might be your opportunity. Check it out here, and then jump to the Comments to share your Turbo thoughts. Good Luck!!

MI

Beast of Boost: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo
Kawasaki February 16, 2019 posted by

Old School Awesome: 1982 Kawasaki GPz 750

There comes a point and time when nearly everything becomes valued – nostalgically if not financially. Such just might be the case with today’s find, a cherry 1982 Kawasaki GPz750. In the early 1980s the GPz was generally a top-dog kind of sport bike. Pitted against Honda’s CB and Suzuki’s GS models, the GPz looked and acted like a sportbike. With an air cooled inline four, double overhead cams and a brace of Mikuni constant velocity carbs, the 750 could pump out 80 HP – good for nipping into the 11s in the 1/4 mile. By today’s standards this is all relatively tame – and old tech such as air cooling, carburetors and twin shocks seems laughable. But it was good enough to put a young fellow by the name of Wayne Rainey on the top step of the AMA Superbike championship on a Muzzy-prepped bike and cement the GPz as a sporting weapon with serious intent.

Old School Awesome: 1982 Kawasaki GPz 750 for sale on eBay

1982 was the first year of the 750, as both the GPz550 and GPz1100 were introduced a year earlier. 1982 was also a bit of a one year only model, based on the older architecture. Follow on years found a revised fairing setup (from quarter fairing to half), as well as the introduction to Uni-Trak, Kawasaki’s rising rate linkage, single rear shock setup. Fuel injection was also on the horizon (the 1100 introduced it to the series), but liquid cooling would have to wait for the introduction of the revolutionary Ninja model. So while one can view the GPz as a mass-produced motorcycle and therefore likely never to become truly rare, the combination of a one year only configuration and the survivor status does elevate this one into something worth considering.

From the seller:
1982 KAWASAKI GPZ 750 , I have the original stock seat and rear shocks, this bike runs like new, I Just installed Michelin Pilots front and rear, the bike has been freshly serviced and a Dyno Jet carburetor kit installed to enhance the Horse power with the period correct Bassani exhaust. The bike has been kept in doors it’s whole life and has zero cosmetic issue’s. It gets attention where ever I ride. they made this model only 1 year so these are very rare to be seen in show room condition.

I bought brand new spare brake pads, clutch kit, gaskets, spare starter motor etc . these are included in the sale. every thing electrical works perfectly, I just freshened up the battery with a Yuasa OEM original. so it’s ready to ride from California to New York.

Most GPzs have lived multiple lives. Purchased new by aggressive riders, many found their way to the racetrack in amateur and privateer formats. Those that stayed on the streets passed through a few owners, with the price likely dropping with each change. That quickly put these bikes into the financial reach of younger riders, driving up insurance rates everywhere. Not all were flogged and forgotten, but enough were to make finding a good example difficult today. And this particular example is no garage queen – with 20k on the clocks (eBay advert lists 18k) this bike has been ridden. But there is life yet in that robust motor, and all the appeal of the “arrest me red” paint still applies. It may be on the far side of 30 something, but viscerally this bike still has all its mojo.

Located in the sunny state of California (which bodes very well for issues such as rust and corrosion), this 1982 GPz750 is looking for a new home. The paint looks good despite the age, and there have been few modifications. The aftermarket exhaust is not stock, but a Bassani is not the worst pipe you could image for this application. There are a number of spares that come along with the purchase, which is a good thing from a maintenance point of view. Parts are still readily available for the mechanicals, although cosmetic trim might be getting scarce. Fortunately, all of those pieces are still attached. Check it out here. If you are of a certain age, you KNOW you wanted one of these. Maybe you had one (lucky bastard), and now miss it. Was this the bike you regretted selling all those years ago? Jump over to the Comments section and share your stories. Good Luck!!

MI

Old School Awesome: 1982 Kawasaki GPz 750
Kawasaki April 27, 2018 posted by

Explosive [Acceleration] Device: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC Turbo for Sale

UPDATE: This bike sold before I could post it, but I’d thought I’d share it with you all anyway, since it is so darn nice. -Tad

The dream of the 1980s was to turbo all the things. Cars, hairdryers, sneakers… If you could buy it, someone was trying to slap a TURBO badge on it during the 1980s to help move units. Actual turbochargers started showing up on commonly-available vehicles during the 80s to inspire that trend, but people were experimenting with turbocharged passenger cars as far back as the Oldsmobile Jetfire, Chevy Corvair Corsa, and Saab 99 Turbo. It took a bit longer for turbocharging to find its way into the production motorcycling world, due to a few challenges associated with the relatively primitive turbo technology of the time. Of course, the term “production” might be stretching things a bit when you’re talking about the Kawasaki Z1R-TC Turbo.

By 1978, the Kawasaki Z1R KZ1000 was decidedly old-fashioned, with honking big air-cooled four cylinder engine, a twin-shock rear suspension, spindly forks up front, and a frame that was less than cutting-edge. The package was generally competent and well-regarded, just a bit long-in-the-tooth. With the development of the much more modern GPz underway, Kawasaki needed to move some remaining stock and generate a bit of excitement for the brand. The TC Turbo, which took the already reasonably quick Z1R and added a RaJay turbo package that increased power by 50%, may have generated a little too much excitement.

TURBO was a word associated with power and speed and modern and cool, even if most people really didn’t know what it meant, or exactly how a turbocharger added power to an engine. A high school buddy of mine drove his mom’s Mitsubishi Tredia L equipped with some sort of POWER button on the automatic shifter, and he was convinced that it activated “turbo boost,” since he’d watched lots of Knight Rider and thought that’s how things worked… What it probably did was lock out overdrive in the transmission, but you couldn’t convince him it didn’t actually release additional power. And likely a great many enthusiasts’ understanding of the technology didn’t extend much beyond that.

Turbos can make big power, but with that great power comes great responsibility and it was laughably easy to adjust the wastegate on the Z1R TC to allow boost far beyond what the stock internals could handle, leading to a sudden, explosive reversal of the normal interior/exterior engine component relationship. Sure, you could always opt to have your new Kawasaki’s engine fully built to withstand the additional pressures, something that was actually recommended by the company, but how many people do you think bothered to do that?

Turbochargers originally came into widespread use during World War II, and the advantages of forced-induction were exploited to allow combat aircraft to perform more efficiently at high altitudes, where reduced oxygen density significantly reduced power. The move towards turbocharging in automobiles was also driven by necessity in the 80s, when the manufacturers were hit by significantly increased fuel-economy and emissions standards. A turbocharger allowed smaller, more efficient engines to perform like larger engines on demand.

Unfortunately, while that Jekyl/Hyde personality of early turbocharged cars generally made them entertaining, it made motorcycles, especially ones already pushing the limits of frame and suspension technology, pretty terrifying: the Z1R probably would have killed more people than Cholera, but luckily very few were actually built. Even fewer still survive today, and most of those aren’t in the hands of their original owners, who likely died horrible, firey deaths…

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R Turbo for Sale

Created through an arrangement between Kawasaki and Turbo Cycle Corporation (which was founded by ex-Kawasaki Marketing Director, Alan Masek) brand new Z1R’s were sent to TCC, who then modified them with a RaJay turbo and badging. These modified bikes were then sold through select Kawasaki dealers- without a warranty. THERE WERE ONLY 500 BUILT. 

The gas tank side covers, header panels, and tail section have been repainted and color matched to an original Z1R TC. It has all new decals from reproductiondecals.com. So much work has been done to this bike. There are approximately 40 miles on the top half of the rebuilt engine. the cylinder was removed, sand blasted, honed, and painted. New piston rings have been installed. I purchased a like new cylinder head that has all new component parts. The original head had two hairline cracks. The forks were removed, cleaned, and polished with new dust covers. It has a new battery. It has a rebuilt,older style Keihn carburetor. I have the original Bendix carburetor, but as most people know, it runs smoother with the Keihn carborator.

The Rajay turbo 370 F 40 was rebuilt by Mr. Turbo.  The seat has no rips or cuts. The seat pan was removed, sanded, primed, and painted with stock stickers installed from reproductiondecals.com. The bike starts, sounds, and runs great. I have all of the receipts from the mechanical work. Only if i feel you are very serious, I will provide you with the name of the motorcycle service center who performed the work on my bike and send you copies of the sales and receipts. Before the engine was rebuilt, I replaced the tires which are Pirelli Sport Demon. The sprockets and the brake pads were replaced. Those items have about 200 miles on them. The only item i know of that is not an original item is the Pingel fuel valve. Passed down from the original owner are the owners manual, turbo supplement manual, and black vinyl Kawasaki pouch, which was provided for Z1R TC conversions. Both manuals have all the pages intact, and are not oily or greasy. By the way, I know on Ebay, there are reproduction turbo supplement manuals, but this one is original. You can tell by the yellowing pages and semi brittle paper. All three items are 40 years old. 

This actual bike, and not one just like it, is pictured in a hard cover book written by Tony Sculpher title, “Kawasaki (K) Z1000 Z1-R.” I have the book. I bought the bike from a collector of Z1R TCs. I wont divulge the info of the collector on ebay, due to privacy and legalities. I made a copy of the title while it was in his name, before I sent it to be transferred to my name. His name is in the book with a picture of my actual motorcycle above the description. All of the instrumentation works. The bike starts, sounds, and runs great. 

This bike’s VIN is listed in the official Kawasaki registration for TCC bikes. I am posting a few photos, however, if you want more, please state the area of the bike that you want more detailed photos of. The frame VIN is KZT00D006472. The engine number is from the state police of California as it looks like there must have been an engine case issue which required a factory replacement. Replacement cases from Kawasaki do not carry an engine number and come blank. 

I will assist with your shipping, but will not be responsible for the shipping.

If you’re in the market for a Z1R TC [and who isn’t?] this looks like a good one. Unfortunately, as mentioned at the start, the listing has been pulled, so I’m assuming it “sold locally.” It’s clearly been owned by a knowledgeable enthusiast and, although it isn’t sporting original paint, it appears to have been painstakingly restored. This is about as nice a machine as you’re likely to find, with history, appropriate mechanical updates, and even a very comprehensive video with lots of commentary.

-tad

Explosive [Acceleration] Device: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC Turbo for Sale
Kawasaki August 1, 2017 posted by

Godfather: 1982 Kawasaki GPz1100

Here is a bike that should need no introduction. The last of the “He-Man” bikes and the best of the rest as the motorcycling world teetered on the verge of technology overload, the Kawasaki GPz1100 was THE bad boy on the block in the early 1980s. This bike is very far from rare in terms of production numbers – the only limit was the number that could be shuffled through the showroom floor. Tack 35 years onto that memory, however, and what you have is something that is a bona fide collector in the kind of condition that we see here (nostalgia only helps). Being sold by a dealer out of Connecticut, this GPz1100 is a survivor that looks tremendous and sports only 12,261 miles on the clock. Interested? You should be. Read on!

1982 Kawasaki GPz1100 for sale on eBay

Young Padawan learners take note: Long before the days of liquid cooling, four valve heads, fuel injection, rising-rate single shock rear suspension, upside down forks, big brakes, ECUs or radial tires, motorcycles still existed. They were just a bit more basic than what you know today. The quest for speed still existed, but the answer to most questions was displacement. Want to create a legacy? Build a bigger bike. Want to sell more bikes? Bore out whatever you have to something larger. Dousing the resulting product in “arrest me – now!” red paint never hurts. Backing it up with the most decent chassis of the day, adding triple disks (a novelty) and capping it with a bikini fairing (oooh, racy!) pretty much made this THE big bore bike to have back when Magnum PI was the hot ticket on TV.

From the seller:
1982 GPZ1100 KAWASAKI
Absolutely Stunning, an Original Paint, Antique Kawasaki, A Rare Museum Quality Piece!

A member of the “Red Revolution” as it is beautifully painted in Kawasaki’s “firecracker red”. The color just seems to hover above this bikes remaining parts (frame, engine, exhaust, mufflers, forks, handlebars, mirrors, etc.) as they are blacked out chrome. Creating a seriously aggressive look! It’s the second year Kawasaki produced an 1100cc and they were serious about having the best superbike! The B2 is similar to the B1 however it is unique due to its cockpit fairing, clip on style handlebars, LCD fuel gauge display, 4 digital fuel injectors mounted directly into the cylinder head, digital microprocessor to measure airflow, throttle position sensor (to eliminate throttle lag and lower emissions), reflectors on both sides of the tail light, stiffer fork springs, compression and rebound damping for a better handling on either track or street.

The GPz was indeed a revolution for Kawasaki; an evolution of the Z1 and the KZ series, the GPz was the most sporting of the Big K lineup, and became the legend behind the forthcoming Ninja. It didn’t hurt that the Kawasaki was very successful against the onslaught of Honda went it came to Superbike racing; while they eventually succumbed to the V-4 Interceptors, the GPz reigned supreme in their final years of competition. Not bad for caveman technology. But then again, a simple club wielded effectively can be a formidable weapon. Today, simply finding one of these archaic rocks can be a chore. Finding one with relatively few miles and looking like this is a dream.

Bidding is currently below $4k USD with no reserve. There is a fair amount of interest in this machine; I’m not surprised given that the last GPz we posted (a lowly 550 model) garnered a good deal of attention from our readers. I cringe when I hear this referred to as an antique, but maybe that is just my age-related pride. This particular example looks to be fetching a far greater sum than the aforementioned 550, but even then it is still quite reasonable by collector standards. Check it out here, and feel free to jump back to our Comments section and share your thoughts on this era of the GPz. Good Luck!!

MI

Godfather: 1982 Kawasaki GPz1100
Kawasaki March 18, 2017 posted by

Nearly New: 1984 Kawasaki GPz750

From the 30-something files comes the epitome of the quintessential 1980s sport bike: the Kawasaki GPz. Conceived during what was to become the eve of the classic sporting motorcyle, the GPz led the way right up to the next real era of technology and died out with the introduction of the hyper bike. Making the ultimate use of air cooling, two valves per cylinder, carburetors and a steel backbone frame, the GPz soldiered on in the face of advancements from Yamaha, Suzuki, and especially Honda. Successful on the track as well as the showroom, the GPz is a classic memory today. But for those that remember the glory, finding one worth shelling out cash for is a rare proposition. Hence today’s RSBFS find: a cherry GPz750 with just over 1,000 miles on the clock.

From the seller:
1984 KAWASAKI GPz 750 1,058 original miles!

I am the 3rd owner of this bike. The first owner put the miles on the bike and the second owner purchased the bike in 1998 and never drove it.

During my ownership, I cleaned it up, rebuilt carbs and got it running (It had not run since 1st owner in the late 80’s) I took it out and put 2 miles on it to verify operation. (I own 2 other GPz’s). The factory exhaust is long gone & I just installed a fresh out of the box Supertrapp system and installed all the discs to keep it quiet. It sounds awesome!

More from the seller:
The carbs were rebuilt with new jets, pilot & mains, new needle & seats & new float bowl gaskets.
All gauges, lights, gas gauge, blinkers and horn works!
New battery last September.
New plugs and spark plug boots.
Original chain & sprockets, original tires! (You will be the first person to change the tires that Kawasaki put on 33 yrs ago!)

Do I know the front fender is mounted backwards in the pictures? Yes (See it the other way in the picture with the saddle bags!)

What is wrong with bike?
Right side mirror glass is missing, was when I purchased it… I have 7 bikes and did not get that far on this one. Very small nick on gas tank graphic and some nicks on left side upper fairing graphic, these graphics are available from RD Decals in Canada. Tank is rust free on inside but does have about a 10mm ding that you can barely make out in picture that shows the nick in tank! It is missing the factory center windscreen attachment bolt so I have a mismatched one in there (factory one is available for a couple of $’s).

Lastly, the outside carb on left side was dripping a little while the bike was running the other day… To cold to drive it outside to get some cobwebs out and may go away but just want to make sure it is in listing as I’m swamped at work and will not have time to look at it!

What is right with bike?

It is absolutely stunning! It looks better in person than it does in these pictures. All the finishes are wonderfully preserved. How many of these bikes do you see with just over 1K miles???

Lastly, I was going to list the matching Bagmann saddle bags separately but really want them to go with the bike… I have been a ebay member for 17 years and never once saw a set of these come up for auction, they go with bike and the 4 GPz test issues you see in picture!

It is always difficult to find a time-period piece in the type of condition that makes it worth your while. This is especially true when the bike in question was not especially rare to begin with. But time has a way of making certain things better, and in this case time has all but erased the supply side of the equation. Had this been a bottle of wine, it would likely have turned to vinegar long ago – but the vintage becomes rare for simply existing in excellent shape. The best part of a well-aged machine is the price: Few bids have been cast, and this retro icon sits at a mere $3,550 (no reserve). It may not be a smoker or some mega dollar collectible, but the knowing nods when you show up to bike night on this earlier generation super bike makes it well worth the price of admission. Only a couple of days left on this auction – check it out here and share your thoughts! Do you GPz?

MI

Kawasaki January 10, 2017 posted by

Collectable Icon: 1983 Kawasaki GPz550

For riders of a certain — ahem — level of experience, the GPz model lineup was the quintessential sport bike during a time of alarming advancements. This was a watershed era for sport riders everywhere, as the Big Four labored tirelessly in the pursuit of new technology. By comparison, this era of the GPz could be considered one of the last “basic” layouts; the best of the old school tech. The next step involved liquid cooling, suspension advancements, brake advancements, fueling evolutions and chassis revolutions.

1983 Kawasaki GPz550 for sale on eBay

Although it does sport a Uni-Track single shock rear suspension – which not only saved weight over twin shocks, but more importantly introduced the revolution of rising-rate linkages – very little else on this GPz could be considered high-tech. Instead, Kawasaki relied upon execution excellence by assembling an air-cooled four-cylinder engine using two valve heads (a hot-rod version of the KZ motor), good for nearly 60 horsepower. Triple disks all the way around (albeit with single pot calipers) and an air-adjustable front fork promised sporting credentials. As an overall package, the GPz delivered.

From the seller:
Low mileage
Original paint
Perfect running middleweight four
Triple Disc brakes
Electronic ignition
6-speed
Fuel gauge
Amp meter
New clutch , fresh battery
Factory keys, owners manual
Air charged fork
Adjustable unitrack
Adult owned
Clear Massachusetts title

In the world of touch-enabled smart phones, this is a Motorola flip phone with no text option. Even in the day it was shockingly fundamental. All would change in another year for Kawasaki with the advent of the Ninja (initially as a 900, then later as a 600), but the writing was on the wall for the air-cooled GPz series; within 5 years they would all be gone. Here is your chance to go back in time and re-live the glory that was old-tech expertise. The pictures could be better, preventing close inspection (i.e. is that rash on the left side case?). As always, RSBFS recommends talking to the seller and visiting the bike in question if at all possible. Bidding has been very light, so this might be a January bargain. Check it out and let us know what you think!

MI

Collectable Icon: 1983 Kawasaki GPz550
Kawasaki May 12, 2015 posted by

Bay Ridge Barn ( well, storage unit ) Find – 1984 Kawasaki GPz-750

Hard as they are to find, unmolested early sportbikes pop up occasionally.  This pre-Ninja 750 appeared on the New York Craigslist recently.

20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 left

1984 Kawasaki GPz-750 for sale on Craigslist

20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 left front

Developed from the KZ-750, the GPz-750 had 92 hp, new frame with Uni-Trak rear suspension, and generally more sport-oriented.  The sweet bikini fairing foreshadows the full fairing to come later.  For 1984, mostly color changes but slightly raising the clip-on handlebars made the bike friendlier.  Rubber front engine mounts helped, too.  The smallish 280mm brakes nonetheless performed well.  Overall a speedy, stable rider.

20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 left rear  20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 right front wheel

20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 right rear wheel  20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 left engine

From the Craigslist ad:

This bike has been very well maintained it’s entire life by a mature older gentleman who kept it in clean, dry, and temperate storage. Pictures do not do this bike justice. The paint is in absolutely stunning original condition. This bike has no mechanical or electrical issues at all and can be ridden anywhere. The carburetors have been jetted and air box has been replaced with air filter pods. Vance and Hines full exhaust looks and runs great with the properly tuned carbs. This bike’s motor pulls strong and has no issues. Chain and sprockets were replaced with new ones last year. Tires are in great condition with no dry rot and lots of tread left. This bike has to be seen in person to truly appreciate how clean it is.

20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 cockpit  20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 tank

20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 seat  20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 nose

CL ads can be hyperbolic and poorly documented, but this common-sense ad has great pictures.  The GPz-750 was the fastest bike in its day and still has a lot to offer.  The silver paint and red/blue stripes look great, and the bike seems very clean overall.  Sensible asking price for such a pretty historic.  Certainly have to do your homework on a purchase like this but a GPz in such fine shape is worth a look.

20150507 1984 kawasaki gpz-750 left rear

-donn

Bay Ridge Barn ( well, storage unit ) Find – 1984 Kawasaki GPz-750